Page 1

Ready, set, dodgeball

Off to the right start By the end of Tuesday of Wish Week, tears have been shed, incredible friendships made, and $5535.91 raised. With $3324.41 made on Friday, $773 raised on Monday, and $1,438.50 raised on Tuesday, RC is well on its way to not only granting Harley’s wish, but another wish as well. The opening assembly was a fantastic kick off and dodgeball was a huge success. Students received much praise from the staff following the opening assembly for their respectful and heartfelt behavior towards Harley. “The assembly was awesome,” said Social Studies teacher David Sapienza. “It was by far one of the best assemblies this school has ever had.” The standing ovation from the entire student body as Harley was introduced and the juniors chanting “We love Harley” is just a small amount of the compassion students have shown her. “A few of us juniors started to chant ‘we love Harley’ because we wanted her to feel welcome and at home,” said Alexis Todd ’11. “We wanted to show her we cared.” Harley was not the only one to shed

Clockwise from above: Social Studies teacher David Sapienza throws a dodgeball at Matt Gilbert ‘11, from the Green Team. The Green Team won the student bracket and got to play against the staff, winning that match as well. Jake Davis ‘12, prepares to throw a dodgeball at Taylor Sheridan ‘11, when they were the only two left on the floor. Sheridan’s team, the Meatheads, was eliminated in the first round. Dustin Dodd ‘11, throws his hands in the air in celebration after moving from the first to the second round of the tournament. Alex Temby ‘11, downs some water between yelling at the referees and his players. He ‘coached’several of the teams. Cody Ann LaCouture ‘11, and Bre Duran ’11, hug after LaCouture was hit by a dodgeball, and as another one approaches them. Remington Caley ‘11, lifts weights to warm up for the tournament. All of the members of his team, the Meatheads, lifted weights, did pushups, and did any other thing that could satirize the male weight lifting mentality before they played. Photos by Alex Rowe

tears at the assembly. Harley’s mom and grandparents shed tears of joy and expressed their gratitude for what Rock Canyon is doing for Harley during the student council lunch that followed. “I have a lot of friends but no ‘good’ long time friends,” said Harley, “and I hope Wish Week can give me that as well as my wish.” “A lot of the students seem to truly care about this and it’s exciting to see all of our hard work pay off,” said Hayley Warner ’11. Although there were only five teams Friday morning, dodgeball turned out to be a successful, exciting event. Eleven teams eventually competed, and student and community attendance was great. “I had a blast,” said Reid Carter ‘10. “I’m glad we raised all of that money for Harley, because that is who it was really for.” “Wish Week so far has made me so proud to be a student at Rock Canyon,” said Renee Horsting ‘10. “It’s so neat to see all the students and teachers in our school coming together to make something incredible happen.” Caley Pavillard

Together we can

Grant

a Wish

Letting the light back into her life For Harley Shepherd, life is about finding the perfect light. Her passion for capturing obscure angles and unnoticed objects through the lens of her camera is only a small clue to how unique this young woman truly is. For as long as her family can remember Harley was either playing soccer or taking pictures. “When she was little I would walk up stairs and she would have a sheet hung up and her stuffed animals lined up perfectly,” said Kristi Shepherd, Harley’s mother. “When I asked Harley what she was doing she would always say ‘Mom, it’s picture day for the animals.’” Harley would look at picture after picture in the scrapbooks her mother and grandmother had made. “One day, Harley was looking at about five pictures I had lying on my counter, and as I was ironing she looks up to me and says, ‘grandma why do my uncles only like to wear black and white?’” said Carol Shepherd, Harley’s grandmother. “I believe that’s where Harley got her passion for old things: old people, old buildings, old everything. It is because she grew up looking at all my black and white photos.” It was May of her fifth grade year when the light on Harley’s passion for soccer was dimmed. Her soccer coach was very concerned with her frequent random falls and awkward running. She believed Harley had a leg problem, and convinced Kristi to take her to a specialist. Doctors believed she possibly had a brain tumor or her legs might be different lengths, but they could never figure out the real cause. Finally, Harley’s aunt saw a special on TV about muscular dystrophy thought that this was Harley’s problem. After several

tests, her blood work came back revealing her diagnosis of Frederich’s Ataxia, an abnormality of the motor and sensory nerve conduction system, ultimately resulting in the degeneration of the spinal cord tracts. Harley entered a time with very little light. Her condition could not even be brought up in the house and she was very uncomfortable around other people. There were times where all the Shepherds could do was cry. “I could hardly get her to come out in public,” said Kristi Shepherd, as soft tears flowed down her cheek. “I would go to the store and she wouldn’t even come in with me. She didn’t want to go anywhere.” “Harley felt very alone,” said grandfather Bruce Shepherd. “It was extremely tough news for all of us.” Through this, Harley and Kristi became extremely close. They started traveling together and going on many mother anddaughter adventures. “They are not like mother and daughter,” said Carol. “They are best friends.” Kristi and Harley have been coast to coast, from San Diego to Philadelphia. It was in Philadelphia that the light started to enter back into Harley’s life. The Shepherds attended a conference specifically for people with Frederich’s Ataxia. This was the first time Harley had ever met anyone else with the disease. In Philadelphia she met Ashley, now a very close friend, who also has this disease. “Harley was a completely new person,” said her mom. “After seeing she wasn’t the only one with the disease her attitude completely changed. She realized she could do and see more and experience the things she loves.” Since then, Harley has traveled to several places including San Diego, which is

the first time she really had the opportunity to take pictures creatively. The whole trip was dedicated to photography and Harley’s favorite photos were taken on that trip. “My favorite picture is probably the one I took in the tunnel near the Stanley Hotel,” said Harley. “It looks like the devil’s head at the end of the tunnel; it’s really abstract and interesting to me.” Because of this conference, and her relationship with Ashley, Rock Canyon has the privilege to experience the strong, courageous, inspiring personality of Harley. Like a typical high school girl, she loves playing video games on her x-box, she loves to paint and draw and take pictures, she is into fashion and she loves listening to music. She spends a lot of time in the water: boating, tubing and knee boarding. The Shepherds found Make-A-Wish through Ashley and her family. Ashley had her wish granted just before the conference. Harley’s wish is to receive the equipment to be a professional photographer. “Originally I was going to wish to go to Ireland,” said Harley. “I wanted to kiss the Blarney Stone at the Blarney Castle.” Myth says that the Blarney Stone gives the kisser the gift of eloquence. Harley finally decided on her wish of having photography equipment because she wanted it to last forever. “If I went to Ireland I would only have my wish for one moment and this is something I want forever,” said Harley. “I want to be able to capture the moments of perfect light in my life, and if my wish is granted I can do that.” Harley’s favorite time is at dawn and dusk because she says, “It’s not too light. It’s not too dark. You can see everything coming perfectly together.” Caley Pavillard

A picture from Harley’s trip to San Francisco. Below: Harley sitting with Student Council at the first Wish Week assembly. Photo by Drew Goodman

Student Voice of Rock Canyon High School

5810 McArthur Ranch Road • Highlands Ranch, CO 80124 • 303.387.3000 Volume 6, Number 6 • February 25, 2010


02 soundtrack: “Da style deh” Busy Signal

02•25•10 community

From Now Until April 1 Buy one 12” pizza, get one free

Odd things heard around RCHS

Only at Little Italy Pizzeria Located at 558 Castle Pines Parkway B-3 Castle Rock, CO 80108 For more information, call 303-663-2111

Rock-arazzi • “I’ve never seen someone make a toga look so skanky.” • “C.T.R.: It’s like the Mormon version of W.W.J.D.” •”Wait, which one of you has gonorrhea?” • “I wish I had brought my lighter to school today. That would have made our project so much better.” • “Fire drills usually make me want to shoot a baby, but not this time.” • “You can make your house out of cakes and cookies!” • “I’m so disappointed. Mardi Gras is on a Tuesday, so we can’t celebrate it!” “Dude, Mardi Gras is always on a Tuesday.” • “The Nazis would have loved Text-a-Tip!” • “I’ve noticed that I’m talking to myself way more than usual. I’m concerned.” • “Hitler loves his Eggos.” • “Do you even know what a skid mark is?”

• “What did you do, brush your teeth with Windex?” •”He has such a weird nipple. It’s the biggest nipple on a boy I’ve ever seen.” • “I hate myself.” “Oh, quit being racist.” • “No... I thought YOU had the beavers! Oh my God! This is really bad!” • “That is NOT the way to walk. It’s all wrong. Watch me do it. I’m an expert at walking.”

Denver’s Best Thrill

• “Don’t I look wonderful today?”

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TESTING

soundtrack: “Shoo fly, don’t bother me” Bryant’s Minstrels

Rock Canyon, This is a time for congratulations. Rock Canyon students spend too much time criticizing one another, myself included, but lately it feels there is less and less to criticize, and instead we can celebrate. Turn to page 31 for three editorials praising the work of Rock Canyon students. Wrapping across the front and back cover is a picture of the standing ovation that we gave Harley at the first Wish Week assembly. This attitude of support, and working towards a collective goal is what will bring the most positive change in the school, and ultimately the world. Wish Week has already been an incredible success, and it has proven the true potential we hold. I hope that we can carry this attitude with us for the rest of the year, and the school can carry it for years to come. I believe that when we work together, and are interested in the well being of others before ourselves, then there is little or no limit to what can be accomplished. In the spirit of celebration, we compiled a visual Rock Canyon bucket list on pages 24 and 25. I hope that everyone goes to the Make a Swish basketball game tonight, and if you haven’t, buy a Wish Kit. Now let’s carry this attitude through the rest of the year. Alex Rowe

A look inside: the maestros

These are the pages with coverage that don’t fit into one of our four sections

Olympic Coverage

Teen Pregnancy

Coverage of the 2010 Winter Olympics and Coloradans who have and are participating. pg. 9

03/01 Monday

03/02 Tuesday

03/03 Wednesday

03/04 Thursday

10th Grade CSAP only – Report to school @ 7:45

9th & 10th Grade CSAP – Report to school @ 7:40

9th & 10th Grade CSAP – Report to school @ 7:40

9th & 10th Grade CSAP – Report to school @ 7:40

9th, 11th, 12th Grade – Report to school @ 11:50

11th & 12th Grade – Report to school @ 11:50

11th & 12th Grade – Report to school @ 11:50

11th & 12th Grade – Report to school @ 11:50

Periods 1, 2, 3, 4 in the afternoon

Periods 5, 6, 7 in the afternoon

Periods 1, 2, 3 in the afternoon

Periods 4, 5, 6, 7 in the afternoon

Fruit flies make a buzz in Biotech Mrs. Fordham’s Biotechnical Engineering class has forgone the traditional lecture notes and PowerPoints and created quite a buzz about genetic inheritance and allele transfer. The class has spent the last three weeks raising, breeding, capturing, releasing, and analyzing flies. It began with the ordering of fruit flies by the hundreds, each with their own unique traits ready to be passed on. The introduction day the vials were distributed to students one vial at a time, with one breaking open and adding some buzzing, pestering annoyance to the lab for a few days until the flies died or were squashed. As the flies continued to breed, the vials filled with amorphous larvae and newly hatched test subjects. Each night the students awoke eight hours before their class the next day to release flies. Thereby ensuring the flies in the vial the next morning were still virgins, as they had not had time to become sexually active. For most students, this meant releasing the unfortunate flies into the cold winter night sometime between 11 p.m. and 2 a.m. every night. In class, the students goaded the flies into secondary vials, and inserting sticks covered in ether, rendered the flies unconscious. But the technique is not a cake walk. “In my first attempt at gassing the flies, my partner and I killed them all,” said Will Ready ’10. “We felt pretty bad about genociding an entire vial of flies, but it made them really easy to sort though.” When the technique goes well, however, and the flies are knocked out, their sexes can be determined. The flies are then sorted into new vials, and the breeding begins. Then, it is the students’ jobs to determine what traits are being passed from generation to generation and how it is happening. Determining the mode of inheritance of a genetic trait is an essential piece of any geneticist’s job. The

Q&A

With Kelsey Krueger

students of Mrs. Fordham’s class are learning skills that will transfer to any career path in biotechnical engineering. To finish the project, the students must finally create a lab write up worth two hundred and fifty points, illustrating whether the traits, are sex-linked (passed on sex chromosomes), or autosomal (passed on normal chromosomes). Traits in the fruit flies can be bar eyes [devil eyes] , wide eyes, partial wings, double wings, no wings, and white and red eyes. Finishing next week, the Biotech students will complete one of the longest labs conducted at Rock Canyon. Hopefully, they’ll find a passion for their subject in the process. Logan Thompson

Mrs. Fordham’s Biotechnology class studies inheritance patterns by breeding Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies every year. The project involves sexing the flies and observing their traits under a microscope. Above is a picture of a female drosophila. These can often be identified by their large bodies and striped pointed tip. The research holds many similarities to current research into human genetics.

Kids for Craig fundraiser a success

Advisement classes were able to raise $1,447.38 for the Kids for Craig program. The fundraiser ran from October to December.

The Rock : What is the CSU President’s Award? A look at teen pregnancy at Rock Canyon High School and in the media. pg. 16-17

Krueger : It’s an award for the leadership I have shown in high school and lets me take classes at CSU next year that will allow me to become an even stronger leader.

Trina Pfeiffer’s sophomore Advise class, raised the most money out of all advise classes and presented the award to Craig Hospital representatives.

The Rock : Did you have to apply for the award, or did someone nominate you? Krueger: My counselor nominated me.

Rock Canyon’s Bucket List

What do you want to do before you die? Rock Canyon students answer this question. pg. 24-25

Student Rights Online

Exploring student rights on the Web. What are students entitled to say about their school and peers online? pg. 26

There has been an important change in the attendance policy. If you arrive after the scheduled time a class begins, you will be considered present if you are in class for 50 percent or more of the period. However, you still may be marked tardy. If you arrive after the scheduled time and miss more then 50 percent of the period, you will be marked absent. Daniel Wheeler

“The biggest challenge was organizing it and getting the word out, but we kept having teachers push the bags in class.” –Tori Eberlein ‘10

The Rock : What did you do to be nominated? Krueger : I’m in Student Council and am a student liaison. The Rock : Are you confident or nervous about the results? Krueger : I’m nervous because there are a lot of other students competing. The Rock : Have you already been accepted into CSU? Krueger : Yes. I already have my dorm stuff and everything. The President’s Award for Civic Excellence, a one-time award of $1,000, is designed to recognize students in their junior year who demonstrate outstanding community service and civic engagement. Compiled by Maddie Jones

Attendance policy update

03

Interested in nutrition?

David Katz, a world-renowned nutrition expert, will be speaking at RCHS on March 10. Dr. Katz is the Director of the Yale Prevention Center, a health columnist for the New York Times, and a contributer to other publications. The topic will be on the state of nutrition in our nation, especially in schools. It will take place in the auditorium from 7:00 to 8:30. The event is free, but a $10 donation is suggested for Dr. Katz’s nonprofit organization, Turn the Tide Foundation. Daniel Wheeler

rumor mill setting the record straight

Rumor:

There will be no CSAP testing next year.

Fact:

According to Assistant Principal Greg Doan, CSAPs will run as usual next year. Many have heard that the test was going away to be reformed or gone completely away due to budget cuts because of the amount of money needed to run the testing. CSAPs are here to stay.

Rumor:

Counselors will be pushing for the Class of 2012 to take five classes their senior year.

Fact:

Counselors won’t be pushing for students to take anything. “We would love for everyone to take seven classes, but with budget cuts that’s not possible,”said counselor Sue Young. It has not yet been determined whether seniors will have the option to take six or seven classes for the 2012 school year.

Rumor:

Five to eight full-time teachers will be cut due to budget cuts.

Fact:

The number of teachers on the chopping block has yet to be determined, as well as the full extent of the budget cuts. It is currently unknown how many students have signed up for each class available. Teachers could end up teaching five or six classes with an increase in class size.

Compiled by Evan Ann Boose


04 soundtrack: “We are the World” Various artists

02•25•10 news

Still saving lives in Haiti After spending four days in Haiti in early January, Dr. Andy Motz (brother of RC Spanish teacher Margaret Motz) returned to civilian life in Denver. Since his return, he has been featured on 9News and NPR’s Colorado Matters to discuss his experience. “I was doing above elbow amputations 15 minutes after I hit the ground,” said Motz. He described the frequency of operations as “moving from gurney to gurney.” Stationed in Port-Au-Prince, one of the hardest-hit areas, Motz worked in an environment where supplies were limited, sanitation was minimal, and the line of people requiring assistance was endless. Patients’ rooms were literally in the courtyard of the hospital. An orthepedic surgeon and sports

medicine specialist by trade, Motz has operated on several RC students in the past. He plans on returning to Haiti with prosthetics for those left without limbs after the earthquake. “I would like to go back in a situation where the equipment we have is a little bit better. That way we can have something closer to what we’d like to have, rather than the ‘Civil War medicine’ we were dealing with in that situation,” said Motz to radio host Ryan Warner on Colorado Matters. “We didn’t have crutches to give them, let alone prosthetics.” Motz has started a fund where people can donate to help with his efforts. If you would like to help, please see Margaret Motz. Myles Wallingford

Cyberspace success

TSA returns as a winner of the state competition

Blue Spruce Assisted Living Facility in Castle Pines, run by Adele and Morris Barbera. Photo courtesy of the Barbera family

Making a difference

Rock Canyon family starts a home for the elderly in Castle Pines North to ‘hang out’ at my workplace, and I have noticed that Adele and Morris Barbera, parents of Michelle she has tremendous compassion and empathy for the Barbera ‘08, and Lauren Barbera ‘11, will soon open elderly.” an assisted living facility for the elderly in “It’s a lot of fun working with older Castle Pines North, Blue Spruce Assisted people,” said Lauren. “They always have Living. The planned opeining date is set for such great stories to tell about the good old March 1. days. And I’m used to working with them “I have worked as a physical therapist for since I used to hang around my mom’s work more than 20 years, mostly with geriatric a lot.” patients in different settings,” said Adele. “A As for Adele, she will be Blue deficit of appropriate living situations has Spruce’s administrator. Morris will be the been identified and will have many detrimanager. Their oldest daughter Michelle mental effects on our society in the future. I will be expected to help out when she can have felt for many years now that I have the when she is home during the summer, but skills, and should try, to make a small differmost of her time will be spent teaching ence.” with Breakthrough, an inner-city school The facility, a modified home, features program. seven private and semi-private bedrooms “When my parents first brought up and five bathrooms. Up to eight residents will live together in the home, along with Lauren Barbera ‘11, takes the the idea of opening an assisted living facility, I was really surprised,” said Lauren. “But I caregivers working shifts. role of activities organizer, “The caregiver’s duties will include putting together classes and was also happy for my mom, because she’s wanted to do something like this for a really general housekeeping and cooking,” said outings for the residents of long time. Even though it stresses them out Adele. “More importantly, they are trained sometimes, it’ll all be worth it in the end.” as nursing assistants to provide medication Blue Spruce Assisted Living “We are excited as a family to pass and assist with daily necessities of life such Facility. on some of the tremendous blessings we as bathing and dressing.” have received,” said Adele. We want to make these folks’ If needed, hospice care and counseling will be provided, so families do not have to worry about creating an ‘golden years’ as good as they should be.” Laura Romer alternative placement plan. Additionally, an activities calendar will be created to For more information about Blue Spruce Assisted ensure the residents never go without things to do. This Living Facility and all it has to offer, please visit is where Lauren’s role comes in. BlueSpruceAssistedLiving.com “She definitely has a talent for organizing holiday decorations, parties, teas and family-oriented activities,” said Adele. “In the past she has had many opportunities

Mock Trial, real awards Attorneys and witnesses receive accolades

Rock Canyon was very successful at the regional Mock Trial competition this past weekend. Along with winning the school’s first regional title, two Rock Canyon teams have also qualified for State, which will be on March 12 and 13. Additionally, eight of the top ten attorney awards and eight of the top 12 witness awards went to Rock Canyon students. Congratulations to the following students, who all qualified for State: Team #1- Gold Amanda Davanzo Megan Spradling

Logan Thompson Brooke Skinner Emily Gray Amanda Grimes Guillermo Arribas Team #2- Black Connor Dozois Megan Sajbel Lauren Johnson Kate Ready Ethan Coppage Drew Schneider Sam Classen

The Case:

Conspiracy to murder. A cut throat fashion executive was suspected of using one of his photographers to murder a competing fashion model. • All of the witnesses were based off of American Idol contestants, such as Jordan Sparkle, Ryan Seastress, and Keri Overturf

FINE ARTS BRIEFS

One step back, two steps forward

The future of many classes is unknown due to budget problems that have appeared this year. Joel Naegele’s band classes are no exceptions, with 22 seniors graduating this year. The loss will be a monumental departure for the music department. “I’ve had those kids since I started teaching four years ago,” Naegele says.

However, there is some optimism over next year’s ensemble. 35 to 40 incoming freshman signed up for the band next year, so the seemingly harsh loss may not be so bad. “My guess is we’ll be okay,” Naegele said. “ A lot is depending on this [the incoming freshman].” Amanda Becker

Q&A

Rock Canyon came back from the Technology Student Association state competition with success. The event, held from Feb. 18-20 at the Pepsi Center, included events such as Technology Problem Solving, Electronic Game Design, and Cyberspace Pursuit. “I thought the kids did especially well in [the game] Cyberspace Pursuit,” said technology teacher and TSA sponsor Christy Street. “Everyone really came together as a team.” Additionally, students partcipated in other events not involving technology. “I really liked seeing the students

dressed up for the banquet dinner,” said Street. Rock Canyon placed in many events at the competition, including first-place finishes in Electronic Game Design and Technology Dare. “My favorite [activity]was radio controlled transportation, because it’s like a remote controlled car but it has an arm to pick things up,” said participant Danny Donat ‘11. Said his twin brother Ryan: “I enjoyed messing around with friends in the hotel.” Max Wellman

Fighting for funding The Wickerdale Walkers, an organization of citizen activists, have continued their crusade to change the way education is funded in Colorado. This past month the Walkers have furthered their cause in three primary ways: State-wide events, attending the Douglas County School Board meetings, and spreading information about their cause.

outside on street corners with signs protesting education-based budget cuts.

State-wide Events On Feb. 14 and 15 the Walkers helped sponsor a state-wide event in which concerned citizens were urged to send red crayons to the Capitol building. The new event, called “Fill the Box,” was to have everyone collect red crayons and send them all on the same day. The other event the Walkers put on was the “Will Work for Education” roadside event where parents, students, and other community members stood

Spreading Information To inform more people about the Wickerdale Walkers and their cause, Brad Wann and the other Walkers held a meeting at Dewey’s American Grill, where they discussed the financial situation of the state and had guest speakers, including state Representative Frank McNulty. Follow the Walkers on their Facebook page or at WickerdaleWalkers.blogspot. org. Connor Dozois

With Brandon Thompson ‘12

The Rock : What on-line classes did you take? Thompson: English I The Rock : How often do you take your on-line class? Thompson: About 30 minutes outside of class, not very long. I get most of my work done during 5th hour. The Rock : What is the hardest thing about taking on-line classes? Thompson:Studying for tests usually, and writing essays. The Rock :What is your grade in your on-line class? Thompson: I have a B. The Rock : What is your favorite part of the class? Thompson: I like that you get to make up credits without taking the actual class. Compiled by Amber Cole

Board Meetings The Walkers also attended the Douglas County School Board meeting at Ranch View Middle School on Feb. 16. They encouraged everyone attending the public forum portion of the meeting to wear red shirts in honor of their cause.

What are you reading? Of 56 students polled: • 15 said ‘Fahrenheit 451’ was their favorite assigned read. • 27 said ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was their favorite assigned read. • 14 said ‘Of Mice and Men’ was their favorite assigned read.

A word from the Librarians: “Our numbers have drastically increased since last year. In January of ‘10 more students had used the library (‘09-’10) than in the previous year all together,” said Mrs. Stevens, library technician. “Nothing out of the ordinary usually occurs in the library. The most surprising thing that’s occurred is when a student fell asleep and we had to wake him,” said Mrs. Stevens. “In the morning it’s especially busy. We average about 60-70 students every morning,” said Mrs. Williams, library technician Compiled by Rebecca Ruh


02•25•10 news

soundtrack: “A,B,C” Jackson Five

05

Quoted: Key Club • David Sapienza Rock: Who did you receive the grant money from, and what does it go towards? “Juniors Lauren Barbera and Suman Mathur wrote to the Kiwanis Club asking for a grant to help support our Costa Rica work. Half of the money will go to student travel and half will go to purchasing math curriculum for Escuela Verde in Uvita, CR. This is what the grant was written to do. As the adult group for Key Club, Kiwanis helps to fund and support in action the efforts of key club.” •Kelsey Babilon ‘11 Rock: What is Key Club up to now? “We go to Redstone once a week to work with students there for a half an hour. We started it because we felt it was importnant for key club to have long term local project. We chose Redstone because it is a feeder school near to our school. There are nine mentors and we are working with nine students.” Compiled by Taylor Pettaway

Shanna Keller ‘10, works with two elementary school students from the ‘I Have a Dream’program located in Denver as her once-weekly community service. Photo by Megan Zamani.

Coming together and making a difference, one child at a time

Rosati’s advise and other seniors have made a volunteer program where seniors go to Denver, Monday through Thursday, to tutor and mentor kids in the “I Have a Dream” program. It all started with a challenge. Melissa Rosati, an english teacher, decided it was time for her advisement class to get together and make a difference, so she challenged them to choose an organization and volunteer together. That is when Rosati found the “I Have a Dream” program. “It’s designed for kids who are at risk for not graduating,” Rosati said. The children are 3rd to 8th graders who attend schools in Denver. The program follows the kids through their senior year of high school to keep them on track. “The ones that we help with are mostly minority students. Some speak English as their second language.” said Jami Becker ’10, who is in Ms. Rosati’s advise, and volunteers every second week. “They all live in the nearby projects and go to a Denver public school.” Every week, Monday through Thursday, about 25 to 30 Rock Canyon seniors take the light rail down to the North Lincoln Housing center, and have been since Fall Break. Rosati took on the extra coordinating to make this possible. Now she just sends out a mass email to remind the usual groups to go on their day, but at the beginning it was more complicated as the students involved were more of a “random sampling.” The program has since expanded to include seniors who are not in Rosati’s class. “When we realized how big of a need they had down

there it became our goal to get more kids involved,” Rosati said. Unfortunately the program was limited to seniors because they have to travel to get there. Although the students are not assigned kids to work with, they bond informally. “It’s a mentoring program as well as tutoring,” said Rosati. “There’s an 8th grade boy who has had a lot of discipline problems, but since Dylan Grimmett ’10, went down there he’s done so much better.” Grimmett is not alone. All of the volunteers who walk in receive a warm welcome. “It also feels good when you walk in and they’re happy and excited to see you,” said Becker. “When the students notice our presence it really lets me know that we’re doing something worthwhile.” For the seniors, it will be hard to leave the kids next year when they leave for college. As well as having an affect on the students, the volunteers have changed too. “It really makes you appreciate the school we go to. At the schools theses kids are going to it’s not uncommon to be a few grades below your current grade level in reading and math,” said Becker. Even Rosati noticed a change. “It’s been pretty amazing,” said Rosati, “watching our kids growing out of their bubble.” Emma Kate Fittes

With Shanna Keller ‘10

The Rock: How did you get involved with this community service? Keller: I am in Ms. Lerolland’s advise. This year we combined with Rosati and I decided to do it. The Rock: What is the best part of what you do? Keller: Definitely the kids. I love seeing their smiles and watching their eyes sparkle when they learn something new.

the field trip. Due to the complaint the Department members found themselves having to re-approve the field trip to the District without the two dollar fee. It was finally approved and the planning for the field trip moved forward. Student teacher Tiffany Harriger said, “I feel like this is a great opportunity for the students. It will really give the students the full experience of what we are trying to teach them. Since this field trip is around the same time we start the unit of anatomy it will really help them see what the systems actually look like up close and personal.” Despite the setbacks the teacher’s came together to give their students the full experience of Body Worlds. “I’m happy the teachers fought to give us this field trip.” Taylor Menning ’12, said. “I can’t wait to see a real human body, and I think it will definitely be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.” Alex Pedrinan

Crunch time

The yearbook team surrounds the center table mid-February in anticipation of the upcoming lecture. “We have five weeks until the spring break deadline,” said Brianna Vail ‘10, the head editor. “We have only completed one of three sections.” The yearbook’s progress in the last months has increased despite the slow crawl of last semester. The addition of new team members and a more structured editorial staff have helped. As outlined by teacher Kristi Rathbun, the class has completed less than half of the book from last fall. “This book has the potential to be awesome,” said Rathbun. “However, it depends on what we put into it in the coming weeks to see whether it will turn out or be a complete failure.” Drew Dodds

The Rock: What are some of your favorite moments? Keller:Some of my favorite moments are when they come up and hug me or hold my hand, and when they run up to me and ask me to sit with them. The Rock: What has it taught you? Keller: It has taught me to live life to the fullest. Compiled by Emma Kate Fittes

Body Worlds complications This year Biology is taking a field trip to Body Worlds- The Story of the Heart, but the Science staff has had trouble making the arrangements happen. On April 26, the Biology, Honors Biology and A.P. Biology students will be traveling down to The Denver Museum of Nature and Science to study the anatomy of the human body. According to Body Worlds Official Website, “The exhibition will give Museum visitors profound insight into the human body, health and disease, and the intricate world of the cardiovascular system. With 200 human specimens, the exhibition will awe the viewers.” As the field trip was being organized and planned, the Science Department found themselves running into a road block. A complaint had been made by a parent to the District, stating the two dollars out of the $22 fee was not appropriate. They advised that the two dollar fee, which was for the substitute teacher, should be taken off the cost of

Q&A

NEWS in brief

Students Emily Fenton ‘11, and Ryan Boryla ‘12, dance in the Commons during lunch to the music playing to raise money for relief in Haiti. Photo by Amanda Becker

Teachers cope with change It may have been sudden, but it really can’t be considered unexpected. Trina Pfeiffer, now teaching the only section of AP Calculus BC, requested over winter break to have her teaching assignment reduced for reasons that she would rather not divulge. One-year-only teachers such as Pfeiffer were aware that they would likely not be returning in the 2010-11 school year due to the budget crisis. The mid-year change has affected not only her students and the teachers that took them on, but other students throughout the math department. Brittney Evanson ‘12, didn’t have Pfeiffer as a teacher, but felt the aftermath of her departure. “Almost my whole class got put from Ms. Zimmerman’s class into Ms. Seaquist’s class,” Evanson said. “The teaching style was completely different and the semester had already started.” Evanson and many others were taken from their second period Geometry class with Zimmerman and switched into Seaquist’s Geometry to make room for Pfeiffer’s former students.

Although Pfeiffer’s first period chemistry class was able to easily transition when science teacher Laurel Johnston stepped up and took over, the math department had to make a quick turn around and find space for all of the extra students. Math teachers Tyler Munro, Allen Gregory, and Mandi Zimmerman each took on extra students on the second day of the new semester by adding classes to their work load. “Adding an extra class eliminated 50 minutes of planning a day,” Munro said. “I volunteered to take on the extra class because I love kids and couldn’t think of a better way to get to know more wonderful students.” While some students such as Evanson thought that the transition to a new class and teaching style was tough, teachers have handled the changes smoothly. “I’m very pleased to have my new 7th period,” said Munro. “I feel that the transition has been seamless.” Sam Pusar

Did you know? If you are an intelligent high school student, you should be able to do this problem. How smart are you? Simplifying Radicals:

√24

If that wasn’t fun enough, here are some mathematical pick-up lines: • If I were sin squared x and you were cosine squared x, then together we could be one. • I wish I was a derivative to your function so that I could lie tangent to your curves. Compiled by Emma Kate Fittes


06 soundtrack: “Get a haircut” George Thorogood and the Destroyers Give me a head with

02•25•10 community

HAIR

“I wake up at 4:30 every morning for my 7 o’clock departure, which gives me plenty of time to achieve perfection.” –Social Studies teacher David Sapienza

“It’s amazing, unique, and pink!” –Faith Marshall ’10

“I don’t know, not many kids have Mohawks anymore. So I thought: Why not?” –Justin Reed ’10

“ ‘Jag gillar mit här rett mycje. Ju kjenar mej cool.’ That means ‘I like my hair pretty much. I feel cool.’ In Swedish.” –Axel Larsson ’13

“It was done by a hairstylist named Ashley. She works at Fantastic Sams.” –Lane Fisch ’12 “I want it long, straight, curly, fuzzy, snaggy, shaggy, ratty, matty, oily, greasy, fleecy, shining, gleaming, steaming, flaxen, waxen, knotted, polka-dotted; twisted, beaded, braided, powdered, flowered, and confettied, bangled, tangled, spangled and spaghettied! from “Hair”the musical

“It’s different. It’s fun. It’s perfect. It’s hot. Very hot.” “It would look good on fire.” –Lamar Chhetry ’11

–Michael Stamper ’12

Photos by Myles Wallingford

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soundtrack: “Peaches” The Presidents of the United States of America

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How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying $

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Last two plays announced

The last two plays of the year have been officially announced. The Theatre III-IV class will be performing the classic play “Harvey” by Mary Chase. The play is about Elwood P. Dowd, a man who has an imaginary friend named Harvey, who happens to be a giant rabbit. The show will be double cast, meaning that two separate casts will perform on separate nights. Harvey will be directed by Guillermo Arribas ‘10, and is free. On the mainstage will be “Beyond a Joke” by Derek Benfield. This comedy concerns a family who lives in a quiet country house, that has a bad habit of killing people who enter. Auditions are open for everyone, and will be the week of March 15. See Cindy Baker for details. Daniel Wheeler

Creative Writing

Karly Bloom’s Creative Writing class got the chance to engage in a poetry project. How was it?

This was all about whatever you feel. It wasn’t trivial work because whatever we had written on paper, we could turn in. We were writing it from the heart. –Kip Gray ‘10

It was cool because it was different than having a teacher grade our work. With a student you can relate. –Erik Bosemberg ‘10

Ms. Bloom really started us out well and gave us some insight to do our own. It was really a step by step writing process –Patrick Cline ‘10

Giant talking insects... for kids! During the Theatre III-IV’s performance of “The Nose Tree,” the restless audience giggled uncontrollably when the actors messed up, added their own sound effects, and even went on stage while the performers performed. Not the typical audience behavior, but for the first graders at Acres Green Elementary in Lone Tree, it only added to the play’s fun. Every year, the Advanced Theater class puts on a play for feeder elementary schools. However, the feeder schools seemed unable to fit the play into their schedule, leaving the two shows without a set performance, until DCS Montessori and Acres Green (two schools outside the feeder) agreed to host the plays. The class performed “The Nose Tree” at Acres Green Elementary, and “James and The Giant Peach” at DCS Montessori. The student-run productions involved participation from the whole class. Students got involved by directing, acting, and running tech for the plays. Kayla Bush ’10, who directed and cast “The Nose Tree,” says that performing for kids is the total opposite from performing for an older audience. “You hear a lot in theater about ‘don’t over-exaggerate’ and ‘watch your facial expressions’, but when you’re performing for children, it all goes right out the window,” said Bush, “If you don’t exaggerate and act really energetic, the kids get bored with you.” During the performance of “James and The Giant Peach,” based on the classic story by Roald Dahl, the actors faced a greater challenge by having older children in the audience. Kim Betthauser ‘10, who played the Spider, feared the kids didn’t understand some of it. She thinks that performing for children is a challenging task, and that it required a different method of acting. “I think the children enjoyed it, but there were fourth graders there so they didn’t laugh as much as we wanted them to,” Betthauser said. “The play was meant for a little. younger audience but they liked it.” Ade Eichie

Not acting sophomoric Only two orchestra students in Rock Canyon history have made it into the Colorado All-State high school orchestra. Ryan McGavin ‘12, practices his upright bass day in and day out, perfecting every measure of every song he plays. The All-State Orchestra consists of mostly juniors and seniors from all over Colorado, so being selected as a sophomore is an unusual feat. To try out, McGavin sent in an audition tape and was originally selected for first alternate. After receiving this news, he was dissapointed but less than a month before the scheduled date of the concert, he was notified that one of the selected bass players was unable to attend. “It required a lot of work but it was definitely worth it because All-State is a huge accomplishment,” McGavin said. Ryan started playing the bass when he was 11. Ryan was fascinated by this instrument, so he decided to stick with it. “I thought that playing the bass was really fun,” said McGavin. “Once I started playing the bass and realized that I liked it and that I was good at it, it was kind of

$ $

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$ Don’t miss the madcap antics and hilarious songs in our spring musical March 11 and 12 at 7 p.m. / March 13 at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. $ $ Tickets: $5 for students, $8 for adults

easy to decide to keep playing.” He attended three different schools for sixth, seventh, and eighth grades, so establishing a good relationship with his conductor was a difficult task. Fortunately, his eighth grade orchestra director also worked at Rock Canyon so he was able to get to know her, which was a great advantage to him. By his second semester of freshman year, Ryan had already progressed his way up to first chair in the chamber orchestra. 2010 has been a great year for Ryan. In January, he was also selected to play first chair bass for the Continental League Honor Orchestra, in which he and fellow RC orchestra students Chris Battin ‘10, Krystal Van Es ‘11, Erica French ‘10, Lauren Fleecs ‘12, Talia Pratte ‘10, and Kevia Qu ‘12, joined students from 13 other south metro Denver high schools for a concert at Boettcher Concert Hall in downtown Denver. “I’m really looking forward to participating in both Continental League and AllState next year,” said McGavin. “It should be a great experience.” Sean McGavin

Clockwise from the left: Students at DCS head into the gym to watch the performance. Ben Bush ‘11, and Jarrod Collins ‘11, got outside their comfort zone to play James’two evil aunts. Ellen Hefner ‘12, Jacob Donaldson ‘11, Kim Betthauser ‘10, and Louise Macdonald ‘12, played the insects that James travels with on his voyage across the Atlantic. Ellen Hefner ‘12, is given a bag of magic from Cole Owens ‘11. The Whole Foods bag was a last-minute prop.

Above: Guillermo Arribas ‘10, fixes his costume moments before performing. Left: Bria Pellandini ‘10, played the energetic butterfly narrator. All photos by Alex Rowe


08 soundtrack: “My junk” Cast of Spring Awakening

02•25•10 news

Chivalry, sacrifice, and sense Drummer in local band is a part of something special: a brotherhood Nate Sowders ‘11, is a true rock star. A recent transfer to Rock Canyon from Valor Christian High School, Sowders is the drummer in the local band Chivalrous at Best, which formed about a year ago. Besides Sowders, it is comprised of David Murphy, a senior at Mountain Vista; Brandon Tomic, a junior at Vista; and Matt Richard, a freshman at Metropolitan State College of Denver, who graduated from Castle View. Why the name? Sowders describes it this way: “When we first got together, we were talking a lot about how annoying it was that guys don’t treat girls well anymore. Chivalry is dead. Then we remembered one of our favorite songs, Mayday Parade’s, “Miserable at Best.” So we combined chivalry and at best to create Chivalrous at Best,” Sowders said. But it’s not just the name of the band that’s all about treating women with respect. Chivalrous’ songs all mention women in them. “We’re here to save chivalry,” said Sowders. “So our songs don’t talk about beating women up or anything. We emphasize respect and being polite.” What about atmosphere? Chivalrous at Best doesn’t have a particular genre. Sowders says they try to keep it fun, casual, and low-key. And this is the glue that holds them together. “The band has been such a positive influence on me and the others. It keeps us all away from alcohol and drugs and together as brothers,” Sowders said. The music is enjoyable and casual, creating a positive atmosphere that Sowders and his bandmates want to maintain. “Anyone can enjoy our music,” he said. “What we’re really here for is to be role models for guys everywhere. There’s no angry screaming in our music and no negative ideas expressed in our lyrics. What we want is to bring back chivalry and manners to society, and we can start by reaching a teenage audience.” What about the fans? In the year it has existed, Chivalrous at Best has already

Q&A

What about chemistry? The chemistry of the band is crucial to their way of working. David Murphy, the lead singer, is not the only one who supplies the lyrics. “We all work together on every song,” said Sowders. “We try to be open minded and give new things a try. Even I help out with the lyrics, but don’t ask me to actually sing them! I’m a drummer first and foremost. My singing voice isn’t too amazing.” Chivalrous at Best hopes to sign a record deal soon, possibly with their church, Jubilee Fellowship. Sowders hopes to make a career out of the band. “We work so well together. I really hope this can become something we do for a living. It’s one of the best things that’s ever happened to me, and I never want it to end.” Laura Romer

The Mr. Jag dance revolution Cooper Ryburn ‘11, performs his talent in an inflatable cowboy suit.

Left: Russell Hunchar ‘11, performs an interpretive dance. Photos by Connor Dozois

Q&A With Rebecca Coffee ‘11

Rebecca Coffee ‘11, is in a highly competitive marching band for teenagers.

Quinn Kennedy ‘13, and Ben Hilzer 10, won first place for their performance in the talent show. The prize was $100 to be split between them.

The Rock : What is the Blue Knights Drum and Bugle Corps? Rebecca: It is an all-brass performing marching band.

The Rock: How did you prepare for this song? Quinn: Ben picked it out. It was We had a karaoke track and practiced it every day after school.

The Rock : How did you sign up? Rebecca: I saw the audition signs on the band board. Over Thanksgiving break I auditioned.

The Rock: Why did you choose the song you performed? Quinn: We both like the musical it’s from, Spring Awakening.

The Rock: And what was your reaction to winning? Quinn: Excitement! Freaking out! We were both really excited. compiled by Daniel Wheeler

What about exposure? Additionally, channel 93.3 KTCL, a radio station that plays mostly modern rock, has asked Chivalrous at Best to play live in its studios. Radio exposure is another way they can garner attention and gain fans. Most of their shows so far have been Battle of the Bands competitions and, more recently, many concerts whose proceeds benefit those suffering in Haiti after the earthquake that struck on Jan. 12. One competition that was originally going to give out prize money to the winners had meetings with the bands participating. The facilitators of the event had a different idea. “All of the bands in the competition agreed together that the money would be better going to the people in Haiti,” said Sowders. “Making sacrifices for the good of others is another thing we want to show our fans is important.”

Talent ShoW

With Quinn Kennedy ‘13

The Rock : Were you apprehensive? Quinn: No, not at all. We both love it and were excited.

amassed a steady fan base, with fan pages on Facebook and MySpace. They have already opened for several local bands and are going to play with The Heyday soon. Opening for The Plain White Tees at Red Rocks is being considered, and Sowders endorses the idea heavily. “It would be amazing to open for them,” said Sowders. “We all love their music, and it would be an honor to get involved with them, even if it’s just for a night.”

Clockwise from above: Mikaela Merrill ‘11, performs a ballet routine on pointe. Mae Rohrbach ‘13, and Taylor Deck ‘13, dance in the talent show. Chris Battin ‘10, and Natalie Seely ‘10, emcee during the show. Emily Gray ‘11, and Ben Dean ‘12, sing and play guitar.

The Rock: What kind of training do you do? Rebecca: I went to a camp over Winter Break. In the summer we will train from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. It’s intense, but fun. The Rock : What do you like about it? Rebecca: When everyone gets together and plays, we sounds amazing. compiled by Erika Guilbault


02•25•10 news

soundtrack: “One” U2

09

art by Alex Rowe

Quoted African-American students who have enjoyed their time at Rock Canyon

“It is hard to come to a school being a minority, but Rock Canyon has been a place where I [may not feel] a hundred percent welcomed but mostly feel welcomed. “People don’t treat me horribly but maybe not as fair as the people who are not minorities.” –Brittany Hill ‘10

“I feel that I have been embraced into the Rock Canyon community.” “My peers sometimes act irresponsibly but it hasn’t reached an uncomfortable point. “I love white people!” –Chris Dixon ‘12 Compiled by Paige Hesen and Austin Frankel

Q&A

With Counselor Sheila Redler Rock : What should a student do if being harassed? Redler: “If someone says something you don’t like, whether it is sexual, racial, or something else offensive, the first step is to ask them to stop. “If you are being harassed the antagonist has to know it offends you for it to be filed as harassment. If it continues, talk to an adult, not just counseling, it can be anyone you are comfortable with. “When harassment is reported the assistant principal will confront the antagonist, [and will] decide what punishment is fitting. “The main thing to do is to let an adult know, possibly even your parents if you are most comfortable with them. As long as it is someone who can help, it’s just important to get help quickly to avoid the effects of bullying.” Compiled by Curtis Stuck

Being pushed out of the crowd

Rock Canyon’s African-American students experience a very different environment from their white counterparts. In honor of Black History Month we took a glimpse at what it is like for some students to look different from the crowd. For the most part, Americans like to believe that racism is dead. February is Black History Month, a month dedicated to celebrating the progress of African-Americans. Even in the full swing of Black History Month racism is still present in society. Beyond the streets of Highlands Ranch and into our own school, racism remains as a common form of bullying and affects the lives of many students in our community. Two students in particular, have their own stories to tell about their experiences with racism at Rock Canyon.

Betrayed by a friend

In August 2007 Noni Campbell experienced her first day at RCHS. She was nervous, like any student would be walking down foreign hallways and seeing faces she had never met before. These faces though, as she watched from the corner of her eye, didn’t look as welcoming as she would have hoped. But she held her head up high, prayed for the best, and managed to survive the first day. The staring, though, became a daily routine; every passing period she could feel cold glares watching her as she walked from class to class. The whole first half of the semester went that way and Noni began to get the feeling that she wasn’t very welcome. Sure she had made a couple friends and met a few cute boys, but overall school wasn’t something she could call pleasant. But this was only the start of her problems, and until those first catty remarks were said, Noni thought the harassment would end at glares. “[The harassment] wasn’t ever anything physical. It was times when girls would say ‘oh you had to have got those jeans from a black store to fit that big of a booty’,” she said. “You know, little things like that.” It was strange to hear racism so openly, especially coming from a background of mixed race schools. So at first Noni wasn’t sure what to do. Her mind screamed to defend herself, to say at least something back, but she was shy and her mouth remained shut. “I wouldn’t say anything and would just take it. If I could do it over,” she said with a laugh. “I think I would have gotten into a fight, like everyday.” But as time went on and the comments got more racist, it became increasingly harder to hold all her frustrations in. Eventually she began to confide in her mother as a daily counselor. Every day after school, they would sit down and just talk. Noni would share her daily stories and her mother would give the best advice she could. “I remember sometimes the harassment was so bad

I would beg my mom ‘please, don’t make me go’ just because I was done with having to spend each and every day with [racist behavior]. I mean, who really wants to deal with that?” Skipping school became her only way out and her grades began to fall, from A’s and B’s to C’s and D’s. Her self-esteem wasn’t far behind, either. Eric Burrage, a childhood friend, noticed a difference in Noni’s morale after she moved to the school. “Noni became a lot more quiet and she always looked mad in the hallways,” he said, “like she hated being at Rock Canyon.” Things got progressively worse. She wanted to join the cheer team but was discouraged by other students and never tried out. But her breaking point came near homecoming. She was walking to the bus stop when a Jeep full of students, two boys and two girls, pulled up to her. At first she didn’t understand what they wanted, but then they began to taunt her. “They started yelling at me, ‘we hate you! We don’t want n***ers in this school!” she said bitterly. “That was when I decided that I really was done with it.” It wasn’t long after that Noni discovered the root of her problems. Surprisingly, it was a friend, who was really an enemy in disguise. “She was always saying racial slurs to my face, but I ignored it and just thought we were friends. But behind my back she was getting other people to start harassing me.” The Campbells involved the police and pressed charges on the girl. Despite the fact there was no other legal action taken, Noni still can feel the emotional scarring. “I’ve seen that girl, one time when I was with my boyfriend. I want to fight her in some ways.” Not much later, the Campbells decided it was in Noni’s best interest to leave Rock Canyon. She moved to Thomas Jefferson, where she has found success both socially and academically. “I have friends of all races now and we get along really well,” she said. “I mean I have Indian friends, an Ethiopian friend, [and] Asian friends.” And with a smile she said, “And all my grades are back up to A’s and B’s.” Now, when Campbell looks back at Rock Canyon, she sees all her troubles as a learning experience. “It makes me stronger because now I can help people who go through similar situations,” she said. But if she could do it all over, Noni wishes she would have never attended Rock Canyon. “Don’t get me wrong, its not like [RCHS] is a bad school. Actually it’s

got an amazing curriculum and it teaches kids [well]. But the students there can be very materialistic and I have been raised to not be a materialistic person.” Her advice for other students: “I tell them to just choose their battles because racism, no matter how much people say it is over, it isn’t. I know who I am, and what my upbringing is and it helps me stick to that.”

Square in the jaw

Robert Anderson dealt with racial diversity for the whole time he attended Rock Canyon. For Robert, being African-American was hard in a school like Rock Canyon, where he was part of a small number of black students. “I wanted to be around other people,” said Robert, “but I always felt singled out, like I could never completely connect with the other Canyon kids.” Being surrounded by racist jokes day after day didn’t help him either. In one of Robert’s classes his sophomore year, there was one student who continually shared racist jokes with the class; with African-Americans as the brunt of the jokes. At first Robert just laughed off the jokes, but it was not long before they began to get under his skin. A week later, the student from his class continued making racist jokes and Anderson could take no more. “He just kept joking about stereotypes of blacks,” Robert said, “and I had just been hearing it for so long and I was so sick of it, I just snapped.” He punched the student square in the jaw. What felt like years of racial insensitivity from his classmates had caused Robert to lash out with violence. The two wrestled, punched and kicked for about ten minutes before faculty members broke them up. Both Robert and the other student got suspended, but that didn’t bother Robert. “I was actually really proud of myself for finally standing up instead of taking it. I don’t regret it,” he said. “I was just so done with the crap.” But even though he felt somewhat better after the fight, the racial differences still affected Robert. At the beginning of his junior year, Robert transferred to Thomas Jefferson High School. “I just felt like it was more culturally diverse. It is a place where there are people like me, and I don’t have to be the minority or worry about being so different from everybody else. Dani Burrage and Taylor Pettaway

By the #s percentage of “White, Not 1475 TheRocktotalCanyonnumber of students at 88.2% TheHispanic” students at RC

percentage of “Hispanic” 4.8% Thestudents at RC

percentage of “Black, not 1.4% TheHispanic” students at RC (83.1% of surveyed students

percentage of “American .2% TheIndian or Alaskan Native” students at RC

percentage of “Asian or 5% ThePacifi c Islander”students at RC (33.6% of surveyed students perceived this correctly)

perceived this correctly)

(44.6% of surveyed students perceived this correctly)

of “American 4 TheIndiantotalornumber Alaskan Native” students at RC

total number of “White, 1302 Thenot Hispanic” students at RC


10 soundtrack: “Chariots ” Vangelis

02•25•10 olympics The Olympic Torch is lit during the Opening Ceremonies of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia. (Harry E. Walker/MCT) “ I thought the whole thing was really cool. I loved how they transitioned from one special effect to the next. I also thought they handled the technical errors at the end very well, “ said Jessie Salus ‘10.

By the #’s

Colorado athletes •Alpine skiing- 4 •Freestyle skiing- 4 •Half pipe ski/snowboard- 2 •Nordic combined skiing- 3 •Cross country skiing- 1 •Hockey- 2 •Biathlon- 1 •Figure skating(singles)- 1 •Bobsled & Skeleton Federation-1 •Total Colorado athletes- 19 •Coloradoan percentage- 9% • Total USA athletes- 216 Compiled by Rebecca Ruh

When dreams really come true Littleton synchronized swimmer worked her way through hard times into the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics She knew at a young age that she wanted to be in the Olympics. She never thought it would become a reality. Having started synchronized swimming at age ten, she knew she had a passion for the sport. In April of 2007, at age 26, Janet Culp, from Boulder Colorado, was picked for the 2008 Beijing Olympic Team. “Growing up, I always thought that being an Olympian would be pretty darn amazing,”Culp said. “I think it is a dream that many children have, but it didn’t seem to be realistic until I moved out to California to swim with the Santa Clara Aquamaids and finally made my first national team in 2002. After that, everything started to fall into place and next thing I knew, I was named to be on the 2008 Olympic Team.” The trials process started in April/ May 2006 with two rounds of individual skill assessments. The top 50 from phase one moved on into the next round. Every athlete swam the same routine. They were judged individually and in groups of similarly skillful athletes. The top 14 athletes went on to compete in a final phase of elements, and the final group of 12 athletes became part of the Olympic Training Squad. In April of 2007, the squad of 12 was cut to the nine athletes and one reserve that made up the U.S. Olympic Team. In July of 2007, the team officially qualified for the Olympic Games by winning first place at the Pan American Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Once Culp was on the team, they had only 15 months to train together. They practiced Monday-Saturday for six to eight hours in the water. On top of that, the team had an additional one to three hours every day outside the pool doing

MEDAL COUNTS as of Monday, Feb. 22 Gold Silver Bronze Total United States 7 7 10 27 Germany 7 9 5 21 Norway 6 3 5 14 Russian Federation 2 3 5 10 Canada 4 4 1 9 Korea 4 4 1 9 Austria 3 3 3 9

is almost indescribable!”Culp said. “The activities like cardio training, strength energy and excitement is so palpable. I training, land-drill, sports psychology, especially remember walking into the stanutrition, circus school (acrobatics), and dium and cheering USA, USA, USA with other forms of training. the other American “Although the athletes.” training took so much The 2008 USA Synphysical endurance,” chronized Swimming said Culp. “Without Olympic team had one a doubt the hardest major goal set for thempart was going through selves...they wanted to everything without medal. Unfortunately, Jennie, my twin sister.” team USA ended up Janet and Jennie placing fifth in Beijing. were connected by the “Although we did hip in the synchronot achieve our goal of nized swimming top three, I think our world. The Culp twins team had one of our were known for their best swims ever and perfection, strength, had tough competiand amazing contors that were talented nection. They swam USA Olympic Team preforming a lift and deserving of their together for their entire during their free routine. Annabelle careers until the Olym- Orme (being thrown) and Kate Hooven. scores,” said Culp. “In a judged sport, you can pics. While swimming only control what is in your power: your for the National Team in 2002, Jennie swim, your execution, your attitude.” severely injured her shoulder and got Currently, Culp lives in San Jose, Calif. major surgery. This affected her ability to with her husband Erick Redwine. She swim, as well as her chances of making comes back to Colorado every so often the Olympic team. “Only 9 athletes could make the team. to visit her family and friends. When in Colorado, Janet visits her old team, Jennie was spot number 11, so dealing Rocky Mountain Splash in Littleton. with the joy of making the team for myself, and dealing with the disappointment She often helps with coaching. After the Olympics, Culp retired from her swimof her not qualifying with me, was a conming career. stant battle, even through the Olympic She is still involved with synchronized games.” said Culp about her sister. “It was swimming, as a coach and an athlete one of the hardest things I had to deal representative. While she figures out with during this amazing time.” what she “wants to be when she grows While in Beijing, Culp made plenty of memories that she will cherish forever. up”, Culp is spending time in a school working as a teachers’ aide and enjoying One of Culp’s favorite memories- the her free time. Her journey stays with her Opening Ceremonies. every day. “The atmosphere of the ceremonies

FIGURE SKATING “ I personally know Evan Lysacek and when he won gold in Men’s Figure Skating, I was thrilled. I ran up stairs crying because I knew how tough his competition was. He put two amazing programs together and deserved every bit of the gold medal. I am excited to see the woman skate, and I am rooting for the USA skaters, especially Rachael Flatt,”said Carlie McAlister ‘11.

HOCKEY “ USA goaltending saved thier butts against the overconfident Canadian goalie, Martin Brodeur in the USA vs. Canada hockey game on Sunday Feb. 21. USA came out [on top] in a well fought [game],” said Colin Abitz ‘11. “They showed that hustle and hard work beats talent, as shown by the empty net goal by Ryan Kesler, with less than a minute in period three.”

During her trip, Culp kept an online blog to remember all the little details. Culp wrote this blog to keep her family and friends, who could not be with her, informed. “The closing ceremonies were exciting and fun, but also sad--the 2008 Olympics, the event I and my teammates have been dreaming about for so very long, had reached it’s end,”Culp said in her online blog. “Now tonight as I write the end of my Olympic Experience, I’m realizing that every huge investment you make in your life is this crazy combination of emotions. And that’s what makes them real and worth it.” “Similar to opening presents on Christmas day, I felt like the Olympics went by so fast that at the end you just stop and think, ‘Wow, is it really all over now? Did all of that really just happen?’ This is a dream come true, and without the words I have written down in my blog, some parts of the games seem like a big blur, while others are so sharp in my memory, it is like it happened yesterday.” Erika Guilbault

Twin sisters Jennie Culp (left) and Janet Culp in Beijing after the USA Olympic team performance which put them in fifth place. SKIING “I am so glad America is going to come home with so many medals!”said Paul McNally ‘12. “I am also thrilled that Lindsey Vonn won a gold medal while injured! I felt so bad when she got hurt but I was ecstatic when she came back so soon and ended up winning gold! ” Compiled by Alex Pedrinan and Erika Guilbault

New tricks, new heights, and a new gold medal Shaun White has managed to come out on the top, during the Men’s Halfpipe in this year’s Winter Olympics. In the Prelims, White received score of 46.8 out of a possible 50 points, but in the Finals he managed to get a score of 48.4. For the Finals, he decided to do his signature trick, the Double McTwist 1260, which includes two board-over-head flips within three and a half turns. This trick has not been attempted by any other athlete besides him. He made sure he was the only athlete out there with this complex and creative trick. Red Bull company paid over a half a million dollars for White’s private halfpipe. In Colorado, he had a 22 foot deep, 500 foot long Halfpipe perfectly built and covered with snow sitting at an elevation of 12,300 ft. This pipe allowed for extra training and practice to prepare for the Winter Olympics. White got his first gold medal at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Torino, Italy. Once again, White awed the crowd this year in Vancouver, not only with his new acrobatics tricks, but also by the amount of height he obtained with them. He seemed to go above and beyond, and won over the crowd and the judges. Alex Pedrinan


soundtrack: “Walk on Water” Eddie Money

11

From left: Coach Nicole Vanderpoel celebrates a good race at state. Marielle Renehan ‘13, swims the 100 breast. The team does its kickboard cheer during prelims.

Boys Basketball

16-7 as of Monday 2/22

Game

Date

Score

Outcome

Chaparral

2/09

54-53

Loss

Littleton

2/12

75-39

Win

Mountain Vista

2/16

74-61

Win

ThunderRidge

2/18

53-40

Win

We have been playing really well leading up to playoffs and have high expectations. –Keith Link ‘10

Girls Basketball Game

Date

Score

Outcome

Chaparral

2/09

61-30

Loss

Littleton

2/12

58-37

Wiin

Mountain Vista

2/16

46-43

Loss

ThunderRidge

2/18

81-37

Loss

Girls Swimming

12-11 as of Monday 2/22

Meet

Date

4A state swimming

12/12-12/13 2nd

Final record: 5-1

Outcome

points 226

The season went well, and the swimmers had their best times at state, which is the way it should be. –Coach Deb Kortabawi

Wrestling

Final dual record : 0-11

Game

Date

Outcome

4A state

12/16

3 points

Coaches Dave Heimer and Martin Castro yell to Gary Davis ‘10, at the state wrestling tournament held at the Pepsi Center. A look at tonight’s events

Come out to support the Unified Basketball team, which plays at home tonight at 7 following the FacultyStudent Make-A-Swish charity game.

Four years of silver and gold Day one – prelims “We race today, were not saving anything for tomorrow,” said Coach Ruthie Milberg as the girls stood behind the blocks ready for warm up. The top 16 times return tomorrow, top eight times will put you in the final heat. Rock Canyon is expected to finish in fourth place. The pool deck became chaotic with 47 other teams, but it’s quiet behind the blocks, where Rock Canyon is the first in the water. Event one – 200 medley relay Thompson Valley, their biggest competition, has already swum an intimidating time of 1:52.45 putting them in first place with one heat left to swim. Jessica Holley ’11, Meghan Long, ’10, Kara Schweitzer ’11, and Allie Berger ’11, are the first to race from the Rock Canyon team. It’s the third leg, and Rock Canyon is behind as Schweitzer winds up and jumps in – inch by inch she gains on the Broomfield team, but is still behind when she returns to the blocks. Berger jumps in, arms tight in streamline and right away pulls up next to the opponents anchor. As Holley, Long and Schweitzer scream and bang their fists on the blocks Berger heads back into the wall pulling forward almost an entire body length, touching the wall with a split of 24.00, a time that would win a gold medal in the individual 50 free, putting the team at a 1:51.28, a time that will send them to finals seeded first. Berger throws off her goggles and climbed to the pool deck, too exhausted to stand. The other three pulled her up and the four hugged and jumped in excitement. To the stands and to the other teams it was clear: Rock Canyon was here. Event 11 – 100 Breast stroke Every race starts with waiting. Waiting to be checked in, waiting in line before your race, and waiting behind the blocks as your names are announced. “When I wait I get really nervous because I’m ready to race,” said Berger. “You feel like everyone is depending on you.” This time it was Freshman Nicole Cassou waiting in line with three of her team mates getting ready for her most important race at her very first state meet. “I was nervous but I knew that if I just kept myself from over thinking it I would be fine.” It was time, the buzzer sounded and the girls dove in and after 100 meters Cassou stretched for the final wall. A best time, a finals time, and a sectional cut. “It was great being in the race with my team mates and it was an honor to make the finals,” said Cassou. Cassou became the only freshman to place in the top eight and would be one of Rock Canyon’s 10 swimmers that would be returning tomorrow for finals. “It felt great to accomplish something that meant so much in the high school season and for my club season as well. I have had the 200 breast for 3 years but I finally got a second sectional cut in the 100.” “I was really happy with the way the girls swam prelims. We knew going into the meet that we would have to have some fast swims in order to make it back to finals to score points. This was by far the best team effort we have seen,” said Milberg. “Every girl swam a best time and moved up in the standings. We really felt like we had a legitimate chance to be in second place and would even

give Thompson Valley a little scare.” Day two – finals Diving marks the half way point in the meet and Thompson Valley has come out faster than ever, snatching away every first place Rock Canyon has had a shot at so far, including the medley relay. However, Rock Canyon is still swimming strong, shedding time, and it is time for a change of pace as Ellen Strampel ’12, steps up to the board. After semi-finals Strampel was in ninth place, one spot up from her tenth place finish last year. She stands at the back of the board rocking her feet until ready. She is performing her best dive, a reverse dive pike. She pulls her body into a pike in the air scoring 6.5 to 7.5 scores and moves into 7th place. Strampel’s next dive is a back double, a dive she has had trouble with in practice. “I wasn’t nervous, but I was anxious to see my results,” said Strampel. She rocks, then throws the dive as hard as she can. Coming out of the dive too late she scores 3’s and 4’s bumping her back into ninth place. Her final, a back one and a half– half, one of her more comfortable dives scored 5.5 to 7 scores, bumping her back to a final eighth place. “I was disappointed. I knew I could have done better if I dove as well as I did in warm up,” said Strampel. “But I was happy moving up two places from last year.” Event 10--100 backstroke Rock Canyon has only one swimmer in the finals of the 100 back. Holley is predominately a freestyle swimmer but in order to max out points, she has been entered in the backstroke, a race she hasn’t focused on for three years. “The atmosphere at state makes you swim faster because everyone is really excited about doing their best and everyone is so supportive,” said Holley. “It’s what we have been working for all season.” Holley finishes fifth in the backstroke swimming a new best time. “It felt amazing to get a best time,” said Holley. “I hadn’t done that well in [backstroke] since I was thirteen.” “Swimming isn’t about winning from what most what people would think, its more about your personal achievements and the little moments when you finally see your work pay off,” said state swimmer Lexie Goldberg ’10. Event 12 – 400 freestyle relay It’s the last race of finals, and Rock Canyon is seeded first from their prelim performance where they shed four seconds from their best time. Senior Katie McLaughlin dives in first for their last shot at a gold medal. The crowd leaps to their feet as three teams pull ahead and remain neck in neck in front of the pack. One of them is Rock Canyon. Madison Vanderpoel ’11, is next to dive in as she holds the lead spot, battling with every stroke not to let Thompson Valley ahead as the other team falls behind. It’s just Rock Canyon and Thompson Valley. The two hands touch at once sending off the third leg. Berger is in the water and pulls ahead on her very last lap in hopes it will be enough that Holley can hang on. Holley enters a split second before Thompson Valley and there is no one left sitting in the arena. The cheering is over-

Allie Burger ‘11, gets onto the starting block as she gets ready for her 100 meter freestyle race at preliminaries Photos by Zach Tornabene

Getting second place was just as exciting as winning last year -Ruthie Milberg

whelming and the coaches are jumping along with the girls who are screaming themselves hoarse. It’s too close to call as the two finish at the wall, but the board shows that by a difference of .02 seconds, Thompson Valley is in first place. Award Ceremony “Getting second place was just as exciting as winning last year, mostly due to the girls working and supporting each other. Last year we had a lot of superstars, and this year we needed every swimmer to step up and swim their best, which they did,” said Milberg. The seniors from this team have never seen anything below second place “I feel very blessed to work with [this coaching staff] and the girls,” said Milberg. “We continually get compliments from the rec center staff on how hard we work and what nice girls we have. Also, we hear from the officials and other coaches at the meets about the girls’ character. That says a lot about the team.” “We did an amazing job because we weren’t expected to even place top three,” said Berger. “We worked really hard all season, and at prelims, and finals, and it paid off.” The team piled onto the podium to receive their second place trophy. It was the third time in four years the team held the silver in their hands. Meghan Long


12 soundtrack: “Second Coming” Juelz Santana Father daughter duo

Chloe Thorderson ’12, has grown up around basketball. Her dad played basketball throughout high school and on a scholarship in college, her two older sister’s play and her little sister is following in their footsteps. “My whole family plays basketball and we all love the sport,”said Thorderson. “It brings us together.” In the Thorderson home Erik is not just dad, he is also coach. “It’s normal for him to be coaching me, whether or not he is my official coach or just coaching me through life as his daughter,”said Chloe. Although he has only coached his daughter for one year on the Rock Canyon basketball team, Chloe sees her dad as a personal coach who has helped her grow into who she is today. “Making varsity last year was the best experience with my dad because I wanted it so bad,” said Thorderson. “All summer long my dad helped me to prepare for the team. When I told my dad I made it that was probably the greatest day.” “I love the game and I love being around kids,”said Erik. “It’s great because I get to be around and spend time with my daughters.” Erik says he loves coaching girl’s basketball not only because of his daughters but because girls listen better than boys. “All boys want to do is dunk and shoot threes,”said Erik. Even though Chloe’s coach is her dad, she never gets off easy. “I know he has to be hard on me because he can’t show favoritism and that can be hard sometimes,”said Chloe. “I know that people think that I made the team cause of my dad but he wasn’t a coach the year that I made it. I am still trying to constantly prove that I deserve it because of how I play and not because of my dad.”

Caley Pavillard

02•25•10 sports

Left: Kimmie Roth ‘13. Above: Chloe Thorderson ‘12, in the game against Littleton on Feb.12, who they beat at home 58-37. Below: Makayla McBride ‘13. The girls record was 12-11 going into the playoff season. Photos by Sara Heyn

Girls earn home play-off game The varsity girls basketball team had two more conference games left before they could enter the 4A playoffs: the highly ranked Mountain Vista, and the fourth in state ThunderRidge, which both resulted in Continental league losses but this didn’t dampen the team’s spirits. The loss to Mountain Vista on Feb. 16 held sentimental value, as it was one of the last two games of the team’s first winning season, but it was Senior Night for sole senior Emily Leines, in her fourth and last year on varsity. “I kept telling myself that it was like every other game and to just do what I do,” said the nervous Leines. A sprained ankle and case of mono caused varsity starter Meredith Micho ’12, to miss the last two games of the season, widening the gap left by permanent loss of Lyndsie Berens ’11, earlier in the season due to a knee injury. “Meredith got mono and then suffered a sprained ankle,” said Leines. “So we were playing positions we weren’t comfortable with.” The game against Mountain Vista began with high energy and strong defense, and in the second quarter, the team got

two three point plays in a row, ending the half with the lady jags ahead by nine points. “Chloe hit a three pointer with 1 minute and 45 seconds to go,” said Leines. “I also made a lay up and got fouled and then made my free throws.” This high level of energy changed when the team entered the third quarter, coming out flat and giving up turnovers instead of building on their lead. “We played really hard overall but in the third quarter we lost it,” said starter Sara Costello ‘11. “We did really well with the defensive pressure but we had some turnovers that gave Vista easy layups.” With minutes to go in the fourth quarter, a Vista lay up denied the Jags the win, with a final score of 46-43. “We had good blocks, steals, rebounds and shots. All in all we should have won but we didn’t push through the entire game,” said Chloe Thorderson ’11. “It was a painful and emotional loss for us.” Two nights later, the team traveled to the 4th in state ThunderRidge for the last league game of the season. “I wish we could’ve done better,” said

Leines. “It kind of felt indescribable and not real.” Although the game brought a disappointing 81-37 loss, it was not the end of an extremely successful season, but the beginning of the 4A playoffs for the team. “We are in the 8th seed and will play a game at home on Tuesday, Feb. 23 against Sierra high school,” said Seaquist. “If we win we go to Pueblo for the second round.” Next year, the team will move up to 5A, and will play in the 5A play offs for the first time. The team reached the majority of their goals, by winning 12 of the team goal of 14 wins. “We certainly turned some heads because I think that everyone was expecting to see the same team they saw last year, but honestly, to me it feels like a completely different team,” said Thorderson. “My favorite moment was when [Leines] hit the game winning shot at the buzzer against Range View.” “We did really well and have improved so much and all the girls are great,” said Leines. “I wouldn’t have changed a single thing about my team.” Kate Ready

Spring sport preseason

Above: Morgan Storch ‘13 participates in the warm up at soccer preseason in upstairs hallways. Below: Christian Storch ‘12 , a returning varsity player, playing in the gym due to the weather.

Shifting focus

One and only

The girls soccer team has started preseason workouts, and they are more focused than ever. Coach Mat Henbest has shifted the focus of the workouts from weightlifting to fitness and agility. “I think it will give us an advantage on the other teams,” Kelsey Huntley ’12, said, “Because we have been working on getting in the best shape possible.” The workouts have been taking place on the soccer fields or indoors if the weather is too harsh. The players have been working on 1-on-1 and 2-on-2 drills, as well as general fitness. “I like how we are just able to practice our skills in the 1-on-1s,” said Lauren Wood ’12. The preseason workouts ended this week, and tryouts are underway. Max Wellman

Baseball has started off their preseason with working out 4 days a week before and after school and even on the weekends to prepare for their difficult league in which Rock Canyon is the only 4A team. “Our leauge is one of the hardest in the state but we’re sure we can still make it to playoffs,” said returning senior player Reid Carter’10. The boys are off to what they believe one of their best seasons yet with six returning seniors from the state team last year. “This is going to be one of our best teams because we have the experience and we know what its like to be in the playoffs and to play under pressure,” said Reid Carter ‘10. Erika Guilbault

Taking arms

Stretch run

Preparation for the boy’s lacrosse season started with a mandatory pre-season camp, followed by tryouts. The boys are optimistic about season predictions. “I feel good about our program, it needs as many players as we can get to make our team strong,” said AJ Cocetti ‘12. “Hopefully we’ll make it pretty far in the playoffs.” The teams were decided Tuesday February 23rd. There were no cuts and all seniors were put on varsity in compliance to Coach Louis Goldin’s rules, no one is cut from the program and all seniors play varsity. “I’m really hoping I’ll make varsity,” said Cocetti, “I’ll do whatever I can to help my team.” Karly Hanson

The track team started pre-season training this year with strength, distance and spirit work to get ready. “We only do lifting in preseason because too much muscle mass is bad,” said Chris Page track coach. Season for the track team started on Monday they practice 5 days a week. “We are focused on a peak system this season, where you peak to your best at state,” said Page. The goals for the season are for the girls to place in the top five at state. For the boys it’s to take more to state. “We haven’t had many boys go to state, but this year we have kids that know what they are doing,” said Page. Lauren Scheirman


02•25•10 sports

soundtrack: “More” Usher

13

Left: Jimmy Brannock ‘10, leans in for a floater during the final regular season game against ThunderRidge. Above: Keith Link ‘10, goes after a loose ball that was knocked free by the ThunderRidge defender. Below: Nathan McCubbin ‘11, makes a cut towards the hoop as he looks for a player to pass to or a lane to go in for a layup. The Jags beat ThunderRidge, at home, 53-40 making it the first time ever the Jags have beaten the Grizzlies. Photos by Sara Heyn

Playoffs bring new intensity

After receiving a #3 seed, the Jags prepare to start their playoff run, emphasizing their half court offense, tough defense It’s a whole new ball game. It’s a whole new feeling. It’s a whole new mindset. It’s playoff basketball.

“It comes down to possession basketball,” explained head coach Jim McClurg. “When you play these better teams that will full-court press for a majority of the game, it becomes essential to execute the half court offense. We’re primarily a fast-paced team so we’ll have to make a transition. We have to learn how to play a different style of basketball, a slower-paced game.” Finishing Strong The Jags finished the season with two convincing wins against Mountain Vista and ThunderRidge and finished with a record of 16-7. “We expect to make a serious push for state,” said Keith Link ’10. “We just have to continue to work hard on the defensive end of the floor.” With a #3 seed, the Jags not only start the playoffs with a bye, but they also will not need to face top-rated Sierra until the state quarterfinal round. “Obviously we would much rather have a home court advantage,” said McClurg. “Last year, we had to play Windsor at their home court. When you play in Windsor, the whole town shuts down and comes to watch the game. It’s a different atmosphere when you’re on the road.” The #3 seed means the Jags will not host a play-off game, but the team still seems confident.

The make-up The 4A playoffs consist of 48 teams. The goal is to get a top sixteen seed which grants a bye, letting them skip the first round. If a team is placed in a top eight seed, not only do they get a bye, but they host two games. Each team gets placed in their respective seed based on several factors such as league standings, record and even the difference of score in the game. The final four teams play their games on a neutral court at Colorado School of Mines. The championship game is March 13, in Boulder. Playoff path With the final push at the end of the season, the Jags finished well enough to earn a #3 seed in the playoffs. They received a bye on Tuesday night and they will play the winner of the #6 seed, Pueblo South and the #11 seed, Frederick. The game will be played this Friday at Lewis Palmer High School. “I’m pretty confident in our team,” said Adam Sunshine ‘11. “If we play our game, we’ll have a really good shot at winning.” If they move past their first playoff game, they will face the winner of the Lewis Palmer and Palmer Ridge/ Fossil Ridge game. “We were pretty happy this year with the seed; we felt like we were rewarded,” Sunshine said. “We felt like last year when we got the #8 seed, it wasn’t really fair to us. It was definitely more fair this year.”

Gary Davis ‘10, in his third round match up at state at the Pepsi Center. Photo by Drew Goodman

Championship contenders “We know we can play for a state championship,” McClurg said. “No matter where we play, we have to step up. If we lose, it will be to a good team.” One of the factors that points to a potentially successful playoff run was that during the regular season, the Jags played a majority of their games against 5A schools. That being said, in the playoffs, the Jags will only be playing against 4A teams, which brings teams such as Sterling, Sierra and Thomas Jefferson into the mix, though the Jags will not meet them until state quarterfinals or semi-finals. “That’s one of our bigger advantages going into the playoffs,” McClurg said. “We’ve had a bunch of success in our league which is regarded as one of the top leagues in Colorado. It will definitely help down the road.” Strong where it counts The last two regular season games exemplified the way the Jags played in their league. Both were wins, over Vista and ThunderRidge, and both wins came in the same week. “It definitely has given us confidence because we haven’t beaten them in any of the seven years of our school history,” Link said. “It was a big week for our program.” “We’re going to ride our two best players in,” Jah-Jaun Lewis ’10 said. “Jimmy and Keith all the way to the top.” Zach Tornabene

at a glance

The Jags received the third seed in 4A playoffs, the highest they’ve ever placed, while earning a record 16 wins and 4th place in the Continental League.

Standing strong at state The halls beneath the stands at Pepsi Center are not a welcoming place at the Colorado State Wrestling Championships. As soon as the first few matches of the day end, they are crowded with defeated, dejected wrestlers. Some sit in corners and cry, and others throw headgear and swear loudly. You would expect to see the other wrestlers, jubilant in their victory running through the halls screaming in joy. But wrestling is a gentleman’s game. The victors seek out their opponents, congratulating them on a great match. Through this chaos, two Rock Canyon wrestlers, Stephen Mabary ’10, and Gary Davis ’10, at 285 and 215 lbs., respectively, start to warm up in the tunnel, along with 20 others. Heavy metal and rap blast from headphones, and wrestlers run through moves like maniacs, preparing for at least two of the biggest matches of their high school careers. Davis and Mabary wrestle late in the day, but both lose in the first round, Davis on a pin in the second period and Mabary by five points.

On Friday, Davis won his first consolation match by pin 48 seconds in, but his fight for third place wasn’t to be. The second consolation match was a brutal fight, with Davis calling blood time in the first period to stop a bloody nose, but the CHSAA trainer is nowhere to be found. It forced Coach Castro to scream, “We need stuff!” to his daughter, who is the head student trainer for the team, as she sat in the stands. Thirty seconds into the second period, Davis gets stopped halfway through a head throw and gives up the takedown to Stephanus. This is the beginning of the end, and Davis never gets back up, getting pinned 49 seconds into the period. Mabary is relegated to the sidelines during the Friday afternoon session, after losing his first consolation match. State is a two-loss elimination, and Mabary lost twice. These losses leave Mabary with a record of 29-10 for the season and Davis with a record of 27-11. Drew Goodman


14 soundtrack: “When you wish upon a star” Pinocchio

02•25•10 sports Far left: Cheer team walks through the rain to the Magic Kingdom. Left: competition team on the warm up mat. Top row: Cecily Baumer ‘11, Ty Strimbu ‘13, Madi Strimbu ‘11, Shaina Hoday ‘10, Lindsey McCormick ‘10. Middle: Abby Baroffio ‘12, Rachel Nickel ‘13, Brittany Hill ‘10, Brooke Skinner ‘10, Marrisa F ‘12, Alex Pedrinan ‘12, Madelyn Falk ‘12, Alyssa Gibbons ‘11. Bottom: Kelsey Karst ‘12, Hope Lytle ‘12, Rachael Hoday ‘12, Lilly Sumners ‘12, Whitney Prior ‘10, Shannon Howard ‘12, Katie Bohus ‘11. Below: Cheer team at the start of their routine.

Becoming a family instead of champions This year the varsity cheerleaders found out the hard way that dreams don’t always come true at Disney World. But that didn’t mean their trip to Nationals was not important to each of them. “When I stepped on the mat, I just tried to soak it in.” Madi Strimbu ’11, said. “We worked so hard all season for that moment, and I knew that no matter what happened we would be proud of ourselves for accomplishing so much this year. It was truly one of the most memorable moments in my life.” “You have to work, to win.” The team began with 24 athletes, and 4 would be lost to injuries and family issues. From the dislocated knee for Abby Barrofio ‘12, to a knocked-out tooth for Ty Strimbu ‘13, the girls found themselves taking one step forward and two steps back. “I felt the pressure,” Barrofio said. “I couldn’t let my injury hold me back. If anything, it made me more determined.” The entire squad knew Nationals was their last chance to redeem themselves after the upsetting fourth place finish at state. During the two months between state and Nationals, the team came to

realize that their routine was getting out of control. “Diana [Miller] took the time out of her busy schedule, to help us. She is a dedicated cheer coach in Texas who has grown to close to our team,” captain Shaina Hoday ’10, said. “Our routine had gotten too confusing for us to keep up, and she helped us improve our routine, and she also helped our mind set.” Miller took the cheer team back to square one, simplifying and then building the routine back up. And then it was suddenly Feb. 12, and the team, led by long-time coach Karen Bryan, found itself in Florida, with heavy thunderstorms outside and hundreds of cheerleaders from across the country inside. Cheer teams occupied every room of the Caribbean Beach Hotel. “Just the atmosphere of the hotel made me feel like a champion,” Rachel Nickel ’11, said. “I loved seeing how big this competition really was going to be.” “Okay, ladies, it’s time” Captain Whitney Prior looked each girl in the eye, and said, ”Okay, ladies, we’re here. This is finally it. Now let’s go out there and give them a show!” It was all happening so fast.

Senior signing ceremony

A ceremony was held for the eighteen senior athletes who signed a Letter of Intent on Feb 3, National Signing Day, to play a NCAA sport next year. • Mackenzie Akerfelds- Soccer •Meredith Rollins- Volleyball University of Arizona, D1 Southwestern University at Georgetown, D3 •Reid Carter- Baseball •Drew Sandlin- Football University of Nebraska at Omaha, D2 Fort Lewis, D2 •Gary Davis- Wrestling •Tarrah Tate- Soccer Briar Cliff, NAIA N. Carolina Ashville, D1 •Evan Fisch- Track •Erik Wetzel- Baseball Carnegie Mellon, D3 University of West Flordia, D2 Compiled by Curtis Stuck •Allison Forrester- Volleyball Colorado State University, D1 •Tanner Krietemeier- Baseball University of Nebraska, D1 •Emily Leines- Baskeball Wesleyan Nebraska, D3 •Keith Link- Football AirForce Academy, D1 •Jacob Lissek- Soccer Fairleigh Dickinson, D1 •Meghan Long- Soccer Duquesne University, D1 •Alex Mierau- Soccer University of Puget Sound, D3 •Kyle Milberg- Swimming University of Denver, D1 Above: Jacob Lissek ‘10, shakes hands with Principal Kim •Kenzi Mitzner- Volleyball Rauh at the end of the signing ceremony. “I really enjoyed Grand Valley State Univeristy, D2 the experience. I’m excited to continue my soccer career at •Court Pietra- Football the next level,”said Lissek School of Mines, D2

“Now on the matt from Denver, Colorado. Please welcome Rock Canyon High School.” Hitting every stunt, every tumbling pass, and every dance move, the girls finished the routine with the crowd screaming “Yeah!” Making their way off the stage they realized what they had just done. A perfect routine. “All I could think about as we cheered off the matt was I couldn’t let the judges think we were just another team,” Madi said. “I was practically bouncing off the walls with all the excitement from our performance. I tried to let it show in the routine.” The girls found themselves huddled around Coach B, who blinked back some tears and managed to squeeze out, “No matter what happens today, I am so proud of you girls.”

“Ready to compete again you guys?” The girls started to believe they could actually make it far in the UCA nationals. When the cheerleaders didn’t hear their name called for finals, they kept their hopes up for semi-finals, but Rock Canyon was never called. They couldn’t believe it, not after that good routine. “I knew something had to have been

Pain, struggle and the performance are what make the champion, not the trophy- Nickell ‘11

wrong,’ Shaina said, “because our routine was spotless.” There were tears. There was anger. All the girls wanted to know was how the best routine they had done all year had not cut it. Coach B and Coach Ronna Prior gathered the girls, the results in their hands. It turned out that the routine had violated a recently added rule that bans pyramids in the cheer portion of the routine. The team later found that, without the rule violation, they could have placed around fifth in their prelim division and moved on to semi-finals. That disappointment did not diminish the pride each girl felt in what they had accomplished. “I think after most of us sulked around we came to our senses that we still will always have each other and God knows what we have truly accomplished,” Nickels said. “Yes, Nationals was a disappointment, but I gained more friendships with my teammates than I could have ever imagined, and that is what really matters. “Pain, struggle, and the performance are what make the champion, not the trophy.” Alex Pedrinan

” Disneyworld dreams come true The varsity poms team anxiously waits backstage shuffling through the moves of the dances they have been practicing for the last 5 months, offering words of encouragement to their team members and trying to calm their racing hearts. It was nationals. It was finals. It was what they had worked for since they first came to Disneyworld three years ago. The stadium was packed, ESPN was taping and their moms were screaming louder than any parents in the whole place. It was go time. After hearing their name called, they ran through the castle, decked out in sparkles, makeup and hairspray. They hit a flawless jazz routine for the third time in front of the panel of judges. “When we came off the stage we were all jumping around screaming and hugging each other.” Webber said. “It was a really good feeling. We felt really accomplished and proud.” Brittney Webber ’10, the co-captain of the team said. Their poms routine was next. Going into finals 9 in the nation, there was a lot of pressure on the girls to perform perfect. Coming off the stage for the second time at finals was even better than the first. They had never been prouder to be Rock Canyon Poms. The anticipation built as awards grew closer. “We were all really nervous, but were all really happy with our performance.” Webber said. “Whatever happened we were going to be happy because we had done our best and had fun doing it.” The teams here were good. Could Rock Canyon hang with the big dogs? The answer is yes. The results were in and the team placed 16th in the nation, out of over 70 teams, in both dances. They were

not just hanging with the big dogs, they were becoming one. They were building a name for the future team. Making coaches, parents and most importantly themselves proud. “The weekend proved to be one of the most successful, exciting and enjoyable experience of the poms season.” Webber said. “It was the cherry on top for the team who had always dreamed of making finals.” Coming home with two big trophies and whole lot of confidence only encourages the team to continue working hard, and proves that passion, dedication and a dream can get you just about anywhere. Paige Hesen


02•25•10 sports

soundtrack: “One Day” Matisyahu

15

A look at winter sport student athletes

Who says girls can’t play hockey? Kali Hengsteler has worked her way up the ladder to playing on a Colorado Select team which practices against college teams; she’s in high school With an overflowing wardrobe of Avalanche attire and hockey sweats, it’s evident that Kali Hengsteler ‘11, has a passion for the game of hockey. Not only is she a fan of the sport, but an avid athlete as well. “Kali is a strong, athletic, defensive woman with an aggressive nature that strikes fear in her opponents,” her coach, Mark Wolf, said. “Along with her determined attitude, she is a great teammate who’s always positive.” Having only played for four years, Kali has quickly progressed to play for Colorado Select U19AA, a competitive club team that often plays CU and CSU for practice. “Being only 16, I’m one of the youngest girls on the team of mostly 18- and 19-year-olds, “ Kali said. “Most of my teammates have played hockey since they were ten and I’ve had to work extremely hard and overcome obstacles to participate at this level. It’s my motivation that drives me to play at the highest rank, and it’s the goal of playing Tier I next year that continues to push me.” Kali has a supportive fan base as well, starting from right at home. “My family has been an enormous factor in my development as a player,” Kali said. “Hockey isn’t a financially cheap sport, yet my parents are willing to encourage me in anyway to help me achieve my goals. Not only do they pay fees for the club team, camps, equipment, travel, and a private coach, they’re also always at my games cheering

Bench brothers unite

my team on. Their encouragement shows how much they care.” “Hengsteler is a great role model for girls who desire to play hockey because from first-hand experience she’s demonstrated that even if you don’t make a great team the first year you play, practice and perseverance will improve your skills,” Morgan Hengsteler ‘11, her twin sister, said. “She’s learned from her mistakes and has improved so much over the past few years.” Traveling with each other to various tournaments, the girls on her team have developed strong friendships. Not only does Kali have love for the game, but for her teammates as well. “The best part about playing hockey is the friendships you create with your teammates, and with girls sharing similar interests around the country,” Kali said. “My teammates are the funniest, craziest girls I know and I can always trust them to be there for me.” “My favorite part about watching her games is the obvious team chemistry present,” Morgan said. “They excel at passing and communicating with each other. It’s really nice to see her teammates bonding with each other on and off the ice.” Kali hopes her ambition pays off and she plans to continue playing club throughout college with her family and hockey buddies right by her side. Rebecca Ruh

Fom left: Brady McNeily 12, Kyle Hawkins ‘11, Trey Buckland ‘11.

The Bench Brothers had a problem. How can you be part of a team if you don’t play very much? Solution: come up with a dance for every three-pointer. For most people, sitting on the sidelines during the big game is a bad thing, but for Brady McNeily ’12, and the Bench Brothers, being able to say they are on the varsity basketball team is enough of an honor. The Bench Brothers, or BB’s as they call themselves, are a group of three boys on the varsity basketball team. They are Kyle Hawkins ’11, Trey Buckland’11, and McNeily. They have made their name not because they make last minute game-saving shots, but rather because they don’t. “Basically, we never get to play. We get the water, and we cheer for the team,” McNeily said. “We have our own cheers.” Buckland, the captain of the BB’s, came up with the name during the tournament in Steamboat at the beginning of the season. The name stuck. Now, thanks to McNeily, the boys have a Facebook group and a small fan base. “It was more of a joke than anything, but people liked it, I guess, because they started joining [the group],” McNeily said. The boys very rarely get playing time.

They only get a chance to play when the team is winning by a large margin, or if the team is getting killed. Instead, they act like cheerleaders on the sidelines, cheering on their team and doing a special dance at the beginning of the game and a three-point dance every time a three point shot is made. They got to perform their cheer a lot as they watched the Jags finish the season at 16-7. “I like being on the Bench Brothers. I don’t regret not playing,” McNeily said. “I still get to play on JV.” McNeily and the other boys swing up to varsity from JV. On JV, they get to start and play for most of the game, which makes being on the Bench Brothers all worth it. Playing basketball for most of his life, McNeily is excited to be able to be part of the varsity team so early in his high school career. “I was happy to swing to varsity,” McNeily said. “I mean, I’m a sophomore.” For most of the season McNeily and his fellow Bench Brothers sat the bench with pride, cheering on their team and getting water when asked, happy to say that they were part of the BB’s. Maddie Jones

She is one tough cookie

Once fighting for glory, Alli Lewis now fights to find her center, even if it means giving up Taekwondo in the future and finding a new career path Alli Lewis ‘11, loves how fighting relieves her stress; how naturally it comes to her. “I had always thought that the sport was for boys, but once I stepped into the studio I felt so satisfied and relaxed,” Lewis said. “I wanted to keep coming back.” Lewis was only nine when she first started Taekwondo and since then, she has competed in over 20 competitions nation-wide, including the 2004 Junior Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. “It was so amazing; it felt like such an honor getting to compete in the Georgia Dome [where the Olympics were held in 1996]. It was the coolest thing in the world.” To get to the Junior Olympics, Lewis only trained for about six months, but her training was more than intense. She would spend ten to twenty hours a week practicing; getting up before school to run, training in the afternoon, and even having to lose weight in order to place in the competitions. In the end all of her hard work paid off. Lewis won three of her four events, which placed her seventh overall in the nation. “I was so happy I couldn’t even believe that I had

done something like that and won,” Lewis said. “I couldn’t even walk back to my room; my coach had to carry me.” Since then, Lewis has not been as active in competitions as she used to be, but Taekwondo has still been a prominent aspect of her life. She now works at the Taekwondo studio that she first took classes at and still fights, but only about two hours a week. Nowadays, she uses Taekwondo as a way to clear her head instead of competing. “Fighting is an excellent stress reliever; nothing feels better on a bad day than just unleashing all my rage on my opponent.” Though she loves the sport, Lewis doesn’t see a career in Taekwondo. “I could not see myself making it to the Olympics because I have seen what it does to bodies; its crazy,” Lewis said. “I have to keep my body for a long time so I am going to try to keep it in working condition. The lives of professional fighters are too chaotic for me. I just like having a sport that I am good at and enjoy doing.” Taylor Pettaway


02•25•10 teen pregnancy

Their little bundles of joy

Nine months of disrespect

Teenage pregnancy has a new place in the public eye. Since 2006, there has been a 3 percent rise in teen pregnancy, the first in 15 years. A movie, “The Pregnancy Pact,” is based on 17 girls at Gloucester High School in Massachusetts who made a pact to become pregnant and raise their children together. Teen pregnancy is also featured in the movie “Juno,” and in the TV shows “Teen Mom,” “The Secret Life of an American Teenager,” and “16 and Pregnant.” Republican Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin’s teenage daughter Bristol is a teenage mother. What is the reality of teenage parenthood at Rock Canyon?

Paige Hesen and Paige Newman

Q&A

With School Counselor Sheila Redler

photos by Emma Kate Fittes

A lot of firsts, and she’s still watching Toward the end of her freshman year, Courtney Ireland ‘10, became pregnant, two and a half years later she is still smiling In the past two years Courtney Ireland ‘10, has experienced a lot of “firsts.” She had her first child, Travis. She listened to his first laugh, then his first word, ‘Dada,’ and his first joke about falling out of his car seat. She watched him first begin to teeth, then take his first steps at 10 months old, and get his first stitches after falling on his cheek into a tree potter. She remembers his first day of daycare, which he hated, then his first day of a new daycare, which he loved, and his first birthday. She also survived through the ending of her first major relationship, her first job, and her first time putting her dreams on the back burner. After about three and a half years together, Courtney and Daniel Orantes, Travis’ father, broke up. “All the stress that we both have in our lives, it was getting to be too much,” Courtney said. “We’d take it out on each other. He loves me to death, and I love him to death, but I think we just started to grow apart with all the stress and arguing 24/7 about every little thing that was going on, even if it was nothing. So we just decided for [Travis] that it would be better just to not be together and happy, than angry and together.” Although Travis still sees his father everyday, the split is already having an influence on the two and a half year old. Because he is so used to always seeing his parents together, when Daniel leaves without Courtney, Travis freaks out and even begins to cry. Even worse, he began to act out. He would be “climbing on furniture at the day care, and [he] spit on one of the little girls, and [is] being mean to my little sister,” Courtney said. “We had to deal with all of those issues. He’s still getting over it, he’s getting better.” Time will help the entire family adjust, as Travis was not the only one affected by the split. Courtney finds that Daniel has had a shorter temper with her, because he is frustrated by the separation. Travis is still their priority, so they agreed to stay friendly for his sake. Although Courtney dated someone new for a month

and a half, she and Daniel continued to support each other, both emotionally and financially. Along with her mom helping out with finances, Daniel helped out, with a full time job in construction, but it did not last through the winter. So, Courtney got her first part time job since having Travis, as a hostess, but it too was not a safe situation. “I quit last Saturday. My boss was a wack job; I am pressing charges for his actions.” Courtney chose not to elaborate. Although she is back looking for another job, Courtney got a taste of how stressful juggling school, a job, and Travis would be. “When i was working, it was chaotic. I worked weekdays until 9:30 or 10 p.m.. It was hard. He definitely reacted towards it. When I’d come home he’d either be mad or when I’d leave he’d cry.” For now, Courtney is able to spend time with Travis from 3:30 p.m. on, but she knows she will need money to move out next year. Courtney’s mom, Lynn Roeder, observed that part of the reason the two broke up was education. “Their goals and their aspirations are completely different. We preach education in our house.” When Travis was born, Daniel dropped our of high school as a junior. Since the split, he has decided to attend Arapahoe Community College to become a firefighter. “I just want to be somebody for Travis, so he has somebody to look up to.” Daniel said. Before Travis, Daniel was planning to go into the army or navy, but now he can’t imagine being away from Travis for that long. Courtney is also finding an alternate route for education than the one she originally planned. “I wanted to be a fashion designer, and that would still be my dream, but it is too hard to get up high in the industry. I need to make money quickly with [Travis].” Instead Courtney plans on going to community college in Denver to become a pediatrician, and moving herself and Travis out of her mother’s house. Fortunately, the community college is not too far away from his dad’s house,

which is important because Courtney has no plans to take her son away from his father. Roeder has noticed all of these sacrifices. “At the beginning I thought adoption would be the best option. She proved me wrong,” she said. “She’s a better mom than most people are in their 30s.” Joining her dream of being a fashion designer on the back burner is cheer leading. After going to state freshman year, secretly a month and a half pregnant, Courtney decided to give it another shot last year. “It was hard because I had to be in school from 7 in the morning until 5:30 in the evening, and still have to do homework,” she said. “That’s why I didn’t continue to [cheer]. One of them had to go, and neither of them should have to. It wasn’t fair to my team.” It’s sacrifices like this that forced Courtney to mature. For the first time she wanted to finish school for Travis, get a job for him, and go to college for him. “I was selfish and wanted whatever I wanted. It was all about me.” Which explains why she was so scared, and doubtful when she found out she was pregnant. “I definitely would not recommend it, I would recommend being safe,” she said. “But it’s not the worst thing in the world if it does happen. I know about a girl that has had abortions, and that’s perfectly fine, but I think everybody takes that road out thinking that it’s not possible, that there is no way they could give their child up for adoption, there is no way they could raise them. “I never thought I could do it to be honest, but it’s been a blessing and it’s been the best thing that’s ever happened to me, but it’s also been the hardest thing that’s happened to me. And it’s a lot of work, and it’s very hard. Sometimes there are days where you just break down and [think] ‘I can’t handle this.’ I have those days every now and then, I think everybody does. But I would definitely recommend waiting until you’re ready, otherwise it puts a lot of stress and pressure on you.” As for Courtney, seeing her son happy makes her happy. She smiles when she’s playing with him, or when he mischievously digs through the Tupperware for a new toy. And every time he hollered “Mommy watch me!” she beamed at him and responded “I’m watching!” as he raced through the house. Courtney will no doubt have a lot more firsts to endure. Travis’ first day of kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, and high school. His first try at potty training, the first time he’ll be grounded, and his first night in a new home. Through it all, every time he calls, she’ll answer “I’m watching!” ` Emma Kate Fittes

16-17

soundtrack: “Anyone Else But You” by The Moldy Peaches, from “Juno”

Rock : How does being pregnant harm a teen’s emotions? Redler: It depends on the kind of support they are getting. Parents that are degrading toward them is a big issue. But a parent who is upset, which most parents would be, but is still helpful will make things much better. Parents should go to the support rather than crisis mode. Also, being represented poorly toward their friends is another huge factor. They don’t want to be called loose because of one mishap, so a lot of times they have no support from their friends. But if you try to hide it you wouldn’t check on the baby and that would be scary.

We walked into Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory, one of us wearing a fake pregnant belly, the other acting as the supportive friend. Sitting at a table were three pre-teens and their mother. She glared at us like she recognized us from “America’s Most Wanted.” Like we had just committed the worst crime in the world. When our backs were turned to her, we heard her ‘whisper’ to her kids, “Never be like that, girls.” It was unbelievable – not only was she rudely judging us, but she was doing nothing at all to be subtle about it. What was surprising about this was that she was the one acting like a child. Although it may have been shocking for her to see a girl not much older than her daughters walking around with a big pregnant belly, she could have saved her comments for private, or at least until we were out of earshot. We were at the Castle Rock Outlet Mall on a busy Saturday. We wanted to understand what pregnant teenagers encounter, so we strapped on a fake belly and lived part of a day in the life of an expecting teenager. We knew that teen pregnancy may bring a little bundle of joy, but we also learned that it brings a bundle of disrespect, complications, and consequences. At one point in the day, we came across

two ordinary looking guys, probably around twenty years old. In a normal situation they were people we could have approached, or at least made eye contact with. But once they noticed the belly, they ran away from us. Uncomfortable doesn’t even begin to explain the feeling. It was like they were truly repulsed by us. In Aeropostale, an eight-year-old girl standing at a nearby rack looked at us as if she saw three heads. All she could do was stare. Her mom pulled her away and said, “Stop looking at that.” She didn’t stop. As a matter of fact, this little girl made us feel so uncomfortable that we left the store. Little kids seem to have a radar for things that seem out of the ordinary, and this girl’s was dead on. It wasn’t as if she was looking because something was wrong, she was just staring at the sight of a pregnant girl. Still, it made us feel out of place, like there was a flashing sign above our heads drawing attention to us. We decided to go into Gymboree, thinking that a children’s store would be the most accepting place. The moms in there were vicious; they looked as though they were going to ram their strollers into us. As we browsed through the racks of baby clothes, a sales woman approached us from behind, asking if she could help us find anything. When she saw the stomach, however, a major double take was followed by her blurting out, “Oh! Oh, you’re pregnant!” Good observation, lady. The day made us feel ashamed, embarassed, and judged, but also made us see society in a new light. We’ll be the first to admit that it is hard not to look when you see a girl our age with a huge pregnant stomach. But it is one thing to just look and politely move on, and another to be completely rude about the

photo by Drew Goodman

Everything else comes second

Rock : How is the situation different for fathers? Redler: It’s different because they have to go through the whole family part of it, where the parents might be angry and not allow him to see the girl anymore. And also there is the whole thing about friends giving them a hard time about it. Also there is the pressure that boys will feel, that they have to quit school and get a job so they can support their family.

Aubree Shockley and Jake Macek are sacrificing social lives and changing their future plans to support their non-traditional family

Rock : Do you think that the percentage of teen pregnancy cases is high or low in Douglas County? Redler: I don’t mean to be prejudiced but probably [relatively] lower because of our socioeconomic status. Rock : What are your feelings toward giving condoms to high school and middle school students? Redler: My personal opinion is that it doesn’t encourage teens to have sex. It teaches people to be safe. It’s like when people take cell phones at school. It never teaches a sort of etiquette that people need to have with a cell phone. And just because they have [a condom] doesn’t mean they are going to use it. Rock : What are some resources for teen mothers? Redler: There are lots of resources. There are pregnancy centers that can be found in the Douglas County Youth resource guide. Compiled by Dani Burrage

situation. It was tempting to scream “It’s not real! I’m actually a good kid!” but we realized that teen pregnancy happens to good kids, despite a bad decision. You can’t just assume that because someone is pregnant, she is not worthy of your respect. She should be able to walk around a mall without demeaning looks coming from all angles. TV shows like “Teen Mom” and “Secret Life of the American Teenager” make teen pregnancy seem glamorous. But it’s not. The girls on those shows make it look easy, or at least tolerable. We didn’t experience that at all. That’s not real life. What we experienced were disrespect, hurtful comments, and a serious blow to our selfesteem. Pregnant teens experience these forms of prejudice every day. They already will be living with the repercussions of one action for the rest of their lives, and they don’t need random strangers throwing this back in their faces. At this point, a mistake has been made, and this time it cannot be undone – not by Mommy and Daddy, not by community service, not by anyone. So if they cannot escape this truth, why not embrace it and make the best for the child they are bringing into this world? Society seems to be unwilling to do so. Obviously, it would be best not to be in this situation in the first place, but it’s not a perfect world and people do make mistakes. Whether a woman is 18 or 38, the fact is she is about to be a mother, and instead of giving criticism, people should try and give support. You can never truly understand what a pregnant teen goes through until you attempt to live it yourself – and we only did it for one day. Nine months seems impossible.

Top: Jake Macek ‘10, feeds his son Kale, while Aubree Shockley ‘09, fixes his bib and smiles at her son. Bottom: Macek kisses Kale hello after arriving at Shockley’s house where she and Kale live. Photos by Paige Hesen

While her friends finalized college plans and prepared to move out, Aubree Shockley ’09, was picking out names and preparing for the long journey that lie ahead. This journey was not about to include dorms and parties and textbooks. This was going to be about love, sacrifice, binkies, and bottles. This journey was going to include a baby. “When I first found out I was pregnant, I was terrified,” Aubree said. “It wasn’t one of those things I cried about; I was too shocked and I was wondering what was going to come next, and what was going to be best for this little person.” Aubree’s best friend Shanel Perry ‘09, was there when the second pregnancy test came back positive, and also there when Aubree built up the nerve to break the news to her parents. And although Aubree couldn’t shed a tear, her mom was at no loss for them. “My mom cried. A lot,” said Aubree, “And my dad... he couldn’t even look at me.” It took a few weeks for the news to sink in with Aubree’s mom. Her dad, however, had a harder time taking it all in. “It took about two or three months of building up to the point when we could talk, and even longer until we could talk about the baby,” she said. Aubree’s boyfriend of almost two years and the father of her child, Jake Macek ‘10, was also in a state of shock when he heard the news. “It was definitely scary at first,” Jake said, “because you now have a person who is dependent on your every action.” Aubree’s friends were by her side from the beginning. She says that she couldn’t have gotten through the first couple of months without them there. “She really needed support and I knew she counted on me, so I did everything I could to stay positive for her.” Shanel said. “We were both really scared but she is strong, and I was there to tell her that everything was going to be all right.” Aubree was induced on Nov. 2, 2009. After 24 grueling hours of labor, Kale was born. “When he came out and they put him on my stomach, I just laid there. My mom kept telling me that I could touch him, but it was just so much all at once.” Terrified, joyful and second guessing herself, Aubree looked into her baby boy’s eyes, and was moved by the little person who had grown in her for the last nine months. “Despite all my worries,” Aubree said, “I knew I loved this child more than anything and kept telling myself that I could do this.” When Jake saw his son for the first time he admits it was a little terrifying.

“I was overwhelmed, and in shock,” said Jake. Although Aubree and Jake were together at the hospital with their son, Kale went home with Aubree, to her parents’ house. Once home, without the help of the doctors and nurses, and virtually on her own, reality set in. “The first 24 hours were the hardest,” Aubree said. “Even though my parents and friends were there, I was ultimately by myself. It was a really powerful experience.” Despite all of the joy Kale has brought her, Aubree was forced to put all future plans on hold to take care of her child, and lost most of her social life. Her friends enjoyed coming over to visit her and the baby, but when they left for the night to go out and party or head back to college, Aubree was left at home, an 18-year-old mother. Jake try visits as often as he can, and explains how amazing it is to have a son, saying that it is “like having a little me around.” “Since the birth, I’ve grown up a lot and been more responsible,” Jake said. “The whole experience has made me realize who I am, and what I stand for.” Kale will be three months in March, and Aubree, now pretty well adjusted to her new life, gushes about how great a baby he is. His smile, his laugh, his head of black hair, even his cry, all inspire her. “I don’t get out bed in the morning because of me anymore, I get out bed and make all my decisions because of Kale,” Aubree said. “It’s all about him, and what is going to be best. Everything else comes second.” Aubree works three days a week to earn some sort of income, and about every two weeks Aubree’s parents will watch Kale and Aubree has a night out. The rest of her time is spent focusing everything on Kale. Her plans are to begin attending several classes at CU Denver in the fall. Kale will be in day care, or with his grandparents. Although the situation is not completely ideal, Aubree wants what will be best for Kale in the end. As for Jake, he is planning on graduating from RC in May and attending college in the fall. “I want to get a good education so later on down the road I can provide for Kale,” Jake said. “I also see myself starting over and finding a life and the person I lost in myself.” Although Jake and Aubree are not together anymore, they are working on developing a strong friendship for Kale’s sake. “I have re-evaluated my whole life, and I have no regrets about keeping Kale,” Aubree said. “This is about owning up to your consequences and not running away. This is the life that has been given to me, and I am all for living it.” Paige Hesen


02•25•10 teen pregnancy

Their little bundles of joy

Nine months of disrespect

Teenage pregnancy has a new place in the public eye. Since 2006, there has been a 3 percent rise in teen pregnancy, the first in 15 years. A movie, “The Pregnancy Pact,” is based on 17 girls at Gloucester High School in Massachusetts who made a pact to become pregnant and raise their children together. Teen pregnancy is also featured in the movie “Juno,” and in the TV shows “Teen Mom,” “The Secret Life of an American Teenager,” and “16 and Pregnant.” Republican Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin’s teenage daughter Bristol is a teenage mother. What is the reality of teenage parenthood at Rock Canyon?

Paige Hesen and Paige Newman

Q&A

With School Counselor Sheila Redler

photos by Emma Kate Fittes

A lot of firsts, and she’s still watching Toward the end of her freshman year, Courtney Ireland ‘10, became pregnant, two and a half years later she is still smiling In the past two years Courtney Ireland ‘10, has experienced a lot of “firsts.” She had her first child, Travis. She listened to his first laugh, then his first word, ‘Dada,’ and his first joke about falling out of his car seat. She watched him first begin to teeth, then take his first steps at 10 months old, and get his first stitches after falling on his cheek into a tree potter. She remembers his first day of daycare, which he hated, then his first day of a new daycare, which he loved, and his first birthday. She also survived through the ending of her first major relationship, her first job, and her first time putting her dreams on the back burner. After about three and a half years together, Courtney and Daniel Orantes, Travis’ father, broke up. “All the stress that we both have in our lives, it was getting to be too much,” Courtney said. “We’d take it out on each other. He loves me to death, and I love him to death, but I think we just started to grow apart with all the stress and arguing 24/7 about every little thing that was going on, even if it was nothing. So we just decided for [Travis] that it would be better just to not be together and happy, than angry and together.” Although Travis still sees his father everyday, the split is already having an influence on the two and a half year old. Because he is so used to always seeing his parents together, when Daniel leaves without Courtney, Travis freaks out and even begins to cry. Even worse, he began to act out. He would be “climbing on furniture at the day care, and [he] spit on one of the little girls, and [is] being mean to my little sister,” Courtney said. “We had to deal with all of those issues. He’s still getting over it, he’s getting better.” Time will help the entire family adjust, as Travis was not the only one affected by the split. Courtney finds that Daniel has had a shorter temper with her, because he is frustrated by the separation. Travis is still their priority, so they agreed to stay friendly for his sake. Although Courtney dated someone new for a month

and a half, she and Daniel continued to support each other, both emotionally and financially. Along with her mom helping out with finances, Daniel helped out, with a full time job in construction, but it did not last through the winter. So, Courtney got her first part time job since having Travis, as a hostess, but it too was not a safe situation. “I quit last Saturday. My boss was a wack job; I am pressing charges for his actions.” Courtney chose not to elaborate. Although she is back looking for another job, Courtney got a taste of how stressful juggling school, a job, and Travis would be. “When i was working, it was chaotic. I worked weekdays until 9:30 or 10 p.m.. It was hard. He definitely reacted towards it. When I’d come home he’d either be mad or when I’d leave he’d cry.” For now, Courtney is able to spend time with Travis from 3:30 p.m. on, but she knows she will need money to move out next year. Courtney’s mom, Lynn Roeder, observed that part of the reason the two broke up was education. “Their goals and their aspirations are completely different. We preach education in our house.” When Travis was born, Daniel dropped our of high school as a junior. Since the split, he has decided to attend Arapahoe Community College to become a firefighter. “I just want to be somebody for Travis, so he has somebody to look up to.” Daniel said. Before Travis, Daniel was planning to go into the army or navy, but now he can’t imagine being away from Travis for that long. Courtney is also finding an alternate route for education than the one she originally planned. “I wanted to be a fashion designer, and that would still be my dream, but it is too hard to get up high in the industry. I need to make money quickly with [Travis].” Instead Courtney plans on going to community college in Denver to become a pediatrician, and moving herself and Travis out of her mother’s house. Fortunately, the community college is not too far away from his dad’s house,

which is important because Courtney has no plans to take her son away from his father. Roeder has noticed all of these sacrifices. “At the beginning I thought adoption would be the best option. She proved me wrong,” she said. “She’s a better mom than most people are in their 30s.” Joining her dream of being a fashion designer on the back burner is cheer leading. After going to state freshman year, secretly a month and a half pregnant, Courtney decided to give it another shot last year. “It was hard because I had to be in school from 7 in the morning until 5:30 in the evening, and still have to do homework,” she said. “That’s why I didn’t continue to [cheer]. One of them had to go, and neither of them should have to. It wasn’t fair to my team.” It’s sacrifices like this that forced Courtney to mature. For the first time she wanted to finish school for Travis, get a job for him, and go to college for him. “I was selfish and wanted whatever I wanted. It was all about me.” Which explains why she was so scared, and doubtful when she found out she was pregnant. “I definitely would not recommend it, I would recommend being safe,” she said. “But it’s not the worst thing in the world if it does happen. I know about a girl that has had abortions, and that’s perfectly fine, but I think everybody takes that road out thinking that it’s not possible, that there is no way they could give their child up for adoption, there is no way they could raise them. “I never thought I could do it to be honest, but it’s been a blessing and it’s been the best thing that’s ever happened to me, but it’s also been the hardest thing that’s happened to me. And it’s a lot of work, and it’s very hard. Sometimes there are days where you just break down and [think] ‘I can’t handle this.’ I have those days every now and then, I think everybody does. But I would definitely recommend waiting until you’re ready, otherwise it puts a lot of stress and pressure on you.” As for Courtney, seeing her son happy makes her happy. She smiles when she’s playing with him, or when he mischievously digs through the Tupperware for a new toy. And every time he hollered “Mommy watch me!” she beamed at him and responded “I’m watching!” as he raced through the house. Courtney will no doubt have a lot more firsts to endure. Travis’ first day of kindergarten, elementary school, middle school, and high school. His first try at potty training, the first time he’ll be grounded, and his first night in a new home. Through it all, every time he calls, she’ll answer “I’m watching!” ` Emma Kate Fittes

16-17

soundtrack: “Anyone Else But You” by The Moldy Peaches, from “Juno”

Rock : How does being pregnant harm a teen’s emotions? Redler: It depends on the kind of support they are getting. Parents that are degrading toward them is a big issue. But a parent who is upset, which most parents would be, but is still helpful will make things much better. Parents should go to the support rather than crisis mode. Also, being represented poorly toward their friends is another huge factor. They don’t want to be called loose because of one mishap, so a lot of times they have no support from their friends. But if you try to hide it you wouldn’t check on the baby and that would be scary.

We walked into Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory, one of us wearing a fake pregnant belly, the other acting as the supportive friend. Sitting at a table were three pre-teens and their mother. She glared at us like she recognized us from “America’s Most Wanted.” Like we had just committed the worst crime in the world. When our backs were turned to her, we heard her ‘whisper’ to her kids, “Never be like that, girls.” It was unbelievable – not only was she rudely judging us, but she was doing nothing at all to be subtle about it. What was surprising about this was that she was the one acting like a child. Although it may have been shocking for her to see a girl not much older than her daughters walking around with a big pregnant belly, she could have saved her comments for private, or at least until we were out of earshot. We were at the Castle Rock Outlet Mall on a busy Saturday. We wanted to understand what pregnant teenagers encounter, so we strapped on a fake belly and lived part of a day in the life of an expecting teenager. We knew that teen pregnancy may bring a little bundle of joy, but we also learned that it brings a bundle of disrespect, complications, and consequences. At one point in the day, we came across

two ordinary looking guys, probably around twenty years old. In a normal situation they were people we could have approached, or at least made eye contact with. But once they noticed the belly, they ran away from us. Uncomfortable doesn’t even begin to explain the feeling. It was like they were truly repulsed by us. In Aeropostale, an eight-year-old girl standing at a nearby rack looked at us as if she saw three heads. All she could do was stare. Her mom pulled her away and said, “Stop looking at that.” She didn’t stop. As a matter of fact, this little girl made us feel so uncomfortable that we left the store. Little kids seem to have a radar for things that seem out of the ordinary, and this girl’s was dead on. It wasn’t as if she was looking because something was wrong, she was just staring at the sight of a pregnant girl. Still, it made us feel out of place, like there was a flashing sign above our heads drawing attention to us. We decided to go into Gymboree, thinking that a children’s store would be the most accepting place. The moms in there were vicious; they looked as though they were going to ram their strollers into us. As we browsed through the racks of baby clothes, a sales woman approached us from behind, asking if she could help us find anything. When she saw the stomach, however, a major double take was followed by her blurting out, “Oh! Oh, you’re pregnant!” Good observation, lady. The day made us feel ashamed, embarassed, and judged, but also made us see society in a new light. We’ll be the first to admit that it is hard not to look when you see a girl our age with a huge pregnant stomach. But it is one thing to just look and politely move on, and another to be completely rude about the

photo by Drew Goodman

Everything else comes second

Rock : How is the situation different for fathers? Redler: It’s different because they have to go through the whole family part of it, where the parents might be angry and not allow him to see the girl anymore. And also there is the whole thing about friends giving them a hard time about it. Also there is the pressure that boys will feel, that they have to quit school and get a job so they can support their family.

Aubree Shockley and Jake Macek are sacrificing social lives and changing their future plans to support their non-traditional family

Rock : Do you think that the percentage of teen pregnancy cases is high or low in Douglas County? Redler: I don’t mean to be prejudiced but probably [relatively] lower because of our socioeconomic status. Rock : What are your feelings toward giving condoms to high school and middle school students? Redler: My personal opinion is that it doesn’t encourage teens to have sex. It teaches people to be safe. It’s like when people take cell phones at school. It never teaches a sort of etiquette that people need to have with a cell phone. And just because they have [a condom] doesn’t mean they are going to use it. Rock : What are some resources for teen mothers? Redler: There are lots of resources. There are pregnancy centers that can be found in the Douglas County Youth resource guide. Compiled by Dani Burrage

situation. It was tempting to scream “It’s not real! I’m actually a good kid!” but we realized that teen pregnancy happens to good kids, despite a bad decision. You can’t just assume that because someone is pregnant, she is not worthy of your respect. She should be able to walk around a mall without demeaning looks coming from all angles. TV shows like “Teen Mom” and “Secret Life of the American Teenager” make teen pregnancy seem glamorous. But it’s not. The girls on those shows make it look easy, or at least tolerable. We didn’t experience that at all. That’s not real life. What we experienced were disrespect, hurtful comments, and a serious blow to our selfesteem. Pregnant teens experience these forms of prejudice every day. They already will be living with the repercussions of one action for the rest of their lives, and they don’t need random strangers throwing this back in their faces. At this point, a mistake has been made, and this time it cannot be undone – not by Mommy and Daddy, not by community service, not by anyone. So if they cannot escape this truth, why not embrace it and make the best for the child they are bringing into this world? Society seems to be unwilling to do so. Obviously, it would be best not to be in this situation in the first place, but it’s not a perfect world and people do make mistakes. Whether a woman is 18 or 38, the fact is she is about to be a mother, and instead of giving criticism, people should try and give support. You can never truly understand what a pregnant teen goes through until you attempt to live it yourself – and we only did it for one day. Nine months seems impossible.

Top: Jake Macek ‘10, feeds his son Kale, while Aubree Shockley ‘09, fixes his bib and smiles at her son. Bottom: Macek kisses Kale hello after arriving at Shockley’s house where she and Kale live. Photos by Paige Hesen

While her friends finalized college plans and prepared to move out, Aubree Shockley ’09, was picking out names and preparing for the long journey that lie ahead. This journey was not about to include dorms and parties and textbooks. This was going to be about love, sacrifice, binkies, and bottles. This journey was going to include a baby. “When I first found out I was pregnant, I was terrified,” Aubree said. “It wasn’t one of those things I cried about; I was too shocked and I was wondering what was going to come next, and what was going to be best for this little person.” Aubree’s best friend Shanel Perry ‘09, was there when the second pregnancy test came back positive, and also there when Aubree built up the nerve to break the news to her parents. And although Aubree couldn’t shed a tear, her mom was at no loss for them. “My mom cried. A lot,” said Aubree, “And my dad... he couldn’t even look at me.” It took a few weeks for the news to sink in with Aubree’s mom. Her dad, however, had a harder time taking it all in. “It took about two or three months of building up to the point when we could talk, and even longer until we could talk about the baby,” she said. Aubree’s boyfriend of almost two years and the father of her child, Jake Macek ‘10, was also in a state of shock when he heard the news. “It was definitely scary at first,” Jake said, “because you now have a person who is dependent on your every action.” Aubree’s friends were by her side from the beginning. She says that she couldn’t have gotten through the first couple of months without them there. “She really needed support and I knew she counted on me, so I did everything I could to stay positive for her.” Shanel said. “We were both really scared but she is strong, and I was there to tell her that everything was going to be all right.” Aubree was induced on Nov. 2, 2009. After 24 grueling hours of labor, Kale was born. “When he came out and they put him on my stomach, I just laid there. My mom kept telling me that I could touch him, but it was just so much all at once.” Terrified, joyful and second guessing herself, Aubree looked into her baby boy’s eyes, and was moved by the little person who had grown in her for the last nine months. “Despite all my worries,” Aubree said, “I knew I loved this child more than anything and kept telling myself that I could do this.” When Jake saw his son for the first time he admits it was a little terrifying.

“I was overwhelmed, and in shock,” said Jake. Although Aubree and Jake were together at the hospital with their son, Kale went home with Aubree, to her parents’ house. Once home, without the help of the doctors and nurses, and virtually on her own, reality set in. “The first 24 hours were the hardest,” Aubree said. “Even though my parents and friends were there, I was ultimately by myself. It was a really powerful experience.” Despite all of the joy Kale has brought her, Aubree was forced to put all future plans on hold to take care of her child, and lost most of her social life. Her friends enjoyed coming over to visit her and the baby, but when they left for the night to go out and party or head back to college, Aubree was left at home, an 18-year-old mother. Jake try visits as often as he can, and explains how amazing it is to have a son, saying that it is “like having a little me around.” “Since the birth, I’ve grown up a lot and been more responsible,” Jake said. “The whole experience has made me realize who I am, and what I stand for.” Kale will be three months in March, and Aubree, now pretty well adjusted to her new life, gushes about how great a baby he is. His smile, his laugh, his head of black hair, even his cry, all inspire her. “I don’t get out bed in the morning because of me anymore, I get out bed and make all my decisions because of Kale,” Aubree said. “It’s all about him, and what is going to be best. Everything else comes second.” Aubree works three days a week to earn some sort of income, and about every two weeks Aubree’s parents will watch Kale and Aubree has a night out. The rest of her time is spent focusing everything on Kale. Her plans are to begin attending several classes at CU Denver in the fall. Kale will be in day care, or with his grandparents. Although the situation is not completely ideal, Aubree wants what will be best for Kale in the end. As for Jake, he is planning on graduating from RC in May and attending college in the fall. “I want to get a good education so later on down the road I can provide for Kale,” Jake said. “I also see myself starting over and finding a life and the person I lost in myself.” Although Jake and Aubree are not together anymore, they are working on developing a strong friendship for Kale’s sake. “I have re-evaluated my whole life, and I have no regrets about keeping Kale,” Aubree said. “This is about owning up to your consequences and not running away. This is the life that has been given to me, and I am all for living it.” Paige Hesen


18 soundtrack: “I’m Just a Bill” Jack Sheldon Below left: Patrick Cline ‘10, buys a Wish Kit, during lunch. RIght: Johnathan Allen ‘13, gives a presentation on Chinese government in Darren Withey’s Ancient Civilizations class. “I don’t really like presentations because it’s nervous and embarrassing I just want to get it over with, fast,” said Allen.

02•25•10 community

day in the life

Wednesday, February 17

Making meaning with a poem Time to present. It’s what happens in Creative Writing. Everyone shares some work, and the class critiques, shreds and compliments the writing. Some students are brutal in their comments, while others stick to the positive side of things. “I really like this line here,” Marley said. “It shows the entire meaning of your poem within this line. It fits perfectly right where you put it.” Andy disagreed. “I didn’t like your title and didn’t understand what it had to do with your poem. I would just take it our all together.” The author may not comment on what a fellow student has to say until all students have voiced their opinions. “I hate not being able to tell the class why I put this here,” Mark said, “and then they would understand the next couple of lines.”

“No talking, Mark,” instructor Karly Bloom said. “Not until everyone is done commenting on your poem may you speak.” Point taken. Bloom is definitely a fun-loving teacher, but commands respect in her classroom. In order for the sharing process to work, everyone has to listen to one another, and forget about how they feel about each other outside the class. It usually takes about 30 minutes to evaluate each piece and leave a bit of extra time for each writer to answer questions and explain the meaning of the poem, if they desire. “Poetry is waht you make of it,”Bloom said. “I love that all of you can write on feelings that you have and then share them with the class. You can’t do that in many other classes.” –Keith Link

Wednesday, February 17

Dodgeball player is like a rainbow Thirty seconds before the tardy bell rings, two students rush in laughing, followed by instructor Melinda Emch. Emch begins World Geography with eyes glinting mischievously. She sits down and attempts to take attendance, when laughter suddenly interrupts her train of thought. Brock is wearing a red bandana. His only comment: “Dodgeball.” With a shake of her head, Emch continues taking attendance. Soon, she hands out an Asian map quiz and the room goes silent. Everyone is working. Two minutes before the end of the test, Brock turns in his work and walks quietly to his desk, snickering to himself. He sits down, pulls out a pack of Skittles, and glares at his teacher, saying, “Taste the rainbow.” The class erupts in laughter again, but the laughter dies quickly when Emch announces just one minute left in the test. The resulting silence gives way to

February 22

Mondays... there is something about Mondays In Lissa Staal’s Psychology class, students did presentations about teen suicide and depression. At the end of class, everyone walked out feeling horrible, yet appreciating their non-suicidal tendencies. –Laura Romer Waking up, calling the snow hotline, and hearing the man tell you all Douglas County schools are running on a normal schedule. Sir, I don’t even know you, but I hate you. –Skyler Draper

Thursday, February 18

Learning biology can be infectious

In an attempt to raise money for wish week, some teachers have resorted to threatening their students with music from hell to get the money in their wallets. –Matt Rabon Someone propped the door outside the 9000 wide open with a bag of salt for the entirety of third period. So if I had been trying to keep a dead body fresh today, the lower hallway would have made a phenomenal make-shift morgue. –Logan Thompson In AP Biology, we made fun of Chemistry students who decided to pour the acid they used in class that day into our fishtank. Really? –Sara Heyn In AP Literature, classmates dissed each other through the symbolism of characters, events and places in Joseph Conrad’s “Heart Of Darkness.” –Evan Almon The sub in AP Government said, “You’re going to start a new unit today,” and then proceeded to hand out the schedule and play solitaire. –Drew Goodman In sociology class we had to draw what sociological perspective was and so we decided to draw Barney on our TV. The girl we had draw it drew a big green dinosaur with four legs. She didn’t know what Barney looked like. –Courtney Schellenger Today in biology, we had to listen to a science radio show. They kept laughing at science jokes that I didn’t understand. –Jenn Burton

steadily increasing noise. Emch notices that Brock’s bandana is now around his eyes, and he is trying to guess the flavor and color of the Skittles without looking. Stifling her laughter, Emch tells him to stop, one, because he looks stupid, and, two, because he is disrupting others. One student says, sarcastically, “Brock always disrupts class!” and the class joins his laughter. Emch chuckles and agrees. The lesson continues with no further distractions, until Emch suddenly bursts out laughing. “Brock, you look like half of Princess Leia’s head.” Everyone turns to look at him, and wrapped around his right ear is the bandana, producing something oddly similar to the famous Star Wars hairstyle. Laughter ensues for nearly three minutes, until Emch takes away the bandana. Brock’s only comment: “Do you want to look like a princess, too?” –Lizzy Marthouse

Juniors Kris Brown, Nick Bahr, Maddie Vanduerpoel, and Hayley Dunn, socialize during 5th period before English class starts. “Stahley’s class is fun because it is very laid back and open to discussion,”Dunn said, “so we can get a little off topic because it’s more of a friendly environment.” Isabella Peters ’11, escapes the hectic lunch room and enjoys “ The Grinch Who Stole Christmas’”during lunch. “I enjoy reading during lunch. It lets me get some peace and quiet,”said Peters “Dr. Seuss Is my favorite author and the “Grinch Who Stole Christmas” is my favorite book.” All photos by Lauren Scheirman on Feb. 22

It was 7th hour Biology, and student teacher Tiffany Harriger had just told the students to pick up the papers for the lab they would be completing that day. She explained that the lab would show how fast illness spreads. Every student was given a test tube, most filled with water, but a few with “illness” in them. Each student mixed the contents of their test tubes with three other students. Then Harriger put a drop of sensitive dye in each test tube. Those “infected” turned pink, and stayed clear if not infected. The first two students to become “infected” were Connor Draper and Wes Cangilla.

“Connor totally had it first!” Cangilla said. Near the end of class, Harriger told the class she had just received a “really scary e-mail,” saying there was a dangerous germ floating around the school and that it was visible under a blacklight. Everyone suddenly became motivated to wash their hands after the blacklight revealed germs on nearly everyone’s hands. The class washed thoroughly, and then Harriger announced that what they had seen under the blacklight were not germs. They were actually just bits of glow-in-the-dark lotion she had rubbed all over everything in the classroom. Sarah Foley

Thursday, February 18

Just another pass on the wall Math teacher Gina Stevens walked into the classroom looking shocked. “Pull your pants up! I don’t want to see your tush.” she said to the group of boys standing by the door. After the warm-up was explained, everyone started working. Christian then walked in late. “Do you have a pass?” Stevens asked. Christian held up a large yellow envelope. “That’s an envelope,” Stevens said. “Yeah, but there’s a pass on it,” Christian said. “Can I have it to put on the wall?” Stevens asked, pointing to the wall with a variety of passes stapled to it. “That’s very important looking,” Stevens said, as Christian started ripping

the flap of the envelope off. “Thanks you. I feel so special!” she said, as he handed the envelope to her. His ordeal over, Christian sits and Stevens begins the lesson. “Here’s the shpiel...” she begins and continues talking about tests, homework, and Access. She then starts discussing rational exponents, using lots of hand motions and being very repetitive so the class is certain to understand the new topic. There were two ways to do the problem. “This way is a different thought process but you get the same answer,” Stevens said. “Whichever version ticks your tock.” Taylor Benson


soundtrack: “The world’s greatest” R. Kelly

Comic by Zach Anderson

The Rock reviewed 2010 Oscar Nominated movies in 10 words or less. • “Up In The Air” - Further proof that movies with unhappy endings receive Oscar Nominees -Alex Rowe • “Transformers 2” - Proof that even critics are seduced by Megan Foxx -Kate Ready • “Avatar” - Trippy blue people fight with humans in glowing wo rld -Jenn Burton • “Nine” - Bad singing and half naked ladies = awkward -Amanda Becker • “The Blind Side” - Proof there are still some good people in this world -Caley Pavillard • “Julie and Julia” - Passion for cooking parallels two different generations, warning: invokes huinger -Evan Almon • “The Young Victoria” - True love+politics+great acting= British history at its best -Laura Romer • “The Hurt Locker” - Depressed? Wanna be? Watch a movie about psychologically damaged soldiers -Connor Dozois • “Transformers 2” - There’s no reason to pay money to pee your pants. -Lauren Scheirman • “Up In The Air” - Do i kill myself before or after the movie? -Drew Dodds • “District 9” -Intense special effects meets aliens and 1950s racism. -Michael Dempsey • “Dear John” - Completely contradictory to the actual meaning of a ‘Dear John’letter -Karly Hanson • “Precious”- The perfect film for tragedy lovers and sadists -Daniel Wheeler • “Up In The Air”- Reminding me that I have friends. Poor George Clooney... -Mike Dempsey • “District 9”- Celebrates the white man’s unlimited potential for racism - Alex Rowe • “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince”- Never-ending angst makes for a poor film -Laura Romer

BRUSH WITH GREATNESS

A day with the Avs An avid hockey fan and Avs supporter, Hannah Plath ‘11, was given the opportunity to spend two hours with the Avalanche Hockey team. “As a babysitting favor, one of my neighbors gave me two tickets to meet Colorado’s professional hockey players,” Plath said. “He knew I was a major fan and it was an awesome surprise.” Given one extra ticket, Plath chose to take Morgan Hengsteler ‘11, who shares Plath’s passion for the Avalanche. The agenda included snapping photos and chatting with the players,

getting their autographs, and playing air hockey and bubble hockey alongside the athletes. “I felt Ryan O’Reilly and Kyle Cumiskey were definitely the most friendly towards the guests,” Plath said. “They were Morgan and my bubble hockey teammates and we had a blast.” “It was an excellent day. The whole time I was really excited and since the players were sociable, conversation came easily,” Plath said. “It was great meeting the athletes, but the best part was taking one of my best friends who shares my love for the Avs and hockey.” Rebecca Ruh

Celebrity look-alikes Left: Austin Perez-Mesa ‘12, and pop singer Justin Beiber. Right: Math teacher Tony Koy and his celebrity look-alike, actor Mel Gibson. Celebrity photos from : http://www.disneydreaming. com http://www.idf1.fr/melgibson.jpg

Left: English teacher Melissa Rosati, actress Cameron Diaz. Right: Taylor Woods ‘12, and celebrity Emily Osmet, a disney channel singer and actress. Celebrity photos from: http://s.chakpak.com/se_images/emily-osment-wallpaper http://blog.zap2it.com/thedishrag/legacyimages/photos/ cameron_diaz_jpg.jpg

• “Lovely Bones”- Loved the book. Hated the movie. Why spend ten dollars? -Paige Hesen • “Star Trek”- Another reason for Trekkies to skip work, dress up, complain -Drew Goodman • “The Blind Side”- Mediocre directing, but Sandra Bullock pulled off the role brilliantly -Connor Dozois

The faces of facebook

The Rock lists popular, funny Facebook groups that encourage a good laugh • Facebook Petition to make “In a Wolfpack with___”a Relationship Status • Women think giving birth hurts, try being hit by a random grenade on COD • You Know You’re an AP Student When... • Petition: make Chris “Birdman”Anderson the official state bird of Colorado • Douglas County doesn’t know what a snow day is • When a teacher calls on you thinking you weren’t listening and you own them • Keep Yo Hands Off My MAMA and My DORRITOS!! • If you tailgate me, I will intentionally slow down to piss you off • I don’t care how comfortable Crocs are, you look like a dumba**. • Making fun of freshmen who are in love • Bromance should be a relationship option • I have also slept with Tiger Woods • My English teacher finds more deep meaning in a book than the author • Harry Potter pick up lines • Team “Guy who almost hit Bella with a car” • 30 things to do in an exam when you know you’re going to fail it anyways

Compiled by Amanda Becker and Courtney Schellenger

Your own invented words AP Lang students wrote their very own neologisms, inspired by the Washington Post’s yearly neologism contest.

• Gleeger: To be eager for an episode of Glee to come on TV. -Mikaela Merrill • Whereo: The uninformed American’s use of the Spanish word “donde,”which is used to ask where something is. -Alex Puccini • Bongle: An indigenous trio that continuously beats drums. -Jessica Swenson • Barachnophobia: Fear of a president’s political agenda -Kali Hengsteler • Myclone: Nickname for someone who looks eerily similar to you. -Taylor Pettaway • Negletee: Person who doesn’t want to wear t-shirts. -Valeria Gavidia

Wuzzles (word puzzles) Cloud Cloud Cloud Cloud Cloud Cloud Cloud Cloud Cloud

• Bried rice: The rice thrown at a bride on her wedding day. -Lauren Packer • Punny: Using puns to cause laughter. -Missy Seely • Pyramid: Intellectual stratification of people and their intelligence. -Zach Tornabene • Hearing maid: The little voice in your head that tells you to clean your room. -Brandi Vlasman • Mallaria: A disease where you are always wanting to go to the mall. -Hannah Plath • Testamint: To test the taste of a mint. -Jessie Puccini • Simphony: A character from a game with a fake identity. -Rebecca Coffee

Submit your own neologism to therockcontests@gmail.com. We will publish the best submissions in the March issue of the Rock.

PpeaOpeaD

RO diamond UGH

Age Beauty

Answers: 1: cloud nine 2: two peas in a pod 3: diamond in the rough 4: Age before beauty

Nominees in a nut shell

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20 soundtrack: “All around the world” Oasis

beyond d n a d Abroa

The importance of experience

Since Social Studies teacher Suzanne McKay was a child, her parents would travel with her all around the world and even encouraged her to study abroad in Chile for eight weeks during her junior year in high school. “I just wanted a new expirience,” said McKay. “I am an only child, and my host family had 18 people in it. I wasn’t used to that.” Even with many more people around, McKay found that the trip helped her understand herself. “I saw a whole different series of possibilities for my future,” she said. “It helped me realize my own capabilities and strengths.” McKay ended up focusing on Latin America in her college studies and the first subject she taught was Spanish. None of these things would have happened, though, if it weren’t for her trip. To this day, McKay still keeps in touch with her homestay family over Facebook. After recieving her major, McKay set her eyes on Asia. “About five years ago, one of my student’s mom was coordinating a program [in which teachers teach abroad].” McKay jumped at this chance to go somewhere new. She taught English at a Chinese high school and conversational English at a University for four weeks during the summer. “In the summer program we had kids attend who weren’t signed up,” said McKay. “It was different to see kids that actually would sneak into school instead of kids that sneak out to go to Chick-fil-A.” McKay would see about 60 to 80 kids per day, plus around 20 teachers in the evenings. The children there were more accustomed to having a professer stand at the front of the class and lecture, rather than do projects. “It lead me to really appreciate how creative and expressive American kids can be,” McKay said. “That’s one advantage American students have. They are taught to solve problems.” Even while enjoying her time across the globe, McKay found it hard to be away from her six year old daughter. She had taken her to Mexico and all over America, but she still wanted her daughter to see China. So, the next summer, when McKay was offered the same opportunity, her seven year old daughter tagged along and was welcomed with open arms. “[The Chinese] were crazy about her,” said McKay. “They treated her like they would treat their grandchild.” McKay is hoping to teach her daughter flexibility, open mindedness, and that some things aren’t better or worse, they’re just different, and that different is cool. These are lessons McKay feels everyone can learn from travel. “I don’t think a lot of student’s in Douglas County take advantage of the travel programs out there,” McKay said. “But I really think they should, because it’s a life changing experience.” Emma Kate Fittes

Above: Suzanne McKay overlooks the city in China, standing in front of the river. Right: McKay plays with red pandas while on her trip in China in 2005. Photos courtesy of Suzanne McKay

Taking a risk Students trickled into the classroom, back from lunch, chatting excitedly about their lives as they took their seats, most not noticing the quiet new face in the back of the room. Jaiwei Liu ’10, a foreign exchange student, came here from Nanning City, China in August and started school only a week after he arrived. “I had learned English in primary school,” Jaiwei said, “but I never paid attention, so I didn’t really know any.” Despite knowing little English, Jaiwei wasn’t afraid to come to a new school, even though he had every reason to be. He had never been to America before, let alone out of China, he had never met his host family before, and he might not go home for four or five years. Jaiwei will have to repeat his senior year at Rock Canyon in order What you don’t know to get the necessary credits. He also plans on going to college here in the about Jaiwei: States, but isn’t sure about what he • He loves shopping wants to do or where he wants to go. • His favorite colors are purple He came to the United States and red to learn English and to get away from the tough school system in China. Ac• His favorite childhood cording to him, the biggest difference memory is playing Chinese between high school in America and Ma Jiang in China is the level of work. • If he could go anywhere in “They study so hard, but I the world, he would go to didn’t understand why,” Jaiwei said. “I Hong Kong for a good place didn’t have any time to have fun. Here the work is easier.” to shop, Nanning city (his Another big difference isn’t in home-town) for a good place the school itself, but how the people to live, and for something at school act. romantic, Paris “Here, everyone hugs each other when they see each other,” • His favorite juice is Mango Jaiwei said. “In China, they just shake hands. They’re very formal.” Jaiwei knows that coming to America for as long as he can is a special opportunity, and he hopes that his parents respect that. Being an only child, he was close to his parents back home, but he doesn’t miss them much now and thinks that they don’t miss him much either. Now he stays with Sheri and Kent Yamamoto, a fun-loving couple, and their three-year-old daughter. Now halfway through the year, though Jaiwei is quiet, he doesn’t sit in the back of class alone. He has a big group of friends who he hangs out with. For him, taking a risk turned out to be the best thing for him. Maddie Jones

02•25•10 culture

That’s one advantage American students have. They are taught to solve problems.

Left: Jaiwei stands on a bridge in China with his mom. While he misses China, Jaiwei loves being here in America and wants to take advantage of this opportunity and stay in the States as long as he can.


02•25•10 culture

soundtrack: “Living in America” Rent

21

Livin’la vida Americana Many of us have taken a foreign language class because of the variety offered at RC. Imagine the discomfort you feel speaking and listening to a language that is not your own. If you’re immersed in a foreign culture, learning from new teachers and new classmates, and enjoying every moment of it, you’ve discovered Sophomore Marta Robledo Cañas’ experience as a foreign exchange student at RCHS. “My parents encouraged me to experience another culture like my brother Cesar did two years ago,” explained Marta. She has been staying with her cousin, Guillermo Arribas ‘10, and his family since August. “Everything is a lot more fun with Marta’s favorites: Marta,” said Guillermo. “Now I have • Food: fish someone to talk to, and I feel a lot less disconnected from my family in • Movie: “Into the Sea” • Color: White Spain.” After a semester at Rock Canyon, • TV show: Women, Men, and Vice Marta found comfort in the many Versa (a Spanish show) familiar faces of the friends she has • Book: Pride and Prejudice made, and has adjusted to her classes • Sport: Soccer here. • Season: Summer “Marta has become a valuable resource in her Spanish IV class,” said • Teacher at RC: Mr. Mike Hall Spanish teacher Courtney LuedtkeBacon. “She is very fun, sociable, and outgoing. She is the kind of person who is willing to ask questions, and is genuinely interested in learning every aspect of American culture.” “I really like that Rock Canyon is a big school with lots of people and a lot more you can do,” said Marta. “In Spain, I went to a smaller school next to the ocean.” The language and people are not the only things different in Marta’s life here. “It’s not as cold in Spain, and we cannot travel around easily because most people don’t get a car until they’re in their twenties,” said Marta. ‘Things in Colorado are much farther from each other than in Spain. Though the mountains aren’t so far, the beach was much closer in the Canary Islands. That’s the one thing I miss the most.” Another difference between Marta’s home and the United States is the age at which students learn a second language. While we don’t learn other languages until high school, Marta began learning English when she was only seven years old.    This Spanish girl with an endearing accent has adapted well to life in America, despite the different language and cultural differences.      “One small way I’ve changed since being in America is that now I think in English most of the time,” said Marta. “I feel this entire experience will affect the rest of my life in a very good way.” Rachel Curtright

Below: Marta (third from left) with a group of her friends at home in Spain. “I really miss my friends at home and can’t wait to see them when I get back,”Marta said. “But I have made a lot of great friends here too.”

Left: Pearson with her friend, a Spanish teacher at Castle View, in Mexico on their trip. Below: Pearson enjoys ice cream on a street in Mexico. Photos courtesy of Pearson

New world, new culture, new outlook

For Spanish teacher Chantal Pearson, this past summer was more than just a two-month break from work. It was an opportunity for her to expand her love for Spanish and create a new outlook on the different cultures around the world. Traveling this summer to Guanajuato, Mexico, Pearson’s main purpose was to get her Masters from Southern Oregon University, by experiencing the culture instead of a classroom experience. Through the struggles of the Swine Flu up rise, Pearson found herself questioning the trip, but eventually went to a city in Mexico where the type of flu was not an issue.     Pearson ended up living with a typical Mexican family, participating in all their day to day life, and learning about them as people. “I loved living with my Mexican family. My Señora has five children. Three of them being grown adults, and the youngest two being twins,” Pearson said. “The twins are 24 years old. I loved living with them and they made me feel just like a member of the family.” Through Pearson’s time in Guanajuato, she succeed-

ed in progressing toward her masters, but also started to become adjusted to the Mexican culture. She participated in the all of the everyday things her family did and experienced the city as a whole. From the donkeys that wandered in the streets to the “mom and pop” stores and the extravagant plazas and cathedrals, Pearson found herself enjoying the different style of life that Mexico had to offer. “The pace of life is much slower in Mexico, which I loved. The food is fresher and they use less store bought items. Most of my meals were home cooked by my Señora and were delicious,” Pearson said. As her time went on in Mexico, Pearson found herself picking up new interests. “I learned how to salsa dance, which was so much fun,” she said. “I hope I take more classes this upcoming year when I return to Guanajuato.” Coming home from the trip, Pearson found herself appreciating the little things that the U.S. had to offer her, from the simple necessities of having clean water to the overall quality of life. She started teaching her students

about the culture in What you don’t know Spanish speaking countries. about Chantal Pearson: “Mrs. Pearson really enjoys what She really likes exotic foods, she does. She teaches rather than typical American us more than just foods. She prefers to be adventurthe language, but ous when it comes to food; her the way that other countries live outside favorite is Mexican papaya. America,” said Taylor Williams ’13. This next summer Pearson is returning to Mexico for six weeks, and the following summer for three and a half weeks to finish her Masters. “From my experience studying abroad I have learned to try to expand my knowledge,” Pearson said. “I have learned to keep an open mind and to jump out of my comfort zone.” Alex Pedrinan


22 soundtrack: “True Colors” Glee Jordan Strother ‘11 Rhinestone peace shirt: Rack & Roll Clothing Company

02•25•10 culture All photos by Paige Newman

Sean Kovacs ‘10

Lexie Goldberg ‘10 Black dress with belt: Nordstrom

Shirt: Banana Republic Sweater: Nordstrom

Purple long-sleeve shirt: Nordstrom Scarf: Anthropologie Boots: Hunters from Nordstrom Add a pop of color to a simple black dress. Wear leggings and a shirt of any color to turn a sleeveless dress into something perfect for a cold day. These Hunter boots are available in almost any color and can be ordered online or found in department stores. A scarf like this one with a fun flower print is the perfect way to spice up any outfit.

Arianna Zabriskie ‘10 Blue t-shirt: Wet Seal

Hannah Wilson ‘11 Pink sweater: BP line from Nordstrom

Grey sweater: Wet Seal Pearl Necklace: Forever 21

Add a

color POP

Madi Strimbu ‘11 Cami : Hollister Shirt: Aeropostale

of

to your fashion

Maddie Davis ‘12 Button-down shirt: Target

A great way to spice up your outfit is to simply add a bright colored shirt or sweatshirt. This red one adds a ton of color to a simple outfit. Match a pair of shoes to your top to complete your look. Other tops on this page, like Strimbu’s red shirt or Wilson’s pink sweater, turn a solid tank top into a fun, colorful outfit. Dustin Dodd ‘11

Chase Stasney ‘10 Plaid button-down shirt: Pac Sun

Sweatshirt: PacSun Jodie Wagner ‘10 Red zip-up jacket: Forever 21 Jeans: Hollister Shoes: Vans


02•25•10 culture

soundtrack: ““Black Black Coffee” Billie Holiday

23

Photos by Paige Newman

Reviews

Crowfoot coffee: just plain mediocre I walked into Crowfoot Valley Coffee off of South Wilcox in Castle Rock with no knowledge about the coffee shop, aside from where it was and that it had a pretty cool logo. It is a small homey coffee shop that one might expect to find in a city like Seattle. The atmosphere was cosy, cool, and welcoming. The menu offered a variety of coffee flavors that you wouldn’t be able to find in a mainstream coffee shop, including their most commonly ordered product, the ‘Trio’ latte. Genuinely interested in how the coffee would taste, I ordered a medium black coffee (a Guatemalan roast), and a small ‘Trio’ (a blend of espresso shots with milk and vanilla and chocolate flavoring), so I could gauge how good both their generic coffee is as well as one of their more unique flavors. After I ordered, the cashier and I exchanged small talk, which warmed my heart more than the coffee would. I broke off the conversation, anxious to indulge myself with what I thought would be delicious coffee. I walked over to a lonely table by a window and peered out at the busy people rushing up and down the street. I took one sip of my black coffee, and much to my disappointment, I wanted to vomit. At that moment I regretted spending my money on that disgusting watered down coffee, and had been tricked by the atmosphere of

Photo by Connor Dozois

the shop into thinking the product would be good . I was fooled. Crowfoot Valley coffee is the equivalent of an Easy-Bake oven; it advertises like its product will be the greatest thing you’ve ever consumed, but when it comes down to it, there is nothing special about it, and it’s actually pretty disgusting. Now, the coffee was anything but tasty, and I mean anything, but to my surprise after trying drink number 1, my second drink, the ‘Trio,’ was actually pretty good. The thick, sweet, sensual, warm coffee was by far the better of the two drinks I had that day. Crowfoot Valley’s more intricate drinks, which are mainly just obscure forms of a latte, mask the horrible taste of the coffee with “delectable” other flavors. The ‘Trio’ had enough vanilla to compensate for the mediocre taste of chocolate flavoring, and enough espresso to overpower the sweetness of the vanilla, so I ended up feeling like the drink was in a taste war with itself, but rather enjoyed the ‘Trio’ anyway. The nice atmosphere, unique syrups and drink flavors, and friendly employees almost make up for Crowfoot Valley’s lack of good actual coffee (which is really the most important aspect of a coffee shop). Ultimately, I am confident in saying that I would much rather just go to Dazbog or Starbucks if I want a good drink. Connor Dozois

Photo by Maddie Jones

Photo by Alex Rowe

Photo by Dani Barrage

Enchanted Grounds

Dazbog Coffee

B&B Diner

Enchanted Grounds is a gourmet coffee shop and gaming store located on South Colorado Boulevard near Platte River Elementary. I ordered the hot cocoa, which turned out to be decent. It was a tad watered down, but it had a bittersweet aftertaste that had remnants of dark chocolate. The cinnamon bun I bought didn’t leave much of a memory, aside from a sugar-induced stomachache that followed it. Still, Enchanted Grounds wasn’t too bad at all. Most people have never heard Enchanted Grounds, probably because it is located in a small nook of a stripmall. The aura of mystery that the name portrays could put off potential costumers. It’s a shame though, because Enchanted Grounds overall proved to be better than most other coffee shops in Highlands Ranch, mainly because of its personal charm. The walls resemble something out of Asia, with reds and pale blues. There is a window that is covered with heavy shades, and behind it is a typical sitting area complete with a shelf dedicated to a Book-Swap and a glass case that holds a woven blanket. The shop is homey and warm, like a coffee shop should be. But what makes Enchanted Grounds unique is what lies behind the coffee shop. There is a store that features all sorts of board games, chess sets, and comic books like Scooby Doo and Spiderman. They also have a large amount of ‘Magic’ gaming merchandise along with tables set up for customers to play. Often times there is an event going on, whether it be open mic night or a digital scrap booking class. Such a unique range of games and entertainment brings a unique set of clientele. While I was there, I saw an elementary schooler, an interior designer with clients, and even a group of competitive Monopoly players. It was a variety that is rare to find in Highlands Ranch. Enchanted Grounds was a quirky coffee shop, but still an enjoyable one. It wasn’t as ‘enchanting’ as the name makes it out to be, but it provided an enjoyable break from the real world. Dani Barrage

Dazbog takes your regular cup of joe to the next level. I am now happy to call this incredible coffee shop in Castle Pines North my home away from home. The Denver based company now has three shops within 15 minutes of Rock Canyon, making it a perfect substitute for the Starbucks chains that I despise so much. Each one of these locations offers a comfortable atmosphere, fair prices, friendly staff, and most importantly, good coffee. While all these things contribute to a satisfying and relaxing café experience, the staple of Dazbog, and what truly makes it great, is really the coffee. Unlike other coffee joints, Dazbog’s “house blend” changes every day. Beans are always fresh, guaranteed to be shipped within 48-72 hours of being roasted, and you can’t go wrong with any of the 45 (yes, 45 including decaf and organic!) types of beans. The menu is diverse, but easy to navigate. The possibilities are endless, so the staff was helpful in suggesting the right drink for me. I settled on a basic vanilla latte, a simple enough drink. I also ordered a blueberry muffin. The bakery items are from Aspen Bakery, and while they are good, they are nothing out of the ordinary. The wait for the latte became a little longer than expected, and out of curiosity I approached the counter. What they handed me was a work of art. My drink had a depiction of the galaxy drawn in foam. The barista working may have taken an extra minute, but the latte art before me was awe inspiring. The drink was still perfectly hot and delicious. It tasted like coffee, unlike the overly sweet mixes from other chains. I thoroughly enjoyed my drink, seated on a comfortable couch. This is the kind of place where you can both quietly do homework and hang out with friends. You don’t have to be a coffee lover to enjoy yourself at Dazbog. It has plenty to offer to every customer, whether they fancy coffee, smoothies, baked goods, or just a place to relax. Michael Dempsey

For 110 years, the B&B café in Downtown Castle Rock has been in operation as a breakfast diner. It is known for their selection of coffee and the old time feel. Sitting in a booth accompanied by a few friends, I had two suspicions in mind. This rickety old dinner with partially ripped cushions and a crack or two in the ceiling was either going to be mind blowing, or horrifically awful. B&B was the first of these suspicions. The waiter brought me out a steaming cup of caramel cappuccino. I originally scoffed at what I percieved to be cheap diner coffee; however with the first sip my taste buds exploded. It was the perfect mix of caramel flavor and full-bodied coffee. Two things that drive me crazy when it comes to mochas and cappucinos is the taste of burnt coffee and an overload of flavored syrup. I want to actually taste the coffee. B&B pulled off avoiding those flaws excellently, leaving me satisfied with a nice caffeine buzz and a full stomach. The coffee used at B&B is a Turkish ground espresso bean from Columbia. I was fully satisfied with their coffee. It was not really anything unique, but it was enjoyable. The coffee is not something to rave about; it is really the atmosphere that draws in the customers. The atmosphere of the diner is very unique. It was built around the turn of century with a strong Victorian style. The booths as well as the old fashion bar leave you feeling like you are in western movie. The large window facing the street allows you to sit back enjoy some hash browns, a nice coffee and watch as people cruise past you on Main Street. The breakfast choices vary, but stay on the theme of a southwestern cuisine. You can get Mexican dishes like rancho rancheros or the breakfast of a cowboy with steak and eggs. The hash browns came out moist and browned and were just crisp enough to enjoy. B&B is a restaurant/coffee shop that’s that eludes many with its rundown appearance, but do not let that fool you. It will blow your mind. Drew Dodds

*We did not want to leave out a fine shop simply because it is one of the Rock’s advertisers.

Fast Facts

• Coffee is only grown near the equator, from the Tropic of Cancer to the Tropic of Capricorn, within a 1,000 mile limit. • There is between 80 and 140 milligrams of caffeine in a seven once cup of coffee. • 400 billion cups of coffee are consumed worldwide, making it the most popular beverage. • 91% of coffee consumed is during breakfast. • A coffee drinker averages 2-3 cups of coffee a day. • Regular coffee has no calories. • It takes about 45 coffee beans to make one shot of espresso. • “Coffee Day”is actually celebrated as a holiday in Costa Rica on Sept. 12 and in Ireland on Sept. 19, and Japan actually has “Coffee Day”on Oct. 1. • 79% of coffee consumed is served from the homes of coffee drinkers • The Dutch were the first to bring coffee out of Mocha and introduce it to the rest of the world. Their first cultivation was in Ceylon, now known as Sri Lanka, in 1658. Source: http://www.stumblerz. com/fun-facts-about-coffee/ Compiled by Lauren Scheirman


24 soundtrack: “100 years” Five for Fighting

02•25•10 news

The RC bucket list MTV has a new TV show, “The Buried Life” where several people created a list of 100 things they wanted to do before they die, and went to tackle them. This prompted us to ask, what do you want to do before you die? TV REVIEW “The Buried Life” is a new television show on MTV which is based around the main question: What do you want to do before you die? In the show there are four best friends (Ben Nemtin, Dave Lingwood, Duncan Penn and Jonnie Penn) traveling the country to complete the 100 things they want to do before they die. In their journey, for every task they complete on their bucket list, they help a stranger complete a task on their list. I find the show a refreshing change to reality television, by the purpose of the show. The show teaches morals to every viewer, to go out and live life, and not waste it doing what is necessarily “right” in society’s eyes. The only thing I don’t appreciate on the show is the way the boys reach out to their viewers. Most of the goals on the list are based around male desires such as; attending a party at the Playboy mansion, delivering a baby, and asking out the girl of their dreams. “The Buried Life” is the first MTV show I’ve seen that is based around selfless ideas. The show catches glimpse of humor by the way the crew presents their ideas, they are creative and give a new meaning to live life to the fullest. Alex Pedrinan

Fast facts

• The term “Bucket list”Comes from “kicking the bucket.” • The term came about in the middle ages with reference to a wooden frame that was used to string animals up for slaughter, called the bucket. When an animal was hung it would kick violently, thus literally kicking the bucket. • Another theory is that the phrase “to kick the bucket” refers to lynching or suicide. When people were hung they would stand on a bucket with a noose around their neck and when the bucket was kicked away would plunge to their death. Compiled by Matt Rabon


02•25•10 news

soundtrack: “Live like you were dying” Tim McGraw

25

MOVIE REVIEW

Laughs in death

Starring Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman as Edward Cole and Carter Chambers, “The Bucket List” is a fantastic comedy about the waning days of two terminally ill elderly men from very different backgrounds and lifestyles, and the outrageous adventures they make of their final moments. The dramatic aspects of the story are sometimes hit or miss emotionally, but it still has touching moments. It forces the viewer to consider whether or not they are making the most of their time. The film starts off when the daring and (mostly) immoral billionaire Edward Cole (Nicholson) finds himself in a cancer ward, in his own hospital, along with the brilliant mechanic/family man Carter Chambers (Freeman). The two men try to ignore each other, but after Cole finds Chambers’ bucket list, a list of everything he hopes to do before he dies, they begin to argue about adventures that are list-worthy They attempt to answer the question by carrying out every item listed, from witnessing something truly majestic, kissing the most beautiful woman in the world, shooting elephant guns on a safari, and racing old Shelby Mustangs from the 60’s. Though “The Bucket List” is technically a comedy, it still puts heavy emphasis on what it is like to be dying and how important family is in a person’s last days. This split focus makes the movie confusing at times, as the wild adventures of Cole and Chambers blend together with family life and hospital stays. The movie would have been better if it had not tried to include so many themes and story lines. Still, kicking the bucket has rarely seemed so fun (or touching), and Nicholson and Freeman play their characters excellently. Gabriel Martinez


26 soundtrack: “Revolution” Beatles

02•25•10 maestro

The Internet

Do students shed their rights at the Web gate? Online Safety Q&A Is the Internet within the jurisdiction of the school administration and what repercussions will come of this?

With Connor Ervin ‘11 The creator of the group “new dance policy sucks join if you want to have your own dance”

Rock: Whose idea was it to have an alternative dance and why? Ervin: A lot of people had the idea the moment the dance policy came out because we all hated it so much. Rock: Did you all decide to collaborate and host it elsewhere? And what were your expectations for the party in regards to size and fun? Ervin: Yeah, pretty much, we found a Rock Canyon alumni who plans parties and he was going to help us out. We hoped it would be extremely fun, and possibly an attendance of 500 or more people. We were going to make the party the way we wanted to, instead of adults telling us what is and isn’t appropriate. Rock: Are the rumors true that administration found out about all of this and proceeded to have the dance shut down? Ervin: No. I chose to call it off because an adult at the school had pointed out that if anything went wrong, I was bound to be held liable. I reasoned that with over 500 people attending, something would be bound to go wrong. Rock: How do you feel about such a large student turn out? Obviously you made the responsible decision, but is it safe to say it made a profound statement about student rights? Ervin: I hope it did. I made the Facebook group the moment I got home from school the day the dance policy came out. By 10 p.m. it had over 100 members. In four days it was already up to 650 members. This policy is terrible and administration should recognize this and change it as soon as possible, or no one will want to attend the dances. Adults need to understand that times have changed, and the way people express themselves at dances has too. compiled by Evan Almon

From MySpace, to Facebook, to Twitter, there are so many different ways that this generation can communicate. That can be good or bad, but the question is when do the things said cross the line? The groups on Facebook such as “You know you go to Rock Canyon if...,” “Rock Canyon Talk,” “Join if you think the dance policy sucks” and many others are an example of some of the groups involved with Rock Canyon. The administration can’t do anything about these groups unless they have to potential be harmful or threatening. When illegal activities, such as bullying, occur the administration and School Resource Officer Mike Adams get involved. The perception many students have is that it is an administrator’s job to monitor Facebook. According to administrators, the only way school officials find out about online activity is when a student or parent reports it to them. “More kids are reporting things than you think,” said Assistant Principal Gregg Sheehan. “I think that unless someone complains to the administration about their rights or privacy being restricted by groups like [Rock Canyon Talk] or if someone feels threatened, then it isn’t okay but otherwise they have no right to investigate on their own,” said Carly Lombard ‘12. Nowhere in the “Code of Conduct” book does it

mention cyber bullying, or anything regarding the Internet. However, students can still be punished for their actions online. “Cyber bullying and Internet safety is a new frontier for high school students. Just like in the movie ‘Mean Girls’; it is like an updated burn book,” says Assistant Principal Greg Doan. If a group or page on Facebook is physically or emotionally hurtful to someone, it can be considered bullying and if it does not involve the school but was brought to the administration’s attention then it goes straight to Officer Adams. “Rock Canyon Talk,” a group where students could anonymously post comments about their peers, for example, was reported and shut down. However, no one got in trouble. When things online are reported owners first get a warning and then if it happens again they will take it to the next level depending on what it is. Internet safety is a big concern and is hard to monitor and enforce because activity happens in the privacy of student homes. “I think it is weird that the administration can look at our Facebooks,” said Wes Cangilla ‘12. “I mean I don’t want them knowing I’m a fan of Jersey Shore or something.” Courtney Schellenger

f

What you can and can’t do CAN

• Can talk to your friends • Can post information about parties (location, host, etc.) • Can post pictures • Can write on group walls • Can tell a story about a teacher • Can trust administration is not stalking your web pages • Can talk about school

CAN’T

Free speech has its consequences

• Can’t threaten someone

Most students believe the First Amendment guarantees them free speech, not only in person, but especially off school grounds. Social networking sites such as Facebook make it possible for your private life to become public. School administrators, coaches, colleges and even potential employers can gain the right to look at a student’s social networking profile. They can even suspend or refuse to admit students based on what they have said or done in their personal lives and online. According to counselor Dan Davies, only about 5 percent of colleges look into applicants’ social networking profiles. However, according to counselor Melanie Perea, colleges are paying increasing attention to the social-networking profiles of their applicants. “More and more, college admissions are becoming Facebook and social networking savvy,” said Perea. “I suggest that students who are either looking for employment or applying to colleges be very careful about what they have on Facebook and other social networking sites/profiles. My advice is to keep it professional and appropriate for school and work.” Recently the administration has been criticized among the student body for allegedly “intruding” upon student-made sites on Facebook, especially those which make fun or joke about the school. The administration is not necessarily to blame for these sites being compromised or students being ratted out for their sites/posts.

• Can’t threaten a teacher or administrator

• Can’t post pictures of illegal activities

7 WAYS TO BECOME FACEBOOK SAVVY 1. Adjust setting so only friends can see your profile. 2. If you wouldn’t want your grandparents to see it, don’t put it up. 3. Analyze a group or page before joining or becoming a fan. 4. Don’t post things in the heat of the moment. You may later regret it. 5. Everything posted is permanent, once its on the Internet it can be found anytime any place. 6. Facebook isn’t a right, it’s a privilege – you can get kicked off. 7. Make your password something only you would know. compiled by Gabriel Martinez and Amanda Becker “Usually what happens is a parent or student informs the school about inappropriate Facebook info, and then it’s turned over to Officer Adams,” said Davies. “When students put this stuff out there for people to see, they take the risk of possible consequences if it’s illegal or inappropriate. School personnel don’t go out there trying to find this stuff.” It turns out that libel, defamation by written or printed words and pictures, has become easy to commit on social networking mediums. In this age of mass communication, everyone must pay close attention to what they say and write, even in the privacy of their own homes.

Gabriel Martinez

• Can’t advertise a fight • Can’t start a damaging rumor about a teacher Administration has the right to look at your Facebook and other profile pages if something is brought to their attention that is bullying, illegal, threatens the safety of the school, students or staff. compiled by Amanda Becker

Photo by Sam Pusar


Find your favorite columnist...

Alex Rowe Page 30

Paige Newman Matt Rabon Page 28 Page 28

soundtrack: “Proud to be an American” Lee Greenwood

Skyler Draper Page 28

Curtis Stuck Page 29

27

Austin Frankel Page 29

Your opinion in a picture... We asked students to draw their opinions on certain topics. Here’s what they think.

Love and peace

Amber Smith ‘12

Art by Dani Burrage and Zach Anderson

Khiem Cabral ‘12

Around Rock Canyon

An incapable United States of America The youth of our nation is unprepared for total warfare, and completely ignorant of war Millions dead. I stood in the pouring rain in front of the World War II Memorial, staring at what seemed to be a never ending sea of stars, each representing 100 American deaths. I was surrounded by my peers, most of whom were complaining about the freezing cold weather front that had hit D.C. I, on the other hand, was silently horrified. I read about the mass deaths of the war in history books, I saw “Saving Private Ryan,” but never had I seen the direct truth that was presented in front of me at that moment. I zoned out as I stood in front of the memorial, imagining the idea of a total war. My group had already fled the scene and boarded the bus, but I still stood there totally baffled by the thousands of engraved stars on that slab of granite. That’s when it hit me. My generation is weak; we have no understanding of war. We are ignorant, and the filled bus only confirmed my fear. The 13,000 deaths resulting from the conflict in Iraq is a miniscule amount compared to the three million American deaths of WWII. Iraq does not even compare to D-Day’s 50,000 deaths. The majority of my generation is more hesitant than prior generations to put themselves on the front line. I believe it is because of the education we have received, the video games we have played, and our lack of nationalism created post Vietnam War. In the eras of the Great War and WWII, the United States used propaganda to convince young Americans to put their lives on the line. They went into battle clueless of the horrors of war, and the toll it had on the human body. The Japanese in the Second World War were said to be horrible savages who would eat you and kill your babies. On the contrary, the Japanese feared Americans so much that

Anonymous

Dan Myers ‘12

women and children would commit suicide before surrendering to U.S. forces. The news, the World Wide Web, and global travel have made this use of propaganda practically impossible. Video games are an example of a war-enlisting deterrent. They have increased new technology skills in warfare, but they have decreased the actual enlistment number, according to 2008 enlistment statistics. This makes complete sense to me, considering the first thing I would think about before I entered war would be the 12 times I died playing one round of Xbox Live. Vietnam was the first war in the nation’s history where upon arrival home, the soldiers were not greeted as war heroes but rather as human rights criminals. Enlistment after the Vietnam war decreased exponentially, as people began to criticize the role of the U.S. government in the Cold War. Originally, the criticism was of Truman and his weak foreign policy when it came to Communism. Post Vietnam, it was flipped so that the United States’ role in Central America, Asia and Europe was criticized. Personally I do not approve of warfare; I believe in peace and world negotiations rather than fighting. My personal opinion is that our current generation is incapable of understanding complete and total warfare. I am unable to visualize myself in war, with bombs flying and friends falling. When many sign up for the military it is out of economic disparity rather than pride. In the song “Bullet and a Target” by Citizen Cope, they explain how the military is one of the only paths for an impoverished person to receive an education and a scholarship. This offers oppertunity in exchange for your life and ultimately your freedom. Many aspects of current American society leave me to believe that my generation is incapable of comprehending or fighting a true, total, war.

HERE’S WHAT’S UP Drew Dodds

Sydney Boyle ‘12

Random

Anonymous Anonymous

Anonymous Dylan Lama ‘10

Dalton Spanbauer ‘11

The story behind the headlights There are many points to consider next time you are sitting in traffic behind the wheel Traffic is an enigma to me. One merges onto the highway and is met with tens of thousands of head and tail lights. The glow may appeal to the sense of sight, but it’s what turned on those lights that appeals to a sense of wonder. Could that portable capsule be filled with different music? What band created those sound waves? What are the contents of that person’s vehicle? Have they ever had to sleep in the back seat? What is the temperature inside? Where and how did the driver purchase that automobile? What does their license picture look like? How does their signature appear when put on paper? Where and how did they spend their 16th birthday? What were they like as children? What were their parents like? Are they the only human in that vehicle? If not, what is their relationship to the passenger(s)? What are they discussing? Is it a canine? Where did their journey begin? Were there multiple stops? Where will it end? Where did they wake up this morning? Where will they go to bed? Do they take medication to fall asleep? Do they take medication at all? Are they currently under the influence of any substance? Is it possible you know who they are? Could they be your

mother’s best friend’s daughter’s co-worker’s uncle’s roommate’s cousin? Have you stood next to them in line once? Could you have been birthed in the same hospital, in the same room? Could they have dialed your phone once and had the wrong number? Could you have both paid with the same dollar bill? What classes did they take in high school (assuming they went)? Who were their friends? What did they do on Friday nights? Who was their first love? How did they meet? What was the most significant event in their life? If they told you one of their millions of stories, how would it affect you? How would you react? How would you respond? What have they experienced that you have not? What do they dream about when they sleep? What makes them happy? What upsets them? What are their passions? What do they believe would happen if they were to die tonight? What are they thinking about? These, of course, are all answerless questions. A being’s entire existence up until the exact moment when you become parallel is represented by a meager pair of white or red lights. All you know of the persons who started the ignition is their speed and direction. Better yet, that is all they know of you.

THE OPTIMISTIC CYNIC Myles Wallingford


28 soundtrack: “Drinking and driving” The Black Flag Art by Dani Burrage

02•25•10 opinion

You’re not alone on the road

Drunk drivers should consider the others at risk when they get behind the wheel A normal weeknight in South Florida. A couple walks their dog in their residential neighborhood. Their three daughters wait at home for them to return. A car runs over the curb. Crashes into the stop sign. Proceeds to run into the couple. The woman is thrown into the stop sign. The man is dragged by the car. Driver gets out of the car and walks away. Drunk. An onlooker calls 911. Rescued, just in time. Ambulance takes them to the hospital. Man is rushed into surgery. Collapsed lung, shattered femur, dislocated shoulder, broken ribs, and a broken wrist. On a ventilator, can’t breathe on his own. The woman is too weak for surgery. Missing teeth, lacerations on her face from her hairline down to her chin, a broken wrist, a dislocated knee, and a broken nose. She goes through two surgeries, he goes through one. They don’t see each other for days, kept in different rooms on different floors. Reunited. She is wheeled into his room after five days. But they do not recognize each other as the people they were before that night. They stay in the hospital for eight days, surrounded by three worried daughters and countless family members, neighbors, and friends. A perfect couple, a perfect family. They are some of the nicest people I have ever known, and neither the parents nor the daughters deserved their worlds to be shaken like this. But their lives were completely turned upside down by a man who made a stupid decision. We’ve been taught countless times not to drink and

drive, but I’m sure a number of people still do. Of all the rules people choose to disobey, this should not be one of them. This couple is living proof that bad decisions don’t just affect the person making them. And, like the driver, the person may come out unscathed, but they could have run over innocent people in the process. You never think it will affect you. I could have never imagined something this horrible happening in my old neighborhood to family friends and girls I grew up with. But it just goes to show that a driver’s one poor decision made an impact on so many people’s lives. If we have heard the drinking and driving lecture so many times, why do people still do it? Why can’t they just try to be smarter, try to think more, so other people aren’t killed in the wake of their dumb decisions? Because they are only thinking of themselves. Because they don’t care about anyone else, or at least don’t care to show it. You learn from day one that decisions have consequences. When you steal cookies from the pantry as a five year old, you get put in time out. When you don’t study for your science test in fifth grade, you don’t get a gold star and everyone else does. When you lie to your parents about staying at a friend’s house, you are grounded. When you drink and then drive, you potentially take someone else’s life. Let’s be smarter. When advice from parents or teachers goes in one ear and out the other, we shouldn’t let the important stuff slip out. Because it’s not just about us; we are not the only ones it will hurt in the end. On average, someone is killed by a drunk driver every 45 minutes. Don’t be that driver.

THE BOSS Paige Newman

The most important advice

Looking for a summer job? You should not look toward the restaurant industry

Last summer, I took a job as a busser at a local restaurant called Lansdowne Arms. That was a mistake. I don’t understand what would ever compel anybody to work at a restaurant. My experience at Lansdowne has been unfortunate, to say the least. Every Friday night, I stroll into the restaurant hoping that my shift will go differently than the one before. Hoping that married couples won’t silently write me off as just another lazy teenager as I ask if they’d like a refill and praying that the waiters won’t order me to do their jobs for them as they go out for a twenty minute break. Too bad all this happens almost every weekend, and nothing ever goes differently. Before I took this job, I was completely oblivious to the world around me. Now, sadly enough, a part of me has lost my faith in humanity. I was rudely awakened to the realities of the world

THE REDNECK Skyler Draper on my first day when a forty-year-old woman insisted that I was cleaning the tables incorrectly. Ma’am, first of all, I’d like to make you a deal. You can happily eat your meal with your husband who is clearly more interested in the Nuggets game than you, and I will clean up after you. We don’t even have to talk if you don’t want to; I’m perfectly fine with that. Simply leave a one-dollar tip and I will be perfectly content.

On a lighter note, I am still thoroughly confused on how one can go about cleaning a table “incorrectly.” It’s rather difficult to screw up, actually. Here, I’ll show you. Step 1: Clear table of all plates, silverware, glasses, etc. Step 2: Wipe table with damp rag. That’s pretty much as hard as it can possibly get. Ma’am, if it makes you feel any better, you’re not the only one that has shocked me with stupidity while on the job. In fact, I’ve had many experiences like this; people never cease to amaze me. Friends, my message to you is simple. Primarily, make sure you’re not one of those people that make me question why I work at Lansdowne Arms. I would greatly appreciate that. But even more importantly, please, save yourself the misery and never work at a restaurant. Believe me, you’ll thank me later.

The most tedious task of all

Every student will eventually go through the application process; here are some tips to help

Recently I finished submitting the last of my college application materials, a process which has taken me well over three months to complete. This was definitely one of the most stressful tasks I have ever undertook, and as this is a process that every student who plans to go to college must go through, I feel obligated to offer what advice I can. The application process really begins in November with the common application, which can be used on almost all state schools and most out of state schools. This constitutes the bulk of the process. For the most part the application is pretty self-explanatory, but there are a couple sections I want to narrow in on: the standardized test scores, the extracurricular activities, and the essay. If you happened to score higher in one standardized test than the other, only put your highest score in the test of your choice and leave the other blank. It showcases your best scores. However, what colleges generally care about more than tests are extracurriculars and your essay. When constructing your college essay,

I would advise that instead of talking about what kind of person you are in broad, general terms, write about one very specific experience that shows the qualities you want them to see. Also, get as many people to edit it as humanly possible. Have parents, siblings, and teachers look over it and offer suggestions. Next, when asked to list activities outside of school, don’t be modest or humble. List everything you can possibly think of, even if you’re not sure if it qualifies. You just want to make yourself look extremely involved, even if you’re not. Finally, if you are part of any ethnic minority, even if only by a fraction, always put that as your ethnicity in anything you fill out. I know that universities say that they will not discriminate their admissions based on race, but it will help you not only in admissions, but also in scholarship opportunities. For example, I am 1/32 part Choctaw Native American, and it gives me a minor advantage. The other major part of the application process is the letters of recommendation. These are a bit more complicated than the online application and require

That‘s due today? Everyone knows that feeling you get when you come to class and your teacher tells you to turn in a huge paper, and you didn’t know it was due. When we get this feeling, we say “That was due today?” Saturday I went to see my friend’s musical. I got there a half hour early and still got stuck in the back corner.

Austin Enterline

When I went out to lunch the other day I was riding in my friend’s car and when we went to park it we were really close to the car next to us. When I got out I hit the car next to us with my door. The people were in the car. There was a huge mark. Oops.

Courtney Schellenger

Today, my friend was looking through my iTouch, and stumbled across the app ‘Boobs and Thongs and Exotic Positions’. It took 20 minutes to explain that my brother and I share an account.”

Emma Kate Fittes

The other day I finally saw Paranormal Activity. When I saw The Ring I was scared, so obviously this movie terrified me. Well, when I got home from my friends house my room was still pitch black and my only light is on the other side of my room. I stood in the doorway for five minutes trying to figure out the fastest way to my lamp. I ran across my room, tripped and started screaming because I thought a demon got me.

Jenn Burton

Today, I woke up from a dream in which one of my teachers stalked and killed me. She just asked me to stay after school and talk.

Karly Hanson

I thought I was so cool, passing out papers for my U.S. History teacher. I realized I wasn’t so cool when I tripped over a kid’s backpack and hit my head on a counter.

THE GENIUS Matt Rabon you to do a few things. First of all, you want to make sure that you ask your teachers for recommendations early on and give them at least two weeks to complete them, and along with the basic information you should provide them with, it helps to give them a small gift partly as an incentive for them to put in on their agenda, but mostly as a way to say “Thank You.” Other than the application and your letters of recommendation, the rest of the process is fairly easy and constitutes simply mailing in transcripts and a midyear report. For the most part, as long as you keep to these basic tips, you’ll find the application process a little less stressful

Laura Romer

Today, I was rushing back to class after lunch, truing to avoid another tardy. The light at my neighborhood would not turn green, so I got out of my running car to see if pressing the crosswalk button would trigger the light. It did. I was out of my car and missed the green light. I almost got a referal for being late.

Paige Hesen

The other day my lip gloss cap wouldn’t close no matter how hard I tried to snap it on and when I got home it was all over the inside of my pants. My mom took it out to examine why it wasn’t closing and was like, “You do realize it’s twist on, right?” Rebecca Ruh

The other day my friend and I had to leave immediately after school to get to an appointment so that we wouldn’t be late. As we were rushing out to the parking lot to leave, we hopped in the car only to discover it was dead. We ended up having to hitchhike for 15 minutes. And then we found out the appointment was cancelled.

Taylor Pettaway


02•25•10 opinion

soundtrack: “Technologic” Daft Punk

America the strong, powerful, and corrupt

Art by Emma Kate Fittes

29

Americans try to cover up the mistakes our country has made in the past and ignore the truth. All of my life, I’ve viewed the United States as the “hero” in a world of villains. In the past, through any conflict, the U.S. was there to punish any nation or radical group for their wrongs. We are expected to be patriotic like we, at Rock Canyon, are expected to have school spirit. I don’t disagree with the need for patriotism. I just find it hard to be patriotic when I see my country doing wrong; rather than acknowledge mistakes and correct them, the story is changed in order to reinforce our self made reputation as the hero, the good guy, or the perfect country. On Aug. 6, 1945 at 8:15am, we dropped the Atomic bomb “Little Boy” on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Our best argument for this action was that it saved us from making a land invasion which would cause more deaths than if we dropped the bomb. The official government report of the strategic bombing survey that interrogated seven hundred Japanese officials before and after the dropping of the bomb concluded that the Japanese were on the verge of surrender and would have ended the war

THE GUY LOOKIN’UP Austin Frankel by December of 1945. This brings into question the motives we had as a nation. Studies made by an American scholar, Gar Alperowitz, argue that these actions were made by a political motive: “to beat the Russians to the chase in defeating Japan and to demonstrate our strength to them and this new weapon to the world.” Another questionable position is that the time and money the military spent in creating the A-Bomb pushed them into a “trigger happy” state, to deploy this weapon. Many reasons add to the pressure of the usage of this weapon leading the na-

Back off from technology    When I saw Steve Jobs’ smiling face on television introducing the iPad, the newest Apple gadget, I groaned in displeasure. Yet another innovation that some people will be convinced they must have. Forget the computer, the iPod, the cell phone. They are useless, my friends. Hand it all over to the iPad. As for books, throw those useless things in the garbage, right? Just use your Kindle. Oh, and please make sure to update your Facebook status so everyone knows about your latest purchase. I’m just utterly confused by our modern desire to be plugged in 24/7. I don’t disdain technology, I just disdain what it does to humanity. It turns us into something you might see in a disturbing short story by Ray Bradbury. Let’s take iPods for example. I have

an iPod with thousands of songs on it. It has served me well. But I don’t listen to it constantly. In fact, I really prefer to have my music played out in the open, rather then enclosed in my ear canal. My peers don’t share this sentiment, though. I see them constantly plugged in: going to class, doing their homework, waiting for the bus, whatever. Constantly trying to drown themselves out. I see their earbuds hanging out from their collars, headphones around their necks. Making sure their purchase get its fair share of use and abuse. For once, just once, take out your headphones during passing period, and listen to the sounds of the hallway. Listen to the sounds of doors opening and closing, of feet shuffling, of people’s mundane conversations. You would be surprised at what you may hear.

In

5 minutes ago

Lacrosse, track, and soccer

Basketball and football

RC underwater basket-weaving

Lent

Christmas

Circumcision (out for 5,000 years)

Taking your girlfriend to see “Valentine’s Day”

Skin-tight ski suits Giving your girlfriend a heart-shaped box of chocolates

OBSERVATIONS Daniel Wheeler This complaint probably stems from my background in the theatre, but could you turn your cell phone off in the middle of a show? We may be doing a good job of ignoring the audience, but we can see you when you whip your cell phone out. You don’t want theatre people hunting you down because of that blunder. Get back in touch with the world around you, instead of trying to hide behind some cyber curtain. I think you’ll appreciate how much you notice when you log off Facebook, silence your cell phone, and quit contemplating that new iPad. For just five minutes. Try it.

Out

Lady GaGa’s yeti mask Testosterone Max Wellman

Human error leads to loss of a human life When a dangerous curve on the luge track was overlooked, a life was tragically lost Georgian luger Nodar Kumaritashvili died Feb.12, 2010. He was only 21 years old. Two days later, walls were built to protect riders from the steel beams that Kumaritashvili crashed into, causing his death. The International Luge Federation reported that Kumaritashvili did not correct himself in the turns before curve 16 on the Olympic luge track at Whistler in Canada. When he came out of curve 16 he was unable to control himself at the high speeds, resulting in a wreck that flung him out of the track and into nearby steel support beams. The ILF had specifically noted the record speeds and the unusually high number of crashes, but still decided to change nothing in an effort to avoid the risk of a crash. How is it not obvious to build a protective barrier that would block off a potentially, now proven, dangerous

THE COMMENTATOR Curtis Stuck area of the track? Why did it take a tragic death to get enough attention to build a simple protective wall? I don’t see the logic behind not protecting the athletes from fatal consequences during competition. I don’t care that it was apparently human error that led to the crash; why wouldn’t the ILF think about human error? After all, it is human error on their part that led to such a dangerous track and now the death of an Olympian.

Quick Hits

After school liars

I love it as much as anyone else but take it in moderation

Flowery ice dancing costumes

tion into an action that was, as I believe, unnecessary. Earlier this semester, my U.S. history class discussed a few ideas concluding that the dropping of the atomic bomb was necessary in order to avoid a high death count from pursuing a land invasion of Japan. We weren’t presented with all of the facts of the bombing of Hiroshima. To this day, our country continues to believe one story in order to avoid the guilt for a choice made that cost the lives of over 240,000 civilians. Personally, I don’t feel it’s right for us to criticize others when they are wrong and pretend we have always acted in the best interest of other nations. Yes, we have done well as a nation, but we should still learn to examine our faults, not cover them up. In spite of all the hurtful things the U.S. has done in the past, I forgive and stand behind our nation with a hope for change. I believe our nation should strive to become a place that treats all people and other nations equally, no matter what has happened in the past.

It is such a pity that even with deliberation over the issue of an unsafe track, something wasn’t changed to protect the athletes, aside from one wall. It doesn’t make sense to not change something that could go horribly wrong, especially if they addressed the issue before the Olympics even began. It would be different if there had never been a problem with the track and nobody could have even conceived anything like this ever happening. But that wasn’t the case; the problem was right in front of them and nobody made the effort to fix the now tragic luge track. There is no reason to have not built the wall that is now a reminder of this terrible accident. There is no reason that Kumaritashvili had to die. All it would have taken was one person to be proactive about the situation and the athlete would be returning home after these Olympics.

This is my first semester as a reporter for the Rock. It’s about two months into the class, and I have noticed an interesting trend that occurs later during the school day. I have found that most RC guys will truthfully answer a question for the newspaper in the morning, perhaps because they are sleepy and caught off guard. However, in the afternoon and especially after the last class, the same students often tell outright lies to Rock reporters (not just me), like the anonymous male senior who told me the highlight of his day was “[using the] girl’s bathroom on accident”. Gabriel Martinez

Settle it the real way

I wish life was like a match of “Rock’Em, Sock’Em Boppers,” where everyone is a clear color, and all your transgressions were handled up front within the plastic ring. Those two boxers who are engineered to withstand pain and conflict would fit perfectly into life. Next time any one has a conflict, instead of taking it to the peer mediators or your friends, go into the 3000 lab, hop up onto the cabinet, and grab that yellow macaroni yellow ring, and let’s settle this like children. Kate Ready

Just listen When I invite friends to my house, I want to be with them, to talk and have a great time. But when they’re in another conversation with someone else at the same time, it’s a little harder. I find it so annoying and just plain rude when you’re with a friend and they can’t give you the respect to even tear their eyes away from their phone to look at you while you’re talking to them. It’s as if you are their second choice, and they will only look at you and acknowledge you while they’re waiting for a reply from whoever they are texting. Is it really too much to ask that you look at me while I’m talking to you? Sam Pusar

Why must I wait? While most of my college-bound peers have been signing up for dorm assignments, classes, and intramurals, I have been reduced to a bane of existence of waiting. No, not waiting to be admitted to college; waiting to register for classes. You see, I made the mistake of deciding to go to school early, 14 days after graduation, to be exact. A reasonable human being would assume, because I’m going early, I’d register early. Nope, I register 2 months after people who’ll be relaxing by the pool this summer. Way to think, University of Missouri. Drew Goodman

Silence the alarms

We had just begun our traditional “sustained silent reading” when suddenly out of nowhere it became a lot less silent with a blaring alarm sounding off right next to my right ear. Of course, it’s the infamous fire alarm that the administration flings on, trying to catch us offguard. I guess we need lessons on how to walk downstairs and out of a door. Come to think of it, why is there that one alarm right as you exit through the side doors? A couple more drills and I’ll be deaf. Zach Tornabene


30 soundtrack: “Bad day” Daniel Powter

02•25•10 opinion and satyr

The terrible, horrible, no good, very bad week

Unbelievable “Wolfman”got ripped apart by critics. Looks like only Harry Potter movies can pull off werewolves.

When your week goes horribly, there is nothing you can do but smile to get through it I stared at the car in disbelief. All I could manage was to smirk at the complete idocy of the situation. It started off as just a terrible sore throat - sore throat that lead to the worst week of my life. Monday through Friday I was bed bound with ear infections that turned to pink eye because of my doctor’s mishaps. I wasn’t allowed downstairs because of the daycare my family owns, at the risk of infecting everyone, so TV was out of the question since I’m not blessed with having one in my room. On Monday I broke up with my girlfriend, six days before Valentines Day and resulting in a sack filled with useless gifts. It wasn’t until Wednesday that my brother Brandon caught the sickness and was bed ridden too. I finally had someone to talk to other than my stressed out mom who was busy stuffing pills down my throat. I felt like I was going to die. Brandon and I were restless, we were sick, and we had no X-box. It was infected with the “ring of death,” the irritating X-box recall where than fan inside fails.

We had to have something to pass the days, so we planned to fix it. We got out of bed to go to Parker to see my cousin Mark, a manager at Best Buy with connections to fix our system for a much cheaper deal than what Microsoft offered. A cousin I am not allowed to see because of family feuds. It seemed like a bad idea from the beginning, not going to school because we were sick, but still going to get the gaming system fixed, and on top of that seeing someone who I would surley be disowned for visiting. Friday was overcast. The wind was piercing cold and howled as if in warning. We snuck out at the day care’s lunchtime and made it to Parker in twenty minutes. We made the exchange, and it seemed like everything was going to be alright. We got back in the car and I turned the key in the ignition, the car grumbled, the gas gage dwindled down, and the battery was dead. I tried to keep my nerves under control; all we needed was to jump start the car. My cousin provided us the jumper cables. I attached the cables and started the car again. Nothing. I got back

THE PESSIMIST Austin Enterline The CSAP is officially a tool that teachers can use to blackmail students into working harder.

out of the car and left the keys in the ignition. The wind howled and I was freezing. I got to the front of the car, fighting the wind as if it was pushing me back to the door, and then there was a loud “clunk.” I looked back to where the noise came from. The car door was blown shut, and the car was locked with the keys inside. Now, after the week from hell, I am $145 in debt because of paying a locksmith, I got a scolding look from both parents, and I was sentenced to a grounding. All I can do is try to smile.

Believable Turns out Canadians are still incredible at hockey. Just not as incredible as the U.S.A. Some of the dodgeball teams missed the memo that the tournament was for charity and not life and death.

With compromise, we can fix a broken system

Mel Gibson is almost as much of a social disaster sober as he is drunk.

The overly partisan ways of the government are causing an eternal political stalemate Eighty-six percent of Americans believe that the government is broken, according to a new poll conducted by CNN/Opinion Research Corp. There are, as of right now, 11 Senators who are choosing not to run for reelection this fall. That means that 22 percent of the members of the Senate are throwing in the political towel, and what do the headlines read? Democrats will be fighting to defend five open seats. Republicans hoping to hold six open seats through the midterm election. Perhaps, instead of just fighting for a party majority, we should be analyzing why so many Americans feel the government is broken, and why so many officials are bailing from the sinking ship. I believe that if America hopes to move out of the economic crisis and maintain its position as a world power, we need to move away from the overly partisan government. When Senator Bayh of Illinois announced that he would not be running for reelection he sited the root of his reasoning as too much partisanship, and

ultimately, “the people’s business not getting done.” Every public official can and does babble about how bipartisanship is being introduced, or how there is a new focus on working together towards a common goal, but as anyone who has seen a campaign knows, those words are cheap. Progress can only start at the bottom and make its way up. If the populous, the one that the government works for, starts debating, compromising, and considering problems on an issue by issue basis, then slowly, the problems that seem too big to tackle will come together piece by piece. Standing on one side of a party line and shouting for conservative/liberal values is no smarter or more productive, than the Revolutionary War tactic of two armies facing each other and shooting into the masses. Though it can happen slowly, the government responds to the will of the people. We need to show our Senators and Representatives that we prefer progress with compromise over an eternal stalemate of absurdly strong values. The economy is getting worse and

Unbelievably believable Studies show that 21-year olds from New Jersey like fame, money, and partying. That, and tanning.

SHORT N’SWEET Alex Rowe worse, the unemployment rate is rising, as is the national debt, and it is no time to subscribe to being a Republican or Democrat; instead we all need to subscribe to progress. Things will only improve if there is a collective understanding that mutual compromise means long term benefits for all. I am not a political pundit, but if you ask me my opinion, it will change depending on the issue. It is not constantly conservative or liberal. The idea of voting along partly lines is becoming increasingly ineffective in a generation defined by constant increases in information and communication.

After criticizing Obama for using a teleprompter, Palin found to write entire speeches on her hand.

The biathlon, combining cross country skiing with rifle firing, has its roots in 1860s Norway. Norwegian soldiers were trained in the sport as preparation for combat. Intrigued, El Satyr performed extensive research into the origins of other Winter Olympic events. The luge originates in Native American history. Quansto, a distant relative of Squanto, created a new buffalo hunting technique. He dragged a piece of wood up a hill, they rode in it through a herd of buffalo with a bow and arrow. This hunting technique was entirely unsuccessful. Olympic ice hockey began when wars were fought with swords and sharp sticks. In their down time, Antarctic soldiers would push around a baby penguin with sticks, using icebergs for goals. This

war-time stress reliever was then combined with skates and angry coaches, and ice hockey was born. The Nordic combined race has an interesting background. The French, being experts at fleeing, found a snowy goat path when escaping an invasion. Using sticks as skis, they cross country skied away, unaware of the giant cliff a few miles down. There were no survivors. Pairs ice skating used to be a Chinese martial art style, using shoe blades and deceptive hand movements. The Chinese found themselves in a position to be both warlike and flamboyant, thus ice skating was born. It is believed that a Frenchman witnessed the awe of the new Chinese fighting technique. Combine the French and ice skating, and you’ve got ice dancing.

Curling found its beginnings in the deep south of the US, where inebriated southerners would collect turtles, scare them into their shells with soup threats, and then fling them at each other. It appears the sweepers were simply PETA employees chasing the turtles with nets. Catching on in Russia, using bear skulls, curling was ready to go Olympic. Speed skating resulted from enemies of the French finding it entertaining to watch them flee from battles in arctic climates so often that they called it a sport and gave them medals to celebrate their fear. El Satyr is unsure of what the next social event with Olympic potential is, however, putting Tiger Woods on thin ice shows strong potential.

Shaun White gives himself a new nickname, securing his position as the Joe Lieberman of men’s snowboarding.

Tiger Woods said “sorry” approximately 8 times a minute in his press conference. Max Wellman

El Satyr

Searching for Olympic roots

Scotty Lago heads home early over a photo controversy. Didn’t anyone ever tell him not to let people kiss objects that are near his ‘personal space’?

New Sponsors

A list of sorts

The Winter Olympics has seen a wave of new sponsors this year. El Satyr did some investigating and found who is behidn many of the great Olympic sports this year...

El Satyr recently noticed that Olympic Pairs Figure Skating is incredibly boring and uneventful. So the Satyr came up with a list of things to do instead of watch.

Biathlon

Sponsored by the Coalition for Gun Control

Men’s Skeleton Race

Sponsored by Curves for Women

Ice Hockey

Sponsored by PEAK Antifreeze

Men’s Snowboarding

Sponsored by Barnes & Noble

Super-G Ski Race

Sponsored by Risk Prevention Inc.

Curling

Sponsored by the USA Janitors Union

Dogsled Race Shaun White

•Eat a cherry PopTart •Drive a Toyota •Listen to anything by Paris Hilton •Give Snooki a spray tan •Go 88 mph in a Delorean and get sent back in time to 1955

Sponsored by Beggin’ Strips

•Breed with the Octomom

Sponsored by American Airlines

•Watch a Sarah McLachlan commercial

Cross Country Skiing

Sponsored by Watching the Paint Dry

Speed Skating

•Watch Glenn Beck cry

Sponsored by Colbert Nation

•For that matter, do anything related to Sarah McLachlan


02•25•10 editorial

soundtrack: “Can you feel the love tonight?” The Lion King

31

The goals of The Rock, the student newspaper of Rock Canyon High School, are to inform, educate, and entertain readers as well as to provide an educational opportunity for the students who produce it.

Editorial Board

The senior section and Student Council as the gymnasium erupted in applause for Harley during the Wish Week assembly Feb. 19. Over 400 Wish Kits were sold this week at $10 each.

RCHS, capable of amazing things... ... in the community We want to make one thing clear. We’re not all sheltered. We’re not all spoiled. We can care. We can be committed, worldly, and concerned with events in our community. The Rock understands many Rock Canyon students come from privileged backgrounds. Some live in houses just slightly larger then Luxembourg. Some have unlimited expenses. Some think we have unlimited expenses. Some have inflated egos about it. Some don’t. Perhaps in the past, RCHS has been enclosed in the clear, clean, artificial bubble of suburbia. But RC students are not so afraid to step into the outside world, where things may not be so sunny. Don’t believe it? We step out of our comfort zone more then you would think. Take Melissa Rosati’s Advisement class for example. Upwards of 30 seniors make their way by light rail to Denver once a week to mentor and tutor kids who are at risk, some who speak English as a second language. What about Theatre III-IV? Little kids frighten many of us, and performing for them? No easy task. Yet they went to several elementary schools to perform. And what about Senior Studies? Talk about a major initiative to think outside the box. The Rock commends the teachers that came up with the class that people are begging, pleading, and dying to take. Whether we are volunteering, entertaining, or simply learning, we refuse to be stereotyped. We’re ready to enter this complex universe unafraid. Unashamed. We’re ready to be able to talk about the things we’ve seen, the thing we want to see. School is more then a fashion show. And it’s more then a chore. But it is also something you have to make for yourself. We’ve stepped it up. Made it something memorable. Mark Twain once said to “never let you’re schooling interfere with your education.” We pledge to not let our schooling interfere with our perspective. And certainly not with our reputation.

... in athletics

... in the world

When people hear the name ‘Rock Canyon,’ it isn’t very often that the following words are “athletic power house,” but The Rock would like to congratulate the winter sport programs for raising the bar in athletics, bringing us a step closer to becoming a school with a recognizable, respected, and competitive athletic program. Poms became Rock Canyons first ever team to win back-to-back state championships, sending them to nationals where they placed 16 in both their poms and jazz routines. Cheer competed at Nationals this year for the first time ever where they performed a spotless routine. They would have advanced to semi-finals if it were not for a technical fault, resulting from a rule in the nationals program the team was unaware of. Boys basketball is so far having their best year ever with wins last week against well respected Mountain Vista and ThunderRidge, teams that our program had never beaten before, moving their record to 16-7 securing the #3 seed in the 4A state playoffs. Our program’s best in both cases. The girls swim team has brought home a second place trophy from the 4A state meet making this the fourth year the team has placed top two at state even after ’08 graduation brought the loss of many key swimmers. Senior swimmers this year have seen nothing but silver and gold at the state competition since their freshman year. Congratulations to the athletes who have put in countless hours of work and who have been a part of the recent success in building a stronger athletic program at Rock Canyon.

In the December issue of The Rock, we commented that Rock Canyon students are only charitable around the holiday season. You proved us wrong. Since December there has been an incredible burst in good-natured, and charitable actions from this small community. After Key Club’s trip to Costa Rica, to bring books to students of the area, they decided that then needed to keep working. They applied for, and received the Kiwanis grant, to give computers to these students. Their drive to help people that they only will get the chance to see a few days a year, is truly incredible. Also, the school’s response to the disaster in Haiti was truly remarkable. Within 24 hours of the disaster there were posters in the school telling the students what number they could text to donate. Student Council, Key Club, and National Honor Society then all joined forces to fundraise during winter week. Their creativity to use passing period, and a little Disney music, helped fill paper bags with money faster than any coin drive. Most of all, the love that has been shown to Harley, someone few students have gotten the chance to know, but most have taken into their hearts, is awesome. When the students chanted, “We love Harley!” the tone for Wish Week was sent. This sentiment was not a brief whim, but a statement that we have stood behind as we have raised money to grant her wish. Despite a struggling economy, and thin wallets you have been willing to donate money to people who are complete, or virtual strangers. When The Rock encouraged everyone to give year round, they responded with as much enthusiasm as has ever been seen at this school. Now, the student body needs to keep this up. After Wish Week ends, and Haiti disappears from the headlines, let’s be like Key Club and continue supporting the causes we believe in. The Rock knows that the student body can continue this pattern of giving. The staff of The Rock is proud to be associated with all of the charitable students at Rock Canyon.

Got a minute? You so Rock! • Senioritis for teachers as well? Who knew? • Dodgeball! Who doesn’t love watching RC students embarrass themselves . • Not changing out of pajamas for the entire duration of a snowy Sunday. • The foreign language department giving away money, suckers, and ducks with every purchase of your favorite magazines. • Not a single employee was trampled during Denny’s free Grand Slam Breakfast. Success! • $3,000 for the first day of Wish Week. The school is generous! • Sleeping in on CSAP days and texting all our underclassmen friends at 10 a.m.... when we wake up. • The boys chanting “We love Harley”at the assembly. That’s one way to make a girl feel good. •Boys varsity basketball received there highest seed in school history for the playoffs, were finally legitimate threat. •Rapidly approaching spring break.

You so don’t Rock! • Realizing you’ve already begun to gain your freshman 15... senior year of high school. • Suing JK Rowling for plagiarism over a book no one has ever, on the face of the planet, heard of. “Willy the Wizard”is a joke. • It feels like spring is just around the corner... until you look outside. • “Party in the USA”by Miley Cyrus being played during the Vancouver Olympics. We’re still confused. • Teachers telling you WAY too much about their personal lives. Do you mind just teaching so we can pass your final? Thanks. • The cold that’s going around. It makes you feel like you’re dying, but moms, satisfied that it’s not swine flu, still make their kids go to school. • The fact that CSAP’s go on transcripts this year, since it really shows our true knowledge, right ? • Having to wait behind 50 cars to get to school just because there is snow on the ground.

Alex Rowe-Editor in Chief Connor Dozois-Online Editor Logan Thompson-Online Assistant Daniel Wheeler-News Editor Ade Eichie-News Assistant Emma Kate Fittes-News Assistant Meghan Long-Sports Editor Zach Tornabene-Sports Assistant Sara Heyn-Sports Assistant Kate Ready-Sports Assistant Paige Newman-Culture Editor Max Wellman-Culture Assistant Caley Pavillard-Culture Assistant Maddie Jones-Culture Assistant Rachel Curtright-Visual Editor Paige Hesen-Visual Assistant Laura Romer-Community Editor/News Assistant The Couch-Copy Editor Jack Kennedy-Non-voting Adviser

Reporting and Photography Staff Evan Almon Zach Anderson Amanda Becker Evan Ann Boose Danielle Burrage Jennifer Burton Amber Cole Michael Dempsey Drew Dodds Skyler Draper Austin Enterline Austin Frankel Drew Goodman

Erika Guilbault Karly Hanson Gabriel Martinez Sean McGavin Alexandra Pedrinan Taylor Pettaway Sam Pusar Matt Rabon Rebecca Ruh Lauren Scheirman Courtney Schellenger Curtis Stuck Myles Wallingford

Submission and Editorial Policies

The Rock invites your comments. Letters to the editor and commentary submissions are encouraged. You are also encouraged to submit coverage ideas, cartoons, photos, or anything else you want to see in The Rock Opinions of the staff of The Rock are presented as editorials. All editorials are at least the majority view of the editorial board. We also feature a number of columnists and commentary writers. Their opinions are their own.

Recent Honors and Awards 2008-09 NSPA All-American Quill & Scroll Gallup Award 2009

The First Amendment

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise therof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Rock Canyon High School 5810 McArthur Ranch Road Highlands Ranch, CO 80124 Phone 303.387.3060 / Fax 303.387.3001 The first three copies of The Rock are free, additional copies are available for 50 cents each

Finish Wish Week the same way it was started. Come to the‘Make a Swish for Make a Wish’faculty vs students basketball game tonight at 6 p.m. for $5 and stay for the Unified Basketball game. Also, be sure to wear your blue Wish Week t-shirt during tomorrow’s assembly. And, hey, did you notice how comfy school can be in PJs?


Ready, set, dodgeball

Off to the right start By the end of Tuesday of Wish Week, tears have been shed, incredible friendships made, and $5535.91 raised. With $3324.41 made on Friday, $773 raised on Monday, and $1,438.50 raised on Tuesday, RC is well on its way to not only granting Harley’s wish, but another wish as well. The opening assembly was a fantastic kick off and dodgeball was a huge success. Students received much praise from the staff following the opening assembly for their respectful and heartfelt behavior towards Harley. “The assembly was awesome,” said Social Studies teacher David Sapienza. “It was by far one of the best assemblies this school has ever had.” The standing ovation from the entire student body as Harley was introduced and the juniors chanting “We love Harley” is just a small amount of the compassion students have shown her. “A few of us juniors started to chant ‘we love Harley’ because we wanted her to feel welcome and at home,” said Alexis Todd ’11. “We wanted to show her we cared.” Harley was not the only one to shed

Clockwise from above: Social Studies teacher David Sapienza throws a dodgeball at Matt Gilbert ‘11, from the Green Team. The Green Team won the student bracket and got to play against the staff, winning that match as well. Jake Davis ‘12, prepares to throw a dodgeball at Taylor Sheridan ‘11, when they were the only two left on the floor. Sheridan’s team, the Meatheads, was eliminated in the first round. Dustin Dodd ‘11, throws his hands in the air in celebration after moving from the first to the second round of the tournament. Alex Temby ‘11, downs some water between yelling at the referees and his players. He ‘coached’several of the teams. Cody Ann LaCouture ‘11, and Bre Duran ’11, hug after LaCouture was hit by a dodgeball, and as another one approaches them. Remington Caley ‘11, lifts weights to warm up for the tournament. All of the members of his team, the Meatheads, lifted weights, did pushups, and did any other thing that could satirize the male weight lifting mentality before they played. Photos by Alex Rowe

tears at the assembly. Harley’s mom and grandparents shed tears of joy and expressed their gratitude for what Rock Canyon is doing for Harley during the student council lunch that followed. “I have a lot of friends but no ‘good’ long time friends,” said Harley, “and I hope Wish Week can give me that as well as my wish.” “A lot of the students seem to truly care about this and it’s exciting to see all of our hard work pay off,” said Hayley Warner ’11. Although there were only five teams Friday morning, dodgeball turned out to be a successful, exciting event. Eleven teams eventually competed, and student and community attendance was great. “I had a blast,” said Reid Carter ‘10. “I’m glad we raised all of that money for Harley, because that is who it was really for.” “Wish Week so far has made me so proud to be a student at Rock Canyon,” said Renee Horsting ‘10. “It’s so neat to see all the students and teachers in our school coming together to make something incredible happen.” Caley Pavillard

Together we can

Grant

a Wish

Letting the light back into her life For Harley Shepherd, life is about finding the perfect light. Her passion for capturing obscure angles and unnoticed objects through the lens of her camera is only a small clue to how unique this young woman truly is. For as long as her family can remember Harley was either playing soccer or taking pictures. “When she was little I would walk up stairs and she would have a sheet hung up and her stuffed animals lined up perfectly,” said Kristi Shepherd, Harley’s mother. “When I asked Harley what she was doing she would always say ‘Mom, it’s picture day for the animals.’” Harley would look at picture after picture in the scrapbooks her mother and grandmother had made. “One day, Harley was looking at about five pictures I had lying on my counter, and as I was ironing she looks up to me and says, ‘grandma why do my uncles only like to wear black and white?’” said Carol Shepherd, Harley’s grandmother. “I believe that’s where Harley got her passion for old things: old people, old buildings, old everything. It is because she grew up looking at all my black and white photos.” It was May of her fifth grade year when the light on Harley’s passion for soccer was dimmed. Her soccer coach was very concerned with her frequent random falls and awkward running. She believed Harley had a leg problem, and convinced Kristi to take her to a specialist. Doctors believed she possibly had a brain tumor or her legs might be different lengths, but they could never figure out the real cause. Finally, Harley’s aunt saw a special on TV about muscular dystrophy thought that this was Harley’s problem. After several

tests, her blood work came back revealing her diagnosis of Frederich’s Ataxia, an abnormality of the motor and sensory nerve conduction system, ultimately resulting in the degeneration of the spinal cord tracts. Harley entered a time with very little light. Her condition could not even be brought up in the house and she was very uncomfortable around other people. There were times where all the Shepherds could do was cry. “I could hardly get her to come out in public,” said Kristi Shepherd, as soft tears flowed down her cheek. “I would go to the store and she wouldn’t even come in with me. She didn’t want to go anywhere.” “Harley felt very alone,” said grandfather Bruce Shepherd. “It was extremely tough news for all of us.” Through this, Harley and Kristi became extremely close. They started traveling together and going on many mother anddaughter adventures. “They are not like mother and daughter,” said Carol. “They are best friends.” Kristi and Harley have been coast to coast, from San Diego to Philadelphia. It was in Philadelphia that the light started to enter back into Harley’s life. The Shepherds attended a conference specifically for people with Frederich’s Ataxia. This was the first time Harley had ever met anyone else with the disease. In Philadelphia she met Ashley, now a very close friend, who also has this disease. “Harley was a completely new person,” said her mom. “After seeing she wasn’t the only one with the disease her attitude completely changed. She realized she could do and see more and experience the things she loves.” Since then, Harley has traveled to several places including San Diego, which is

the first time she really had the opportunity to take pictures creatively. The whole trip was dedicated to photography and Harley’s favorite photos were taken on that trip. “My favorite picture is probably the one I took in the tunnel near the Stanley Hotel,” said Harley. “It looks like the devil’s head at the end of the tunnel; it’s really abstract and interesting to me.” Because of this conference, and her relationship with Ashley, Rock Canyon has the privilege to experience the strong, courageous, inspiring personality of Harley. Like a typical high school girl, she loves playing video games on her x-box, she loves to paint and draw and take pictures, she is into fashion and she loves listening to music. She spends a lot of time in the water: boating, tubing and knee boarding. The Shepherds found Make-A-Wish through Ashley and her family. Ashley had her wish granted just before the conference. Harley’s wish is to receive the equipment to be a professional photographer. “Originally I was going to wish to go to Ireland,” said Harley. “I wanted to kiss the Blarney Stone at the Blarney Castle.” Myth says that the Blarney Stone gives the kisser the gift of eloquence. Harley finally decided on her wish of having photography equipment because she wanted it to last forever. “If I went to Ireland I would only have my wish for one moment and this is something I want forever,” said Harley. “I want to be able to capture the moments of perfect light in my life, and if my wish is granted I can do that.” Harley’s favorite time is at dawn and dusk because she says, “It’s not too light. It’s not too dark. You can see everything coming perfectly together.” Caley Pavillard

A picture from Harley’s trip to San Francisco. Below: Harley sitting with Student Council at the first Wish Week assembly. Photo by Drew Goodman

Student Voice of Rock Canyon High School

5810 McArthur Ranch Road • Highlands Ranch, CO 80124 • 303.387.3000 Volume 6, Number 6 • February 25, 2010

The Rock - Feb. 25, 2010 - #6  

Volume 6, Number 6

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