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YEAR 7

TEACHER

RESOURCE


This resource book has been written by teachers, for teachers. Special acknowledgments go to: Kati Recinos Anna Urbano Hugh van Cuylenburg

ABOUT THE RESILIENCE PROJECT We teach positive mental health strategies.

© The Resilience Project 2017


WELCOME The lessons in this resource and the corresponding student journal are divided up into categories: •

Emotional Literacy

Mindfulness

Gratitude

Empathy

You will see which category applies to a lesson by identifying the corresponding colour. The categories and their identifiers are listed below: EMPATHY MINDFULNESS GRATITUDE EMOTIONAL LITERACY


LESSON 1 CHARACTER STRENGTHS Watch the Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone film trailer. Write down a strength or quality each character possesses: Hagrid: Harry: Hermione: Ron: Draco Malfoy:

LESSON 12 CHARACTER STRENGTHS - REVISION

Professor McGonagall: Neville Longbottom: Professor Snape:

My top five character strengths:

Professor Dumbledore:

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I share my top character strength with:


LESSON 1 INTRODUCTION TO CHARACTER STRENGTHS Australian Curriculum PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY Self-Awareness: Recognise Personal Qualities and Achievements •

Make a realistic assessment of their abilities and achievements, and prioritise areas for improvement.

Outline: Activity 1: (5 mins) •

Watch Video 701 from the Video Resource List.

For each character, students are to write down a strength or quality they possess.

Hagrid, Harry, Hermione, Ron, Draco Malfoy, Professor McGonagall, Neville Longbottom, Professor Snape, Professor Dumbledore

Understand Themselves as Learners: •

Identify and choose a range of learning strategies appropriate to specific tasks and describe work practises that assist their learning. For example: choosing strategies that capitalise on and expand their strengths and preferred learning styles. Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Self-Management: Develop Self-Discipline and Set Goals •

Select use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Activity 2: VIA Character Strength Survey (30 mins) •

Using the following website: https://www. viacharacter.org/survey/account/register.

Students must first register to do the survey. They should keep their user name and password in a safe place to make logging in at a later date easy.

They should complete the survey individually, answering questions as honestly as possible.

Upon completion, it will produce a document outlining the students’ character strengths in order. Students must save the document by cutting and pasting the results into a Word document for later reflection and writing their top five in their workbooks.

Learning Intentions: •

To discover their own character strengths.

To discover others’ character strengths.

Activity 3: Hands Activity (15 minutes) •

Resources: •

Hand printouts (Year 7 Resources) —photocopy for class.

Computer and internet access for each student

Textas.

Video Resource List.

A character strength is written on each hand. All students with those strengths in their top five should sign their name on that hand. Pin them up in the room.

Journal Entry: •

Name three people who have the same character strengths in their top five:

Debrief: •

Share some of the top strengths and shared strengths. Inform students that this is a list of how they are at their best. It’s important not to go to the bottom of the list to see what students are not as good at; look at these bottom strengths as growth strengths or areas of character that are not used as often as the top strengths, because as humans, we tend to stick to what we are good at!

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LESSON 2 MY CHARACTER STRENGTHS

Create a coat of arms or emblem that represents your top five character strengths. Brainstorm some ideas here:

My Character Strength Coat of Arms:

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LESSON 2 CHARACTER STRENGTHS Australian Curriculum PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY Self-Awareness: Recognise Personal Qualities and Achievements •

Make a realistic assessment of their abilities and achievements, and prioritise areas for improvement.

Outline: Activity 1: Coat of Arms (30 minutes) •

Students are to create a coat of arms or emblem that represents their character strengths.

Students should write down their top five strengths and develop a symbol for each. They then put this onto their coat of arms.

Understand Themselves as Learners: •

Identify and choose a range of learning strategies appropriate to specific tasks and describe work practises that assist their learning. For example: choosing strategies that capitalise on and expand their strengths and preferred learning styles.

Activity 2: Class’ Top Strengths Wordle (15 mins) •

Do whilst students are engaged in coat of arms activity.

Have each student email you or tell you what their top five character strengths are and enter them into http://www.wordle.net/. Ensure that they are spelled correctly, with the same capital letters and with no spaces in between words (e.g. Appreciation of beauty and excellence becomes appreciationofbeautyandexcellence). Print and display in the room.

Discuss the class findings and ask students to reflect the times that, as a class, the strengths may have been demonstrated, and by whom.

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Self-Management: Develop Self-Discipline and Set Goals •

Select use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Learning Intentions: •

To become aware of the strengths of other members of their class.

To deepen their understanding of their own character strengths.

Resources: •

Student workbooks.

Coloured pencils.

Internet access.

Debrief: •

It’s important to highlight the class’ top strengths. Use this as a framework for classroom common languages. For example, if someone does something that frustrates another student, encourage forgiveness, reminding them that it is a top strength of the class and discuss ways to forgive the student for frustrating you?

Or, if kindness doesn’t appear in the wordle as a top strength, recognise small random acts of kindness within the class and point them out. Further, encourage students to acknowledge kind acts, and discuss how as a class we are developing our strength of kindness.

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LESSON 3 LABELLING EMOTIONS What are the characteristics of each of the characters, Fear, Anger, Disgust and Joy and Sadness? Emotion What it feels like in your body

A time when you’ve felt it

Joy

Label each of these emotions: Anger

Disgust

LESSON 3 LABELLING EMOTIONS

Sadness Journal Entry: Underline the emotions that you have felt today. Circle the emotions you felt the strongest. Fear

anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

hope

boredom nervous

Were there any other emotions you felt? REMEMBER: there are no right or wrong answers when it comes to discussing or labelling emotions.

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LESSON 3 LABELLING EMOTIONS Australian Curriculum

Outline

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: (5 mins)

Self-awareness:

Watch Video 702 from the Video Resource List.

Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts

Self-Management:

Activity 2: (25 mins) •

Watch the following individual clips and complete the table in student books.

Inside Out: ’Get to know your emotions’:

Express Emotions Appropriately

››

Fear: Video 703

››

Anger: Video 704

››

Disgust: Video 705

››

Sadness: Video 706

››

Joy: Video 707

››

What are the characteristics of each of the characters? Fear, Anger, Disgust and Joy and Sadness?

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviours

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing

Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity

Develop skills to evaluate health information and express health concerns

Activity 3: (10 mins) •

Divide the class into five groups; one for each of the characters above.

Give the ‘Joy’ group a piece of yellow paper, ‘Sadness’, a blue piece, ‘Disgust’, a green piece, ‘Fear’, a purple piece and ‘Anger’, a red piece. You could nominate a colour group as they walk into the room to make the groups more random.

Each group member writes their example of a time when they have experienced that emotion on the paper provided. Pin up in the room.

Learning Intentions: •

To begin to be able to articulate feelings and emotions and provide examples in their own lives.

To expand their language around emotion.

Share with the class some of the examples provided.

Resources: •

Internet access, speakers, projector.

Student books.

Coloured paper.

Textas.

Video Resource List.

Activity 4: (15 mins) •

Students are to label each of these emotions in their workbooks.

Journal Entry: •

Underline the emotions that you have felt today. Circle the ones you felt the strongest: anger, disgust, happiness, frustration, boredom, apathy, fear, excitement, confusion, hope, nervous.

Were there any other emotions that you felt?

Debrief: •

Highlight to students that there are no right or wrong answers when it comes to discussing or labelling emotions, as it is a very personal approach. 9


LESSON 4 DEMONSTRATING EMPATHY

Responding to News My partner’s name: Our scenario of someone’s ‘news’ is:

LESSON 4

DEMONSTRATING EMPATHY Now devise a role-play of how to appropriately respond to their news: How to show empathy in the thingsawe do loser: 2. Being good people do tooutlined demonstrate Brainstorm ways in which toThings behave in thecould situations below.this… In your brainstorm, you should think of different ideas of how to act in the situation and then draw on a past example of how you have demonstrated it in the past, OR how you could have demonstrated this (instead of the way you may have dealt with the situation). 1. Being a good winner:

When is a time you have experienced this and how did you or how could you have behaved?

Things people could do to demonstrate this…

4. Showing encouragement and offering help to less skilful peers: Things people could do to demonstrate this…

3. Showing respect to other people: When is a time you have experienced this and how did you or how Things people could do to demonstrate this… could you have behaved? When is a time you have experienced this and how did you or how could you have behaved?

LESSON 4

DEMONSTRATING EMPATHY

When is a time you have experienced this and how did you or how could you have behaved? 5. Resolving conflicts without Journal runningEntry: to the teacher/parent: 9 What did you learn about someone else today? Things people could do to demonstrate this…

When is a time you have experienced this and how did you or how could you have behaved? What did you learn about empathy today and how can you use it in future?

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LESSON 4 EMPATHY 1 Australian Curriculum

Resources:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Internet access, laptop, speakers, projector.

Student workbooks.

Video Resource List.

Self-Awareness: Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management:

Outline: Activity 1: Video (5 minutes) •

Watch Video 708 from the Video Resource List.

Express Emotions Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviours.

Activity 2: Responding to the Clip (5-10 minutes) •

After watching the clip, ask students some of the emotions that they may have felt while watching the clip and now after seeing it? Students may respond by saying they felt sorry for him, or they felt inspired, or they were glad that he was able to finish the race, etc.

Explain to the students that feeling for Derek whilst watching the clip is an example of empathy. Further, explain what empathy is (refer to the introduction of the resource manual for accurate explanation and examples).

Social Awareness: Appreciate Diverse Perspectives •

Acknowledge the values, opinions and attitudes of different groups within society and compare to their own points of view.

Social Management: Communicate Effectively •

Analyse enablers of and barriers to effective verbal , non verbal and digital communication.

Intercultural Understanding—Recognising Culture and Developing Respect.

Interacting and Empathising with Others: Consider and Develop Multiple Perspectives •

Activity 3: Making Faces When Responding to News (10 minutes) •

Assess diverse perspectives and the assumptions on which they are based.

Empathise with others: •

Imagine and describe the feelings and motivations of people in challenging situations.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Analyse factors that influence emotions (expressing gratitude), and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Learning Intentions: •

To feel empathy in response to a stimulus video clip and recognise these feelings as empathy.

To identify ways in which to demonstrate empathy when responding to news and situations.

As a group, discuss appropriate responses when hearing news. Brainstorm as a class the types of responses. These could include: ››

Facial expressions

››

Sounds (laughing, gasping)

››

Body language (facing and eye contact with the person sharing the news)

››

Actions (fist pump, high five, cuddle, pat on the back/shoulder)

››

Verbal responses (questions asked related to the news such as ‘what?’, ‘how?’, ‘are you ok?’)

Activity 4: Role-plays—Responding to News (10 minutes) •

Have the students work in pairs to brainstorm a scenario of ‘news’. They are to demonstrate, through a role-play and using the brainstorm above, an example of an inappropriate response to the news and an empathetic/appropriate response to the news. You could have pairs perform their role-plays to the class when they have had some practise time.

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LESSON 4 EMPATHY 1 Activity 5: How to Show Empathy in the Things We Do (20 minutes) •

Using the student workbook, students should brainstorm ways in which to behave in the situations outlined. In their brainstorm, they should come up with different ideas of how to act and then draw on a past example of either how they have demonstrated it in the past OR how they could have demonstrated this, (instead of the way they may have dealt with the situation): ››

Being a good winner (e.g. not bragging; showing respect for the losing team)

››

Being a good loser (e.g. congratulating the winner; not blaming others for the loss, not becoming frustrated)

››

Showing respect to other people, (peers, teachers, umpires in sport, etc.)

››

Showing encouragement and offering help to less skilful peers

››

Resolving conflicts without running to the teacher/parent

Journal Entry: •

What did you learn about someone else today?

Describe what you learnt about the meaning of empathy and how can you use it in future?

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LESSON 5 AN INTRODUCTION TO MINDFULNESS

Check in: How are you feeling right now?

Smiling Mind—‘Exploring the Breath’ How did you feel… before the meditation?

during the meditation?

LESSON 5 AN INTRODUCTION TO MINDFULNESS Rainbow Walk

after the meditation?

What did you spot? Red: Orange: Yellow: Green: Blue:

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Indigo: Violet:

Journal Entry What are three little things you noticed today, (this could be within your body, in the classroom, about someone else, or on the walk)?


LESSON 5 AN INTRODUCTION TO MINDFULNESS Australian Curriculum

Outline:

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Activity 1: (20 mins)

Being Healthy, Safe and Active: •

Evaluate strategies to manage personal, physical and social changes that occur as they grow older.

Practise and apply strategies to seek help for themselves or others.

Investigate and select strategies to promote health, safety and wellbeing.

Check in: How are you feeling right now?

Ask students to complete the following meditation, Smiling Mind—Exploring the Breath

Discuss with students how they feel having completed the meditation, and how they felt before and during the activity.

Activity 2: Rainbow Walk (20 mins)

Learning Intentions: •

Take the students outside for a guided walk around the school grounds. They must spot something for every colour of the rainbow. They should do this individually and try not to double-up on things someone else has spotted previously. Ideally this is a task done in silence.

Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo, Violet:

To begin to understand the concept and experience of mindfulness.

Resources: •

Speakers, projector, laptop with internet access.

Ensure you have registered for Smiling Mind and have a login. www.smilingmind.com.au.

Coloured paper—one for each colour of the rainbow.

Textas.

Activity 3: •

Back in the classroom, lay out a piece of coloured paper for each colour of the rainbow. Students write down the things that they spotted for each colour on the relevant piece of paper. Display.

Discuss the findings.

Debrief: •

This type of activity will encourage students to look for the little things, to be more attentive and focussed.

Journal Entry: (5 mins) •

Three little things you noticed today:

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LESSON 6 GRATITUDE 1 What does ‘gratitude’ mean?

Watch the clip and answer the below. What is he grateful for?

Who is he grateful to?

How do you know he is thankful?

Journal Entry Three things I am grateful for today:

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LESSON 6 GRATITUDE 1 Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: Hugh Van Cuylenburg Video (5 mins)

Self-Awareness:

Watch Video 709 from the Video Resource List.

Recognise Emotions

Activity 2: What Does Gratitude Mean? (10 mins)

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Social Awareness:

On the board, write the word ‘gratitude’ and ask students what they think it means.

Appreciate Diverse Perspectives

Activity 3: Thank You From Kid President (15 mins)

Watch Video 710 from the Video Resource List.

Discuss: What is he grateful for? Who is he grateful to?; How do you know he is thankful?

Try to encourage students to observe his body language as well as the words he says, especially as he is walking through the city—he is awestruck, observant and open.

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Analyse factors that influence emotions (expressing gratitude), and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices and behaviours (expressing gratitude) and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities.

Activity 4: Gratitude Photo Board (20 mins) •

Collect a range of magazines and newspapers and have students cut out images of things that represent what they are grateful for.

Divide the class into nine groups and give a letter from the word ‘gratitude’ to each group to cover with images. Alternatively, students could write responses onto each letter if pictures are not available.

Journal Entry: (5 mins) •

Learning Intentions: •

To begin to understand the concept of gratitude.

To begin to express gratitude.

Debrief: •

Resources: •

Print out the letters of ‘GRATITUDE’ and enlarge them onto A3 paper (Year 7 Resources).

Student workbooks.

Projector, speakers, access to internet.

Whiteboard and markers.

Magazines, newspapers.

Video Resource List.

At the end of each gratitude lesson, students document three things they are grateful for. Students should be encouraged not to repeat items.

Expressing gratitude helps us to focus on the present and appreciate your life as it is in the moment. It doesn’t focus on wants and needs, but expresses thanks for what you have. Gratitude should be expressed daily for benefits to personal character and resilience. At the end of each gratitude lesson, we will make a note of three things we are grateful for today, but it would be beneficial to continue this each day on your own in a ‘Gratitude Journal’ of some description. This could be a diary, your phone or you could write it on the shower screen in the steam! As long as you express it, you will feel it!

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LESSON 7 HOW FULL IS YOUR BUCKET?

CHECK IN Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

boredom

hope

nervous

Are there any other emotions you are feeling?

How does it feel to add to someone’s bucket? How Full is Your Bucket Watch the clip. How does it feel to have an empty ‘bucket’?

LESSON 7

How does it feel to take away from someone’s bucket? HOW FULL IS YOUR BUCKET? How can you add to people’s buckets? 20 Things We Should Say More Often Make a poster with a partner about bucket fillers. Write on the bucket everything you can think of that are ways to add to people’s buckets.

CHECK OUT Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

hope

boredom nervous

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Were there any other emotions that you felt?

Debrief: Kindness creates a resultant feeling like no other. It can be as simple as opening a door for someone, offering your seat to someone on the train or a kind comment. It doesn’t take much effort, but goes a long way for you and the recipient! Look for ways to be kind each day and take note of the feeling you have given someone else, and the feelings you have created for yourself.

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LESSON 7 HOW FULL IS YOUR BUCKET? Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: CHECK IN (5 mins)

Self-Awareness:

Have students complete the CHECK IN activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management: Express Emotions Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviours.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing.

Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Develop skills to evaluate health information and express health concerns.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities. Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

Learning Intentions: •

To emotionally connect with the topic of kindness.

To understand and experience ways they can contribute to a positive learning environment and community.

Activity 2: How Full is your Bucket? (15 mins) •

Watch Video 711 from the Video Resource List.

Discuss or answer the questions in workbooks:

How does it feel to have an empty ‘bucket’?

How can you add to people’s buckets?

How does it feel to add to someone’s bucket?

How does it feel to take away from someone’s bucket?

Activity 3: 20 Things We Should Say More Often (35 mins) •

Watch Video 712 from the Video Resource List.

Ask students to make a poster with a partner about bucket fillers. Ask them to write on the bucket everything they can possibly think of that are ways to add to people’s buckets.

Activity 4: CHECK OUT (5 mins) •

Have students complete the CHECK OUT activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Debrief: •

Kindness creates a resultant feeling like no other. It can be as simple as opening a door for someone, offering your seat to someone on the train or a kind comment. It doesn’t take much effort, but goes a long way for you and the recipient! Look for ways to be kind each day and take note of the feeling you have given someone else and the feelings you have created for yourself.

Resources: •

Internet access, speakers, projector OR a copy of How full is your Bucket? book.

Student workbooks.

Video Resource List. 19


LESSON 8 PUT-UPS AND PUT-DOWNS

Journal Entry How did it feel giving a put-up?

Who did you give a put-up to? Why?

What did you learn about someone else today?

Debrief Put-downs can be very hurtful. There may be other things going on in that person’s life that you have no idea about and the put-down can seem small to you, but can be very painful to the recipient. Put-ups require no effort and don’t cost a thing. Just remember the words of Thumper: ‘If you can’t say something nice, don’t say nothin’ at all’.


LESSON 8 PUT-UPS AND PUT-DOWNS Australian Curriculum

Outline:

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Activity 1: Class Discussion (25 mins) •

As a class discuss: What is a put down?

On the board, write down all the put-downs students can think of.

They may laugh during this process, let it go. Then ask, ‘how does it feel when someone says something like this to you?’ This will change the mood. Ask what happens when you experience a put-down. It is important at this time to make it more personal. How does it feel? Write down all the negative emotions they list.

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities.

Next, ask them if they know what a put-up is and provide some examples by giving students in your class some put-ups. Examples:

Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

’I notice that Myranda always has a smile on her face and is ready to help anyone with anything at all.’

’I really love how Augustine always reminds all of us to turn out the light when we leave the room.’

Now we are going to look at put-ups. How might it feel if we used put-ups instead of put-downs? Write these on the board.

Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing.

Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY Self-Awareness: Recognise Emotions

Activity 2: Put-Up (15 mins)

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour.

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Form a circle. Students are to go around the circle giving the person on their left a ‘put-up’.

Activity 3: Put-up Slips (15 mins) •

Inform students that they are going to begin ‘reading’ each other, finding positive things schoolmates are doing and giving each other putups. To do this, they are going to use the ‘put-up slips’. Students complete three ‘put-up slips’ for people in their class. Play some music whilst they are doing this. When they are done, they ‘post them’ in the box. This allows you to check them before redistributing.

Learning Intentions:

Journal Entry: (5 mins)

For students to experience kindness through putups, and think about how it feels to experience put-downs.

Students will understand the difference between put-downs and put-ups.

Students will be encouraged to give others put-ups.

Debrief: •

Put-downs can be very hurtful. There may be other things going on in that person’s life that you have no idea about and the put-down can seem small to you, but can be very painful to the recipient. Putups require no effort and don’t cost a thing.

Just remember the words of Thumper: ‘if you can’t say something nice, don’t say nothin’ at all’. (You can watch Thumper saying it in this cute 20-second clip if time permits, Video 713 from the Video Resource List.

Resources: •

Whiteboard and markers.

Student workbooks.

Put-up slips photocopied, Year 7 Resources (enough for three per student).

A box to put put-ups in.

How did it feel giving a put-up? Who did you give a put-up to? Why? What did you learn about someone else today?

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LESSON 9 PRACTISING MINDFULNESS Mindfulness Treasure Hunt You are to find: Five colours:

Three sounds:

LESSON 9 PRACTISING MINDFULNESS Two textures:

Four shapes:

One emotion you feel:

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LESSON 9 PRACTISING MINDFULNESS - COLOURING

Journal Entry What are three little things you noticed today, (this could be within your body, in the classroom, about someone else, or on a walk)?

Debrief Mindfulness is about the ability to focus and maintain that focus, looking for the small things and being aware of your surroundings 23 and tuning in to them. The mindful colouring helps to facilitate this.

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LESSON 9 PRACTISING MINDFULNESS Australian Curriculum

Outline:

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Activity 1: Smiling Mind (5 mins)

Being Healthy, Safe and Active: Activity 2: Mindfulness Treasure Hunt (20 mins)

Evaluate strategies to manage personal, physical and social changes that occur as they grow older.

Practise and apply strategies to seek help for themselves or others.

Have students look around the classroom or outside. This is best done in silence.

Investigate and select strategies to promote health, safety and wellbeing.

Students should look for the following and record the location of these items in their books.

Five colours

Four shapes

Three sounds

Two textures

One emotion you feel

Share with the class.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Activity 3: Mindfulness Colouring (25 mins) •

Learning Intentions: •

Ask students to spend the remainder of the lesson completing the mindfulness colouring sheets provided in the student books. Play some music in the background.

For students to practise mindfulness activities.

Journal Entry:

Resources: •

Student workbooks.

Coloured pencils.

Speakers and access to Smiling Mind.

What are three things you noticed today?

Debrief: •

Mindfulness is about the ability to focus and maintain that focus, looking for the small things and being aware of your surroundings and tuning into them. The mindful colouring helps to facilitate this.

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LESSON 10 GRATITUDE IN THE WORLD

Write three things that you are grateful for in each of the images or what the people in the images might be grateful for.

LESSON 10 GRATITUDE IN THE WORLD

I’m grateful for… 27

What are three things you are most grateful for? (3 points) (2 points) (1 point)

‘What is our class is most grateful for?’

Share your responses with the class.

Journal Entry What are the three things you are grateful for today? (Remember, no double-ups from above!)

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LESSON 10 GRATITUDE IN THE WORLD Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: (20 mins)

Self-Awareness:

In their books, students are to look at the pictures and write three things they are grateful for in each of the images, or what the people in the images could be grateful for.

Share responses with the class.

Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Social Awareness: Appreciate Diverse Perspectives •

Activity 2: (35 mins) •

As a class, discuss the things that they are grateful for. Give them five minutes in silence to write these down in their books. After this, students are to think about the three things they are most grateful for. Rank them, awarding three points for the top one, two points for the middle one and one point for the last one. Collate responses on the board and then ask students to give their points.

From the data collected, students create a graph in their books, titled, ‘What we are most grateful for’. You could make one for the classroom too.

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Analyse factors that influence emotions (expressing gratitude), and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices and behaviours (expressing gratitude) and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities.

Journal Entry: •

Debrief: •

Expressing gratitude helps us to focus on the moment and appreciate your life as it is at present. It doesn’t focus on wants and needs, but expresses thanks for what you have. Gratitude should be expressed daily for benefits to personal character and resilience. At the end of each gratitude lesson, we will make a note of three things we are grateful for today, but it would be beneficial to continue this each day on your own in a ‘Gratitude Journal’ of some description. This could be a diary, your phone or you could write it on the shower screen in the steam! As long as you express it, you will feel it!

This was mentioned in their first Gratitude lesson. Ask students who has started a gratitude journal? How has it made them feel? 

Learning Intentions: •

For students to practise gratitude.

For students to be encouraged to look for gratitude in many places.

For students to become aware of what others are grateful for.

Resources: •

Student workbooks.

Computer/internet access—access to Wordle or Excel to graph responses.

Whiteboard and markers.

What are the three things you are grateful for today? Remember, no double-ups from last lesson!

25


LESSON 11 EMOTION VOCABULARY

CHECK OUT Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

hope

boredom nervous

X Factor Clip Are there any other emotions that you are feeling? Watch the video carefully and write down all the emotions you see:

LESSON 11 EMOTION VOCABULARY

Debrief What emotions did you feel during the game of Celebrity Heads? Tiny Teddy Exercise Which emotions did you spot? (Make the longest list possible!)

Why do you think you felt this way?

CHECK OUT

Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness

frustration

boredom

excitement

confusion hope nervous What were some of the physical/verbal signs of this emotion (e.g. feeling hot, sweaty, heart rate elevated, laughing out loud, etc.)? Were there any other emotions that you felt?

31


LESSON 11 EMOTION VOCABULARY Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: (5 mins)

Self-Awareness:

Have students complete the CHECK IN activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Activity 2: Tiny Teddy Exercise (20 mins) •

Each student opens a packet of Tiny Teddys. Spread them out in front of you. Name each emotion the Teddys are feeling. The catch is that you cannot use the same word twice! Regroup and share.

Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour.

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Activity 3: ‘Celebrity Heads’ (20 mins) •

Select three students to come up the front. Write an emotion above their head on the whiteboard. They need to ask five ‘yes/no’ questions before guessing which ‘emotion’ they are representing. Students should also not use the names of other emotions when asking the first five questions.

E.g. Does this look like the emotion? (Do a face.)

Would I feel this if I had just won the grand final?

Would I experience this if my dog died?

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing.

Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Develop skills to evaluate health information and express health concerns.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities. Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

Learning Intentions: •

For students to expand vocabulary around emotion.

Resources: •

Student workbooks.

Packet of Tiny Teddys for each student (check for any allergies).

Whiteboard and markers.

Activity 4: X Factor / BGT Inspiring and Emotional Auditions Clip (15 mins) •

Watch Video 714 from the Video Resource List for the first seven minutes.

Students are to write down all the emotions they see during the video in their workbooks, (e.g. nervous, fear, surprise, elation, excitement, love, pride). Share results with the class.

Have students complete the CHECK OUT activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Debrief: (5 mins) •

What emotions did you feel during the game of ‘Celebrity Heads’?

Why do you think you felt this way?

What were some of the physical/verbal signs of this emotion? (e.g. feeling hot, sweaty, heart rate elevated, laughing out loud).

27


LESSON 12

LESSON 12

REFLECTIVE LISTENING AND RESPONDING TO NEWS

REFLECTIVE LISTENING AND RESPONDING TO NEWS

Ways you can show empathy Practise Reflective Listening: Show respect for the person by reflecting what they have said back to them—this lets them know for sure that you were listening.

My biggest fear is…

For example, say any of the following: • ‘What I hear you saying is...’ (then repeat what they just said as best you can). Do not interpret or put your ‘spin’ on it! • ‘If I'm getting this right, you're saying…’ (again, repeat what they just said.)

My most happy memory is…

After you have repeated their words back to them, ask, ‘Is that correct?’ If they say ‘yes’, then move on. Otherwise try again until you have accurately reflected what they have said. My big dream for the future is…

Showing Empathy and Validation Accept the validity of the other person's feelings regardless of whether you agree with them. For example, say any of the following:

One time when I felt sad was…

• • • •

One thing I would like my class to know about me…

‘When I put myself in your shoes, I can see why you would feel that way.’ ‘When I look at this from your viewpoint, what you're saying makes sense to me." ‘That must really feel bad to you.’ ‘I can only begin to imagine how much that would… (hurt you, bother you, make you mad, etc.)’

33

LESSON 12 REFLECTIVE LISTENING AND RESPONDING TO NEWS

News You have to really mean these statements for this to work. You can't fake empathy! It can help to imagine that you are the other person, and think about how things look from their viewpoint. This is a skill that anyone can learn!

My team lost the grand final.

This next type of communication is also very good for showing empathy.

My dog died.

Expressing Understanding

My sister is sick.

Non-empathetic response

Indicate understanding of what your partner is experiencing. Say any of the following: • ‘I think I can see where you're coming from.’ • ‘I see what you mean’ • ‘I think I understand what you're saying.’

It’s my birthday and I’m so excited.

I’m going overseas.

Journal Entry What did you learn about someone else today?

35

Empathetic response


LESSON 12 REFLECTIVE LISTENING AND RESPONDING TO NEWS Australian Curriculum HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing.

Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities. Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

Outline: Activity 1: (25 mins—depending on the size of the group) •

Form a circle and ask students to answer the prompts on a piece of paper (photocopy the table in Year 7 Resources). Scrunch up the paper and throw it into the middle of the circle. Go around the circle and select a piece of paper. The class needs to guess who wrote it.

Activity 2: Responding to News (building from your first introductory empathy session) (30 mins) •

Watch Video 715 from the Video Resource List.

How do you respond to people who share news (good or bad) in an empathic way? Brainstorm some options with the class. Below are some examples to help guide discussion:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

››

Practise Reflective Listening: Show respect for the person by reflecting what they have said back to them—this lets them know for sure that you were listening. For example, say any of the following:

››

‘What I hear you saying is...’ (then repeat what they just said as best you can). Do not interpret or put your ‘spin’ on it!

››

‘If I’m getting this right, you’re saying…’ (again, repeat what they just said.)

Self-Awareness: Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour.

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

After you have repeated their words back to them, ask, ‘Is that correct?’ If they say ‘yes’, then move on. Otherwise try again until you have accurately reflected what they have said.

Showing Empathy and Validation: Accept the validity of the other person’s feelings regardless of whether you agree with them. For example, say any of the following:

Learning Intentions: •

For students to understand how their actions impact others.

For students to understand how they can grow from negative experiences.

To learn that experiences shape who we are.

Photocopy the table (Year 7 Resource Sheets).

Computer, internet access, speaker and projectors.

‘When I put myself in your shoes, I can see why you would feel that way.’

››

‘When I look at this from your viewpoint, what you’re saying makes sense to me.”

››

‘That must really feel bad to you.’

››

‘I can only begin to imagine how much that would… (hurt you, bother you, make you mad, etc.)’

You have to really mean these statements for this to work. You can’t fake empathy! It can help to imagine that you are the other person, and think about how things look from their viewpoint. This is a skill that anyone can learn!

This next type of communication is also very good for showing empathy.

Resources: •

››

29


LESSON 12 REFLECTIVE LISTENING AND RESPONDING TO NEWS •

Expressing Understanding: Indicate understanding of what your partner is experiencing. Say any of the following: ››

‘I think I can see where you’re coming from.’

››

‘I see what you mean.’

››

‘I think I understand what you’re saying.’

Debrief: (5 minutes) •

Discuss: How is getting to know each other helpful in developing empathy? It breaks down barriers and judgement, enables perspective, and can create cohesion and understanding within a classroom.

Journal Entry: •

What did you learn about someone else today?

31


LESSON 13 MINDFULNESS 3

Sensory Mindful Class Activities

LESSON 13 See

List everything you see happening in the picture:

MINDFULNESS 3

Clip Three:

Object Two:

Listen Clip Four:

Listen to the four clips that will be played in class and list as many different sounds you hear in each. Clip One:

Object Three: Touch

Clip Two:

Write the name of each object you touch during this activity. For each, use as many words to describe the objects you felt during this activity:

Object One:

Object Four:

37

LESSON 13

Object Five:

MINDFULNESS 3

‘Think’ - My Day So Far

39

41


LESSON 13 MINDFULNESS 3 Australian Curriculum HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Being Healthy, Safe and Active: •

Evaluate strategies to manage personal, physical and social changes that occur as they grow older.

Practise and apply strategies to seek help for themselves or others.

Investigate and select strategies to promote health, safety and wellbeing.

students try to list all of the musical instruments they can hear in each piece, including vocals, on the relevant activity page in their student workbook. •

Watch Video 716 from the Video Resource List.

Watch Video 717 from the Video Resource List.

Watch Video 718 from the Video Resource List. The duration of this is two hours! Just play first two minutes, do not stop it suddenly, gradually fade out the volume to finish the piece.

Watch Video 719 from the Video Resource List.

Watch Video 720 from the Video Resource List.

Activity 4: Touch (10 mins)

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

(Note, to set the mood for this activity, you may like to play some soft instrumental music in the background. This will encourage students to avoid talking to each other and to help set the tone of the activity).

Choose five items in the classroom that the students can spend some time touching/feeling for the different textures. These could include the tabletop, carpet, door handle, etc. Students should close their eyes and handle each item. After touching each item, students should describe in great detail what they feel/touch on the relevant page in their student workbook. Some responses could include ‘soft’, ‘cold’, ‘rough’, ‘smooth’, etc.

Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Learning Intentions: •

For students to experience periods of mindfulness.

For students to recognise and appreciate the ‘little things’ in life.

For students to understand the importance of mindfulness activities and the impact on daily life.

Activity 5: Think (10 mins) •

(Note, to set the mood for this activity, you may like to play some soft instrumental music in the background. This will encourage students to avoid talking to each other and to help set the tone of the activity).

Students are to reflect on their day so far by writing a detailed recount of their day since waking up this morning. In their reflections, they should include what they did, how they felt at various points of the day, (describing their emotion/mood and the physical signs of these). They should write this in the relevant page of their student workbook.

Resources: •

Student workbooks.

Laptop/speakers/data projector.

Internet access.

Bring some objects to class with a variety of textures for students to touch. For example a pinecone, brush, a marble.

Outline:

Debrief: (10 mins) Activity 1: Smiling Mind Meditation (5-10 mins)

Activity 2: See (10 mins)

Why is it important to focus on just one thought/ feeling/sense for a short period of time each day?

How could practising mindful activities benefit you in your life?

List and describe three little things you have noticed today.

Students are to look closely at the picture in their workbooks and list everything they can see happening in the picture. Write down as many as they can think of!

Activity 3: Hear (10 mins) •

Students should close their eyes.

Play the following music clips, (sound only no visual). At the end of each piece of music, have 33


LESSON 14 NEEDS AND WANTS

Needs and Wants Categorise the words into ‘needs’ and ‘wants’. Justify your responses. Words

Need?

Want?

Water

Why?

Words

The human body needs water to function.

Holiday

Jewellery

Bed

Health

Plane

Food

Phone

Love

House

Car

Land

Sleep

Fresh Air

Wardrobe

Friends

Need?

Want?

Why?

43

LESSON 14 NEEDS AND WANTS

Journal Entry Which of these things on the ‘needs’ list do you have?

Which of these things on the’ wants’ list do you have?

Look at the lists and consider the things you DO have. How do you feel about this list?

How does categorising these things make you feel?

Three things I am grateful for today are:


LESSON 14 NEEDS AND WANTS Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: Workbook Activity (15 mins)

Self-Awareness:

Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Social Awareness:

Activity 2: Consquence Chart (20 mins) •

Select two of the ‘wants’ and two of the ‘needs’ and complete a consequence chart if you didn’t have them. Responses can be written either in a positive or negative manner.

E.g. ‘Water’ – if I didn’t have access to water – I would not be able to survive.

‘Car’ - if I didn’t have a car – I would have to walk – my health would improve – I could enjoy my travel time more – I would feel calmer.

Appreciate Diverse Perspectives •

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Analyse factors that influence emotions (expressing gratitude), and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Activity 3: Workbook Activity (15 mins) •

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

In workbooks, students categorise the images into ‘needs’ and ‘wants’. They should justify responses. Discuss answers.

Plan and use health practices and behaviours (expressing gratitude) and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities.

Discuss and answer in workbooks: ››

What of these things on the ‘needs’ list do you have?

››

What of these things on the ‘wants’ list do you have?

››

Look at the lists and consider the things you DO have. How do you feel about this list?

Debrief/Journal Entry: (10 mins)

Learning Intentions: •

For students to learn about needs and wants and to categorise these into levels of importance.

For students to begin focusing on the things they do have, rather than don’t have.

How does categorising these things make you feel?

Three things I am grateful for today are...

Resources: •

Student workbooks.

Scissors and glue.

35


LESSON 15 FIXED AND GROWTH MINDSETS

CHECK IN Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

hope

boredom nervous

Are there any other emotions that you are feeling?

FIXED MINDSETS THINK

SAY

DO

=

I suck at maths

Maths is dumb. I’m never going to need it anyway

Don’t try, study or practise

Poor results

EMOTIONS EXPERIENCED Feel sad, disappointed, discouraged and dejected

LESSON 15 FIXED AND GROWTH MINDSETS

GROWTH MINDSETS EMOTIONS EXPERIENCED

THINK

SAY

DO

=

I find maths difficult

I need help

I try, study and practise

Improved results

Feel more confident, proud and encouraged

45

CHECK OUT Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

Are there any other emotions that you are feeling?

hope

boredom nervous


LESSON 15 FIXED AND GROWTH MINDSETS Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: CHECK IN (5 mins)

Self-Awareness:

Have students complete the CHECK IN activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour.

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Activity 2: Growth Mindset Video Clip (15 mins) •

Watch Video 721 from the Video Resource List.

This features the importance of a growth mindset and how it can help achieve success.

Discussion: Relate this to ‘blocking’ emotions or emotions that may prevent you achieving success.

Activity 3: Fixed Mindsets (15 mins) •

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing.

Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity

Develop skills to evaluate health information and express health concerns.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities.

Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

In a circle, go around the room and ask each student for one example of a fixed mindset they have about themselves. It may have stemmed from something someone said once, or from having difficulty with a subject.

Activity 4: Workbook Activity (25 mins) •

Complete the growth mindset worksheet in the student workbook.

Activity 5: CHECK OUT (5 mins) •

Have students complete the CHECK OUT activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Learning Intentions: •

For students to learn about fixed and growth mindsets and how it relates to our emotions.

For students to practise growth mindset.

Resources: •

Student workbooks.

Internet access, speakers, projectors.

Video Resource List.

37


LESSON 16 POST TRAUMATIC GROWTH

Paste your heart in here:

Journal Entry What did you learn about someone else today?

47


LESSON 16 POST TRAUMATIC GROWTH Australian Curriculum HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Outline: Activity 1: Hearts (15 mins)

Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing:

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing. Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities. Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 2: Colour / Decorate (40 mins) •

Self-Awareness: Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour. Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Learning Intentions:

For students to understand the impact of their actions on others. For students to be introduced to the concept of Post Traumatic Growth.

Resources: • • •

Photocopy of heart shape, Year 7 Resources (one for each student). Textas/fineliners/pencils to decorate the heart. Scissors to cut out the hearts.

Introduce the idea that sometimes we can grow from these experiences and actually become better and stronger from it. It doesn’t mean that what happens to us should be disregarded or forgotten, or that it completely goes away. Rather, it becomes something that we can learn from, and when seen in a positive light, can actually help us be better in the long run. Students are to colour in and decorate the spaces that the creases have formed in order to create something even more beautiful than it was before. (Fineliners are ideal for this, but Textas and pencils will be fine too).

Activity 3: Share (5 mins) •

Have students cut out the heart shapes from the paper. Ask students stand in a circle, recall the ‘put-downs’ from a couple of lessons ago. They need to have a think about a time when someone did something that hurt their feelings. Go around the room and ask for examples. When an example is provided, they should fold the heart. Repeat until all students have given an example and the paper is folded into tiny pieces. Now, unfold the hearts. Look at what has happened to the paper. There will be deep creases, shallow creases, small creases and large ones. Explain that this is like when people put you down. Ask them to try to rub out all the creases. What happens? They will fade, but not be completely gone.

Display the artwork and allow students to look at each other’s work.

Debrief: •

This is an important lesson for students to be able to grow and learn from experiences, and not dwell on them.

Journal Entry: •

What did you learn about someone else today?

39


LESSON 17 MINDFULNESS AMBASSADORS

Mindfulness Ambassador Your challenge is to become a mindfulness ambassador and create something to promote mindfulness around the school! The possibilities are endless; challenge yourself and spread the word on the benefits of mindfulness! Here are some important points to cover in your quest in becoming the Mindful Ambassador: 1. What is mindfulness? 2. Why is it important? 3. What are the general and specific health benefits associated with being mindful?

Planning Space

Planning Space (opposite page) What will you create/organise/run in order to promote mindfulness around the school?

Journal Entry What are three little things that you noticed today?

49


LESSON 17 MINDFULNESS AMBASSADORS Australian Curriculum

Outline:

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Activity 1: Smiling Mind (5 mins)

Being Healthy, Safe and Active: •

Evaluate strategies to manage personal, physical and social changes that occur as they grow older

Activity 2: Inspiration (15 mins) •

Practise and apply strategies to seek help for themselves or others.

Watch Video 722 from the Video Resource List.

Watch Video 723 from the Video Resource List.

Investigate and select strategies to promote health, safety and wellbeing.

Activity 3: Mindfulness ambassadors (40 mins) •

Students are to create a poster/event/video to promote mindfulness and become ambassadors for mindfulness!

Brainstorm ideas a class and discuss the important points to cover:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Learning Intentions: •

For students to deepen their understanding of the purpose of mindfulness and to promote it to the local and wider community.

Resources: •

Speakers and internet access.

Poster paper or video cameras or computer animation programs.

Video Resource List.

››

What is mindfulness?

››

Why is it important?

››

What are the general and specific health benefits associated with being mindful?

Debrief: •

Why is mindfulness important? How can it help us to be healthy and mentally fit?

Journal Entry: •

What are three ‘little things’ you noticed today?

41


LESSON 18 GRATITUDE 4

People I Am Grateful For Write down the names of the people you are really grateful to and why. Gratitude Tree Person: Reasons:

Write the names of each person and the reason you are grateful for them onto the leaves.

Person:

You can colour the leaves and then cut the leaves out and stick them to the tree. Show your tree to others and look at other students’ trees to identify similarities you may have.

Reasons:

Person: Reasons:

Person: Reasons:

Person: Reasons:

Journal Entry Three things I am grateful for today are: (Remember: no double-ups from previous lessons!)

51

LESSON 18 GRATITUDE 4

53


LESSON 18 GRATITUDE 4 Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: (10 mins)

Self-Awareness:

Turn the lights down and play some soft music. Ask students to close their eyes, take several deep breaths and imagine the following: There is a whiteboard in front of you. Pick up a marker and write all your thoughts onto the board—everything that comes into your head, (your thoughts, feelings, questions). Write until there is no room left. Pick up the eraser and slowly wipe the board clean so all your thoughts are rubbed off and the board is completely clean again.

Now I want you to think of those people around you that you are most grateful for. How do they support you? What do they do for you? How do they show you that they value you? These people could be your friends, family, sports coach—anyone you have in you life that supports you and that you are truly grateful for. Now slowly open your eyes and come back into the room.

Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Social Awareness: Appreciate Diverse Perspectives •

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing •

Analyse factors that influence emotions (expressing gratitude), and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Activity 2: People I Am Grateful For (35 mins) •

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices and behaviours (expressing gratitude) and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities.

Learning Intentions: •

For students to consider who they are grateful for.

For students to express this gratitude.

In their workbooks, students are to write down the names of the people they are really grateful to and why. ››

Person:

››

Reasons:

Gratitude Tree: They then write the name of the person and the reasons onto each of the leaves. They can also colour them and paste them onto the tree.

Activity 3: (10 mins) •

Students should then set out their trees for others to see and read.

Resources: •

Photocopy the leaf outlines, Year 7 Resources (one page per student).

Enlarge the tree below to A3 size and copy, (one for each student).

Textas.

Journal Entry: •

Three things I am grateful for today are:

43


LESSON 19 OPTIMISM VS. PESSIMISM

LESSON 19

CHECK IN

LESSON 19

Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: How does this relate to what you now know about the Kid President? anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

hope

OPTIMISM VS. PESSIMISM boredom

OPTIMISM VS. PESSIMISM

nervousCHECK OUT

Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: Optimism vs. Pessimism CHECK OUT Are there any other emotions that you are feeling? Sort the following statementsanger into optimistic vs. pessimistic the emotionsboredom you are feeling right now: disgust happiness Circle frustration statements. Complete the table below: apathy fear excitement confusion hope anger disgust nervous happiness frustration How to Maintain Optimism

Optimistic

apathy fear Pessimistic Are there any other emotions that you are feeling?

e.g.(character The glass strengths) is half full that Write down some of the personal qualities Kid President possesses.

The glass is half empty

excitement

confusion

hope

boredom nervous

Are there any other emotions that you are feeling?

Debrief This donut looks amazing

Remember, an optimistic person does not ignore the realities of life Debrief (e.g. troubles, sickness, death, etc.), but views them in the best possible Remember, an optimistic person does not ignore the realities of life light. It’ll probably be pouring with (e.g. troubles, sickness, death, etc.), but views them in the best possible rain tomorrow light.

‘When you wake up every day, you have two choices. You can either be positive or negative; an optimist or a pessimist. I choose to be an optimist. It’s all a matter of perspective.’ Harvey Mackay

It’s so far away

I had to wait for ages at the doctors today

I love shopping!

55

Optimistic

Pessimistic

E.g. The glass is half full

The glass is half empty

This donut looks amazing

It has a big hole in it

It’s a beautiful day today

It’ll probably be pouring with rain tomorrow

It’s a great walk, it’ll do us good

Its so far away

I got to see a doctor today to help me with my throat infection I love shopping!

I had to wait for ages at the doctors today Everything is so expensive!


LESSON 19 OPTIMISM VS. PESSIMISM Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: (5 mins)

Self-Awareness:

Have students complete the CHECK IN activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour. Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Activity 2: How to Maintain Positive Emotions (35 mins) •

Watch Video 724 from the Video Resource List.

Have students write down some of the personal qualities (character strengths) that Kid President possesses. Discuss.

Watch Video 725 from the Video Resource List.

Discuss: What does this tell us about the type of person he is? He has an extremely positive and optimistic view on life, despite his illness and setbacks because of this.

‘When you wake up every day, you have two choices. You can either be positive or negative; an optimist or a pessimist. I choose to be an optimist. It’s all a matter of perspective.’ Harvey Mackay

How does this relate to what you now know about the Kid President?

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing.

Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Develop skills to evaluate health information and express health concerns.

Activity 3: Optimism vs. Pessimism (15 mins) •

Students should complete the table of optimism vs. pessimism statements by filling in the blank spaces with an appropriate statement. Some example answers are in the table.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities:

Activity 4: CHECK OUT (5 mins)

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities.

Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

Learning Intentions: •

For students to investigate and understand the importance of an optimistic outlook.

For students to apply this understanding.

Have students complete the CHECK OUT activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Debrief: •

An optimistic person does not ignore the realities of life (e.g. troubles, sickness, death, etc.), but views them in the best possible light.

Resources: •

Speakers, projector, and internet access.

Student workbooks.

Video Resource List.

45


LESSON 20

LESSON 20

EMPATHY TOWARDS OTHERS

EMPATHY TOWARDS OTHERS Role-play #2: Jason and the Teacher

If you empathise with the other person, would you behave differently?

What would you do in each situation? A classmate trips and falls down the stairs on the way to lunch.

Jason: Jason was talking to his friend about what they were going to do on the playground at lunchtime at the same time that the teacher was talking. The teacher told him that she was going to contact his parents and discuss his behaviour with them. Jason is mad because he thinks the teacher is always picking on him. ‘Other kids talk’, he says, ‘and the teacher doesn’t do anything about it’.

EMPATHY ROLE-PLAY/SCENARIOS

A classmate thinks you intentionally pushed him, when in fact you bumped into him by accident. He yells at you and calls you names.

The class will be divided into eight groups. Your task is to take one of the scenarios below and write a script for the situation that demonstrates both sides of the argument. Your group will perform it for the class.

Teacher: When she was explaining the homework assignment, Jason was talking instead of listening. She sees him talking all the time. When he doesn’t have his homework, he says he didn’t hear her give the assignment. Jason needs to start listening in class.

A classmate gets sick and throws up in the classroom. Role-play #1: Joanne and her Father Joanne: Joanne’s dad insists that she be in the house by 8 p.m. on school nights. But the weather is getting warm, and her friends are staying out later in the street. Joanne wants to be able to stay with her friends.

A classmate doesn’t do well on a test and starts to cry.

You get upset with a classmate and hit him or her.

Role-play #3: Sarah and her Mum (teachablemoment.org) Sarah: Sarah wants to have a short school dress. Sarah thinks it looks cool and all the girls at her school have short skirts.

Joanne’s father: The rule is that Joanne must be in the house by 8 p.m. on school nights. Joanne’s father is concerned that it is not safe for her to be out after 8 p.m., and he worries about her. He also wants to be sure she gets enough sleep so that she is not tired in school.

You are choosing teams for basketball. There is only one person left, and you know that they aren’t very good. You and the other captain argue about who should have this player. You argue right in front of this person and they start to yell and call you names.

Sarah’s mother: Sarah’s mother thinks students should be dressed neatly for school, and she worries that adults won’t respect her daughter as much if she dresses in that way. Sarah’s mother went to a very strict school where students wore uniforms where the length was constantly monitored, and she thinks the discipline was much better there because of the dress rules.

57

59

LESSON 20 EMPATHY TOWARDS OTHERS Role-play #4: Raymond and Thomas Raymond: Raymond wants to play with his friend Thomas. Thomas, as usual, wants to play basketball. Raymond doesn’t like to play basketball, he’s not very good at it, and he’d rather play something else. He feels as if all Thomas ever wants to do is play basketball. Thomas: Thomas would like to play with Raymond, who is a good friend. Thomas is on a basketball team, and he wants to practise basketball. He would also like Raymond to play basketball better, because then he might want to join the team, too. Then they could spend more time together. (Source: Operation Outreach USA -- oousa.org) (teachablemoment.org)

Script:

Journal Entry What did you learn about someone else today?

How would considering the other person’s perspective when a difference occurs help to understand the other’s point of view? How could this improve relationships?

61


LESSON 20 EMPATHY TOWARDS OTHERS Australian Curriculum HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing. Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Outline: Activity 1: Differing Perspectives Video Clip and Discussion (10 mins) •

Watch Video 726 from the Video Resource List.

Discussion guide: ›› This is a light hearted look at two different perspectives; the way the owner leaves the pet and their expectations of behaviour versus the way the pets actually want to behave when the owner is gone. Use this to help students understand the idea that people think differently to one another.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities. Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

››

Ask students to provide some examples of when they may have experienced differing perspectives (for example, when working on group tasks).

››

Ask students to think of some benefits (using the group work e.g., the group might end up producing something better considering all group members’ perspectives).

››

Ask students to think of some disadvantages (using the group work e.g., students may end up disagreeing and tension may build).

››

Brainstorm some ways to accept/rationalise differing perspectives.

Self-Awareness: Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour. Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Activity 2: Discussion (15 mins) •

Provide students with examples of common situations that occur in school. Ask them what they would do in each situation. If they empathise with the other person, would they behave differently? ›› A classmate trips and falls down the stairs on the way to lunch. ››

A classmate thinks you intentionally pushed him when in fact you bumped into him by accident. He yells at you and calls you names.

Learning Intentions:

››

A classmate gets sick and throws up in the classroom.

››

A classmate doesn’t do well on a test and starts to cry.

››

You get upset with a classmate and hit him or her.

››

You are choosing teams for basketball. There is only one person left, and you know that they aren’t very good. You and the other captain argue about who should have this player. You argue right in front of this person and they start to yell and call you names.

For students for develop empathy with others by seeing things from a different perspective. For students to develop empathy and understanding of others through role-play.

Resources: • • •

Student workbooks. Projector, speakers, internet access. Video Resource List.

47


LESSON 20 EMPATHY TOWARDS OTHERS Activity 3: Script (40 mins) •

Divide the class into eight groups. Their task is to take one of the scenarios below and write a script for the situation that demonstrates both sides of the argument. They will perform it for the class.

• •

Role-play #1: Joanne and her Father Joanne: Joanne’s dad insists that she be in the house by 8 p.m. on school nights. But the weather is getting warm, and her friends are staying out later in the street. Joanne wants to be able to stay with her friends. Joanne’s father: The rule is that Joanne must be in the house by 8 p.m. on school nights. Joanne’s father is concerned that it is not safe for her to be out after 8 p.m., and he worries about her. He also wants to be sure she gets enough sleep so that she is not tired in school.

• •

Debrief: •

• •

• •

Role-play #2: Jason and the Teacher Jason: Jason was talking to his friend about what they were going to do on the playground at lunchtime at the same time that the teacher was talking. The teacher told him that she was going to contact his parents and discuss his behaviour with them. Jason is mad because he thinks the teacher is always picking on him. ‘Other kids talk’, he says, ‘and the teacher doesn’t do anything about it’. Teacher: When she was explaining the homework assignment, Jason was talking instead of listening. She sees him talking all the time. When he doesn’t have his homework, he says he didn’t hear her give the assignment. Jason needs to start listening in class.

Role-play #4: Raymond and Thomas Raymond: Raymond wants to play with his friend Thomas. Thomas, as usual, wants to play basketball. Raymond doesn’t like to play basketball, he’s not very good at it, and he’d rather play something else. He feels as if all Thomas ever wants to do is play basketball. Thomas: Thomas would like to play with Raymond, who is a good friend. Thomas is on a basketball team, and he wants to practise basketball. He would also like Raymond to play basketball better, because then he might want to join the team, too. Then they could spend more time together. (Source: Operation Outreach USA -- oousa.org) (teachablemoment.org).

How would considering the other perspective when a difference occurs help to understand the other person’s point of view? How could this improve relationships?

Journal Entry: •

What did you learn about someone else today?

Role-play #3: Sarah and her Mum (teachablemoment.org) Sarah: Sarah wants to have a short school dress. Sarah thinks it looks cool and all the girls at her school have short skirts. Sarah’s mother: Sarah’s mother thinks students should be dressed neatly for school, and she worries that adults won’t respect her daughter as much if she dresses in that way. Sarah’s mother went to a very strict school where students wore uniforms where the length was constantly monitored, and she thinks the discipline was much better there because of the dress rules.

49


LESSON 21 MINDFULNESS IN NATURE Mindfulness Walk Take a mindfulness walk. The focus is to look for things you never knew were there. Your challenge is to spot five things that you never noticed about the school environment before. Write these down here:

Photography Challenge Whilst out in the yard, observe what is around you. Look closely. Take close-up shots of items such as the bark on a tree, the grass, a flower, etc. Look for interesting compositions, patterns and textures. Take the photos back to class and classmates will try to work out where the picture came from/what the image is. You may like to print the photos and stick them opposite.

LESSON 21

Paste photo here

MINDFULNESS IN NATURE

Journal What are three things you enjoyed about today’s activity?

Why did you enjoy them?

What are three little things you noticed today that you haven’t noticed 63 before?

Remember Looking and appreciating the small things can improve the character strengths of Gratitude, Appreciation of Beauty, and Excellence, and also make you more mindful as you take time to view things from a different perspective. This activity also promotes flow and awe.


LESSON 21 MINDFULNESS IN NATURE Australian Curriculum

Outline

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Activity 1: Smiling Mind (10 mins)

Being Healthy, Safe and Active: • • •

Evaluate strategies to manage personal, physical and social changes that occur as they grow older. Practise and apply strategies to seek help for themselves or others. Investigate and select strategies to promote health, safety and wellbeing.

Activity 2: Walk (20 mins): •

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Learning Intentions: For students to look for the small details and to take time to find them in an environment that they would normally take for granted.

Ask the students, whilst out in the yard, observe what is around them. Look closely. Tell them to take close-up shots of things such as the bark on a tree, grass, a flower, etc. Look for interesting compositions, patterns and textures. They should take the photos back to class and classmates will try to work out where the picture came from.

Debrief: •

Resources: • • •

Tell students to take a mindfulness walk in the bush/around the school. Inform them that the focus is to look for things they never knew were there. The challenge is to spot five things that they never noticed about the school environment before. They are to write these down in their journal.

Activity 3: Photography Challenge (20 mins)

Smiling Mind.

Cameras or phones. Computers. Internet access, and speakers.

Looking and appreciating the small things can improve the character strengths of Gratitude, Appreciation of Beauty and Excellence, and also make students more mindful as they take time to view things from a different perspective. This activity also promotes flow and awe.

Journal: (10 mins) • • •

What are three things you enjoyed about today’s activity? Why did you enjoy them? What are three little things you noticed today, that you haven’t noticed before?

51


LESSON 22 EXPANDING GRATITUDE

Gratitude Chatterbox

Three things I am grateful for today:

This way gratitude not only contributes to the positive wellbeing of the deliverer but also the recipient. 65


LESSON 22 EXPANDING GRATITUDE Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: Gratitude Chatter Box (25 mins)

Self-Awareness:

Students are to reflect on the people they are most grateful to from previous ‘tree’ lesson. The task is an opportunity to now deliver that message. This way gratitude not only contributes to the positive wellbeing of the deliverer, but also the recipient.

Students should think of four or eight reasons why they are grateful to that person. The recipient’s name goes onto the top. Numbers go in the middle and underneath the flaps, the recipient will find the gratitude notes.

Watch Video 727 from the Video Resource List.

Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Social Awareness: Appreciate Diverse Perspectives •

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Activity 2: (30 mins)

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Analyse factors that influence emotions (expressing gratitude), and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices and behaviours (expressing gratitude) and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities.

Learning Intentions: •

For students to be able to express gratitude to someone important to them in a creative way.

For students to see the impact their gratitude can have on others.

For students to think of ways they can be grateful to everything, even the small things.

Have students write down random objects onto a small slip of paper. Then place them into a box or hat at the front of the room. Add in your own. For example: ››

Flies

››

Homework

››

Windows

››

Grass

››

Computers

››

Sport

››

Spiders

››

YouTube

Divide the class into two teams, either side of the room. The first person in the line comes to the front of the room and picks a topic out of the hat. They then need to think of three reasons why they are grateful for that object. If they can’t do it, the opposing team is given the opportunity to win the point. Keep score on the board. They must be legitimate reasons—points are won at teacher’s discretion!

Journal Entry: (5 mins) •

Three things I am grateful for today:

Resources: •

Speakers, projector.

Internet access.

A4 paper.

Textas.

Student workbooks.

Video Resource List.

Debrief: •

This way gratitude not only contributes to the positive wellbeing of the deliverer but also the recipient.

53


LESSON 23 HUMOUR

CHECK IN Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

hope

boredom Positive Emotion nervous Watch the clip.

Are there any other emotions that you are feeling? My Jokes

Mood Changers Activities Watch the clip. Journal Entry

Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

hope

boredom nervous

Positive Emotion Watch the clip. CHECK OUT

Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

hope

Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: boredom nervous anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

hope

boredom nervous

67


LESSON 23 HUMOUR Australian Curriculum

Resources:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Internet access, speakers, projector.

Video Resource List.

Self-Awareness: Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour. Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Outline: Activity 1: CHECK IN (5 mins) •

Have students complete the CHECK IN activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Mood Changers Activities.

Activity 2: Sadness (10 mins) •

Play the following sad piano music for five minutes: Video 728 from the Video Resource List.

Discuss with students how it made them feel.

Circle the ones you felt the strongest: anger, disgust, happiness, frustration, boredom, apathy, fear, excitement, confusion, hope, nervous.

Social Awareness: Appreciate Diverse Perspectives •

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing.

Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Develop skills to evaluate health information and express health concerns.

Activity 3: Positive Emotion (15 mins) •

Watch Video 729 from the Video Resource List.

Watch the students laugh out loud during it and discuss how it made them feel.

Circle the ones you felt the strongest: anger, disgust, happiness, frustration, boredom, apathy, fear, excitement, confusion, hope, nervous.

Activity 4: Video (25 mins) •

Watch Video 730 from the Video Resource List.

Discuss how they felt during and after the clip.

Give students the opportunity to find and tell jokes for the class.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities:

Debrief: (5 mins)

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities.

Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

Have students complete the CHECK OUT activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Learning Intentions: •

For students to experience humour as a mood changer.

55


LESSON 24 APPLYING EMPATHY

Write a short play/scenario about empathy. It could be about characters that see a particular scenario completely differently, or about the meaning of empathy. You are to create the characters using paper bag puppets. Simply draw the face of the character onto the bag. You can work in groups of four. Paste your puppet here:

Journal Entry What did you learn about someone else today?


LESSON 24 APPLYING EMPATHY Australian Curriculum HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing. Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Outline: Activity 1: Video (5 mins) •

Activity 2: Play / Scenario (50 mins) •

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities. Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Watch Video 731 from the Video Resource List.

• •

Students are to write a short play/scenario about empathy. It could be about characters that see a particular scenario completely differently, or it could be about the meaning of empathy. Students are to create the characters using paper bag puppets. Simply draw the face of the character onto the bag. Students can then place the bag over their hand. They should work in groups of four. Have students perform the plays and video them. Paste your puppet into your workbook.

Journal Entry: •

What did you learn about someone else today?

Self-Awareness:

Debrief:

Recognise Emotions

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management:

After watching each group’s clip/play/scenario, discuss with the class the importance of empathy in recognising and understanding what others are feeling/experiencing, and appropriate ways in which to respond to that person and how to help them. 

Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour. Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Learning Intentions: •

For students to create and act out a scenario based on the concept of empathy.

Resources: • • • • •

Textas. Paper bags or paper, icy pole sticks, sticky tape. Video camera to film if desired. Table cloth the create a theatre. Video Resource List.

57


LESSON 25 MINDFULNESS AND OUR BODIES

LESSON 25

CHECK IN

MINDFULNESS AND OUR BODIES Write down all the thoughts that are going on inside your head at the moment. What did you notice about your body—breathing, temperature, muscles, your thoughts during yoga? How do you feel? (circle) anxious

excited

curious

bored

happy

sad

Other emotions? CHECK OUT How do you feel? (circle) Yoga

anxious

excited

curious

bored

happy

sad

Before the yoga session I felt… Write down three things you noticed about your body today.

During the yoga session I felt…

After the yoga session I felt…

Remember Yoga has many health benefits, including mindfulness. It provides the opportunity to find flow, to become more connected with your body, and to clear your mind. It also increases flexibility and strength. 69


LESSON 25 MINDFULNESS AND OUR BODIES Australian Curriculum

Outline:

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Activity 1: Check in (5 mins)

Being Healthy, Safe and Active: • • •

Evaluate strategies to manage personal, physical and social changes that occur as they grow older. Practise and apply strategies to seek help for themselves or others. Investigate and select strategies to promote health, safety and wellbeing.

• •

Check in: In their journals, students are to write down all the thoughts that are going on inside their head at the moment. How do you feel? (circle) Anxious, excited, curious, bored, happy, sad Are there any other emotions you are feeling?

Activity 2: Smiling Mind (10 mins)

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Smiling Mind

Self-Management:

Activity 3: Yoga (30 mins)

Express Emotion Appropriately:

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Learning Intentions: • •

For students to become more aware of their bodies. For students to participate in a yoga session and reap the benefits of this type of exercise—both physical and mental.

Resources: • • • • •

Yoga mats (if you have them). Speakers and projector. Computer and internet access. Student workbooks. Video Resource List.

• •

Clear a space on the floor for each student. Provide a yoga mat, if you have them. Ensure each student has enough space. Yoga session: Video 732 from the Video Resource List.

Activity 4: Discussion (10 mins) • • • •

How did you feel before/during/after the yoga session? What did you notice about your body—breathing, temperature, muscles, thoughts? Check out: How do you feel? (circle) Anxious, excited, curious, bored, happy, sad Write down three things you noticed about your body today:

Debrief: •

Yoga has many health benefits, including mindfulness. It provides the opportunity to find flow, to become more connected with your body, and clear your mind. It also increases flexibility and strength.

59


LESSON 26 GRATITUDE CHAIN

Gratitude Paper Chains Reflect on what you have been writing in your books about the things you are grateful for. Choose the three that you consider the most important and why.

Write these onto the strips of paper. Make paper chains with all the strips of paper and decorate the room. Remember to say WHY you are grateful to the people and to the things you have mentioned.

71


LESSON 26 GRATITUDE CHAIN Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: Gratitude Ball (15 mins)

Self-Awareness:

Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Social Awareness: Appreciate Diverse Perspectives •

Clear some space in the room. Throw a ball around the room to each other. Whoever catches the ball says something that they are grateful for. Any double-ups or no response means disqualification. Award the winner a prize.

Activity 2: Share (25 mins) •

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Sit students in a circle. Each student must take it in turns to tell the group what they appreciate about the person to the left and right of them.

Activity 3: Gratitude Paper Chains (15 mins)

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Analyse factors that influence emotions (expressing gratitude), and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices and behaviours (expressing gratitude) and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities.

Have students reflect on what they have been writing in their workbooks about the things they are grateful for. They need to chose the three things that they consider to be the most important and why, and write these onto the strips of paper. Make paper chains with all the strips of paper and decorate the room.

Debrief: •

Encourage students to say why they are grateful to the people and to the things. They need to be quite specific.

Learning Intentions: •

For students to express appreciation for the people in the class, and to consider the things that are most important to them.

Resources: • • • • • • •

Ball (soft and suitable for throwing inside). Student workbooks. Prize for the winner. Ball of wool or string. Strips of paper. Stapler. Textas.

61


LESSON 27 EMOTIONAL RESPONSES CHECK IN Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

boredom

hope

nervous

Are there any other emotions that you are feeling? Music plays and you will mingle and play the above bingo game. At the conclusion, share you findings and further compare responses.

Bingo: find someone else who‌ Gets nervous before a test:

Has the same fear or phobia as you? What is it?

Is excitedMusic about the as a Mood-Changer weekend:

Signature:

Signature:

Signature:

Has felt sad at school:

Has felt proud, (write down what it was):

Loves someone:

Link an emotion to each of the songs. Song 1:

Signature:

Gets angry at siblings at times:

Signature:

Signature:

Is grateful for something the same as you (and what is it)?

Signature:

Song 2: Song 3: Song 4: What’s your favourite song to lift you up?

Signature:

Is repulsed by something the same as you (and what Find songs that is it)?

would change your mood and can be used as a moodchanger for the next time you are feeling down.

Signature:

CHECK OUT Circle the emotions you are feeling right now: anger apathy

disgust fear

happiness excitement

frustration

confusion

hope

boredom nervous

Are there any other emotions that you are feeling?

73


LESSON 27 EMOTIONAL RESPONSES Australian Curriculum

Resources:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

• • • •

Self-Awareness: Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management:

Outline: Activity 1: Check in (5 mins) •

Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour. Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Appreciate Diverse Perspectives Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing. Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity. Develop skills to evaluate health information and express health concerns.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities. Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

Learning Intentions: • • •

For students to find commonalities with others in emotional responses. To diversify their experience with emotion and listen to the experiences of others. For students to consider how music can impact their mood.

Have students complete the CHECK IN activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

Activity 2: Music (10 mins)

Social Awareness: •

Music and speakers. Access to iRadio. Student workbooks. Video Resource List.

Play some music. Have students mingle around the room. When the music stops, they grab a partner and ask: ›› What makes you nervous? Repeat but next time ask… ››

What makes you angry? Repeat but next time ask…

››

What makes you proud? Repeat but next time ask…

››

When was a time you were embarrassed? What led to this?

Activity 3: Bingo (15 mins) • • •

Find someone else who… Play some music and have students mingle and play the above bingo game. At the conclusion, ask students to share their findings and further compare responses.

Activity 4: Music as a Mood Changer (20 mins) •

Play the following music to the students. Ask them to link an emotion to each of the songs. They should record these in their student workbooks. ››

SAD: Video 733 from the Video Resource List.

››

HAPPY: Video 734 from the Video Resource List.

››

ANGRY: Video 735 from the Video Resource List.

››

EXCITING: Video 736 from the Video Resource List.

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LESSON 27 EMOTIONAL RESPONSES Activity 5: Discussion (20 mins) •

Discuss with students: ›› What’s your favourite song to lift you up? ››

Find songs that would change your mood and can be used as a mood changer for the next time you are feeling down.

Play for the class. Scribe a list to be displayed so that students can refer to it if needs be.

Debrief: •

Students should see commonalities between themselves and others in terms of emotion and the way their mood can be altered through music. Have students complete the CHECK OUT activity by circling the feelings they are experiencing now.

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LESSON 28 EMPATHETIC CONNECTIONS

Journal Entry Discuss your observations of others/the group, including your thoughts and feelings about yourself and others before, during, and after, the following activities: 1. Have you ever?

4. I rolled the ball of string to ...

2. Step to the line:

and I identified that I learnt...

about them.

3. Empathy Web

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LESSON 28 EMPATHETIC CONNECTIONS Australian Curriculum: HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Communicating and Interacting for Health and Wellbeing: •

Outline: Activity 1: Have You Ever? (10 mins) • •

Investigate the benefits of relationships and examine their impact on their own and others’ health and wellbeing. Analyse factors that influence emotions, and develop strategies to demonstrate empathy and sensitivity.

Contributing to Healthy and Active Communities: •

Plan and use health practices, behaviours and resources to enhance the health, safety and wellbeing of their communities. Plan and implement strategies for connecting to natural and built environments to promote the health and wellbeing of their communities.

Activity 2: Step To The Line (30 mins) •

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY Self-Awareness: Recognise Emotions •

Examine influences on and consequences of their emotional responses in learning, social and workrelated contexts.

Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour. Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Learning Intentions: •

To create compassion and understanding within the group by finding common emotions and experiences.

Resources: • • • •

Ball of string. Student workbooks. Masking tape to create a line down the centre of the room. Peaceful music, speakers.

Play a game of ‘Have you Ever?’ Create a circle in the room with chairs, minus one. There is a student in the middle of the circle and their goal is to get a chair. The student states a fact about himself or herself, starting with, ‘Have you ever…?’ For example: ‘Have you ever cried when you lost a basketball game?’ All students, for which this statement is true, must swap seats. One person will be left without a chair. This student then asks a question. No swapping seats with the person next to them.

Move furniture to the sides of the classroom and use masking tape to make a line through the centre of the room on the floor. Have students standing shoulder-to-shoulder along the length of the masking tape line, facing it. They should take one step back from the line. Note—if all students don’t fit in one line, have two lines of students both standing shoulder-to-shoulder facing into the masking tape line. Ask the students questions, beginning with, ‘step to the line if…’ If students have experienced this, they should step up to the line. Nb. This activity should be done in silence and students should only step forward if they have experienced it, not just because everyone else has stepped to the line/their friends stepped to the line. You must also remind students that this is a judgement-free zone, and open and honest responses will be accepted and supported. Inform them that what goes on in the room today remains in the room, so to ensure feelings of safety and trust when doing this activity. There should be no talking or laughing. You may like to play some soft/ instrumental music during this activity to help set the mood and encourage silence. The statements could include, but are not limited to: ‘Step to the line if…’ ›› (Start with a few easy warm ups): ››

You’re wearing socks

››

You ate breakfast this morning

››

You have used social media today

››

(Then get a little more meaningful)

››

You have ever felt nervous coming to school

››

You have stuff going on outside of school that people in this class wouldn’t know about

››

You have ever felt nervous at home

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LESSON 28 EMPATHY 7

››

You have ever been hurt by a friend

Activity 3: Empathy Web (15 mins)

››

You have hurt a friend

››

You have ever been bullied

››

You have been a bully

››

You have people you can trust here at school

››

You have someone you look up to in your life

››

You have things in your life that you enjoy doing

››

If you have learnt something about someone else during this activity

Have the students sit down where they are, continuing to be silent. Prompt a discussion with the class about the activity by asking the following questions and having only one student at a time talk: ›› Was there anything you noticed about the activity (students may identify that there are more similarities in the group than they may have realised)? ››

Was there one response that stood out to you (choose a few students to report something different each)?

››

Was there one that disappointed you? (If possible, guide students/discussion to identify the amount of people who stepped to the line who have both been bullied and also have bullied before. This may prompt a discussion around bullying and how it feels to be bullied and why people might bully. Remind students that no one should be judged during this activity—promote open and honest responses in a safe environment).

››

What did you learn about this activity? (This could be a good opportunity to identify bravery of students who are anxious at school or at home. It might also be a good opportunity to remind students who have bullied others in the past to think prior to acting in future. Lastly, it would be great to remind everyone to think about the supportive people they have in their life or that person they look up to—you may even like to have some students identify them).

Stand students shoulder-to-shoulder in a circle. Have one student start off by holding the ball of string by the tail end and thinking of something that they learnt about one other student. As they say it, they should pass the ball of string to that person (still holding the tail). When that student receives the ball of string, they repeat the process. This should continue until each student is holding a part of the string; it will look like a large web.

Debrief: (5-10 minutes) •

Take a photo of the class and the web that links them all together. Put this up in the classroom at a later stage to remind the class of demonstrating empathy to their fellow classmates. Another way to remind the class of demonstrating empathy in the future is by cutting each piece of string they are holding, and to tie the piece around their wrist, or to their pencil case, keys or somewhere they will see it regularly. Congratulate them on their openness and honesty, and remind them to ensure that what has gone on in the room and the discussions that have been shared today should remain in the room and not to gossip—that would definitely NOT be demonstrating empathy!

This lesson is themed around empathy. How can we demonstrate empathy to one another beyond today, given what we have learnt about each other during this activity?

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LESSON 29 MINDFULNESS 7

My Mindful Activity Plan Your challenge is to plan a mindfulness session that could be run in our class! The possibilities are endless, so get creative! Make sure you use the space below to carefully plan as you will be running your activity for the class! Name: Overview of activity (here you should explain whatmaterials to do): will be needed for the class to complete this activity? What

Write a script of exactly what you will say in order to run your activity with the class. Remember, this step is very important in order to ensure that the class will experience mindfulness. It should be very detailed avoid any mistakes in your presentation, and also to Use your knowledge of what mindfulness isand andclear how so to to achieve that activity? the class are very clear on what they need to do. If there mindfulness to describe how your activity isensure a ‘mindful’ are mistakes or if people are unsure of what to do, they will not achieve mindfulness!

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LESSON 29 MINDFULNESS 7 Australian Curriculum

Outline:

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Activity 1: Smiling Mind Meditation (5-10 mins)

Being Healthy, Safe and Active • • •

Evaluate strategies to manage personal, physical and social changes that occur as they grow older Practise and apply strategies to seek help for themselves or others. Investigate and select strategies to promote health, safety and wellbeing.

Activity 2: Create Your Own Mindful Activities (30 mins) •

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY Self-Management: Express Emotion Appropriately •

Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Learning Intentions: • •

For students to experience a period of mindfulness. For students to apply creativity and knowledge of mindfulness in developing activities.

Students can work individually or in pairs in developing their very own ‘mindful activity’ for us all to do together as a class in the second half of the lesson. They should use their experiences from the mindfulness sessions they have taken part in as ideas, in coming up with their own creative, original activity. They should use the plan in their student workbook to ensure they have covered elements of mindfulness and to assist them in the delivery of their activity to the class. The activity they create should take around 3-5 minutes as a minimum. The possibilities are endless: they could create their own mindful colouring sheets, write a meditation script, a sensory story to be read to music that follows the mood changes of the story, or anything they can think of. They should be as creative as possible; for some, it will be a mindful activity in coming up with the activity! When they have finished their activity, they should have their activity plan signed off by you to ensure it is covering the criteria.

Resources: • •

Laptop/speakers/data projector/internet access. Student workbook.

Activity 3: Participating in the Activities •

When students have finished creating their mindful activity and they have been signed off by you, they are to present their activity to the class and have the whole class participate in the activity.

Debrief: •

Discuss that by the end of the lesson and subsequently, the mindfulness unit, students will have participated in a number of different mindful activities, increasing their repertoire of activities they could take part in outside of school.

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LESSON 30 SHARING GRATITUDE

Looks, Feels, Sounds Like Chart for Gratitude:

In small groups of four, you need to create either a: a) cartoon strip b) short video c) play

Looks like

Feels like

d) poster It must include what gratitude looks, feels, and sounds like, to show you understand empathy! It will be presented to the class, so use your creativity and make it engaging! Circle the mode of presentation from the list above and use the space below to brainstorm your ideas for your presentation.

Sounds like Journal Entry Three things I am grateful for today are‌

What have you learnt about gratitude during the year?

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LESSON 30 SHARING GRATITUDE Australian Curriculum

Outline:

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CAPABILITY

Activity 1: Workbook Activity (10 mins)

Self-Management:

• •

Express Emotion Appropriately: •

Forecast the consequences of expressing emotions inappropriately and devise measures to regulate behaviour. Select, use and analyse strategies that assist in regulating behaviour and achieving personal and learning goals.

Activity 2: Create (30 mins) •

Learning Intentions: •

For students to be able to share their knowledge and understanding of gratitude with others.

Resources: • •

Computers access for students. Workbooks.

Looks, Feels, Sounds Like Chart for Gratitude. Students should use the relevant page of their workbook to brainstorm what gratitude looks like, feels, and sounds like. They should record their brainstorm in their workbook.

In small groups of four, students need to create either a: ›› cartoon strip ››

short video

››

play

››

poster

It must include what gratitude looks, feels and sounds like and should demonstrate their understanding of what gratitude is and why it is so important.

Activity 3: Presentation (15 mins) •

Presentation of their cartoon/video clip/play or poster to the class.

Journal Entry: (5 mins) •

Three things I am grateful for today are:

Debrief: •

What have you learnt about gratitude during this course?

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NOTES


© The Resilience Project 2017

TRP - 2017 Year 7 Teacher Resource  
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