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The Resilient Wellbeing Borders Centre & Project Market + Programme and Place + Prospectus + Prototype

Other Resilient Borders 2016 Projects + Textile Centre + Textile Community Centre + Mobile Kids + Borders Design Incubator + Wellbeing Centre and Market + A Centre for Visual Landscape + Borders Water + Skills Traditional + Open Textile Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture M.Sc. Advanced Sustainable Design 2016

Katie Zoppo

This proposal stems from a successful organisation already known within The Borders in Thornylee called Grow to Work. G2W is grounds its praxis on premise of increasing people’s health and wellbeing by connecting them with their environment through horticulture. Working with the handicapped, unemployed and people wanting a better lifestyle to reap the benefits of being connected to their surrounding land and give them a sense of purpose. Naturally, there are people who don’t feel the need to be involved in this type of activity and for that there are a few development routes that emanate from this one idea of growing for wellbeing that can expand and include more of the town of Galashiels as well as helping it be selfsustainable. Galashiels is a large town in comparison to the other towns in the Scottish Borders with a population of nearly 15,000. It is a town with a rich history and is surrounded by a picturesque landscape. Within the values that should be inherent to any society is the importance of locally sourced, good quality and wholesome. This town has the advantage of being in a central location within the Borders. Since the reopening of the railway, it is even more easily accessible for locals and passing visitors alike. A few towns within the borders currently run monthly outdoor farmers markets, including one in Galashiels. However, one of the most difficult issues these initiatives have had to face is the rapidly changing weather conditions of the area and how it has negatively affected their success due to their exposed nature. The G2W initiative is currently held by the community members and helps individuals in the community to have a sense of purpose and benefit from the ability to work with nature. For instance, a farmers’ market was once held in an outdoor space in Tweedbank. However, there were some issues, such as the weather and having the produce available to sell only once a month due to ripening. Hence, the proposal for a centrally located, indoors daily market could bring the community together with local whole foods and handcrafted products.


The Resilient Wellbeing Borders Centre & Project Market + Programme and Place + Prospectus + Prototype

Katie Zoppo

Adaptive Reuse of St. Aidan’s Church St. Aidan’s church is in a prime location within the city, just outside the centre, and in close proximity to the Bank Street Gardens, which could allow for outdoor market space in good weather conditions. The gardens can be used on summer weekends to expand the market from indoors to outdoors and utilise the area. An added benefit of having the market in St. Aidans Church is that visitors are more inclined to go further into town and see the beautiful area and bridge rather than going straight to the old post office where they would miss one of the more charming parts of the town. Travel time from the train and bus is still short with an average of six minutes walking distance from the station.

Other Resilient Borders 2016 Projects + Textile Centre + Textile Community Centre + Mobile Kids + Borders Design Incubator + Wellbeing Centre and Market + A Centre for Visual Landscape + Borders Water + Skills Traditional + Open Textile Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture M.Sc. Advanced Sustainable Design 2016

The building is to be a market hall and wellness centre. It will hold activities relating to health, fitness, eating, cooking and socialising. The Complete Health Borders enterprise currently located in an adjacent house would have the opportunity to move into this structure and utilize the rooms on the first floor for renting out, as they currently do, for fitness, therapy, etc. A gym is to be placed in the small wing at the back of the church with an independent entrance. The area used for choir seating in the past will be converted into a welcoming lounge space where people can socialise, or look enjoy indoor views of different activities below, such as cooking classes or demonstrations. The physical intervention will be very controlled. Externally, visible changes will include the gym entrance, a roof skylight and a ground source heat pump system for heating. Internally, the existing structure is left intact as much as possible.

St. Aidan’s Church location

Programme Proposition

Flexible and Adaptable Spaces


The Resilient Wellbeing Borders Centre & Project Market + Programme and Place + Prospectus + Prototype

Katie Zoppo

Flexibility and Adaptability The main spaces are designed to be flexible. The gym for instance can be partitioned or not depending on the activity (yoga classes, etc.) and the two rooms on the first floor can be opened up to create a larger usable space.

Outdoor Farmers’ Market on Bank Street Gardens

In terms of service connections, market stalls are each fitted with a sink and gas. Electrical tracks with outlets hanging down will placed on either side of the hall to allow flexible electrical connections. Gas, water and electric floor connections will allow flexibility in terms of the proposed programme. On the ground floor this will allow cooking classes to take place on wheeled countertops that can stored when not in use. On the first floor this will allow for an area that can in the future be used as a restaurant, and may be used as lounge spaces in the mean time. Moreover, the partition walls can be rearranged to create different stall sizes.

Other Resilient Borders 2016 Projects + Textile Centre + Textile Community Centre + Mobile Kids + Borders Design Incubator + Wellbeing Centre and Market + A Centre for Visual Landscape + Borders Water + Skills Traditional + Open Textile Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture M.Sc. Advanced Sustainable Design 2016

Furthermore, if the market concept doesn’t thrive the building can still be used alternatively as a meeting hall or event space, allowing the building to adapt over time to meet different types of needs the community may require.

Above: Interior Market during daytime activities. Bellow: Evening cooking classes.


The Resilient Wellbeing Borders Centre & Project Market + Programme and Place + Prospectus + Prototype

Katie Zoppo

Economic Sustainability Farmers can benefit from the market as an extra source of revenue, which also eliminates retailers and gives farmers more control. Also, it provides business, marketing and networking experience to local farmers and businesses. The market will incentivise the local economy and provide different types of employment opportunities. Artisans and crafters can also set up business projects. Social Sustainability Socially, it increases the understanding of local residents as to where food comes from and gives them a sense of the process involved in providing such a service. It brings an atmosphere that makes people want to be involved

Other Resilient Borders 2016 Projects + Textile Centre + Textile Community Centre + Mobile Kids + Borders Design Incubator + Wellbeing Centre and Market + A Centre for Visual Landscape + Borders Water + Skills Traditional + Open Textile Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture M.Sc. Advanced Sustainable Design 2016

and want to leave the house to see and buy fresher produce than can be found in the supermarkets.

enclosed rooms on the first level will most likely need an alternate source of heating such as radiators.

Environmental Sustainability Environmentally, the food doesn’t need to travel very far thus reducing CO2 gases and uses less packaging than that found in larger supermarket chains such as Tesco.

Daylight will be the primary source of light and by keeping the spaces open as much as possible the light can reach more spaces. Skylights will be added to the north-facing roof. Enclosed rooms have windows to ensure daylight entering as much as possible.

Energy Proposition A vertical ground source heat exchanger is proposed to provide heat. Under floor heating will be in place in winter and will be used for cooling in the summer. During the winter as the floor heats the hot air will rise up to the top and floor out through the vents at the top of the spire. The

Any insulation added needs to ensure the walls can let any condensation out, materials such as wood fiber/reed sheet materials, recycled newspaper blown cellulose, sheep’s wool/hemp insulation rolls or any lime based renders.

The spire is an existing area of the building that not only adds to its attractiveness but is also used as a method of stack ventilation.

The insulation aids in keeping the warm air in during the winter as well as allowing the building to breath and detract moisture. Because of this and the ERV there should be no need for a

Energy Recover Ventilator System An ERV (Energy Recovery Ventilator) was chosen over a heat recovery ventilator because and ERV helps combat moisture 40% more than and HRV. Because of the type of building and cnstruction it is best to prevent moisture buildup where possible. This system takes fresh air and uses the heat from exhaust air in order to create fresh warm air with very little electricity needed. The fresh air in this case is taken from a vent in the external wall and hot exhaust air is taken from a vent just below the new balcony on the first floor. The fresh warm air that is created is then expelled through a floor vent in each room on the first floor and the exhaust air keeps passing through and is let out at the roof of the atrium to either flow into the spire or be collected by the ashp.

Air heated on can be ventilated out through the spire through opening on the

building.

placed on the

Hot air can get trapped in crevices such as this, for this reason there is an energy recovery ventilator in place to utilize the heat trapped below to heat the enclosed spaces on

As the air heats heating, people and lighting it rises and is attracted into the spire by the colder external air and pushed out through the louvres at the top.

Natural Ventilation Stack Effect


The Resilient Wellbeing Borders Centre & Project Market + Programme and Place + Prospectus + Prototype

Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture M.Sc. Advanced Sustainable Design 2016

Fresh air from outside

Exhaust air from home

Ground Source Heat Pump

COMPRESSOR

EXPANSION VALVE

Katie Zoppo

Fresh air to home

CONDENSER EVAPORATOR

Construction Considerations Detail 1 Adding insulation internally can create complications when it comes to windows or decorative elements. The solution for the decorative trusses is to finish the insulation 50mm from the truss and add lights to emphasise them. The existing window glazing is clear and, since a change in glazing will not effect the external faรงade much, the glass will be changed to triple glazed panes. In order to avoid creating a cold bridge, the insulation will be added to the existing slope at the windows.

Other Resilient Borders 2016 Projects + Textile Centre + Textile Community Centre + Mobile Kids + Borders Design Incubator + Wellbeing Centre and Market + A Centre for Visual Landscape + Borders Water + Skills Traditional + Open Textile

Exhaust air to center

Detail 2 A steel frame structure was the chosen method of construction for the balcony extension, as well as to convert the first floor stepped flooring into a flat surface area. Steel was chosen because it is much lighter than wood and more durable. At the end of every second joist the new balustrade is attached, on the other joists are lights giving light to the central area on the ground floor. The new balcony is made with 30mm frosted laminated glass; this is to allow as much sunlight as possible from the skylights to reach the ground floor. Detail 3 Insulation should be added to the interior side of the external walls to help keep a consistent temperature without the use of mechanical equipment. The internal side was chosen in order to preserve the external faรงade. 50X175 strapping placed at 600 centres need to be mounted in order to hold the insulation in place. Insulation should be placed 25mm off the external wall to allow a gap for air to flow through to help dry any moisture that enters. The chosen insulation is Thermafleece Natrahemp 100mm in thickness, which is a highly breathable insulation. Only 100mm thickness was chosen because if the insulation is too thick it will not allow the walls to breath enough. A 50 mm gap will be left for electrical and plumbing services before placing the wood wool boards and finishing with lime plaster.

Vertical ground loop can be placed anywhere from 15-120 metres deep.

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Detail 1

Detail 2

Detail 3

2016 e wellbeing centre  
2016 e wellbeing centre  
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