Issuu on Google+

Bringing you the very best property, places, events, people and stories from the area

May 2012 www.theresidentmagazine.co.uk COMPLIMENTARY COPY

PACK your HAMPER Six places perfect for a picnic

the POLO ISSUE

This summer’s matches and fashion

your SOCIAL CV How an online profile can damage your career

SUSSEX

MARTIN BELL TELLS his STORY


44 the polo issue The history of polo in Britain, this summer’s matches and some stylish womenswear perfect for the event

RegulaRs 7 From the editor 10 Select ProPerty Our property pick from East and West Sussex

119 What’S on?

65 MaRtin Bell RepoRtinG

Famed war correspondent and politician ‘in the white suit’, Martin Bell OBE has lived on the edge, and survived – just!

An extended guide to the best events and activities for the coming weeks

128 the it liSt Vintage inspiration for the home in our guide to what’s hot on the high street or web

128 Bridget JameS The summer fairs begin, in this month’s column

74 social suicide Employers are scouring online profiles before hiring (or firing) people. Career coach Michelle Baker explains how your actions on social networks could make or break your career

Bringing you the very best property, places, events, people and stories from the area

May 2012 www.theresidentmagazine.co.uk COMPLIMENTARY COPY

SUSSEX

81 picnic places Catherine Ross packs her rug and hamper and takes the family to find some of the best picnic spots around. Pimms and lemonade anyone?

pacK your haMpeR Six places perfect for a picnic

the polo issue

This summer’s matches and fashion

your social cV How an online profile can damage your career

MaRtin Bell tells his stoRY 3


Visit Horsham’s largest kitchen and bathroom showroom for expert help and advice.

www.robertsltd.co.uk 01403 253606 4 Genesis Business Centre, Redkiln Way, Horsham, West Sussex, RH13 5QH


54 borde hill garden

James Hood takes a tour around Borde Hill Garden and finds a refreshing mix of old and new, British and exotic with a surprise around every corner

Features 38 What makes a home sustainable? How developers are building for the future

45 this season at CoWdray The upcoming polo events at the historic club

56 Polo Guide Fixtures for the summer 2012 season

62 fashion at the

74 CromPton’s has arrived

polo

A new bar and restaurant for those who enjoy the finer things

Style writer Charlotte Schroeter takes a look at some of the latest fashion pieces perfect for a picnic at the polo

82 JeWel in the sussex CroWn Part 2 The second of our features on local independent jewellers

86 is it safe to Go on a Cruise? Find out why it’s safe to go back in the waters

92 learn to run

69 help your kids pass their exams

Exam time can be stressful for students. So, if you’ve got children who are going through it, take heed from these two experts on what you can do to help them pass with flying colours

Want to be a jogger? Tips for beginners on where to begin

112 in the niGht Garden A new photographer has captured the outdoors after dark

115 travellinG by triumPh A new book that explores social change in the 50s, from a motorbike

5


Homes& interiors 102 Take The plunge Advice on picking the right pool

110 ConservaTories and garden rooms Read our expert advice before extending your home

52

WIn Readers of The Resident Magazine have the chance to win a personal training session with a Matt Roberts fitness expert. Find out more in our feature on the Rare Brand Market

92 the greek Islands

Travel expert Carolyn Lodge selects a few of the most luxurious vacation spots in the Greek Islands

98 for queen and county

West Sussex has a new high sheriff. Tom Rhodes went to meet him to find out what the job entails


from the

Arun MediA Ltd

01403 251000 theresidentmagazine.co.uk Editor James Hood james@the-resident.co.uk LAYoUt & dESiGN Lewis Forsaith lewis@the-resident.co.uk

EditoriAL CoNtribUtorS Bridget James Katrina Smith Tom James Michelle Baker Rachael Burgess Catherine Ross PhotoGrAPhY Lewis Forsaith Carly Symonds Toby Phillips dESiGNErS Steve Goodwin Hazel Cairney CirCULAtioN Davey Pearson davey@the-resident.co.uk ACCoUNtS MANAGEr Dave Smith dave@the-resident.co.uk

A

s someone who loves to tell a story and inform people, I am thrilled that we have a personal interview with Martin Bell in this month’s issue. The former war correspondent and TV journalist talks to The Resident Magazine about his passion for reporting the news around the world, which was often done at the risk of his own life. And he tells us that despite putting down his microphone, he’s not done yet when it comes to spreading the word about some of the world’s most worthwhile causes. A proverb I once read said ‘the teacher shows up when the student is ready’. If that is true, you really are never too old to go back to school or even get a degree. That’s exactly what Rachael Burgess did after raising two children, a

dog, a cat and running her own company. She’s now a year into her course at Chichester College and is a testament to the fact that it’s never too late to do something you’ve always wanted. We also took the opportunity to work with photographers on an adult course at Collyer’s college to take a photograph of Rachael for our article. See which one we selected on page 68. Our homes and interiors section this month looks at garden rooms, extensions and swimming pools. So if you’ve been thinking about a pool for your property, read our interiors expert’s advice on the right one for you and you might be able to take a dip this summer. But for the time being, dive in to The Resident Magazine!

SUbSCriPtioNS subscriptions@the-resident.co.uk 01403 251000

AdVertiSinG SENior ACCoUNt MANAGEr Emma Knowlton emma@the-resident.co.uk

JAMES HOOD editor

SENior ACCoUNt MANAGEr Michele Stock michele@the-resident.co.uk SALES CoNSULtANt Terry Oliver terry@the-resident.co.uk MANAGiNG dirECtor Matthew Wheeler matt@the-resident.co.uk The views and opinions expressed in the articles herein are those of the authors concerned and are not endorsed by the publisher. Whilst every care has been taken during the production process, the publisher does not accept any liability for errors that may have occurred or for the views expressed. Printed in the UK by The Magazine Printing Company using only paper from FSC/PEFC suppliers. magprint.co.uk The Resident Magazine May 2012 This publication is protected by copyright. ©2012

7


GRANGE

BERSTED PARK CHICHESTER ROAD NORTH BERSTED

Picture yourself in a classic at Bersted Park Change up to Berkeley quality at Bersted Park, where a new phase of 1 and 2 bedroom apartments, and 2, 3 and 4 bedroom houses has just been launched at Village Walk. All feature timeless design, with a specification you will fall in love with. Bersted Park is set in country park surroundings, with good connections to Bognor Regis, Chichester and the coast; just picture yourself living there.

1 & 2 bedroom apartments from ÂŁ145,000 2, 3 & 4 bedroom houses from ÂŁ187,000 For your appointment to view call 01243 210423 Sales Suite and Showhomes open daily 10am-5pm Bersted Park, Chichester Road, North Bersted, West Sussex, PO21 5DR

01243 842123 Photography depicts indicative lifestyle and typical interiors at Bersted Park. Computer Generated Image depicts the Lavington and is indicative only. Our vision for the future

www.berstedpark.co.uk


PROPERTY THE FINEST PROPERTY THE AREA HAS TO OFFER

INSIDE The best of town, country and city properties from local estate agents as well as a special ‘Select’ international home by the seaside in Brighton S An elegant Edwardian mansion S Designer Mark Lewis writes about the history of open plan living


select

BRIGHTONEAST SUSSEx


Beside the seaside

One of the finest regency homes in Brighton and Hove is available. With 180 degree panoramic sea views, this grand property, which was built between 1822 and 1830, is one of the most imposing addresses in the city. With multiple floors, reception rooms and eight bedrooms it is spacious and impressive, boasting rooms suitable for a pool table, a library and a beautiful sun deck.

PRICE GUIDE ÂŁ4,500,000

Contact Winkworth on 01273 320300 or visit winkworth.co.uk 11


select slindonwest sUssex

The high life


Highfield House is an elegant late Edwardian country home set within well kept grounds. The main house has nine bedrooms and a library, office suite, cellar and adjacent barn suitable for entertaining. In addition there is a detached three-bedroom guest or staff cottage and a gym. The property is situated within stunning countryside and the South Downs National Park in charming Slindon.

PRICE GUIDE ÂŁ3,750,000

Contact Knight Frank on 01403 339180 or visit knightfrank.co.uk 13


KnightFrank.co.uk

East Preston, West Sussex Elegant house on beach front position

East Preston 1.5 miles, Chichester 18 miles, Brighton 21 miles A unique property built in a colonial style, designed to take maximum advantage of the fabulous views of the beach and out to sea. 4 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, master bedroom with en-suite bathroom, 2 guest bedrooms with en-suite bathrooms, 3 further bedrooms, family shower room. Double garage, garden room, gardens and grounds. Guide Price : ÂŁ1,450,000 (Knightfrank.co.uk/HOR110100)

KnightFrank.co.uk/Horsham matthew.mannall@knightfrank.com 01403 339180


KnightFrank.co.uk

Twineham, West Sussex

Georgian house with equestrian facilities Burgess Hill 5 miles (London Victoria 56 minutes), Gatwick Airport 19 miles Situated in a delightful rural location surrounded by farmland. 3 reception rooms, snug / bedroom 5, kitchen/breakfast room/family room, utility room. Master bedroom with en-suite bathroom, 3 further bedrooms, family bathroom. Stable block, sand school, paddocks, double bay garage, workshop, log store. In all about 8.6 acres. Guide Price : ÂŁ1,550,000 (Knightfrank.co.uk/HOR110131)

KnightFrank.co.uk/Horsham michael.sparks@knightfrank.com 01403 339180


www.struttandparker.com

Lower Beeding | West Sussex Cowfold 1.5 miles, Horsham 6 miles, Gatwick Airport about 15 miles, London about 42 miles A beautifully situated converted coach house, with a wealth of character yet contemporary open planned living Entrance hall | Kitchen/breakfast room | Utility room | Cloakroom | Drawing room/dining room | Study | Mezzanine | Playroom | Principal suite with en-suite bathroom | Four further bedrooms all with en-suite shower rooms Converted outbuilding suitable for a variety of uses or additional accommodation | Car port for two cars | Walled garden About 6.6 acres Guide price ÂŁ1,475,000

Horsham Office horsham@struttandparker.com

01403 246 790


www.struttandparker.com

Horsham | West Sussex Horsham 2 miles, Gatwick Airport 16 miles, London 39 miles An attractive Grade II* listed character house, arranged over three floors and offering comfortable and versatile accommodation throughout Entrance hall | Drawing room | Dining room | Sitting room/bedroom 4 | Study/bedroom 5 | Kitchen | Utility room | W.C. | Master bedroom with en suite bath and shower room | Family bathroom | Garden | Double garage | Allocated parking Private garden in addition to about 2 acres of communal gardens Guide price: ÂŁ765,000

Horsham Office horsham@struttandparker.com

01403 246 790


www.struttandparker.com

Colgate | West Sussex Horsham 5 miles, Gatwick Airport 12 miles, London 36 miles A beautifully presented family home in a sought after semi-rural, village location within the High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Entrance vestibule | Hallway | Cloakroom | Study | Drawing room | Dining room | Sun room | Kitchen/breakfast room | Utility room | Master bedroom with en-suite and dressing room/4th bedroom | Two further bedrooms | Family bathroom | Annexe with 2 bedrooms, living room and en-suite Beautifully landscaped gardens | Heated pool | Double garage Planning permission for substantial additional accommodation About 1.4 Acres Guide price: ÂŁ1,400,000

Horsham Office horsham@struttandparker.com

01403 246 790


www.struttandparker.com

Horsham | West Sussex Horsham 3 miles, Gatwick airport 14 miles, Brighton 26 miles, London 36 miles A beautifully refurbished detached family home situated in the grounds of a Georgian mansion house with private gardens and grounds of about 1.56 acres. Reception & dining hall | Drawing room | Kitchen/breakfast room| Sitting room/bedroom 5 | Utility | Cloakroom | Master bedroom with en-suite bathroom |3 further bedrooms with en-suite facilities Attached garage with planning permission to convert into a two bedroom ancillary dwelling | Terrace | Formal gardens | Pond | Disused tennis court | Summer house converted in to a gym About 1.56 acres Guide price: ÂŁ899,999

Horsham Office horsham@struttandparker.com

01403 246 790


Equestrian Estate on the Surrey/Sussex border Chiddingfold, Surrey

Guide price ÂŁ3,500,000 Haslemere about 6 miles Cowdray Polo about 11 miles

6 bedroom farmhouse and staff quarters. 50 stables, gallops. In all about 50 acres (20.24 ha).

London about 44 miles

Midhurst Office 01730 812357 midhurst@jackson-stops.co.uk www.jackson-stops.co.uk

Offices covering the UK London office : 17c Curzon Street, W1J 5HU

Fast Find TR47260


Family house in quiet country setting Redford, West Sussex

Price Guide ÂŁ1,795,000 Midhurst 3.5 miles Petersfield 10 miles Haslemere 12 miles

A characterful and spacious period family house, traditional outbuildings and paddock, set amidst beautiful countryside and including 12.66 acres of common land. Hall, boot room, wine cellar, cloakroom (wc), utility room, dining room, kitchen/breakfast room with Aga, sitting room, drawing room, study, 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms (1 en suite). Bothy and store, double garage (with loft over), 3 bay car barn (with loft over), stable. Gardens of 0.623 acres including a disused grass tennis court, paddock of 1.428 acres, common land of about 12.66 acres In all about 14.11 acres (5.71 ha).

London 57 miles

Midhurst Office 01730 812357 midhurst@jackson-stops.co.uk www.jackson-stops.co.uk

Offices covering the UK London office : 17c Curzon Street, W1J 5HU

Fast Find TR46464


CHURCHILL Country & Equestrian Estate Agents Ltd THE LONGEST ESTABLISHED EQUESTRIAN PROPERTY AGENT

HoRsHam £1,650,000

a glorious grade II listed 5 bedroom Farmhouse with a range of traditional out buildings including a sussex Barn suitable for conversion (sTPP). • 10 stables • Horse walker • 60m x 30m • Sand school • Grooms 2 bed cottage overlooking the stables • 28 acres of Paddocks and Woodland • Brighton 25 miles • Gatwick Airport 17 miles • London 40 miles

CHIDDINGFoLD £1,700,000

a spacious 5 bedroom detached family home with good equestrian facilities and set in a lovely rural location. Approx gross internal floor area 5371 SQ FT. • 5 Bedrooms • Double garage with pit • Dutch Barn with lean to • Tack Room • Rug Room • 9 Stables • All weather manege • Storage Sheds • Direct hacking • Approx 14 acres • Haslemere 8 miles • Guildford 12 miles • Gatwick Airport 24 miles • London Heathrow Airport 40 miles

Tel: 01403 700222 Fax: 01403 700255 www.churchillcountry.com


CHURCHILL Country & Equestrian Estate Agents Ltd

THE LONGEST ESTABLISHED EQUESTRIAN PROPERTY AGENT

soUtHwAteR £1,400,000

A stunning barn conversion presented in lovely order. the property has superb equestrian facilities to suit a professional trainer or family with horses at home. • 5 Bedroom Barn Conversion • Impressive Leisure Complex with Swimming Pool • Direct Hacking • 2 Spacious Guest or Grooms Flats • Staff Accommodation • 8 Internal Hancox  stables • 50 x 35 Sand school • Approximately 15 acres • Brighton 25 miles • Gatwick Airport 17 miles • London 40 miles

fIVe oAks OIEO £495,000

A Victorian spacious semi-detached cottage comprising four bedrooms, twin garage, large garden. There is a second access to the timber framed stable block, manege and paddocks of approximately 3 acres. The Equestrian facilities are newly erected and kept to a very high standard, perfect for the family horses. • Semi Detached • 4 Bedrooms • Twin Garage • Off Road parking • Large Garden • Separate road access to stables • 3 loose boxes • Tack room • 2 Storage sheds • Hay Barn • Sand  school • Approximately 3 acres

IfIeLd wood £960,000

A delightful detached 4 bedroom Victorian family house with potential to modernise and extend (subject to planning permission) together with a detached staff cottage, detached private gym (pot for further accommodation) and immaculate equestrian facilities to include 10 loose boxes, 60m x 35m floodlit manege, horse walker and some 14 acres of grazing. • Direct access to bridlepath. • Detached 4 bedroom Victorian house • Detached Staff/Relative Cottage • Detached Private Gym • Enclosed Yard of 10 Loose Boxes Each With Automatic  Drinkers & Rubber matting • Tack Room • Feed Room

Tel: 01403 700222 Fax: 01403 700255 www.churchillcountry.com


EDGE OF THE SOUTH DOWNS, SLINDON/FONTWELL | Guide Price £1.35 million

Fine barn conversion with annexe and equestrian facilities in rural location without any immediate neighbours Spacious reception areas, exceptional kitchen/breakfast room, 5 bedrooms (2 en-suite), bathroom. 2 bedroom annexe. Double garage, garden with swimming pool. 4 stables, sand school, paddocks. Excellent riding country. About 6.25 acres.

RURAL FAYGATE | Guide Price £595,000

Refurbished and extended attached cottage in rural location with equestrian facilities 3 receptions, kitchen/breakfast room, 3 bedrooms, bathroom. Garden, barn, hay store, 5 stables, sand school, home and off-lying paddock. Over 2 acres.

PARTRIDGE GREEN | Guide Price £545,000

Extended and improved attached cottage in fine rural location on village edge Superb kitchen/breakfast room, sitting

room, family room, wet room, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Oak framed garage/workshop, parking sweep, garden. About 0.3 of an acre.


DIAL POST | Guide Price ÂŁ1.5 million

Charming and spacious country house with rural views set in its own grounds which include 2ž acres of beautiful lakes Drawing room, sitting room, superb kitchen/dining room, study, utility room, principal bedroom suite, 4 further bedrooms and 2 bathrooms. Fine gardens with swimming pool, large garage and stores. About 13 acres in all. (Further 15.2 acres of adjoining pasture and woodland also available)


a

GOOD PLAN

INTERIOR DESIGN CONSULTANT MARK LEWIS EXPLORES THE FOUNDATIONS ON WHICH OPEN PLAN LIVING WAS BUILT For the last 50 years, home owners have been knocking down interior walls and building extensions to create that open plan look and make better use of the space available. The Scandinavian approach offered something new and modern – a more minimal design and a change from the style of the 50s and 60s. For the first time, contemporary design ideas were universally embraced and celebrated and were enthusiastically introduced at every social level during the regeneration of postSecond World War society. The origins of the modern approach to living began to emerge in the early 20th century but were interrupted by the First World War with scarcely a moment to breath before the distraction of the second. My first personal experience of open plan living was when visiting my Uncle’s house in Surbiton in the late 60s when I was only 11. He is an Architect and at that time worked

for the Greater London Council supervising their civic developments, mainly schools and hospitals. Earlier in his career, after leaving college, he joined the practice that designed most of the features for Festival of Britain in 1951. Not only was he a keen modernist, as many post war Architects were, having absorbed the edicts of the Bauhaus and Le Corbusier but he also met and married a young East German who had escaped the Russians and managed to get into Britain as a refugee. She brought into his life a thoroughly European approach to family living. Having established a carrier for himself by then he set about building a thoroughly modern family house - mostly wood and glass with split-levels. A large round dining table sat in the dining hall adjacent to the open kitchen area. It had a revolving disk inset in the centre, which we pushed to pass the amazing selection of pastries and teatime condiments.


Another open plan house I first experienced before I had begun my own design education as an under graduate was a rather modest interpretation of the theme (possibly inspired by those Sunday visits to Surbiton). This was my older brother’s effort to modernise a small terrace house in Chester. Known then as a ‘two-up two-down’ with back yard and privy. The front room, the ‘parlour’ as it was called by its original occupants, was reserved for when the Padre came to visit or the laying out of the dead. It was the back room that had the fire and hot water kettle, a sink and a table and one or two fireside bucket chairs leaving scarcely any room to move about. This room, used all the time, was the only warm room in the house. That is unless someone was sick and a fire was lit in a bedroom. A lot of enthusiasm with a hammer soon tore out the tight hall way and dividing wall between the two rooms leaving the stairway stringers exposed. By incorporating the privy and coalhole situated at the back of the house into the main room the kitchenette became a new feature, open to the new living and dining area. Furnished with a Futon sofa made of salvaged wood and home sewn and dyed Hessian been bags, together with a freshly sanded slide leaf table and French café chairs, the ensemble completed an interior that was likely one of the earliest Habitat-inspired homes. Most British residential building stock is over a hundred years old and enjoyed for its charm and distinction. Currently contemporary homes are built on small plots using a traditional footprint but modern building techniques. These often lack the integrity associated with original Victorian or Edwardian architecture and represent an inhibited housing initiative of resent governments. A far cry from those of Harold McMillan’s promise to build 300,000 new homes a year who embraced the modern ideas of architects and the ruthless ambitions of the developers who set about the task of rebuilding Britain. We have their legacy. Some of which (the more successful high rise buildings of the Alton Estate, Roehampton in south West London and the Barbican development in the City of London) are good examples of post-war architecture and are now highly sought after as modern homes. As one travels along the copious urban and suburban avenues of 18th and 19th century houses, terraced, double fronted or detached one could imagine their interiors matching those depicted in period dramas. What one often finds instead, after further inquiry to the rear, are the extensions and the interior alterations that have made these once intimate cocoons for living into veritable ice rinks of domestic function. Open plan from entrance door to sliding glass wall panels opening up the rear of the house there is little or no indication that the back garden is any less or more a significant space than the

dining area. Or that one is in a different space to the lounge, living room, sitting room, snug it definitely could not be, or whatever words we may now use to describe that space we may have a Sunday afternoon snooze in after lunch. Certainly not the drawing room given that in these houses there are no longer any rooms from which to withdraw. Other than the occasional depiction in a home magazine of radical interiors which include the bath or wet room-type shower in the bedroom, the upper floors of our houses are less likely to be as open plan as the ground or lower ground floors. My own career started in earnest applying the fashion for open plan in the early 80’s. My clients were pleased to have me re-model their homes with an emphasis on the kitchen being the prevalent room in the house, which would require the opening up of either the lower ground or the ground floors presenting a room for cooking and living in as one area incorporating dining, sitting and kitchen in an architecturally cohesive themed room that acknowledged the desire to have the ability to entertain and cook in the same space. At the time of their last renovation, these homes had adjusted themselves to deal with the lack of domestic staff enjoyed by the previous era’s occupants. To maintain the notion that the food was still prepared by others, the kitchen was more of a utility from which the hostess would emerge with a trolley laden with the warmed serving dishes full of food and be issued on to the table after which guests were invited to come into the dining room having had their aperitifs in the living room. More often than not, in the absence of the hostess who had actually done all the cooking. The most expert of hostess would plan the menu to ensure that as little time as possible would be spent away from the gathering of friends and family and that the logistics of the dining experience did not appear to be too much of an effort or a distraction from the social occasion. One of my more extraordinary clients in those early days, was an enthusiastic cook of near professional expertise, whose husband, a financier of international projects like building dams in far flung continents around the world, would often entertain senior British politicians and their international counter parts. The whole orientation of the house was adjusted to create an environment equitable to their expectations of presentation, usually reserved for the reception rooms but now incorporated into the kitchen. On completion of the refurbishment and a few dinner parties later her eminent guests were reported to have been thrilled and charmed to be able to have helped in the kitchen like any family member, gossiping and chatting about the stuff of life whilst pealing the potatoes and trimming the broccoli. For more information on Mark Lewis, visit marklewisdesign.co.uk

27


T TO

LE

T LE TO

Bignor

Tillington

Fabulous top floor apartment with glorious parkland views within Part of The Old Manor House, situated close to the village church. an historic house. Superb kitchen/dining room. Private garden. Not 3 Bedrooms, ground floor bathroom, upstairs cloakroom. Shared suitable for children or cats. garden. Off street parking.

TO

LE

TO

LE

T

£1400 per calendar month

T

£1600 per calendar month

Lodsworth

Upwaltham

A modern, 4 bedroom detached house situated in the centre of the village. Pretty garden with garden services included. Double garage.

Delightful 2 bedroom cottage with large garden, garden shed and double garage/workshop. Lovely rural situation. Not suitable for pets.

£2000 per calendar month

£1000 per calendar month

Petworth office t 01798 343111 petworth@smithsgore.co.uk

smithsgore.co.uk


LE SA FO R

Fittleworth A stunning Grade II listed Georgian family house situated in a favoured village location. Range of useful outbuildings together with a lovely walled and lawned garden amounting to 0.8 acres. Guide Price ÂŁ795,000

Petworth office t 01798 343111 petworth@smithsgore.co.uk

smithsgore.co.uk


STEYNING A Picturesque Period Cottage in the Town Centre A very pretty Grade II Listed building of 18th Century or earlier construction, in the heart of the market town, with a private and sunny walled garden. Entrance lobby/study area, sitting room, back hall/dining area, kitchen, bathroom, separate w.c., two bedrooms, walled garden. Early possession is available. Price ÂŁ335,000 Freehold

ESTATE OFFICE : 38 High Street, Steyning, Sussex

www.hamiltongraham.co.uk

01903 879212


STEYNING Light and Spacious Family Home in a Quiet Lane overlooking Farmland An attractive and individual detached house in an outstanding elevated location within minutes of the High Street, yet adjoining open country. Reception hall, cloakroom, sitting room, dining room, large farmhouse kitchen, four bedrooms and two bathrooms, secluded south-facing garden. Price ÂŁ575,000 Freehold

ESTATE OFFICE : 38 High Street, Steyning, Sussex

www.hamiltongraham.co.uk

01903 879212


Earn £50*

when you introduce a new Earnto£50* To help maximise landlord when you Guy Leonard & Co the exposure Homes, industry insight and stories from across Sussex, brought to you by Guy Leonard & Co

introduce a new of your home, *A payment of up to £50 becomes payable contact Guy landlord to you for the introductionto of a new landlord who instructs Guy Leonard & Co to let their Leonard & Co to property. There is no upper limit to& the Co number Guy Leonard of introductions that can be made by any individual under the scheme. appear in our high quality magazine that will be seen by all the right buyers. See website for full terms andto conditions *A payment of up £50 becomes payable

to you for the introduction of a new landlord who instructs Guy Leonard & Co to let their property. There is no upper limit to the number of introductions that can be made by any individual under the scheme. See website for full terms and conditions

www.guyleonard.co.uk Find us on

Follow us on

www.guyleonard.co.uk

Storrington 01903 744166 | Horsham 01403 246750 Find us on

Follow us on

Anniversary Storrington 01903 744166 | Horsham 20th 01403 246750 mobilityfriendlyhomes.co.uk

2012

5/1/12 Horsham: 01403 248222 Storrington: 01903 742354 Pulborough: 01798 874033

eferral A5 ad.indd 1

20th Anniversary Lettings 01903 744166 Email: enquiries@guyleonard.co.uk mobilityfriendlyhomes.co.uk

2012

0


www.guyleonard.co.uk

West Chiltington, guide price £735,000 A beautifully presented five bedroom detached Carver style property set in a secluded plot approaching half an acre in one of the most sought after roads in the popular village of West Chiltington.

∙ SPACIOUS ENTRANCE HALL ∙ KITCHEN BREAKFAST ROOM ∙ UTILITY ROOM ∙ SITTING ROOM ∙ GROUND FLOOR GUEST BEDROOM ∙ JACK AND JILL ENSUITE SHOWER ROOM ∙ STUDY/BEDROOM 5 ∙ DINING ROOM ∙ DRAWING ROOM ∙ FIRST FLOOR GALLERIED LANDING ∙ PRINCIPAL BEDROOM ∙ ENSUITE SHOWER ROOM ∙ 2 FURTHER DOUBLE BEDROOMS ∙ FAMILY BATHROOM ∙ INTEGRAL DOUBLE GARAGE ∙ GOOD SIZE SOUTH FACING LANDSCAPED REAR GARDEN ∙ AMPLE PARKING ∙ SECLUDED PLOT ∙ GAS HEATING TO RADIATORS enquiries@guyleonard.co.uk

Storrington Office

01903 742354 33


Storrington, West Sussex Ä575,000 This individual 1970Ås detached home enjoys a beautiful setting in east & south gardens approaching half an acre. Backing onto fields and countryside, less than a mile from the village centre Light interior with 4 double bedrooms and 2 bathrooms, 1 en-suite | Triple aspect sitting room Dining room opening onto the terrace | Large kitchen breakfast room | Integral garage ideal for study/family room conversion | Spacious hall | Galleried landing Cloakroom | Boiler room | Extensive drive and parking | Gardens on four sides including a small orchard | Backing onto grazing land with distant rural views | Available as a no-chain sale |

Woods Mill, Henfield, West Sussex Offers around Ä825,000 Stylishly remodelled & enlarged home ideal for entertaining. Traditional 1930Ås features, but now with a fabulous new 34Åx23Å kitchen family room, new utility room, conservatory and 2 new Travertine bathrooms. Gated drive and halfacre gardens on four sides 4 bedrooms | Traditional 18Ä bay drawing room Elegant formal dining room | Central hall | Study area connecting the new 18Äx11Ä conservatory | Fabulous semi-vaulted kitchen breakfast & family room opening onto the rear gardens | New utility/boot room & cloakroom linking to: New 20Äx18Ä double garage | Gated circular drive and extensive parking | Large Greenhouse |

Kithurst Park, Storrington Ä475,000 Set In a wide-verged private road within a pleasant half-mile walk of the village, with footpaths to the Downs nearby. Sunny south-west facing gardens on 3 sides enjoying high natural privacy Wide drive & parking area | Entrance courtyard | Hall & cloakroom | 2 bedrooms, each with built-in wardrobes | Refitted white & chrome bath/ shower room adjacent to the main bedroom | Sitting room with fireplace | Conservatory/garden room | Dining room | Study | Kitchen breakfast room with appliances | Gas heating & double glazing | Wide single garage | Mature locality with homes of differing age & design | No through traffic | Available with no forward chain |

12 Church Street, Storrington, West Sussex RH20 4LA

01903 74 12 12 email: property@clarkeandcharlesworth.com

www.clarkeandcharlesworth.com


West Chiltington, West Sussex Price guide Ä1.1 million An historic Grade II school building in the heart of the old village. Now a stylish and characterful home in part-walled, south facing gardens of about one third acre. Featuring a self-contained annexe 5 to 6 bedrooms over 2 floors | Imposing 32 ft reception hall | Magnificent vaulted & galleried drawing room | Dining room | Sitting room/family room |ÅHeadmasterÄs studyÇ| Kitchen breakfast room, utility | Cloakroom |Ground floor bedroom suite |4 further first floor bedrooms in the main house & 3 bathrooms | The Annexe: Kitchen, bedroom, mezzanine study/sitting room, shower room | Easy to re-integrate back into main house Outbuilding & summerhouse | Double carport | Ideal family home; has also been an exclusive B&B

Former village school is now a character home & Annexe

The Annexe

Storrington, West Sussex Offers in the region of Ä395,000 A rare chance to buy an 1,100 sq ft 1968-built ÇColtÉ detached bungalow hidden in a beautiful south-facing garden plot. Ideal for a ÇNew EnglandÉ style facelift, enlargement or redevelopment (STC) About a mile from the village in the rhododendron lanes | Footpaths & country walks nearby | Good existing space and plain dÉcor | 3 double bedrooms | 24x21ft Living/dining room with windows to the length of one wall overlooking the gardens | Kitchen | Recent new shower room | Hall & cloakroom | Timber garage | Extensive drive | Green outlook all round | Available as a no-chain sale |

Village & Country Property Lettings & Land

01903 74 12 12

The property is hidden from view (arrowed)


Stunning The Letting Experts

“When letting your property there are several concerns which your agent must be able to address in order to protect both your property and your money. How much experience does the agent have with both letting and managing property? Are they a member of a professional body that offers full client money protection? How up-to-date and on top of lettings legislation are they? Leaders are not only ARLA registered and part of the SafeAgent scheme, but we also have over 28 years of experience and are known in the industry for our in-depth knowledge of the legislation that affects lettings. These strengths combined with our local teams, high level of customer service and extensive marketing tools are just some of the reasons why we are ‘First in Letting’ across Sussex and Surrey. Why not call us today to arrange a free rental valuation and see just how expert we are.”

Kathy Taylor Senior Branch Manager of Horsham & Cranleigh Winners of Best Company in the 2010 Sussex Business Awards

329388 Hurst Court Horsham £975 pcm

Executive two bedroom, two bathroom unfurnished apartment close to Horsham station and town centre. Central heating, double glazing and parking.

593903 Horsham £850 pcm

897467 Ifold £850 pcm

Executive two bedroom 2nd floor apartment in a gated development and conveniently situated within walking distance of the town centre and station.

Leaders Horsham are pleased to offer this newly redecorated and spacious two bedroom annexe in the rural area of Ifold.

983177 The Maltings Billingshurst £ 875 pcm Newly redecorated and well presented two bedroom end of terrace house situated in a convenient location in the centre of Billingshurst village.

Horsham:

01403 217585

Superb

264381 The Comptons, Horsham £900 pcm

Two double bedroom unfurnished 2nd floor apartment set in an exclusive gated development and within easy reach of the town centre.

18a Market Square, Horsham, West Sussex, RH12 1EU email: horsham@leaders.co.uk Follow us @LeadersSussex

Opening times: Mon-Fri 9.00-6.00 Sat 9.00-5.00


First In Letting www.leaders.co.uk

Charming

758851 Warmer Close Southwater £1695 pcm

Superb and beautifully presented four double bedroom detached house in a quiet residential area. Optionally furnished.

339189 Horsham £975 pcm

988290 Gorings Mead Horsham £995 pcm

462667 Pulborough £1,050 pcm

Luxury two bed two bath unfurnished apartment in a modern development within a short distance of Horsham main line station.

Well presented three bedroom Victorian style terrace house situated close to Horsham town centre and mainline station.

Modern three bed two bath house set on a exclusive development and within easy reach of the village centre and station.

Beautiful

945037 Speedwell Way Horsham £1200 pcm

992487 Knowle Lane Cranleigh £1395 pcm

997085 Puttenham Guildford £3950

Delightful and spacious three bedroom link detached family house situated in a popular residential cul-desac and within a short walk from local amenities.

Unique Cottage Set in the middle of idyllic countryside yet still only 5 minutes drive from local amenities of Cranleigh.

A handsome Grade II listed former farmhouse dating back to the 17th Century offering versatile accommodation.

Winners of Best Company in the 2010 Sussex Business Awards

Cranleigh:

01483 27444

228 High Street,Cranleigh, Surrey, GU6 8RL email: cranleigh@leaders.co.uk Follow us @LeadersSurrey

Opening times: Mon-Fri 9.00-5.30 Sat 9.00-2.00


PIONEERING RETIREMENT VILLAGE still delivering 30 years on

ELMBRIDGE VILLAGE IS AN ESTABLISHED RETIREMENT COMMUNITY OFFERING EXTENSIVE LEISURE FACILITIES, WELL DESIGNED HOMES AND A FLOURISHING SOCIAL SCENE Elmbridge Village has the honour of being the grandmother of Retirement Villages, not just within the company but across the UK. The village, on the fringes of Cranleigh, Surrey, celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2011. But thanks to the vision of founder Ray Brown it remains as relevant now as it was then. Now president of Retirement Villages Ltd, he spotted the potential of the concept having seen its popularity in the United States. He returned with the vision of recreating a similar community albeit tweaked for the UK market. Work started on Elmbridge Village in 1981. Some of the buildings from Elmbridge Village’s former incarnation as a Second World War education camp and then a boarding school were retained. Other parts of the site were transformed with the addition of bungalows and apartment buildings. The first residents moved in soon after and, in May 1984, the village was officially opened by Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra who, 24 years later, opened the company’s Roseland Parc village in Cornwall. Since those early days the village has enjoyed its place at the heart of the company, a blueprint not only for Retirement Villages Ltd but also for other developers moving into the market. There are still a handful of residents at the village who moved in as Elmbridge Village opened. They have seen the village grow organically, shaped by them and their ideas. “Elmbridge Village works so well because it is an established community and has all the benefits that brings,” said Simon Baird,

the Village Manager. “Neighbours aren’t just neighbours they are friends. Interest groups, outings and events have become part of the calendar because that’s what those who live here like to do and share with each other.” The village has also enjoyed a long relationship with the wider community in Cranleigh and beyond. The village choir regularly sings at local residential homes; students from a nearby Japanese boarding school have spent time at the village practicing their English; performers and speakers regularly call at the village. “Like any neighbourhood, Elmbridge Village and its residents are an integral part of Surrey life,” said Simon. The community spirit is helped by the facilities Elmbridge Village boasts. There is a large village hall complete with stage, perfect for performances, meetings and activities. A small general store provides day to day supplies while the library, snooker room and restaurant are available for residents and their guests. Outside there is a meadow, croquet lawn and allotments, all crossed by paths and dotted with seats. All of these are looked after by a team of village staff, under Simon’s watchful eye. “It’s the variety of the lifestyle that appeals to many people who choose to live here,” said Simon. “Residents have the option to get involved in the busy calendar of social events if they wish. Equally they can enjoy the comfort and peace of their individual property, or get involved in the wider community.” Indeed, life at Elmbridge Village can be what each individual wants it to be.

Elmbridge Village: the facts 236 bungalows and apartments 28 acres of grounds For 60s and over One and two bedroom apartments and bungalows 24 hour emergency call line and twice weekly doctor’s surgery Central clubhouse facilities including village hall, general store, library, snooker room, restaurant and village reception How to find us Elmbridge Village, Essex Drive, Elmbridge Road, Cranleigh, Surrey, GU2 8TR www.elmbridgevillage.co.uk 0845 5211857 The calendar The Elmbridge Village calendar is full of activities, events and outings which residents can dip in and out of as they like. Regular interest groups include: Indoor bowls Choir Line dancing Solo whist Reading group Knitting Scrabble Painting Medau exercise class Table tennis Poetry Visiting speakers and entertainers Fellowship group Computer group Bingo Craft group


Award Winning Developer Converts Old School

www.residedevelopments.co.uk

The Old School House

The Walled Courtyard

Actual View

In the heart of the West Sussex village of Pulborough, winners of the Evening Standard New Homes Award, Reside, has developed a stunning collection of just nine new properties and two converted homes.

Behind The Old School House, which was once the playground, tennis court and gymnasium, a development of just nine individual and very elegant new homes has been built. The new homes offer two or three bedrooms and feature large open plan living spaces, en-suites and some have balcony spaces.

The Old School House, which dates back to circa 1899 and from 1953 was used by the popular and highly regarded Arundale School, now provides two substantial properties. Offering three or four bedrooms, large kitchen/ family rooms and en-suite bathrooms, the properties benefit from private parking and stunning views across the Wildbrooks and towards the South Downs. The larger of the two also has a cellar and wine store area.

All the properties enjoy the benefit of being within walking distance of the village shops and local amenities, as well as having private parking, gardens and beautiful well chosen specifications that are eco-friendly and have low running costs.

The Walled Courtyard

The Old School House & The Walled Courtyard Old Pulborough, West Sussex Price guide: £265,000 – £550,000

All enquiries:

www.fowlersonline.co.uk

01798 875197 / 01903 745844


?

what makes a home

SUSTAINABLE James Hood looks at the criteria for an environmentally friendly home and learns that it’s about much more than just loft insulation


?

Sustainable housing. If you thought it was all about solar panels, think again. Admittedly, those were my thoughts initially and solar panels do play a big part in creating sustainable (that’s green to you and me) homes. But there is much more that goes into building properties that are kinder to the environment and future generations than simply converting sunlight into electricity. Sure enough, there are a lot of technical elements that go into building a sustainable development. And the work that a construction company does can play a major part in making sure the impact of their homes on the environment both during development and in the future is minimal or reduced. For example, did you know that on sites that are redeveloped, materials from the original, derelict or demolished buildings can be recycled and re-used in parts of the new building? And on greenfield sites, where building starts from scratch, wood and other materials can be sourced sustainably. In addition, measures are often taken to ensure that wild animals cannot climb into or create a home in any excavated holes or other areas while construction is taking place. And, wherever possible, construction companies can also help conserve the wildlife in an area in which they are developing, by providing ways to create new habitats for badger and bats, for example, in nearby wood or park land. Then, there are the actual properties themselves. You’ve probably heard about or got double glazed (there’s even triple glazed now) windows. They help keep the warmth from escaping. But there are newer ways to create heat in the home, and keep it there, which can dramatically reduce the energy costs for residents and mean that their carbon footprint on the environment is lower too. At a development built by Osborne on behalf of Saxon Weald housing association in Steyning, a method of extracting heat from the earth’s core and into the home has been used, and rain water harvesters collect water which is then used to flush the loos. It’s all part of the plan to keep the effects of construction and daily life on our planet to a minimum, making sure we do what we can to protect our environment for our own future and the future of our children and their children. But the foundations of sustainability go deeper still. After all, what good does a ground source heat pump or solar panel do if those who live in the

home are not fully invested in using it or aware of the benefits? That’s why people, residents and communities are equally as important for creating sustainable homes as the contractors who build them. And also why one of the four areas that developer Berkeley has committed to focusing on in its ten-year sustainability strategy is ‘delivering sustainable communities’. Also on the list are ‘building greener homes’, ‘enhancing the customer experience’ and ‘running a sustainable business.’ Together they form the company’s Vision2020 plan, which shows just how seriously the developer takes sustainability. Berkeley, one of the premium quality and most respected developers in the country, takes the idea of living an environmentally friendly lifestyle to the next level. All of its homes are built to a minimum of Level 3 of the Code for Sustainable Homes a government-run organisation which monitors the effect of construction on the environment. But rather than looking solely at construction, Berkeley has identified ways it can integrate more eco-friendly choices into the everyday living of residents. For example, homes might have space for a home office desk, close to plug sockets and telephone points, reducing the need to drive to work as frequently. They will also have space for recycling bins, so less waste goes to a landfill and there will be secure bicycle storage, helping you reduce carbon emissions further. And as well as making individual homes eco-friendly, the organisation places a great importance on the surrounding community. For example, where possible, new developments and homes will be close to amenities such as schools, play areas or pubs and they will have easy access to public transport links and services. New developments will also be designed so that they are safe for pedestrians and cyclists. All of which means there is less impact on the roads, congestion and pollution. So it is clear that as environmentally friendly the process of constructing a home may be, the fact remains it needs the buyin of those who live in it to make it truly sustainable. And rather than being about simply insulating your loft, maintaining a high quality of life for generation after generation takes the involvement of a community and everyone in it as well as every home.

41


THE IT LIST

VINTAGE

inspired...

From

£46

Lampshade sizes: Small H 15cm x Dia 26cm Large H 21cm x Dia 33cm

FOR TEA LOVERS AND AMAZING HOSTESSES Beautiful and original teaware, jugs, plates and bowls can be purchased online (otherwise not open to the public). Plant a seasonal bulb or two in a cup (or coffee pot) to give as an extra special gift! www.everythingstopsfortea.com Tel: 01629 821822

LIGHT UP YOUR HOME Lovely fluted lampshades decorated with ribbon and lace. Choose from: ivory, mink or black. Available in large and small sizes. www.primroseandplum.co.uk Tel: 01428 643040

£235 WEAR IT! George Twyford Large Potting Bench - normally despatched within 24 hours of order

£15.30

STYLISH STORAGE This vintage inspired potting bench is not just destined for the outdoor shed It can also be used as a storage statement piece inside the home. www.bettytwyford.com Tel: 01568 611124

£125

VINTAGE HOSTESS From vintage chic to jubilee inspired... there’s never been a better time to update your pinny AND look fab at the same time! www.theapronstore.co.uk Tel: 01483 799140 DAPPER IN A HAT £7.25 Wear a genuine vintage silk top hat to that very special occasion. Children’s cotton apron with chef hat - suitable for ages 7-9 www.bottlegreenhomes.co.uk email: sales@bottlegreenhomes.co.uk


STEP BACK IN TIME Fabulous vintage butter knives ready for a pile of crumpets by the fire, in the garden with scones on a sunny day or as elegant butter spreaders at dinner. www.owlandmonkey.co.uk

£25 £18.50

Set of six Approx. 17-18 cm long

CELEBRATE IT!

£10 PROPER OLD JELLY Celebrate in style this summer and make some show-stopper jellies in original vintage glass jelly moulds. All products offered by Owl and Monkey are beautifully designed, high quality and made with care; but remember the adorable antique rules! There may be some slight variations in colour from those pictured. Their unique nature is part of the joy of discovering your vintage find.

www.owlandmonkey.co.uk email: funky@owlandmonkey.co.uk

JUST ADD FLOWERS Mix and match vintage bottles with more modern products - complete the look with a flower stem or two, or indeed a candlestick. www.bottlegreenhomes.co.uk email: sales@bottlegreenhomes.co.uk

Size - approximately 1 pint (570ml) jelly

£28.99 £195 PUT IT IN YOUR PURSE Pretty butterfly vintage inspired purse - with gift box. www.daisypark.co.uk Tel: 01769 579077 ONE-OFF VINTAGE Escape the trends of the high street and purchase an original vintage piece. The vintage wall offers an online shopping destination for one-off 19th- and 20thcentury decorative homewares and gift items. www.thevintagewall.com email: via site form only

Nestle's Milk advertising clock, Whitelaw, c. 1910

£35

Stripped metal 'half gallon' water jug, early 1900s


Prince Philip receiving the Gold Cup on behalf of the Windsor Park team in 1957

COWDRAY PARK the people and the polo

Winners of the Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup 2011, Zacara

John Cowdray, third Viscount, preparing to play in 1937

The England team lines up at the St Regis International Cup 2011


LIZ HIGGINS TAKES A LOOK BACK AT THE HISTORY OF COWDRAY PARK POLO CLUB, AND EXPLAINS WHY ITS FOUNDER WOULD BE PROUD OF THE PLACE IT HAS BECOME In 1909, the noted Victorian engineer and industrialist, Sir Weetman Dickinson Pearson, purchased the Cowdray estate from the Egmont family of nearby Petworth House. Sir Weetman was made Baron Cowdray in 1910 and rewarded for his massive engineering projects, which included the Blackwall Tunnel, an oil pipeline through Mexico, a tunnel under the Hudson River from New York to New Jersey and the re-construction of Dover Harbour, by becoming the first Viscount Cowdray in 1917. Sir Weetman’s eldest son, Harold Pearson had learned to play polo whilst at Oxford; later, as a Liberal MP, he played for the House of Commons. His passion for the sport resulted in a polo ground being laid out at Cowdray House in 1910 with a second below the house in a bend of the River Rother. Chukkas started in April and the Cowdray archives hold a poster inviting the public to watch ‘A handicap tournament’ on the ground in front of the House on April 15 1911. However, the key period for competitions at Cowdray coincided with the festival of horseracing at nearby Goodwood with picnics, golf, archery, and even a parade of heavy horses around the River Ground to celebrate the week. An announcement from Harold Pearson in 1911 notes that ‘play will take place in the mornings and evenings before and after the Racing.’ It also helpfully explained that ‘Midhurst is seven miles from Goodwood and one of the two grounds is not harmed by rain, so play will take place regardless of weather.’ The highlight of the week was The Cowdray Park Challenge Cup - still in existence today. In 1914 the Challenge Cup saw an entry of ten teams with Harold Pearson’s team, Capron House, named after his home in Midhurst, losing in the final to Cowley Manor. Only days later an announcement had to be made during a polo match that war had been declared on Germany and that all men on leave should return at once to their regiments. Harold and his brother Clive Pearson survived the First World War, but their brother Geoffrey was killed in action in 1914. After the Great War ended, in 1919 Lord Cowdray made over his estate to Harold whose Capron House team would now become known as Cowdray Park. The famous orange shirts became the signature colour of any Cowdray team. Within a few years of the war’s end, polo was enjoying a renaissance with many officers looking to the sport to bring some gaiety and fun into their lives. Polo at Cowdray Park thrived, with an increased number of spectators turning up to enjoy the exciting spectacle. It is on record that in 1926 3,000 people attended the final of the Cowdray Park Challenge Cup and Lady Cowdray entertained 500 to tea in front of the Ruins after the match.

The new Lord Cowdray’s only son, John, shared his father’s enthusiasm for the sport, playing properly for the first time on a trip to the USA in 1927. A mountain of press cuttings indicate both local and national interest in the Cowdray family, particularly the house-parties which signalled Goodwood Week. Their guest-lists, menus and the elegant outfits worn by Lady Cowdray were widely reported. In 1933 Lord Cowdray died aged just 51 and John, only 23 years of age, inherited the Estate and all the duties it entailed. In terms of polo, he was to prove even more passionate about the sport than his father. The late 1930s saw enormous interest from the public for the Goodwood Week polo. The Cowdray Horse Show was a great spectacle on the final day with all the Cowdray farms putting in teams which paraded in highly polished tack resplendent with ornamental horse brasses. John Cowdray was determined that polo should be enjoyed by everyone. However, the Second World War meant that for six years there was no polo at Cowdray – every piece of available land was cultivated to support the war effort and Cowdray House was used by the Royal Army Service Corp. John Cowdray survived the war despite losing an arm in the battle for Dunkirk. Immediately after the war, he single-mindedly pursued a revival of the sport he loved so much, having a prosthetic arm with a hook fitted so that he could hold the reins with his left and continue to hold a polo mallet in his right hand. A few of the pre-war Cowdray ponies were still alive and Lord Cowdray set about importing 50 ponies by ship from the Argentine, a country he had enjoyed visiting before the war. By summer 1947 John Cowdray was organising tournaments at Cowdray once again, although there was a serious shortage of players and often the matches were three-a-side. In 1948, seven teams took part in the Cowdray Challenge Cup attracting a large number of spectators including Argentinian players Jack Nelson and Luis Lacey who thought the standard of play good enough to invite an English team to the Argentine. In 1949 John Cowdray took English players to Buenos Aires to play against some of the world’s finest in the Argentine Open, in 1951 offering them a return visit for the first revival of the Coronation Cup since 1939. The trophy had been inaugurated in 1911 to mark the coronation of King George V. The early 50s saw Cowdray Park firmly on the map with spectators flocking to the grounds to catch a glimpse of Princess Elizabeth watching her dashing husband Prince Philip play. The prince had been encouraged into the sport by his uncle Lord Mountbatten. Prince Philip had a handicap of three and became a regular player for the Cowdray team. 45


Horsepower of a diff erent kind

SEASON HIGHLIGHTS:

19th May

England vs USA e St. Regis International Cup

24th June South Downs Polo Day

7/8th July Quarter Finals Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup

12th July

Semi Finals Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup

15th July

Final Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup

Polo at Cowdray Park - www.cowdraypolo.co.uk


By 1953, Cowdray Park was without question the centre of English polo. Lord Cowdray arranged an international tournament and over 1,000 cars and coaches brought an estimated 15,000 spectators – unfortunately seeing Argentina beat England in the Final. The business community of Midhurst presented John Cowdray with The Midhurst Town Cup to thank him for bringing prominence to the town through the sport of polo. In 1955 Prince Philip, with John Cowdray’s help and advice, formed his own polo club, the Household Brigade Club (later to become Guards), in Windsor Great Park. The Coronation Cup was given a new home at the Guards Club. This encouraged John Cowdray to launch the Cowdray Park Gold Cup in 1956 with an eye to establishing a British Open Polo Championship at his club. It took two years before the Cowdray team managed to win the handsome trophy, beating Woolmers Park 10-3. Cowdray went on to win again in 1962 beating Sao Silvestre 8-5. The Cowdray team appeared in the Final eleven more times but lost on each occasion - the most memorable being in 1990 when the match went into two extra chukkas and the Hildon team at last snatched victory at 10-9 to scarcely a dry eye on the grandstand. The 1970s saw polo beginning to change with a decline in the number of amateur players and a rise in the number of professional players in each team. Once upon a time, the overseas players sold a few horses to English gentlemen players to cover the cost of their polo season but the days of the well-paid professional really began. In 1975 Cowdray Park’s well known commentator, Terry Hanlon, became ‘hooked’ by the sport and presented himself at the office of Colonel Tatham, Cowdray’s Polo Manager. ‘I went into his office and respectfully addressed him as ‘Colonel.’ Don’t call me Colonel, boy, call me Bolshie like everyone else’ Terry recalls. It didn’t take Bolshie long to get the measure of Hanlon. Cowdray’s regular commentator was unavailable and Bolshie shouted to Terry: ‘Hanlon, you’ve got enough to say for yourself, get up in the commentary box and say something about the match. Don’t argue with me, boy’. And so the ‘Voice of Cowdray’ was born. Terry Hanlon has been Official Commentator ever since and observed every significant match on Cowdray turf. It was with great pleasure that Lord Cowdray saw his second son Charles take to the polo field having honed his skills as one of the earliest members of the Cowdray Park Pony Club’s polo section. Charles reached a handicap of three and as Patron of the Cowdray Park team played 16 Gold Cup tournaments, reaching the final three times, most notably the epic 1990 Gold Cup Final. He reflects: ‘The

Cowdray Park Gold Cup really is the toughest polo competition in the world to win.’ It was with great sorrow that the polo community learned of the death of John Cowdray in January 1995. Not only had he made Cowdray Park a mecca for polo enthusiasts from all over the world, he had raised awareness of the sport and set many young players on the path to success as professional players. He had also served as Chairman of the Hurlingham Polo Association, governing body of the sport in the UK, from 1947 to 1967, whilst simultaneously running a huge portfolio of business interests, two large country estates and the polo club itself. In 2007 the Polo Club become a limited company, managed by a committee comprised of its President, the 4th Viscount Cowdray, and current and former playing members under the chairmanship of businessman Robin Butler. Its playing membership remains vibrant and attracts those who want to play and compete on some of the finest pitches in the world. Many of the club’s senior members now have the pleasure of seeing their children taking to the field. There is also a core of knowledgeable non-playing members watching from the grandstand or the members’ car park throughout the season, not just during the period of the Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup tournament when attendance rises significantly. Today the club is in great shape offering a full programme of tournaments throughout the season from late April to September. Cowdray Park plays more polo than any other club in the UK, and, as well as a full programme of domestic tournaments, six HPA tournaments, and the vibrant four weeks of the world famous Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup for the British Open, spectators are guaranteed the sight of the finest players in the world in action on Cowdray’s well-tended pitches. Eleven grounds are in use, five at the Lawns complex at Midhurst, and six at the Ambersham complex three miles away. Cowdray has hosted an international match annually for the past seven years, this year marking the fifth year of support by St. Regis Hotels & Resorts with an exciting encounter between England and the USA in store. Cowdray Park Polo Club’s founder would no doubt be astonished at the scale of the club’s expansion, the majority of which took place during the 60 year guardianship of his son John. He would be thrilled that today several of his great grandchildren compete in the sport and that its future is secure in the wonderful countryside of the newly created South Downs National Park.

47


Set amidst spectacular rolling downland, the award-winning Cowdray Park Golf Club is considered to be one of the most beautiful courses in Southern England and offers a true test of golf, with 18 holes on a par 70 course measuring 6,212 yards. The Cowdray Estate can offer Clay Pigeon Shooting for groups and corporate events as well as fly fishing on the River Rother at Cowdray Park, which is stocked annually, there is a healthy population of wild brown trout. In 2010 we acquired Chiddingfold Golf Club, a picturesque Surrey course located approximately 20 minutes away from Cowdray. Cowdray Park is the perfect place to stay for the ultimate country break, whether you want an action-packed weekend or a peaceful refuge from modern life.

Over 60 years of craftsmanship in period residential, community and commercial projects

Telephone: 01243 865771 www.eachiverton.co.uk

RK C OWD PA G OL F R A Y C L U B

COWDRAY PARK GOLF CLUB Midhurst, West Sussex GU29 0BB Tel: 01730 813599 Fax: 01730 815900 E-mail: enquiries@cowdraygolf.co.uk Website: www.cowdraygolf.co.uk


the

2012 SEASON at the home of

BRITISH POLO Cowdray Park Polo Club opens its 2012 season on 28 April with a full programme of low, medium and high goal polo and the introduction of two new tournaments at four and six goal level. Why not make this the year that you take a picnic and relax for an afternoon of polo in Cowdray Park’s glorious scenery at the foot of the South Downs? Cowdray’s experienced commentators will guide you through the throw-ins, ride-offs, backhands and under-theneck shots, so that by the time you come to tread-in at half time you will be an old hand.

over 40 matches in prospect in the run-up to the final on Sunday 15 July. The fabulous golden trophy, played at Cowdray Park since 1956, is the most coveted prize in polo and the tournament ranks alongside the Argentine and US Opens in world polo terms. On the first weekend of the British Open tournament, the club marks its enviable location at the heart of the South Downs National Park by presenting the South Downs Polo Day and its feature match, The Midhurst Town Cup, on Sunday 24 June. Entry is just £5 per head on this special day – under 12s free.

The first major fixture of the season is on Saturday 19 May, when England takes on the USA in The St. Regis International Cup, the first of the UK’s senior home internationals of 2012. Go and support the England boys in what looks to be a very exciting 24-goal handicap match. With a retail village, food, bars and a mini funfair there’s fun for everyone. Earlier in the day Young England take on Young South Africa in the John Cowdray Trophy.

The following Sunday, 1 July, the Cooch Behar Cup is the feature presentation of the weekend. Four quarter final matches take place over Saturday and Sunday 7th/8th July, with the Argentine Ambassadors Cup the feature match on Sunday 8th July. Semi Finals of the Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup, one of Cowdray Park’s most popular occasions, take place on Thursday 12th July. The Final, when up to 15,000 spectators attend, takes place on 15th July. And the following weekend sees the final of the British Ladies Open tournament on Saturday 21 July.

The Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup for the British Open Polo Championship, with the world’s finest players in action, opens on 19 June with

49


the

INTERIORDECORATORS “Premium standard of workmanship, carried out by skilled, qualified and discreet professionals�

Specialising in interior decorating, we have the skills and techniques required to deliver the highest quality of work. Portfolio and testimonials are available on request as a testament to our commitment to an exceptional finish. We provide a two year guarantee for the work we carry out, under-written by Dulux Select and Trustmark. FOR ENQUIRIES TELEPHONE OR EMAIL: Peter Hales-Alexander on 07973 251383 doedecor@btinternet.com Richard Johnson on 07769 906367 richardjohnsondecorating.co.uk


Polo at Cowdray Park is surprisingly affordable. For the majority of the season, admission is free on weekday afternoons. At the weekends or on Bank Holidays there is an admission charge of ÂŁ5 per person, under 12s free. Parking is free. There is an admission charge of ÂŁ5 per person for all weekday matches of the Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup. Spectators are able to check the website cowdaypolo.co.uk or call the Polo Office on 01730 813257 for information on admission charges for the The St. Regis International Cup, Quarter Finals, Semi Finals and the Final of the Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup, when tickets can be pre-booked.

Visitors are welcome to picnic at either of the two Cowdray Park polo complexes situated at the Cowdray Lawns at Midhurst or 3.5 miles away at Ambersham. The Sat Nav reference for Cowdray Lawns is GU29 0AJ and for Ambersham GU28 0PR

51


Fashion & Food on the Farm! Thursday 14th June

ster n i m d Go eses Che

Southend Farm Barns, Chichester.

Beth P Connock London

:

in d e r atu

As fe

ollock

EKO The GlagmCo Campin

Come to THE RARE BRAND SUMMER MARKET this year at a stunning new venue: Southend Barns, in Donnington, 1.5 miles south of Chichester. Enjoy shopping in a totally unique and stylish environment but more importantly enjoy the pleasure of discovering rare products from some of the most talented and chic rare brands around. Over 50 Rare Brands will be exhibiting. Plus we will have a lovely café on site for a morning coffee, a light lunch or an afternoon tea! Hours: 9am - 4pm Entry: £3.50 inc. £1 to

Chichester A27 West

A27 East

follow the pink signs!

Selsey Road Chichester Marina

Witterings

Wophams Lane

www.therarebrandmarket.co.uk

Hunston Southend Farm Barns (PO20 7PS)


Fashion & Food on the Farm Prize Draw!

$W7+(5$5(%5$1'6800(50$5.(7ZHZLOOEHUXQQLQJDVHULHVRI 0DWW5REHUWVZRUNVKRSVLQRQHRIWKH%DUQV 0DWW5REHUWVFHOHEULW\WUDLQHU FXUUHQWO\WUDLQLQJ'DYLG&DPHURQ KDVGHVLJQHG DQHZGLHWDQGÀWQHVVUHJLPHSURJUDPPHWKDWKHVD\VZLOOVDYH\RXKDYLQJWR KDYH\RXURZQSHUVRQDOWUDLQHUDQGGLHWLFLDQ+HLVJLYLQJDZD\WUDGHVHFUHWVWR ORRNLQJDQGIHHOLQJJRRG3HUIHFWIRU6XPPHU $0DWW5REHUWVWHDPPHPEHUZLOOEHFRPLQJWRWDONDERXWKRZWKHSURJUDPPH ZRUNVDQGWKHNH\HWKRVEHKLQG0DWW·VWRSWLSV :HDUHJLYLQJDZD\D)5((:25.6+23IRU\RXDQGVHYHQIULHQGVLQWKH FRPIRUWRI\RXURZQKRPHZLWKD0DWW5REHUWV'LHWDQG)LWQHVVWUDLQHU 7RHQWHUSOHDVHHPDLO\RXUDQVZHUWRWKHTXHVWLRQEHORZWRHPPD#WKHUDUHEUDQGPDUNHWFRXN +RZPDQ\\HDUVRIWKH4XHHQ·VUHLJQGRHVWKH'LDPRQG-XELOHHPDUN"


James Hood takes a tour around Borde Hill Garden and finds a refreshing mix of old and new, British and exotic - with a surprise around every corner

Most of us know how much work goes into nurturing and maintaining a garden. And nowhere else has as much love, care and attention to detail gone into an open space as it has at Borde Hill Garden. There you will find 35 acres of fine plants, trees, flowers and other features all sitting within the ground’s 200 acres. The garden itself consists of numerous different areas, some wide open, others hidden in discrete corners of the property. It boasts a complimentary mix of both contemporary design and traditional, more natural gardens and yet another contrast is the beautifully British combined with the exquisitely exotic when it comes to the horticulture and variety of plants.

The house on the property is a breathtaking mansion, built in the 1590s and was home to the Great Grandfather of Mr Clarke, who currently resides there and oversees the management of the garden with his wife. His Great Grandfather first began cultivating the gardens more than a hundred years ago - the Stephenson Clarke family celebrates the 120th anniversary of being at Borde Hill this year. He wanted to create a spectacular oasis of tranquility and as a keen gardener invested in some of the most exotic plant species ever seen in Britain at the time, having magnolias, rhododendrons and camellias, for example, shipped from countries in the Far East.

There are four full-time gardeners in the garden and two part-time, all of whom work all year round come rain or shine. The head gardener, Andy Stevens, has been working at Borde Hill Garden for three and a half years and says that it has something very different to most others in the country. “There is such variety here. You can be sitting in a rose garden one minute then turn a corner and you will find a very unusual tree or flower from somewhere else in the world. We have plants that come from the Mediterranean and South Africa for example, and then we have hundreds of tulips around our pond, which was the house’s original swimming pool. And then there is the nice contrast between the small spaces and the large expanse of open land and views. There’s something to explore at every turn”, Andy told The Resident Magazine. He also believes that part of the garden’s appeal is that many of the area’s are small enough that visitor’s can replicate them in their own garden at home. He added: “Many of the garden areas are intimate and small enough for people to get inspiration for their own homes. It can make the prospect of doing something similar in their garden less daunting. And we try to make sure everything has a label, because if people love something we want them to know what it is and be able to go out and get their own if they would like.”

Today, the garden has been maintained to the highest standard and also include lakes, greenhouses, and the occasional pheasant. In addition are the views. In places, you can take in the beauty of Sussex for as far as the eye can see and there’s also magical woodland to enjoy. Dogs are also welcome on a lead and guests are invited, even encouraged, to bring a picnic with them. As well as the gardens, there are a number of other facilities on the estate at Borde Hill. The renowned Jeremy’s restaurant offers a fine dining experience for lunch and dinners and the cafe also provides a welcoming and relaxing place to enjoy breakfast, lunch, drinks and cream teas. There is also a gallery on site. The Green Tree Gallery offers contemporary arts and crafts within a charismatic barn. There is also a busy calendar of events taking place at Borde Hill Garden. They include the high profile and popular Jools Holland concert, in June and The Proms performance in July. In fact, not only are the gardens some of the best kept in the country, but the entire estate at Borde Hill may just be the best kept secret in Sussex. One that you should really discover for yourself. As Mrs E Stephenson Clarke puts it: “There is a surprise around every corner.” Visit bordehill.co.uk for more information

55


MYSTERY IN STONE FGF 28 Apr - 9 Sep Extraordinary contemporary hand carved Zimbabwean stone sculptures displayed in the Garden. Exhibitions & workshops throughout. BRITISH EVENTING HORSE TRIALS FGF 26 May - 27 May DIAMOND JUBILEE GARDEN PARTY FGF 4 June Come and join us for the Garden Party of the Year. There will be a Licensed bar, plus as separate Pimms and Mojitos tent, the well known folk band “Jigalots” will be playing some excellent folk music in the garden from noon until 4.00pm. For the kids we have a professional Balloon Maker and Face Painter. There will be bunting and flags around the garden, so bring your picnics and come and join us. Normal entry fee applies.

Summer Nightslive Pack a picnic and party

Jools Spitfire Holland The Jubilee

Special guest

Marc Almond

Sat June 30

Adult £32 : Child £15 Children 5-15 / Under 5 free

Proms

with Spectacular Firework Finale

Sun July 1

Adult £22.50 : Child Free

Children must be under 16 - Conditions Apply

Borde Hill Garden Haywards Heath EMS Concerts 01603 660444 : Borde Hill 01444 450326 www.emsconcerts.co.uk : www.bordehill.co.uk Gates Open 5pm : Programme from 6.30pm Full programme at www.emsconcerts.co.uk

BRIGHTON CLASSIC CAR RUN FGF 10 June Once again, Brighton will be holding the Famous London to Brighton Classic Car Run and this year Borde Hill Garden will be one of the main competitor stops for over 200 vehicles, who will be parked within the garden for viewing during the day as they arrive and leave. ROSE DAYS 15 -30 June Enjoy the soft pastel colours of Jay Robin’s Rose Garden with over 500 David Austin Roses in full bloom or visit the Gold Standard Rose Borders for bright yellows and reds inter-planted with herbaceous plants. The shop is stocked with rose plants and rose soaps and perfumery.

FGF = Friends of Borde Hill Garden Go Free Opening times: 10 March - 9 September 24 October - 4 November

Daily 10am to 6pm, weekends only during September & October

Jeremy’s Restaurant will put a ‘rose twist’ into their Menu of the Day during Borde Hill’s Rose Week 15-30 June, featuring edible flowers in a savoury salad and a rosewater dessert. Menu of the Day 2-courses £15 3-courses £18, available Tuesday to Saturday lunchtimes and Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursdays dinner SUMMER NIGHTS LIVE 30 June - 1 July 30 June - Jools Holland & His Rhythm & Blues Orchestra + special guests. 1 July - Jubilee Spitfire Proms National Symphony Orchestra and violinist Gareth Johnson perform a sensational music extravaganza. Picnic style concerts. For tickets see our website or call 01444 450326. WEST SUSSEX JAGUAR DAY FGF 15 July After the successful Jaguar Event held at Borde Hill Garden last year, we are pleased to announce that West Sussex Jaguar will be returning to the Garden for their annual car event. There will be a varied selection of very old to very new Jaguars on display. THE ‘SEED’ OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE 19, 20, 21 & 22 Jul The Seed is an incredible adventure, part performance, installations and treasure hunt on true stories of the intrepid Victorian plant Hunters. BRITISH EVENTING HORSE TRIALS FGF 18 Aug & 19 Aug TBC HALLOWEEN FGF 24 Oct – 4 Nov Spectacular hunt, haunted witches’ house, face painting, spooky arts and crafts.

Borde Hill Lane, Haywards Heath, West Sussex RH16 1XP

01444 450326

www.bordehill.co.uk


57


PORSCHE PREVIEW

Motors writer Olli Knott takes a look inside and under the bonnet of the latest launch from Porsche, which will be available from July The new Porsche Cayenne GTS builds on the Cayenne model’s reputation as the most sporting SUV, offering a more powerful engine, increased dynamic power development and a tauter chassis with lower ride height. While the Cayenne GTS sits between the Cayenne S and the Cayenne Turbo in the range, its own special character enables it to be differentiated clearly from its siblings. Beneath the bonnet of the Cayenne GTS lies an uprated 4.8-litre V8 engine, with 420hp, based on the Cayenne S power unit. Power transmission is via the eight-speed Tiptronic S with integrated auto start/stop function. Unfortunately the manual option on the previous GTS is no longer offered. The engine and gearbox have each been tuned to deliver particularly sporting levels of responsiveness, with the consequence that the Cayenne GTS sprints from a standing start to 62mph in

5.7 seconds, reaching 100 mph in 13.3 seconds. The top speed is 162mph and the combined fuel consumption on the NEDC is 26.4mpg. The chassis settings have been modified to further raise the dynamic ability of the Cayenne. The suspension is more tautly tuned and equipped with Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) as standard, while the body is lowered by 24mm relative to the Cayenne S. As a result, the GTS is even closer to the road and handles with trademark composure and agility. The appearance of the Cayenne GTS clearly proclaims its pronounced sportiness with eye-catching features including the front-end styling inspired by the Cayenne Turbo. Further design details include window surrounds and trims in a highgloss black finish, prominent side skirts and wider wheel arches plus a distinctive roof spoiler with twin-wing profile.

From behind the wheel, the GTS offers a sporting interior ambience courtesy of a bespoke interior finished in leather and Alcantara, and front sports seats with eight-way adjustment. Further standard features include a SportDesign steering wheel with paddle-shift, sports exhaust system and Bi-Xenon headlights. Making its debut at the Beijing Motor Show on April 23, the Cayenne GTS goes on sale in the UK this July, starting at around £67,000. Fitted to every Cayenne GTS is a Porsche Vehicle Tracking System (VTS), a sophisticated vehicle security package approved to Thatcham Category 5 standard, and customers will also be able to explore the potential of their new car by participating in a complimentary course at the Porsche Experience Centre, Silverstone. And don’t worry, it comes in other colours as well as just lime green, that’s just my one. 58


for every move you make

We all want to be as supple and flexible as we can be, Cortaflex® nutritional supplement supports the health of every joint in the body. It provides nutrients for lubrication and flexibility of movement, giving more comfort to your joints. Cortaflex® has been formulated around the concept that smaller molecules are more likely to be absorbed than larger ones. Cortaflex® contains the small molecule key active isolates of Chondroitin and Glucosamine – Glutamine, Glucuronic Acid, Glutamic Acid, Proline and Glycine. For the health of your joints take Cortaflex® every day like many athletes and professional sports people. Also available for cats, dogs and horses.

www.cortaflex.co.uk

01403 255809 /cortaflexuk

/cortaflexuk

The Cortaflex® hypothesis is smaller molecules are more likely to pass through cell walls and into the joints

For introductory offer, call and quote: ‘RES2012’ Products that really work!


POLO

We select the key matches of the season from two of the countries premium polo playing venues

HURTWOOD PARK POLO CLUB hurtwoodparkpolo.co.uk MAY 2nd – 13th 15th – 20th 22nd – 27th

Lola’s Trophy Jubilee Trophy Bluebell Trophy

JUNE 1st – 4th 5th – 17th 19th – 24th 16th – 30th

Itchycoo Park Festival Bremont Watch Trophy The Gaucho Cup Cody’s Challenge - Armed Forces Day on 30 May also RAF v Army

JULY 3rd – 8th 10th – 18th 21st 28th – 29th

Colin’s Cup Jay’s Trophy Polo Rocks in aid of TUSK Ewhurst

AUGUST 31st – 5th 7th – 12th 14th – 19th 21st – 26th

6 Goal Challenge Erin’s Plate August Challenge Club Friendly

SEPTEMBER 1st 4th – 9th 11th – 16th 18th – 23rd 25th – 30th

Aviation Challenge September Cup Stable Challenge End of Season Farewell Tournament


GAME GUIDE Sum3m3e2r3 2012

COWDRAY PARK POLO CLUB cowdraypolo.co.uk MAY 12th -27th 19th 22nd -10th June

Dollar Cup, 12 goal tournament England v USA in The St. Regis International Cup Duke of Sutherland Cup, 18 goal tournament

JUNE 19th 24th

Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup for the British Open Polo Championship opens South Downs Polo Day (featuring the Midhurst Town Cup – a Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup league match)

JULY 1st 8th 12th 15th 16th - 21st 20th - 5th August 21st - 4th August

Cooch Behar Cup, a Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup league match Argentine Ambassadors Cup, a Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup quarter final match Semi Finals of Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup Final of Veuve Clicquot Gold Cup for the British Open Polo Championship British Ladies Open Polo Tournament Holden White Cup, 8 goal tournament Harrison Cup, 15 goal tournament

AUGUST 9th - 26th 10th - 23rd

Uber Polo 12 goal tournament September Autumn Cup, 12 goal tournament

61


Feathers, Hurstpierpoint

Cape Scarlett, Horsham

Cape Scarlett, Horsham


Feathers, Hurstpierpoint

Feathers, Hurstpierpoint

Feathers, Hurstpierpoint

LET’S

PLAY Style writer Charlotte Schroeter takes a look at some of the latest fashion pieces perfect for a picnic at the polo

63


SPRING INTO SUMMER, WEARING

Great selection of quality luggage and business accessories

Fantastic range of leather handbags for all occasions

155 High Street, Hurstpierpoint BN6 9PU 01273 834686 www.feathersofhurstpierpoint.co.uk

C lassic B ags

01403 754440 5 Piries Place Horsham Quality Handbags & Luggage RH12 1EH www.classic-bags.co.uk

35 East Street | Horsham West Sussex | RH12 1HR www.capescarlett.com

01403 754445


Martin Bell

OVER TO YOU, MARTIN Famed war-correspondent and politician ‘in the white suit’, Martin Bell OBE has lived on the edge, and survived – just! Here he talks candidly to Liz Trundle about war, political sleaze, and life as an ‘accidental poet’

65


M

artin is excited about his forthcoming trip to Sussex. “I like festivals and meeting people.” He also loves poetry - writing his own that is - and at this year’s Steyning Festival he will be treating his audience to a taste of his new passion. We met in a local drinking hole in Golders Green. “I’ve just popped down on the Number 2 bus – I go everywhere for free now, it’s great!” He’s a man that wears his celebrity status as modestly and easily as he does his legendary white suit. I asked him if he missed the buzz of reporting from war zones. “I miss the camaraderie in the press core and the fact that you’re reporting while it’s all still happening, contemporary history if you like. But it’s not about systems, weapons and battle. It’s about the people.” It’s an art Martin confides took years to learn. “I was recently given back footage of my first report from Vietnam which was dreadful! All about war tactics, nothing about the people going through it.” Nowhere was this more profoundly impressed on Martin than during his time covering the Bosnian conflict in the early 1990s. Aside from being nearly killed by shrapnel live on TV, it was witnessing the horror and sheer brutality on civilians that made it so hard for Martin to adapt back to civilian life. “After Bosnia nothing much mattered to me – I was kept awake by the silence. People were talking about Eurosceptics, John Major was in Government, but I had no interest – I just wanted to get people’s attention to the war going on in their continent!” The late Sunday Times reporter, Maria Colvin, who tragically lost her life reporting from Syria this April was a personal friend and contemporary of Martin’s. Her death came as no surprise. “It’s

too dangerous, you just can’t do it anymore. It’s a brave thing to do to run with the rebels, and now it’s compounded by social media which means you’re permanently targeted by the enemy. l don’t recommend anyone becomes a war correspondent now.” If war for Martin was about revealing the truth, then life in politics was about honesty and accountability. Outraged by the ‘cash-for-questions’ scandal and the allegations surrounding Neil Hamilton in the run up to the 1997 general election, Martin stunned the country by standing against the Tory MP and winning the Tatton constituency on an independent ticket. Another tricky transition followed. “It was shocking - I had no idea what I was getting into. The ‘Punch-andJudy’ approach to debate and the way MPs didn’t vote the way they believed. I remember one senior MP who voted for something he thought was wrong but he wanted a peerage. Now he’s a Lord!” Since then parliament has been tainted by dishonest and corrupt practises – not least the MP expenses scandal, and most recently the dubbed ‘donations for dinners’ question. Does Martin feel like a pioneer, opening the floodgates on ‘dodgy’ governmental deals? “No - I’m a failed anti-sleaze campaigner!” he says modestly. Prior to the expenses scandal Martin witnessed how MPs could “write their own cheques” for expense claims. “One year I wrote a cheque for £8,000 for rent with no evidence required. I remember when Elizabeth Flicken (Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards from 1998 to 2002) started asking too many questions, so they got her out. That sent out another message to MPs that they could do what they wanted.

“AFTER BOSNIA NOTHING MUCH MATTERED TO ME – I WAS KEPT AWAKE BY THE SILENCE”


“I’M ACCELERATING NOW. I’VE GOT SO MUCH I WANT TO DO AND I DON’T KNOW HOW LONG I’VE GOT TO DO IT!” Change only ever came about surreptitiously – because the records were stored on discs and these were bought by the Daily Telegraph. The real villains are still in the House of Commons, but there is a new atmosphere among the 250 new MPs.” We’ve been talking for almost an hour now, but Martin is still in full flow, happy to oblige a fellow journalist. I find myself thinking there’s something admirable about his relentless focus on the next project. For Martin one term of parliamentary antics was enough. Disillusioned, yes, but postBosnia, post-BBC, post politics, he is far from jaded by any of his experiences. “Oh no, I’m accelerating now. I’ve got so much I want to do and I don’t know how long I’ve got to do it!”. Martin is certainly a man who defies any notion of old age; now in his 74th year, he rarely spends a weekend at home, racks up five or six cruises a year and travels widely in his capacity as Ambassador for UNICEF. “I love being at sea and I lecture and it’s a good way of raising the profile of United Nations and why it matters.”

my life, what’s happened, being shot at, being in politics; some are romantic, some anti-romantic. I want people to react – be moved, to understand.” Martin published his first book of poetry For Whom the Bell Tolls (Icon Books) in January; he has already clocked up another 127 poems for a followon publication. He is excited to share his latest verse, created the day we met, word perfect from memory (below). His enthusiasm is infectious and I feel honoured to be privy to his creative process.

There once was a native waterway so angular Its course was virtually triangular, And the name for this river in common use Was the Mighty Flowing Tennessee Hypotenuse; The Apache and the Cherokee Had such a sense of symmetry That when time came for them to choose Their partners, squaws and brides, They thought that the squaw on the Hypotenuse Was equal to the sum of the And his re-invention as a poet? squaws on the other two sides. “Well, I wrote my first poem when I was just 19, as an acting Martin glimpses the No 2 bus corporal in the Suffolk Regiment. through the window and our It was a good way of making a time is up. The white suit point without being marked off. disappears into the dusky London But then I didn’t write another night. Unassuming, passionate, poem for 50 years. It was when I poignant and entertaining – was sitting in a hotel in the Hague Martin is all these - and a pretty in 2001, waiting to give evidence good poet to boot. Join him this for the wartime tribunal, I wrote summer, amid the splendour of Principal Witness. I was still quite the Wiston Estate, for an evening affected by the ‘disaster’ of Iraq, of wit and wry repartee, in ‘An how I saw it as an illegal act. And Evening with Martin Bell’ on from that day, [the poems] have 6 June at Wiston House, West just written themselves. I just Sussex. Tickets are available from can’t stop writing them, poetry is the Steyning Festival box office, a form of therapy, a way of saying Steyning Bookshop, High Street, things very concisely without Steyning or buy them online at: being done for libel! I write about steyningfestival.co.uk

67


HOW TO HELP YOUR KIDS PASS THEIR EXAMS EXAM TIME CAN BE STRESSFUL FOR STUDENTS AND ANYONE LIVING IN THE SAME HOUSEHOLD. SO, IF YOU’VE GOT CHILDREN WHO ARE GOING THROUGH IT, TAKE HEED FROM THESE TWO EXPERTS ON WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP THEM PASS WITH FLYING COLOURS David Sinclair, bursar at Sompting Abbotts independent school It is important that a comfortable work space is made at home away from distraction where all resources etc are available. I would advise setting targets and breaks to follow. Bear in mind that concentration declines after about 20 minutes. So it’s a good idea to set short and more achievable timescales. Generally an hour and a half every day is enough work at home. Bullet points and highlighting facts is a great help revising. If a child has missed long periods of school, help from the subject teachers should be sought they are always available to give that extra help. If you feel your child is over anxious or spending too much time revising, they should contact a teacher at the school. Also, it’s a good idea to suggest that your child takes advantage of the extra study/revision lessons offered by the school during any school holidays. Also, try and avoid any unhelpful comparisons to siblings when things are not going well. It’s better to support your child’s efforts positively, using encouragement. Finally, even if you don’t actively help your children with their studies, it’s always a good idea to be aware of your child’s well being, keeping an eye on their diet and nutrition, moods and the amount of sleep they are getting. Mel Hargreaves, Collyer’s college Mel suggests asking four questions that could help you to help your children improve their grades What do you want or need? It is good to get all of you on the same page and ensure that their expectations are the same as yours. This means

that you can really share in the results and success. What do you want to do in your next break? Breaks must be scheduled to aid with stress and concentration. Encourage a reasonable bed time – a focused brain will do better than one that has had inadequate sleep because of late night revision. During the day, try and break topics in to 30 minute chunks with a 5 minute break in between. There needs to be a balance to revision and therefore see what they want in a break – whether that be a walk, TV, check their emails, cinema. It is better to have a quality break with an activity, ideally in the fresh air. What can we do to help? It is great to feel that you are all in this together and therefore seeing what you can do to help may be a way of approaching the topic form their side. Also ensure the learning environment is supportive. This involves ensuring that they can be sat at a desk or table with good lighting. Students will be at a desk for their exam and so it is good practice to revise in this position too. The environment should not be disruptive and so noisy younger siblings may need to be elsewhere or alternatively look in to using a library. What do you want for breakfast on the days of your exams? Good nutrition is imperative for exam performance and maintaining energy and concentration level but breakfast can often be the last thing that the young people want to think about on the day of an exam. Having a bowl of porridge for breakfast or a sugar free muesli, even a protein-rich breakfast such as eggs or beans on toast will feed the brain and keep it alert. Most of all be there for them, be someone they can talk to, and a calming and helpful influence.

69


AN INDEPENDENT PREPARATORY SCHOOL FOR BOYS AND GIRLS AGED 2½-13

SOMPTING ABBOT TS PREPARATORY SCHOOL

OPEN MORNING 10am to 12pm - 4th May • Caring family atmosphere and high academic standards that cater to the needs of all the pupils. • Respect for the individual being at the heart of the school's philosophy. • Good manners and behaviour being the norm not the exception.

• A committed teaching staff working with small classes. • Splendid opportunities in Music, Art and Drama. • A wide variety of sporting activities and facilities. • Extensive grounds where children can be children with a "heritage" of building at its heart.

MEMBER OF THE INCORPORATED ASSOCIATION OF PREPARATORY SCHOOL

Tel: 01903 235960

www.somptingabbots.com


A FRESH APPROACH

JAMES HOOD TALKS TO ROBERT MCLAUGHLIN, BURSAR AT SOMPTING ABBOTTS, AND LEARNS THAT LESSONS ON THE SPORTS FIELD AND IN THE CLASSROOM CAN BE EQUALLY IMPORTANT WHEN IT COMES TO PREPARING YOUNG PEOPLE FOR THE WORLD OUTSIDE THE SCHOOL GATES Never let it be said that Sompting Abbotts doesn’t place a great importance on the fundamentals of learning. The West Sussex independent prep school, for children aged two to 13, has an impressive track record of developing ‘bright young things’ who show terrific aptitude in areas such as Maths, English, Science and foreign languages. But equally, the children who attend Sompting Abbotts leave the school happy, with confidence and the ability to work well and interact with others and those lessons don’t only come from a white board.

kind of scenarios and social interaction they will encounter when they come to leave Sompting Abbotts and go out into the world. Obviously academic success is our number one priority but there are some lessons that simply can’t be learnt by sitting at the desk. Team sports develop a young person’s ability to work and co-operate with others in order to achieve a common goal. They also learn how to deal with success and failure. We have struck a good balance between time in the classroom and time on the pitch.”

The list of sporting activities, both indoor, outdoor and even abroad, that pupils at Sompting Abbotts can take part in is extensive. The likes of football, netball and rugby join mountain biking, archery, trampolining, cross country and skiing as just a few of the activities in which children can partake. And as bursar Robert Mclaughlin tells The Resident Magazine, such a focus on physical activity can bring multiple benefits to young people.

Pupils at Sompting Abbotts play team games three days a week for 70 minutes. They have a PE lesson for 35 minutes on a fourth day and have the option of taking part in an activity of their choice for an hour on the fifth day. Wednesdays are match days when fixtures are played home and away against other schools within travelling distance. All the year groups participate at under 9s, under 11s and under 13s levels. In addition, the children enjoy playing games of their own choice in the beautiful grounds during morning and afternoon break times and in summer terms they can learn to swim in the outdoor heated pool, often choosing to take part in additional swimming after school.

“Sports is not just about letting off steam and giving children a break from the classroom. It’s about fitness and healthy physical growth”, said Mr Sinclair. And he added that there are other advantages in addition to health benefits: “Sports, physical activity and team work helps boost confidence in young people, creating higher self esteem. It provides them with the

But sporting activities take place in other places too. Something which Mr Sinclair believes helps children learn further. He added: “As

well as team sports at the school, we also believe taking children away from a school environment can provide a wonderful way for them to develop personal and social skills. More adventurous activities, further from home can foster independence and self reliance, and not forgetting helping them experience other countries and cultures. We run a ski trip every other year to the French Alps and a camp in which the children will encounter many activities for the first time such as rock climbing, canoeing, sailing, orienteering and forest crafts. We also run a mountain biking club which takes advantage of our direct access to the South Downs.” And the emphasis on team building and physical education reaps rewards for the school and its pupils. Many of of them gain sports scholarships at higher levels of education and many gain representative honours at county level. Mr Sinclair added: “Sompting Abbotts children are very active children! Pupils do need time away from academic studies. Taking part in physical activity gives them a rest from their studies which enables them to return to the classroom relaxed and revitalised with a smile on their face. That’s ultimately what we want, isn’t it?”


Rachael Burgess photographed by Collyer’s mature photography student Carly Symonds


BACK TO SCHOOL At 47, with two children, a dog, a cat and her own company, Rachael Burgess decided to give Superwoman a run for her money by going back to school. Here she explains why and tells The Resident Magazine she’s gaining much more than just a degree Well, they say it’s never too late and goodness knows I am proving them right. Only the really clever kids attended University when I was young and I knew I wasn’t one of them. I wanted to earn money and travel and, to be fair, that’s exactly what I did. However, here I am at 47 years old embarking on a degree course which I will complete in 2016 when I am 52 - gulp! I have tinkered at studying in the past decade, including my hobby and love of interior design and some lengthy studies to qualify as a health and safety instructor for the events and hospitality business that I run. However, this is different. This is a degree. A Foundation degree leading to a BA (Hons) in Business and Management. Scary? Not at all! In fact it’s jolly exciting.

was relieved. Clare arrived and we followed her to our lecture room, passing lots of young, trendy teenagers with big hair and piercings. I was feeling about 105 by now. We all bonded at once on that first day and that was it, the first day of my uni life.

As with many courses for ‘mature’ students, it’s part time and designed for anyone wishing to improve their career opportunities or who is self employed, just like me, and looking to develop their business skills. My course is delivered in partnership with you and your employer, it causes little disruption to work schedules and has a very definite, relaxed feel to the learning. There are assignments to complete, with the odd exam popped in, but it is certainly manageable.

Early on in the first term there is a conference to attend at Portsmouth University, for some 1st year student bonding. This resembled an hilarious school outing for our lively group. I started the train journey first at Billingshurst and, at various stops along the route to Portsmouth, picked up the rest of the gang. Our team building session continued after the conference at a pub in Gunwharf Quays and also on the journey home with various unedited photos being posted on Facebook the next day! A great day out and it was like being allowed to be giggly teenagers again. How refreshing!

Initially, I Googled local universities and was quite astonished to find out exactly how many subjects and courses are available to us ‘mature’ students. I found this course available at Portsmouth University but, even more perfect, it could be taught at Chichester College. As I mentioned I run my own business, Lifestyle Sussex, in Horsham, and am a single mum of two teenagers so, to be honest, the thought of taking on such a commitment terrified me - but I found myself downloading the application forms and very soon was off to the college on a cold wet blustery day in January for an interview - another terrifying moment! I needn’t have worried. It was held in the college coffee shop with my course tutor, Clare Hughes, who put me at ease at once and it all felt rather more like a relaxed networking 121 than an interview. Clare discussed the syllabus and the commitment involved along with the lecture details. This course is a perfect mix of excellent lectures, individual tuition and relaxed work based learning. My son (studying A levels) was a bit worried at first – exactly how cool was it having your Mum doing a degree the same time as you? Hmmm, well, apparently folks, it’s fine so long as we are not both actually at the same Uni. The day I met my fellow students (11 of us) was just weird and, initially, I felt like running away. I sat nervously in the college reception clutching my shiny notebook and gorgeous new ‘must have’ student bag (any excuse girls) and, one by one, the others arrived, thankfully looking as nervous as me. Thank goodness they were all old like me (sorry dear fellow students, if you read this) but I really

We set up a Facebook page for our group and enjoyed much banter in the dark days of winter when revising had lost its spark and we would post ‘should we study or be shopping for shoes?’ ‘Should we buy college books or that gorgeous handbag?’ ‘ Where are we going after college to celebrate Lynn’s 40th?’ These are important ‘mature’ student issues you know.

Now I’m not saying it’s all parties and some days I have wondered what on earth I am doing it all for. It’s hard; studying, working, keeping a home, dog, cats, chickens oh and two teenagers happy, fed and watered - not necessarily in that order! But there are bonuses. The kids have learnt to cook and I return home from uni to a meal, lovely roaring fire, glass of wine and suddenly very grown up children who not only know where the dishwasher is but they can use it too. Not just me that’s learning something then. So do I recommend returning to study? Absolutely. It creates such a sense of self worth and an opportunity to really focus on something for yourself. And it has helped enormously with my business already for planning and providing some formatted structure for the future. I would say, if you, a ‘mature’ student, (which incidentally is anyone over 25) are even tempted by my article or indeed have thought about some form of personal development course, then now is the time to investigate. Go for it! The hardest part was day one and now, at the very least, I’ve made 11 new friends. Roll on 2016 – I’ll be a graduate! Rachael Burgess runs Lifestyle Sussex, a lifestyle, event management and PA service. For more information visit lifestylesussex.com If you would like further information about the course please email clare.hughes@chichester.ac.uk

73


SOCIAL

EMPLOYERS HAVE STARTED SCOURING ONLINE PROFILES BEFORE HIRING (OR FIRING) PEOPLE. HERE, CAREER COACH MICHELLE BAKER EXPLAINS HOW YOUR ACTIONS ON WEBSITES LIKE LINKEDIN AND TWITTER COULD MAKE OR BREAK YOUR CAREER AND WHAT YOU CAN DO TO IMPROVE YOUR ‘ONLINE BRAND’ You’ve probably been there - started a LinkedIn or Facebook profile promising one day to finish it and never quite getting to it. In the meantime, you add a ‘it will do for now’ photo and forget that your employment dates don’t quite match your CV. I bet you’ve even added or been tagged in a photograph or two on Facebook when you are looking a little worse for wear. Maybe after a particularly stressful day, you’ve gone online and vented your frustration to all your friends on Twitter and Facebook. It’s fine right? After all it was a couple of years ago. It’s only fine until you want a new job. In a recent study carried out with 300 professionals by Reppler, a social media monitoring service, more than 90 per cent of recruiters and hiring managers have visited a potential candidate’s profile on a social network as part of the screening process. And a whopping 69 per cent of recruiters have rejected a candidate based on content found on his or her social networking. Top of the social networking sites used are Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Facebook has made it really easy for hiring professionals to now check out your reputation online through your Timeline – each year sitting there ready to reveal the real you – photos, status updates and events chronologically from when you first started using Facebook. Posts and photos you’d forgotten about laid bare for inspection, debate and ridicule – all without having met you. Covered a gap in your CV by stretching the finish date as the company is no longer trading? Thought you were safe? The gap is exposed with your two months of posts and photos of all your travels. The CV you have submitted for that great job has just supplied the hiring professional with all the tools needed to look at your online career profile

and decide your fate with that company before even meeting you. Thought your Twitter account was safe and your silly name was funny and original? Think again. Through your name, your connections online or email address it is really easy to find your Twitter account and read what you really think. The amount of times you tweet and when, indicate your attitude and work ethic. Of course I’m painting a pretty awful picture of a job seeker here but these are just some of the situations I came across working as a recruitment consultant. They are real examples of how people right now are sabotaging their ‘Online Career Branding’ without realising it, especially if new to the job market after years of employment. Hiring professionals surveyed also said that after receiving the initial CV 47 per cent would check out the applicant online first, 27 per cent said after the first conversation. 69 per cent said they have rejected someone after seeing their online profile! Reasons ranged from inappropriate photos, inappropriate language, drugs were openly used and clearly enjoy partying a little too much. The worst response came to lying about their qualifications and that their CV and timeline on LinkedIn and Facebook didn’t match. Applicants were also rejected for posting negative comments about a previous employer or had been seen to lie about a sick day after bragging about ‘the great night before’. They were also deemed as unsuitable because they shared confidential information about a previous employer. But before you go and make all your accounts private and never Tweet again, there is good news - 68 per cent of the


SUICIDE

professionals surveyed also said that they had hired someone after viewing their online profile. Reasons range from; give a positive view of their personality and life, supported qualifications, good references posted by others and showed solid communication skills. That they gave an impressive image online about not only themselves but their company and industry. So what is your Online Career Branding saying about you? Whether you are at college, a graduate or a seasoned professional we all need to look after ourselves online when it comes to our career and our reputation. What can you do right now to brand yourself for the career you want, attracting hiring professionals for the right reasons?

Let’s start with the most used and looked at social networking tool. Facebook – two ways of using Facebook is to either make your personal page private but create a new page for yourself as a professional or limit your audience for past posts. Go through your timeline and delete old posts and photos that are no longer relevant or paint you in a bad light. Tick privacy settings so you are not able to be tagged in photos without your permission. Before you delete everything though, remember hiring professionals also had positive things to say about people who were clearly gregarious, team players, enjoyed their lives, so be selective who sees it and what you want Facebook to be used for. Remember, Facebook is also fast becoming the number one site used by professionals to hunt for jobs or be found for a job. LinkedIn – the number one tool now used for professionals to connect with like-minded individuals in their industry but also a great resource for hiring professionals to find and recruit new talent. Warning - before you update your LinkedIn profile, if in current employment be aware that your company will also monitor their employees online too. Ensure you cover yourself, don’t advertise that you are looking for a new job, you are just being professional and making connections in your industry, right? Top tips to generate

interest in your profile include; have a great headshot, preferably one of you smiling, write a summary of your skills and experience and the reasons you’ve made such great impact in your past and present positions. Optimise your profile to 100% if possible following the LinkedIn guide, get recommendations from past co workers, employers. Start joining groups in your industry, make connections – be interesting but remember to only make positive comments online. This is a professional area and the one place for you to showcase your talent. Build your network before you need it, join company groups you aspire to work for, follow what they are discussing. The more connections you have and the more interactive you are, the higher on the rankings your profile will show to recruiters. Twitter is fast becoming a great online tool for not just making connections and following recruiters, companies and people – it’s been used more and more for people to advertise jobs for free. So give yourself a professional image on Twitter; make your account easy for someone to find you - yes you want to be found! Have a professional Twitter account name, follow people relevant in your sector, make interesting and valuable tweets, ensure you are engaging and people want to follow you. Use Hootsuite and you’ll be able to post to all social networking tools above and schedule them as part of your marketing campaign. Create an informative profile. If in employment, ensure you do not conduct any of your marketing campaign online during work time, it will show on your timeline and will ruin your reputation. Got something worth saying in your industry? Start writing a blog. It’s a great way to engage your target audience and you can also attach your blog link to Twitter, Facebook and your LinkedIn wall. What are you doing today to create a positive online brand for yourself? Ensure your online reputation is polished and professional and don’t let a hiring professional and possibly your dream job pass you by. 75


PICNICS PETWORTH HOUSE PETWORTH HOUSE 01798 342207 petworth@nationaltrust.org.uk nationaltrust.org/petworth

Pack a picnic and head to the Pleasure Grounds at Petworth House on Monday 4 June (it’s a bank holiday) from 12 noon to 4pm where you can celebrate the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. There will be bunting, flags and union jacks a plenty, not to mention the good old British street party spirit. You’ll even have the chance to contribute to a royal themed outdoor mural and a giant ’60’ on the lawn, pictures of both will be sent to Buckingham Palace. Come dressed in your royal glad rags and make your very own crown or tiara, there will even be prizes for the best creations! Usual admission prices apply. Petworth’s picnic continues into the Historic Kitchens with a special jubilee themed ‘What’s Cooking?’ event on Sunday 3rd and Monday 4th June from 11am – 3pm. Visitors can watch costumed interpreters create traditional trifle and all the essentials for an authentic 1950s picnic, you can even take home the recipes. For a lasting souvenir the Gift Shop has a range of Jubilee and British themed treasures, fit for a Queen!


SIGHTS &SOUNDS of the UNDERGROUND On Saturday 12 and Sunday 13 May between 11am and 4pm, go underground where the house and grounds at Petworth hide a complete subterranean world ready to explore. Venture down from the Servants’ Quarters into the service tunnels and feel the chill in the Ice House. Discover the history of the tunnels below the house; see the well that was used to provide water for the kitchens and bathrooms and hear about the boy and pony who had to keep the well going. Visitors can also see the hydraulic lift, installed in 1870 that was used to carry coal and luggage from the cellars and lower floors to the attic rooms. The tunnels, which are only open three times this year, were sometimes used during the Second World War as air raid shelters for children. Some were evacuees staying at the Chelsea Day Nursery that was housed in the

Servants’ Quarters. Others were from evacuated families who had been moved from bombed out areas. One lady who worked at Petworth House during the war recalls the Footmen having to step over sleeping children whilst carrying the meals across to Lord & Lady Egremont’s dining room. Another lady spent the war years as a little girl here after being evacuated from Portsmouth. She remembered running through the tunnels with her dressing gown over her head to ward off bats, convinced that if a bat got caught in her hair it would have to be shaved off! Hear stories like these and witness the sights and sounds of the underground beneath Petworth House with this enlightening and rare opportunity. The tunnels are also open on Monday 11 June, Tuesday 26 June and Saturday 21 and Sunday 22 July.

77


CROMPTONS HAS ARRIVED

A BAR AND RESTAURANT HAS OPENED IN WEST SUSSEX WHICH PROMISES TO BRING FIVE-STAR QUALITY, FOOD, DRINKS AND SERVICE TO THE NEWLY REFURBISHED VENUE

Horsham has a new bar and restaurant and it was officially opened at a recent party. Crompton’s at The Olive Branch is the new name for the establishment, which offers drinks and food for those who enjoy the finer things in town. It’s the new offering from Andrew Crompton, formerly the operations manager at South Lodge hotel - a man who knows a thing or two about service and style. He told The Resident Magazine: “What I wanted was to combine more than 20 years of experience in hospitality with great food, service that is second to none and a really nice venue. And I believe we’ve done that here. I’d been looking for a long time for the right spot. I think we’ve found it.” Andrew is hands on at the new restaurant and bar, which is in the town centre. He has retained the building’s traditional interior

(refurbished by brewery Hall & Woodhouse just a couple of years ago). He has also brought with him colleague Kim Neaves as well as personally recruiting chef Andy Collard, who used to work at the Effingham Park in Copthorne. The new bar and restaurant boasts a new menu and wine list, as well as many of the beers and ales on offer at the pub previously. There is a large dining area as well as outside space - perfect for summertime drinking and dining. Andrew and his colleagues hosted an extravagant launch party recently for friends, family and customers of the venue. With complimentary drinks and delicious canapés being handed out by waiters it was a sign of things to come from one of the town’s few independent-owned and premium quality bar and restaurants.


Guests enjoy the party at the opening of Crompton’s at the Olive Branch

80


Photograph by Lewis Forsaith

SIX PERFECT PICNIC PLACES

Catherine Ross packs her rug and hamper and takes the family to ďŹ nd some of the best picnic spots around. Pimms and lemonade anyone? With summer just around the corner, many people are turning their attention to how to make the most of those little rays of sunshine. And what could be better than packing up a picnic hamper and finding a perfect spot in which to enjoy it.


THE ASHDOWN FOREST The Ashdown Forest Is the fictional home of Christopher Robin and his pals, Pooh and Piglet. Follow in their footsteps and enjoy a picnic on the heath and maybe even a game of Pooh sticks in the woods. The visitor centre offers maps for walks that will take visitors past all the Winnie the Pooh sites, including the Heffalump Trap, Roo’s Sandy Place and, of course, the 100 acre wood. Toilets and picnic tables can be found at the Forest Centre.

THE BLUEBELL RAILWAY One of the best steam railways around, The Bluebell Railway offers several picnic spots. The three stations, Sheffield Park, Kingscote and Horsted Keynes all have picnic areas. The biggest station, at Sheffield Park houses the engine shed for the railway and an impressive range of engines from throughout the age of steam. Kingscote station, at the opposite end of the line, is accessible by bus, or car users can park at the forestry commission car park and enjoy a gentle stroll through the woods to the station. Horsted Keynes has its own car park and a picnic field, which is a perfect place to watch the steam engines come and go. Admission to Sheffield Park station is £4 for adults. The other stations are slightly cheaper.

PARIS Well, why not? Beneath the Eiffel Tower is one of Paris’ prettiest parks - the perfect place to set up your picnic and enjoy some magnificent french fare including breads and cheeses from nearby markets. On a nice sunny day, it’s glorious and the most decadent picnic you can enjoy - all just a mere two hours from London St Pancras.


BORDE HILL GARDEN This estate near Haywards Heath is a real jewel in Mid Sussex’s crown. Set within 200 acres of traditional parkland, the formal gardens are a site to behold. Enjoy a stroll through tropical plants in the Round Dell, 500 roses in the rose garden and magnolias, rhododendrons and azaleas are just a few of the highlights. For families, there is an adventure playground, including an area for younger children and a zip wire for all the family. Woodland walks are available all year round. There is also a cafe for morning coffee and afternoon tea. Entrance to the gardens costs £8 for adults and £5 for children. Annual membership is £25 for an adult or £65 for a family of two adults and two children.

PETWORTH PARK This beautiful, Capability Brown designed deer park offers 700 acres of prime picnic land to choose from. From open parkland to an 18th century rotunda and from woodlands to the lakeside there’s landscape to satisfy every picnicker’s fancy. There is a restaurant on site in case you want to top up your picnic with a hot drink or slice of cake. If the weather turns, the extraordinary 17th century house has one of the finest art collections in the country. A highlight of the house is the servants’ quarters, which includes the kitchens and other rooms. Admission is £4.20 for adults and £2.10 for children for the pleasure grounds or £10.90 and £5.50 to include entrance to the house. HOVE SEAFRONT If you do like to be beside the seaside, Hove seafront is the picnic destination for you. There are plenty of picnic spots to choose from. Hove Lagoon has grass, water-sports and a children’s playground. Hove lawns are, as you might expect, grassy areas just back from the promenade, big enough for picnics, ball games and a spot of kite flying. And the beach, though pebbly rather than sandy, makes a great picnic spot. Shelter from the sea breeze behind one of the groynes. Take a paddle, or try a spot of sea fishing. Once you’re at the seafront, there is, of course, the added bonus of one of the finest ice cream shops around. Make your way to Marroccos, but be prepared to queue. It’s not a very well kept secret, but well worth the wait. Barbecues are allowed on the beach west of the derelict West Pier after 6pm. 83


1 EAST STREET, CHICHESTER, 01243 527715 WWW. GOLDARTS. CO. UK WWW. GOLDARTSONLINE. CO. UK


the jewel in the

SUSSEX CROWN In part two of our feature on independent jewellers in the area, Jess Archer discovers two more sparkling examples of what the county has to offer when it comes to diamonds, watches, bespoke rings and more

MIKE SHORER Brighton-based Mike Shorer is a seventh-generation goldsmith and developed his passion for creating fine jewellery from a young age. With a celebrity client list to die for, he also specialises in ‘Jyotish’ - a process combining individual astrological charting and natural gemstones to create one-off jewellery benefitting health, happiness, relationships or career.

WHAT SETS YOU APART? I’ve been taught by extraordinary craftsmen and experimented with more techniques, materials and gemstones than most designers. Jewellery is deep in my roots and I understand what is happening inside the heart of the metal; I’ve an almost Zen-like belief that precious metals have a soul that I liberate when creating a great piece of jewellery. WHY COME TO YOU? Tailored personal service with a smile and the ‘Wow’ factor when clients see what I’ve produced. I’m also blessed with ‘selective amnesia’ - whether for a spouse, a lover, mistress, toy-boy or cougar, it’s between us. Discretion is the better part of valour. MOST EXPENSIVE PIECE YOU’VE MADE? A platinum and diamond articulated tapered line necklace: 65 carats of natural, coloured uncut diamonds, each one in its own setting, invisibly hinged so laying perfectly around the neck. Made for the wife of a guy who owned his own diamond mine, which was handy! Cost over £200,000 AND BEST VALUE? When I re-design previously-owned jewellery inherited by someone or divorcees seeking to eradicate a piece from their past! I remove the gems, melt

down the metal and recreate something they want. Some clients like to come to the workshop to see it being melted down as it can be a cathartic experience. YOUR DESIGN STYLE IN A SENTENCE? Affordable, luxurious, reflects my client’s personality, and is the only one like it on the planet. TELL US A SECRET? Oh, too many over the years! When creating jewellery and objet d’art for some of our Royal Family, I had to engrave romantic messages in discreet places. Quite enlightening - can’t tell you who or what for fear of a trip to The Tower! CELEBRITY YOU’D LIKE TO DESIGN FOR, AND WHY? Liz Hurley or Nigella Lawson; both supremely elegant with impressive décolletages that would be fantastic to cover in diamonds! IF NOT A JEWELLER WHAT WOULD YOU BE? That’s simple – a racing driver of powerful and noisy engines. I love my Suzuki GSXR750 and whether cars or bikes, I have a need for speed. 01273 612959 mike@mikeshorerjewellery.com mikeshorerjewellery.com


KATERINA JEWELLERS’ GALLERY Situated in the bustling market town of Horsham, the handcrafted jeweller and giftware designer Katerina says she’ll make a perfect piece for “brothers, mothers or lovers”. She specialises in bringing your dream piece to life and creating and delivering that personal touch

WHAT SETS YOU APART? I spend a great deal of time with my customers – I like to get to know them in order to get a feel for their style. Some customers have very strong ideas, but cannot always articulate them very clearly. I believe that it is important to take the time to listen and sketch out ideas without the customer feeling there is any pressure on them. I set out to make my customers feel they are my one and only customer.

special every time you put it on. Jewellery is like perfume: it can be the finishing touch to any outfit.

YOUR DESIGN STYLE IN A SENTENCE? Strong contemporary lines with a feminine edge.

WHY COME TO YOU? I am passionate about making jewellery, whether it is a pair of silver stud earrings or a platinum and diamond eternity ring. I make each piece with absolute care and attention; I enjoy creating perfection and I hope this shows in my work.

HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR CAREER? Three things: Getting my jewellery featured on some of the UK’s leading retail websites, being named Retailer of the Year in a pre-eminent regional business awards scheme and the success of my ‘Pop the Question’ rings (guess what they’re for ?). CELEBRITY YOU’D LIKE TO DESIGN A PIECE FOR AND WHY? It would have to be Kate, Duchess of Cambridge. I would design something bold for her; she has great style, is a trend setter and should break free and be more daring. WHAT MAKES A GREAT PIECE OF JEWELLERY? Anything that makes you feel

WHAT JEWELLERY DO YOU WEAR? I often make a new piece of jewellery for a special occasion. But I always wear my engagement ring – my husband designed it and it has a “dash dot dash” in diamonds, which is morse code for K, my initial.

WHAT SHOULD CUSTOMERS LOOK FOR IN A BESPOKE DESIGNER? A good designer should listen to the customer’s ideas, and will offer options rather than try to push the customer in one direction. Choose someone who uses quality materials, particularly when it comes to diamonds. 01403 243024 contact@katerina.co.uk katerina.co.uk

87


Horsham’s Premier Wedding Venue

Mannings Heath Hotel Winterpit Lane, Mannings Heath, Horsham, West Sussex RH13 6LY Tel: 01403 891191 www.manningsheathhotel.com


DOUG NEWMAN A sparkling success describes the career of business man and jeweller Doug Newman, proprietor of Gold Arts Jewellers. His career started when he left school at 15 and after taking on a six-year apprenticeship and going on to work for Ernest Jones, he opened his first shop in the Lanes of Brighton, manufacturing his own designs, with only one member of staff. He now employs over 40 staff in his 5 retail stores with workshops and 4 pawnbroking shops.

WHAT SETS YOU APART FROM THE REST? We are committed to offering the very highest levels of customer service. Plus the team at Gold Arts and I all have years of experience and knowledge to help advise customers. We also have more than one premises, which offers our customers with more convenience. We now have shops in Brighton, Chichester and Eastbourne.

SENTENCE? All of our shops have professional, committed staff members. And I’m pleased to say you will receive the same level of service whether you’re buying a watch strap or a 5 carat diamond ring. It’s relaxed, informal and friendly too. The way buying jewellery you will treasure should be.

WHY COME TO YOU FOR JEWELLERY? We offer a huge choice to our clients. From certificated diamonds, the latest fashion brands to pre owned collectible vintage timepieces. I have been working in the business for more years than I’d like to admit, so you know that when you come to me you and your jewellery are in safe hands. I established my first shop in 1979 and that was after many years in the business. I’m proud of the knowledge I have developed.

WHICH CELEBRITY YOU’D LIKE TO DESIGN FOR OR SELL TO, AND WHY? That’s a tricky one. There are so many people I’d like to design for. But most importantly, all our customers are treated like celebrities!

DESCRIBE YOUR SHOP’S STYLE IN A

IF NOT A JEWELLER, WHAT WOULD YOU BE? I love my cars as well as my watches and rings so I’d have to say a racing car driver. But to be honest, I wouldn’t change my profession for the world. That’s why I’ve been doing it for so long!

89


CRUISE CONTROL

After a spate of incidents involving passenger ships, James Hood asks is it safe to go on a cruise? This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Titanic’s maiden and only voyage. A century later and many of the risks faced by cruise ships remain the same. Even if technology has improved, human error can never be fully discounted. Coincidentally, earlier this year we saw one of the greatest disasters at sea since the Titanic when the Costa Concordia ran aground off the coast of Italy, killing 32 people and in March a cruise liner carrying 100 Brits was adrift near the Philippines after a fire on-board. It doesn’t do much to inspire you to book a holiday sailing round the Caribbean now does it? Add to that the possibility of a Pirate invasion or falling overboard after one too many Pina Coladas and it all gets a bit of a worry. But fear not. Apparently, in the grand scheme of things a cruise is an incredibly safe way to travel. According to the Passenger Shipping Association: “Cruising is extremely safe, and the industry and regulatory authorities are constantly working to make it safer still. Cruise shipping has an incredibly low rate of safety incidents and compared with other forms of passenger transport, cruising is one of the safest forms of transportation in the world. In the ten years prior to the Costa Concordia accident, cruise lines carried more than 223 million passengers and crew with a total of six passenger and 22 crew deaths related to marine incidents.” A spokesperson also said that the industry is showing no signs of slowing down either. He added: “We are

confident that the cruise industry will continue the growth that it has experienced in recent years. There are more than 32 cruise lines currently operating in the UK and Royal Caribbean Cruises will base a second major ship in Southampton from next year, and a new P&O Cruises ship – its largest ever – will be delivered in 2015. Globally, cruise lines are taking delivery of 14 new ships in 2012 and exploring new markets, and passenger demand remains extremely strong.” If that’s not done enough to get you off dry land and booking your ‘Port Out, Starboard Home’ luxury Queen-sized cabin with a balcony, then perhaps the latest announcements from the cruise industry consortium might set your mind at ease. The European Cruise Council and Cruise Lines International are implementing new safety policies with immediate effect. So it seems a cruise is still a safe way to spend your vacation. And it is certainly a nice alternative for those who quake at the knees at the thought of flying in a steel tube at 30,000 ft with two large tanks of fuel strapped to either side. So next time your browsing possible holidays, don’t miss the opportunity to see the world, literally, at a slower pace and in sheer luxury. If nothing else it’s worth it just to witness how they manage to fit a movie theatre, three restaurants, a night club and a driving range on a ship. Just go easy on those cocktails.


BATH TRAVEL NATIONAL AWARD WINNERS BOURNEMOUTH-based holiday specialist BATH TRAVEL has been named leisure high street agent of the year in national industry awards. The company also picked up best agent accolades in two regional categories, London and the South East and London and the South West. The awards were made at the 16th Agent Achievement Awards in London and collected by sales and marketing manager, Mark Dowling. He said: “We are incredibly pleased, especially to have been voted the national high street agent of the year. “It is a tremendous accolade, a testament to the hard work and dedication of all our staff.” He added: “These awards are made by the travel industry itself, so it is especially pleasing to be recognised by fellow professionals for the grace, courtesy and professionalism of how we do business.

“I think it says we are a good company to work with.” Bath Travel has over 60 branches in Dorset, Hampshire, Devon, Wiltshire, Sussex and the Isle of Wight.

Heart set on a new

bathroom?

The fantastic 300m2 Roger’s Ceramics bathroom showroom displays top bathroom brands (suites and furniture) including Simpson, Ideal Standard, Crosswater, Roca, Bauhaus, Blu, Mereway and Roper Rhodes. Soak up our knowledge with full-service computer-aided bathroom design and advice. Metcalf Way Crawley RH11 7SU (Behind County Oak Retail Park)

Open 7 days: bathrooms and tiles

01293 612244

www.rogers-ceramics.com

PLUS beautiful tile showroom at: Mill Green Rd , Haywards Heath RH16 1XQ

01444 458157


GRECIAN GETAWAYS Travel expert Carolyn Lodge selects a few of the most luxurious vacation spots in the Greek Islands


Blue Palace, Crete

Blue Palace, Crete

93


The seaside village of Elounda in eastern Crete is home to the 5 star Blue Palace Resort and Spa with its elegant bungalows, suites and villas. Elounda itself is a beautiful location surrounded by mountains with a bustling harbour and several luxury hotels. The Blue Palace boasts eight restaurants and a 23 treatment room spa as well as offering a range of activities from water skiing, scuba diving, tennis and yoga. It is a hotel that is well suited to families, couples and single travellers alike. An oasis where the stresses of everyday life melt away. The Grace Mykonos on the ‘happening’ island of Mykonos in the Cyclades group is an exclusive 31 room and suite boutique hotel which is most suited to couples. The deluxe double rooms with their own private plunge pools on the terrace are a favourite of Carolyn Lodge Travel. Its décor is contemporary and stylish and its service is exemplary. The perfect place to relax and to be pampered in the delightful spa before heading in to the buzzy town of Chora with its many bars and restaurants. Mykonos, with its white washed buildings and landmark windmills, can be easily combined with Andros, Tinos and Syros if you fancy some island hopping.

Mykonos


Sister hotel to the Grace Mykonos is The Grace, Santorini. This jewel of a hotel is located on the stunning and well known island. All the rooms and suites have magnificent views of the Caldera basin, Skaros Rock and of the glorious and renowned sunsets. Popular with honeymooners and couples celebrating anniversaries and special birthdays, the Grace Santorini combines luxury, attentive service with fine food and drink in a serene environment. There is a great history on this island with the Minoan colony at Akrotiri, the ruins of Ancient Thira at Mesa Vouno and the Museum of Prehistoric Thira in Fira – all well worth a visit during your stay. Situated in Sithonia on the mainland of Northern Greece, Danai Beach Resort and Villas, Halkidiki is a wonderful discovery which will ensure a magical stay. Perfect for couples and single travellers alike, the Danai Beach Resort is located on a beautiful sandy beach and boasts four contrasting restaurants. For that special romantic occasion they will prepare a private dinner on the beach complete with a pianist playing a grand piano on the sand and a waiter standing in the sea floating hundreds of lighted candles on the water. Designed in the style of a mini Greek village the Danai Beach Resort has a delightful small spa and also offers watersports and tennis. Scuba diving and golf are available just a short distance away. Just 50 minutes drive from Thessaloniki this hotel is a ‘must’ for travelers to Halkidiki. Stays at all four hotels can be booked directly by Carolyn Lodge Travel.

The Grace, Santorini

For special offers and packages please call 01483 276197/272379 or email clt@carolynlodgetravel.co.uk 95


LEAR

Dan Forster


RNTORUN Our resident personal trainer, Dan Forster, begins a series of articles on how to run properly, helping you become fitter, leaner and stay injury-free

The sun has started to shine, the evenings are drawing out, it’s warming up outside. Which is why a lot of people decide it’s time to take up running. You whack the trainers on that have been sitting in the cupboard for over a year (and which you purchased two years ago) and off you go. Slogging away running as far and as fast as you can. Immediately you start panting, feet and calves hurt and you can’t understand why people put themselves through this and pretend to enjoy it! To top it off you have only been going three minutes. Sound familiar? Well fortunately, I’m here to help and this is the first in a series of articles on how to run properly for a new leaner, healthy you.

THE RIGHT SHOE FOR YOU

So what do you need to do? Firstly, get yourself a good pair of trainers. Ones that work with your feet to keep them working as they are meant to. To find out which way your feet lean, get your bare feet wet and step onto the floor. If your whole sole leaves an imprint you are flat-footed, which makes you an ‘overpronator’. The best trainers for you would be a support pair which will stop the arches collapsing and rolling in. If the imprint of your wet feet looks pretty normal you may be neutral, then the best trainer is normally an all-rounder with the cushioning shared throughout the shoe. If you just leave a sliver of imprint, it points towards you being a supinator, which requires you to purchase a pair with cushioning to encourage arch flexibility. If this is all too much to take in initially, any decent trainer/shoe shop will give you loads of advice and they normally give you a free consultation to explain the best trainers for you. Then, when they eventually wear out, you will know what type of trainer you require and can purchase them from wherever you like.

GET GOING

As I have mentioned, don’t start too fast initially. If you’ve not done any running or walking before, you need to start by walking 10 minutes and building up to 30 minutes. When you feel comfortable walking for 30 minutes, bring in one to two minute running intervals. As you become fitter and can extend the intervals till you can run comfortably for 30 minutes. Sometimes when you start running you may feel slight discomfort, this is normal as your increase the distance speed and intensity. Although if you feel a lot of pain you will have to alter the way you are running and your stride. You may need to stop running and take a rest for one to two weeks if the pain does not to go away you will need to get the area checked by your GP or a physiotherapist. If you decide to start running on a treadmill, bear in mind that you should set the incline to 1%, to mimic running outside, wind resistance and the fact you are propelling your self forward. It will seem harder when you venture outside but that is to be expected. Stitches tend to be quite common when we take up running, this is due to the abdomen being knocked about. They should go away as your fitness increases. Try not to consume food one hour before going for a run you don’t want the body trying to break down food at a time when you want the body to be concentrating on the task in hand. The best technique is striking with your heel first, rolling forward and propelling off your toes. Throwing your arms backwards to propel you forward will help too. It’s easy to get impatient, and you may feel tempted to dive head first into the running but hold yourself back and take it steadily at the beginning. For more information about Dan’s services, visit ptplayground.com 97


for

QUEEN&COUNTY

Andrew John Stephenson Clarke photographed at Borde Hill Garden


WEST SUSSEX HAS A NEW HIGH SHERIFF. TOM JAMES WENT TO MEET HIM TO FIND OUT WHAT THE JOB ENTAILS Posses once rode the land, searching out thieves, vagabonds and ne’er-do-wells. But they were not those of the lawless 1800s in the Wild West of North America. These were deputised by the High Sheriff centuries before in mediaeval England. Now more than a millennium old and dating back to Saxon times, the Office of High Sheriff is still going strong, albeit in modified guise. Originally vested with a host of duties, including law and tax enforcement, as society has grown increasingly complex, many of the responsibilities of the High Sheriff have devolved into authorities, divisions and departments in their own right. However, the High Sheriff is still the reigning sovereign’s representative for all judiciary matters and for maintaining law and order. Not a position to be taken lightly then. In fact, so important is the post that the Privy Council itself (which numbers the sovereign’s most trusted subjects) recommends those it considers worthy of nomination to what is the oldest continuous secular office under the Crown. Last November, the council earmarked three nominees for the High Sheriff of West Sussex – one for each of the next three years - and on 15 March, Andrewjohn Stephenson Clarke was duly appointed to the post in a ceremony at which The Queen selected him from the list. The so-called `pricking ceremony` dates back to the 1500s, when Elizabeth I used a bodkin to literally pierce a hole through the name of the applicant chosen for the position from the list placed before her. The Queen officially is still the final judge of who will take up the year-long post, although pricking is now rathermore a process of rubber-stamping. Names are put forward to the Privy Council for consideration several years before a high sheriff takes up his or her position. “In Elizabeth I’s time, the names of the three nominees, scrawled in ink by quill pen on parchment, could be tampered with – erased or altered,” explains Andrewjohn, who is the latest member of the Stephenson Clarke family to hold the honorary position and who was sworn in, resplendent in full court dress with sword and cocked hat - at the declaration ceremony in Lewes on 26 March. “Pricking a hole through the name of the nominee written on the parchment prevented the possibility of any malicious or fraudulent practices. Today, three nominees, one for each of the next three years, are still selected, for less sinister though still valid, reasons. Should the circumstances of the first nominee change, there are other names to choose from without going through the whole selection process again.” Borde Hill mansion and garden, near Haywards Heath, has been home to the Stephenson Clarke family for the last 120 years and is no stranger to county sheriff incumbents. Andrewjohn’s great great grandfather, Col Robert Stephenson Clarke, assumed the position in 1915 as had Sir Stephen Boord, the builder and first owner of Borde Hill, in 1628. The high sheriff formerly held many of the powers now vested in lords lieutenant (the sovereign’s personal

representative), high court judges, magistrates, coroners, local authorities and the Inland Revenue. In the time of the Domesday Book, it was the task of sheriffs to quantify how much money each county was liable to pay to the treasury. By the time of Magna Carta, they were empowered to appoint deputies when a posse was required to enforce their powers. The splitting of Sussex into East and West in 1974 created a high sheriff of each county. Like their eastern counterpart, the High Sheriff of West Sussex takes precedence after the respective lord lieutenant, except when it is deferred to a lord mayor, mayor or chairman of the local authority when they are undertaking municipal business in their own district. ”My duties will include ensuring the well-being and protection of high court judges on circuit,” Andrewjohn adds, “while also acting as returning officer for parliamentary elections in the county constituencies, proclaiming the accession of a new sovereign (not a function he is expecting to have to undertake!) and maintaining the loyalty of subjects to the Crown. “Some of my responsibilities are delegated,” he says. “The protection of the judges and maintenance of law and order, for example, rest in the hands of the Chief Constable of West Sussex.” As High Sheriff, he will be attending a host of official and public functions, including royal visits, in the county. In Diamond Jubilee year, Andrewjohn is expecting a particularly crowded calendar of engagements, as he will stand at the side of the Lord Lieutenant of West Sussex when members of the royal family visit here. “I am a royal official, nonpolitical, above local interest and so able to enforce the sovereign’s interest in the county,” he explains. “The post is an unpaid one and none of my expenses falls on the public purse.” As High Sheriff of West Sussex, Andrewjohn has the power to assemble individuals and office-holders in the county and to support and encourage voluntary and statutory organisations. The consequences of prison for offenders and the impact of internment on their families will hold special interest for him in his year of office, as will the plight of disadvantaged young people. “As a member of the court of the Clothworkers’ Guild in the City of London (as was Samuel Pepys) I’ve visited many charities under its remit of donating millions of pounds a year to help disabled people and the young disadvantaged. The visits raised my awareness of the good work being done to help the employment of offenders but that it is disparate. I hope to bring together the community and law and order in ways that will improve their prospects.” Conscious of his “privileged” position as a landowner - Borde Hill estate is spread across hundreds of acres of beautiful Sussex Weald - Andrewjohn believes that with that privilege comes “duty and responsibility”. “Everyone in society has a duty to give back to society because we are all members of it. The office of High Sheriff offers a way of carrying out that duty, without monetary reward or perceived gain.”

99


Inspirational

B ATHR OOMS & W ETR OOMS LEADING HIGH QUALITY BRANDS

Showroom @ 37 East Street, Horsham, West Sussex, RH12 1HR T: 01403 276266

E: info@tilecenter.co.uk

W: andsotobathe.co.uk


Bathrooms C+Sfera Catalano basin

370370

370370

135 135

600 600

200 370 200 370

270 470 270 470

185 185

185 185 150150

150150

135 135

135 135

185 185

140140 40 40

140140 40 40 150150

40 40 120120

640640

620620

150150

600 600

275 185 275 185

470 270 470 270

1100 700 1100 700

370370

450450

450450 370370

370370

370370 500500 120120 40 40

150150

135 135

185 185

400 120 400 120

900 900

280 280

£550

150150

1100 700 1100 700

135 135 650 650

185 230 185 230

370 370

150150

140140 40 40

120 120 40 150 15040 640640

140140 40 40

135135 45 45 620620

135 135

275 275 185 275 275 185

470 470

620620

140140 40 40

140140 40 40 620620

230 280 185 230 280 185

620620

275 275

cod. 110AC3N

280 280

135 135 700 600 700 600

900 650 650

cod. 70AC3N

will work in small and large spaces £415 cod. 90AC3N alike. Comfortable curves take form£485 and function to a higher level. £415.00 www.andsotobathe.co.uk

370370

450450

450450

130130 25 25 300300

370370

450450

500500

135 135 900

620620

275 275

380 380

600 600

C3 L110 Washbasin 0 or 1 tap hole cm 110x37

900 900

280 280 280 280

40 40 120120

700 700

230230

450450

450450

550550 135135 45 45 620620

900 900

1100 1100

280 280115 280 280115

115 115

25 25 300300

280 280115 280 280 280115 280

115 115

100100 65 65

t

C3 L70 C3 L90 Washbasin Washbasin Coherent and simple design with a 0 range or 1 tapof hole 0 orin1sizes tap hole over 30 pieces that cm 70x37 cm 90x37

A basin using the most natural of all material to help you create your little haven. We believe that good material and good craftsmanship are the fundamental basis to good design. www.andsotobathe.co.uk £438.00 ZeroDomino 125 Washbasin up to 5 tap holes cm 125x50

a focus on

NNA * COLONNA - PEDESTAL * COLONNA - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE 800 - STANDSÄULE 800 800

* COLONNA - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE 800

COSI

130

500

200

600

500

200

830

600

550

200

830

600

550

200

150 150

* COLONNA - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE 800

60

600

500 500 500

490

830

600 600

500 500

830 830 500 500

600 600

830 830 95 95

830

500

600

60 60 60

660 660

660 660

200

COLONNA -- PEDESTAL PEDESTAL -- STANDSÄULE STANDSÄULE 850 850 ** COLONNA

60

150 40

95 95

150 40 295 295

95 95 95 95 95 95 95 95 60

95 95 95 95

150 150 40 40

150 150 40 40

490 490

95 95 95 95

60 60

101

COLONNA -- PEDESTAL PEDESTAL -- STANDSÄULE STANDSÄULE 850 850 ** COLONNA

60

95 95

830

600

500

200 200

200 200

500

95 95 95 95

90

90 500

600 600 600

830 830 D

50 0

C

50 150 Basins are semi punched and are stocked with 0 or 1 tap200hole. Where possible basins can be drilled by us for an additional tap hole at a cost of £20.00 each

200

150 40 150 40 150 40 150 40

60

200 200

295

500 500 500 500

130 130 450 130 450 130 450 450

90 90

95 95 95 95 95 95 95 95 60

50 150 40050 150

60 60

200 200 200 200

ACCESSORI FITTINGS FITTINGS ACCESSOIRES ACCESSORI 60 60 ACCESSOIRES A B

200 400 400

50

£560

200 400 400 400 400 270 270 130 130 180 180 270 270 130 130 180 180

CC

COD. COD.

A

60 60

200 200 200 200

150 40 150 40 150 40 150 40

95 95 95 95

150 150 40 40

200 200

200 200

100

200

200

735

AA

200

500 500 250 250 980 500 500 250 250 980 750 750 750 750

275 275

BB

500 500 500 500 750 750 D 750 750 D

200 200

250

90

250 250 250 250

400 400 1000 1000

490 490

500 500 500 500

490 490450 450 450

* COLONNA - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE 810

90

500 500

450 450

450

130 130 130 130

290 290

250 980

500

500

600

550

600

830*

cod. 7DZE

200

400 400 400 400 180 180 130 130 270 270 180 180 130 130 270 270

130 130

490 90 490 275 275

150 40

150 40

COLONNA -- PEDESTAL PEDESTAL -- STANDSÄULE STANDSÄULE 810 810 ** COLONNA

100 200100

750

200 ZeroDomino 75dx Washbasin 60 60 0, 1 or 3 tap holes cm 75x50

90

95 95

200 200

600 600

200

600 600

200

ZeroDomino 75sx Washbasin 60 60 0, 1 or 3 tap holes cm 75x50

Natural material has that certain charm and quality that we all crave. And that’s why Stonearth only use 100% solid natural stone to make a variety of stunning basins. www.andsotobathe.co.uk £594.00 130 130

500 750

cod. 10DO £720 cod. 7SZE u £560 Stone counter-top basin 290 290

60

200 200

500 500

830 830

600 600

90 90

60

180

390

130 450

490

500

500

500

275

750

550 550

830* 830*

150 40

150 40

95 95

150 40

200

500

400 130 180

95 95

500

400 270 130

550 550

250 750

200

90

270

95 95

250

1000

ZeroDomino 100 60 Washbasin 0, 1 or 3 tap holes cm 100x50

270

550

400

130 270

450

400

180 130

550 550

130

450

500

490

450

130

130

180

400

275

150 150 40 40

200

* COLONNA - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE 800

130

290

490 450

130

60 60

1000

830

30 30

30 30

30 30

Part of the definitive range in contemporary bathroom design that 35 has been so widely emulated. This large range of more than 40 products provides versatility and the opportunity of bespoke design solutions. www.andsotobathe.co.uk £720.00

90 90

30 30

p

750 750

290

400

275

C3 L110 | Sfera54 Wc|Bidet

440440

440440

495 495

Zero Catalano sink

550 750 550 750

200 200

200

INSPIRE - drawer solid wood washstand

650

690 690

440440

540540

690 690 495 495

450

90 90

490

490

500

95 95 95 95

60 60

650 1250

500500

600

800

830830

800

600600

200

Towel rail chrome A selection of contemporary and stylish cod. PI25N £140 New style available April 2011 basins for your bathroom with the individual artistic flair required to impress both guests and family alike

330

* COLONNA * COLONNA - PEDESTAL - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE - STANDSÄULE 800 800

150 150 40 40

450

P TRAP-COVER COPRISIFONE SIPHONVERLEIDUNG P TRAP-COVER SIPHONVERLEIDUNG

* COLONNA * COLONNA - PEDESTAL - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE - STANDSÄULE 800 800

550

95 95

200

D

200 D

600

150 40

200

550

290

200 200

90 90

550

600

400 400 130 1000 1000

290

90

600

115 45

830

SIPHONVERLEIDUNG 830 * COLONNA - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE 800

HALBSÄULE COPRISIFONE

C

550 C

830

500500

COSI

230

P TRAP-COVER COPRISIFONE SIPHONVERLEIDUNG P TRAP-COVER

NNA * COLONNA - PEDESTAL * COLONNA - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE - PEDESTAL - STANDSÄULE 800 - STANDSÄULE 800 800

485 25 25 95 95

PEDESTAL COSF COLONNA HALBSÄULE PEDESTAL

25 95

COSI

200

65 95

COSI

200

A B ACCESSORI FITTINGS ACCESSOIRES 830 600 A B

COSF COLONNA

460

150 50 50 150 150 150 50 50 150 150

830* 830*

500

500

ACCESSORI FITTINGS ACCESSOIRES

600600

500

600

HALBSÄULE COPRISIFONE

COD.

95 95

600

800

500500

150 100 100 150 PEDESTAL COSF COLONNA 150 100 100 150 HALBSÄULE 800 PEDESTAL

COD.

50

290 290

450 450

490 490

450 450

275 275

340

200 200

150 40

200

330 330

D 200 D

550

500500

C 550 C

500500 600600

600

830* 830*

830

600600 830* 830*

A B ACCESSORI FITTINGS ACCESSOIRES 830 600 A B

COSF COLONNA

500 65 95 65 95

115 115 45 45

ACCESSORI FITTINGS ACCESSOIRES

COD.

650 650

830* 830*

500500

150 100 150150150 150100 50 50 150 100 150150150 150100 50 50

COD.

600600

600600

830* 500500 830*

830* 830* 600600

600600 500500

230 230

130 130

BASINS 650 650 280 1250 1250

340

490 490

C C

290 290

340 340

A. Roma basin – granite B. Granite top F. Hali stainless steel high rise tap

460 460

100 100

D D

280 280

130 130

A A B B

500 500500500

500 500 130

400 400

100 100

150 150

485 485

830* 830*

600600

C C

500500 B B

830* 830*

D 150 50 50 150 D 150 50 50 150

£800

340 340

130

400 400

600600 A A

150 150 50 50 150 150 150 50 50 150

500500

830* 830* 600600

600600 500500

cod. 125DO 130 130

500 500

100 100

130 130

ZeroDomino 100 100 100

500 500

200 200

500500

500500

200 200

600600

830* 830*

Stonearth Granite C3 L70 basin u


BATHROOM SHOWCASE

BASIN UNIT Roma black granite basin available in 3 different styles and shapes

FURNITURE Cupboards and drawers offering multiple storage solutions from linen to cosmetics. Made in solid walnut


DESIGN TIP Keep windows unadorned. This will create an illusion of depth

FURNITURE Tall storage offering slimline options for tighter areas helping to maximise your space

BATH AND FILLER Contemporary floor standing bath and floor standing taps can be fitted and located anywhere in the room

HOW TO MAKE a focal point of a freestanding bath Create a space where you can enjoy a decadent, indulgent soak 1 If you can, allow plenty of space around a modern freestanding bath so that it becomes a stand-out feature. 2 Use wall-hung or floor-standing taps for a sleek designer look. A plinth beneath or next to the bath will conceal pipes. 3 Keep the room free of clutter for a relaxing environment. 4 Position the bath so you can enjoy the best view.

FOR MORE DETAILS, SEE WWW.ANDSOTOBATHE.CO.UK | 01403 276266


BATHROOM SHOWCASE

LIGHTING Multiple lighting sources help create the right ambience during both the day and the night

FURNITURE Suspended units that appear to levitate above the floor help draw the eye across the room giving a feeling of more space


DESIGN TIP The current trend is not to tile every wall. Only the necessary splash back areas

STORAGE UNIT Where storage space is at a minimum look at solutions like this illuminated mirrored cabinet for a great addition to the room

TAP UNITS Slick design single lever mono basin tap for a minimalistic feel

BATHING Your bath can be filled through the overflow eliminating the need for rim-mounted taps

FOR MORE DETAILS, SEE WWW.ANDSOTOBATHE.CO.UK | 01403 276266


TAKE THE PLUNGE 8

If you’re thinking of getting a pool, interior designer Katrina Smith has some advice on the different types available and how you can pick one that will suit you and your lifestyle 8 A client of mine from East Grinstead recently asked my opinion on a) whether to have a swimming pool and b) where to put it. She and her husband weren’t too fussed about it themselves, but their two teenage daughters really wanted one. Only problem was that they had absolutely no idea what to look for or where to begin. One of the first things to consider was should they have a submerged pool or an above ground pool? An above ground pool is not permanent. It can move with you if you decide to move house. An above ground pool is also less expensive. On the down side they are not as attractive. You are also limited in design – usually rectangular or circular. However if you are unsure about whether you want a pool, and are doing it just for the kids, this might perhaps be the option for you. Once the kids have left home you can rid yourself of the pool. Submerged pools are by far the more popular. They are however expensive. You will need a contractor to design the pool and to build it. There are lots of different shapes and sizes you can choose from. If you have decided on a submerged

pool you now have lots more choices to make. What shape would you like? Lots of curves? A rectangular pool with curved corners? Perhaps you would like it to look like it belongs in the Bahamas – adding rocks and waterfalls, add some tropical plants and you can be sipping cocktails beside the pool in Horsham! One of the first things to consider is size – you need a large enough garden to accommodate the pool and have room for seating as well as a barbecue area. Safety is a huge consideration, prior to starting my interior design business nine years ago I worked for a tour operator. I travelled around the world checking the safety elements of hotels - one main area being their swimming pools and surroundings – you must consider the ground or floor around your pool. This should be a nonslippery surface. Ensure that any guests you have over for swim parties are aware of the water depth. If you have young children then you really must have a fence constructed around your pool with a locked gate. Safety fences come in many sizes and colours and do not need to detract from the overall look of your pool.


107


MORE PLANTS THAN YOU CAN SHAKE A STICK AT

Horsham Cook’s Farm Nuthurst Horsham West Sussex RH13 6LH

Chichester Lidsey Road Nursery Woodgate Crossing Chichester West Sussex PO20 6SU

Tel : 01403 891772

Tel : 01243 545008

www.architecturalplants.com We’re told we have the most beautifully presented nurseries in England. Come and see for yourself.

Protect your pet this National Vaccination Month! May is National Vaccination Month and Arthur Lodge wants to ensure that your pets Arth are properly protected. It is vital that pets are immune to certain diseases which could be imm fatal if an animal were to become infected. fata Prevention is better than cure! Prev For more information on what is needed pets, visit our website at for your y www.arthurlodgevets.co.uk, call us www 01403 252964 or pop into the on 0 surgery for a chat. surg

“We care as much as you do”

Join us today

Arthur Lodge, Horsham

01403 252 964 Downslink, Southwater

01403 732 219 www.arthurlodgevets.co.uk


Photograph courtesy of Fowler Swimming Pools

109


Photograph courtesy of Fowler Swimming Pools


Next you want to choose your poolside furniture. Loungers are great for relaxing, reading or for simply soaking up the sun. If you fancy dining by the pool, then there is a vast collection of different dining sets, whether you are looking for wrought iron, rattan, wooden or aluminium, there is something on the high street for everyone. If you don’t want to have to put it away every year once the summer is over, then look for all weather dining sets. You can extend the pool season by having a glazed enclosure. Friends of ours have one, and they are able to use their pool from around April to October. When it gets too hot they can slide back the enclosure to make an open-air pool. If you are really lucky you might be able to go for option 3 – the indoor pool! You can have a striking new building built to your own specification, something to complement the architectural style of

your house or a striking glazed building as a feature of the garden. The building can be a detached structure within the garden or an extension of your house. You can also have changing rooms and perhaps even a spa incorporated. Above all, look at having the right pool for your family’s lifestyle. And jump in! A BIT ABOUT KATRINA Katrina Smith owns True Colours Interiors, based in Horsham, West Sussex. The business has been operating for over eight years. Having worked on many diverse projects from a high tech funeral chapel in Worthing, to a 16th Century Hotel in Pulborough, as well as a beauty salon in Horsham and show homes for property developers. Katrina also undertakes projects for residential clients, whether it be a full room makeover, a kitchen design, new flooring or new curtains and blinds.

111


SPECIALISTS IN SWIMMING POOL DESIGN, BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION SINCE THE LATE 1950S.

It is our intention to turn your dream into reality.

WE CATER FOR ALL ASPECTS OF SWIMMING POOL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION INCLUDING: • Swimming pool landscaping • Swimming pool lighting • Swimming pool covers • Solar pool covers • Automatic swimming pool covers AND ALL AREAS OF POOL MAINTENANCE. Covering Sussex, Surrey, East Hampshire and Kent

Fowler Swimming Pools Ltd are recognised as one of the leading swimming pool contractors in the South East. Our extensive experience enables us to create swimming pool finishes of the highest quality.

01403 864373

www.fowlergroup.co.uk Fowler Group Henfield Road Cowfold West Sussex RH13 8BS


FAMILY VALUES RUN DEEP DIRECTOR OF FOWLER SWIMMING POOLS, TOM HOLMAN, EXPLAINS WHY YOUR SOCIAL LIFE, HEALTH AND BANK ACCOUNT CAN BENEFIT FROM A POOL AND HOW HIS BUSINESS CONTINUES TO THRIVE When it comes to designing and installing a swimming pool, you’ll want to get it right. It can be a large investment of time and money and it will also have an impact on the aesthetics of your home or garden. That’s why Fowler Swimming Pools has lasted in the business for more than five decades - because they understand how important it is to you, your family and your lifestyle. The Fowler Group was established as far back as 1853 when it was the village builder. Fowlers have been building swimming Pools since the 1950s and today it is still a family affair at the company. Managing director, Tom Holman, told The Resident Magazine: “I am a Fowler family member - and I’ve worked here since 1979. My co-director Philip Pamment is group Chairman John Fowler’s son-in-law. Our staff are all direct employees and many

of them have been with the company for their entire careers, some as long as 40 years. In fact, Kevin Dack, who began as a plumber many years ago, is now our service director. It’s a great team and we are all proud to work for the company and know that we have a strong reputation to uphold.” Fowler Swimming Pools can manage every aspect of swimming pool design, build and management. The company offers assistance with the planning formalities, the construction, they can maintain the pool on your behalf on a continual basis and also supply the chemicals and other supplies you need. In addition, they sell products such as saunas, hot tubs and steam rooms as well as pool chemicals As well as the company’s long-standing success, sometimes during tough economic times, and its comprehensive services

there are other reasons to choose a Fowler swimming pool. They include the skill of the people who design and build them, as well as its solid financial stability - so you can be sure the job will get finished, and be completed to a first class standard. “Our track record says it all”, added Mr Holman. But if you’ve never had one before, what are the benefits of installing a pool at your home? According to Fowler Swimming Pools’ director there are plenty. “It’s a great way to socialise with friends and family. They provide another space in your home for entertaining and they can also have a positive impact on your health as they allow you to exercise in the comfort of your own home or grounds. And they will add value to your property or estate as well. So a pool brings social, physical and financial benefits! The question should be why not get one!?” 113


EXTENSION EXPLANATION

Interior designer Katrina Smith talks us through the dos and don’ts of extending your home and answers some common questions about space, light and most importantly, where to begin


Adding a conservatory or garden room to your house will not only give you extra space, but could increase the value of your home. When designing one, think about how you and your family are going to use it. Is it a garden room or a conservatory you want? What is the difference? A garden room has a tiled roof and glazed walls, whereas a conservatory has glazed walls and a glazed roof. So often I am told by clients who only use their conservatory for half the year, that it is just too cold in the winter, and if we have a particularly hot summer, then it gets too hot! We need to ensure that our conservatories are used year round, after all - what a waste of time and money if you only use it for six months of the year. Before you start to look at conservatories and garden rooms think about how much you want to spend. A conservatory with all the trimmings (lighting, heating, flooring, decoration, furnishings etc) may cost a lot more than you would expect. Check whether you will need planning permission. It is not normally required for a conservatory, provided you do not exceed the permitted development limit for your property (which is usually 50-70 cubic metres, depending on where you live). There are exceptions – listed buildings and conservation areas for example. And don’t forget if your property has been previously extended, then you will have used up some of your “permitted development” area. Think about how the room will look from the outside. Will it reflect the style of your house? What do you want it made from? The three main materials available are PVCu, hardwood or aluminium. PVCu is probably the cheaper option and hardwood is more suitable for older properties. Aluminium is similar to PVCu, but is stronger, more expensive and not such a good insulator. Which direction do you want your conservatory or garden room to face? South facing will get the sun, but you will need good ventilation and good quality blinds, or it may feel more like a sauna than a conservatory in the summer. North facing will have the reverse problems, in that the conservatory will receive very little sunshine and will require heating for those cooler months. At the outset, think about heating your conservatory. Do you want radiators or under floor heating? Ask your conservatory company about the different options available for the roofing material. Roof blinds can be a godsend in the summer. There are many different types

available and many different colours to suit whatever scheme you have in mind. Blinds or window films can protect you in the hot summer months. While they both perform similar functions by reducing heat gain, the blinds will bring alive your interior scheme while also giving the added benefit of privacy if your room is overlooked. Window films are more concerned with heat gain, and in this respect may perform a little better. They are also good at reducing glare and fading, which will be particularly useful if you intend to use your new conservatory as a study or office, but still want a view of the garden. You could always use both by adding blinds to the roof and window films to the sides. You’ve made your mind up You’ve chosen the style, now to design the interior. Cool greens and creams are relaxing and fresh, and bring a little of the garden in. Add stone flooring or flagstones, or even wood to continue the theme of an outside room. Wicker and rattan furniture are still popular choices for conservatories and garden rooms, but not essential. Oak furniture can look amazing as you can see from our photo – we used oak from Con-tempo furniture, who are firm favourites of mine. I would avoid bright colours, as inevitably the sun will bleach the fabric. In the winter you can change the scheme slightly by changing the cushions on the sofa and adding a rug – substitute the green for red and hey presto - a warm winter feel, making the room instantly more appealing in the colder months. Do think beyond the room as well. What does the garden look like? Well thought out lighting in the garden forms a wonderful backdrop for your conservatory or garden room. My own garden room has a wall of doors which lead out onto a square deck with a fish pond wrapped around it in an L shape. In the summer the doors are open all the time. We spend many an evenings drinking wine on the deck (weather permitting) – it becomes an extension of the garden room. Lanterns look good in conservatories, as will spotlights focused on features such as architectural plants or artwork. Table lamps will also help create a relaxed, warm atmosphere. Candles also add a lovely ambience, although they should not be left in the room in direct sunlight as they will melt, and as always do remember to take care and extinguish them out when you have finished with them. 115


SECRET GARDENS

Art Consultant Maddi Reid introduces her latest find - a photographer who captures the beauty and secrecy of the outdoors at night This time of year is a delight for the senses. Not only do we bear witness to new life in nature, we are delighted by the wonderful smell of spring flowers and begin to feel the sun’s warmth on our skin. In light of this, we are pleased to be working with Alice Colling, whose exploration and fascination with landscapes highlights beauty that might otherwise goes unnoticed. Her latest series of work is entitled ‘Night Landscapes’, which depict gardens and private sanctuaries that take on a new dimension when darkness falls. From the beginning of this body of work Alice’s intentions were clear. She wanted these landscapes to have a limitless feel to them, which she achieved by intentionally mounting them in Perspex without a frame that meant the environments were not restricted in any way. Alice is careful not to disclose particular locations for the photographs, not to be secretive, but to ‘’invite the viewer to project their own emotions and ideas on the landscapes”. The photographs taken at night both obscure certain elements with darkness and leave time for latent light to emerge, which accentuates speckles of beautiful colour, leaving the viewer with the utmost appreciation of what surrounds them in nature.

One might think that these effects are created on computer, but actually they are extremely considered, like a painter who would carefully compose his painting. Alice takes these pictures on long exposures and assures us that no flash has been used on the camera. Instead she has carefully selected areas with a white torch or hand-held flash, illuminating the fondant of colours. As an Art Consultant, it is a rare find to discover such a unique process of working that reveals how imaginative one can be with technology. Alice certainly has embraced this, constantly exploring new ways of working. It is no surprise that Alice has featured for two years running in the Foto8 Summer Show at Host Gallery, a highly esteemed annual photography competition which last year attracted over 2000 entries from 40 countries. The event is recognised for showcasing and supporting dynamic new work from emerging and established contemporary photographers. Certainly a photographer to watch out for! Fawn Art Consultancy is based in Brighton, East Sussex. Its services cover the South East of England & London. For more information or for enquiries regarding Alice Colling’s work, visitfawnartconsultancy.co.uk


By Alice Colling

117


now only

£799 *

Save with immediate delivery Selected Stressless® Altlantic and Consul recliners while stocks last

Stressless® Atlantic recliner

The incredible comfort this Stressless® Atlantic recliner and selected Stressless® Consul recliners is now yours for only £799 - saving you up to £470! And with immediate delivery, you’ll soon be enjoying the unique comfort features you only find on Stressless® recliners. • Patented Stressless® Plus™ system for perfect support in any position • The footstool automatically tilts to the correct position for your legs Stressless® Consul recliner

• Stressless® Atlantic recliner with footstool is also available to order in a choice of luxurious fabrics and colours from £699† Experience the ultimate in comfort for less at a Stressless® Comfort studio today or visit www.stressless.co.uk *Save £470 on a Stressless® Atlantic recliner with footstool in Batick Cream leather with natural wood finish, was RRP £1,269, now £799. Save £380 on a Stressless® Consul recliner with footstool in Batick Cream leather with natural wood finish and Batick Hunter Green leather with brown stain wood finish, was RRP £1179, now £799. Offer and immediate delivery available on these leather orders only. †Save £430 on any Stressless® Atlantic recliner with footstool in Cocoon, Ocean, Placidus or Spa fabric ranges was RRP £1,129 now £699. Save £430 on any Stressless® Atlantic recliner with footstool in Natura, Oasis or Siena fabric ranges was £1,179 now £749. Savings between 1 March and 31 May 2011. While stocks last at participating Stressless® retailers only.

Collingwood Batchellor www.collingwoodstores.co.uk Horsham ( 01403 269261

Haslemere ( 01428 641947

Horley ( 01293 782404


TRAVELLING

with

MR TURNER

A new book uses the Triumph motorcycle as a vehicle for exploring the social and political changes in the 50s. Its author, Nigel Winter, shares an excerpt with us

A new book, written by a West Sussex resident, has been selected as a possible winner of the Orwell Book Prize 2012, joining other titles by the likes of Ken Livingstone and Lord Egremont. Travelling with Mr Turner is the work of lawyer Nigel Winter, who also has a passion for the Triumph motorbike, which his book is about. But Mr Winter points out it’s not just for motorbiking enthusiasts. “The book is really more a historical satire than something for petrol heads. But it is inspired by my love of the Triumph.

It’s about ordinary people encountered on a fictional journey to Joan O’Groats and explores different political and social opinions and eras. I felt I had a story to tell. And despite being rejected time and time again it was eventually published and is being extremely well received. People seem to really relate to it and the Orwell Book Prize nod is a real honour”, Mr Winter told The Resident Magazine. Overleaf, Mr Winter shares an excerpt from his book with The Resident Magazine readers. 119


EDWARD TURNER DIED IN THE SURREY VILLAGE OF OCKLEY IN 1973. He designed the motorcycles for Marlon Brando and Steve McQueen. But in the austere coronation year of 1953, he travelled from Lands End To John O Groats to publicise his motorcycles to a very different market, as discovered by Sussex author, Nigel Winter in this excerpt from his book, Travelling With Mr Turner

ENTER MR TURNER Mr Turner was probably a genius. I do not mean that he had a crazy haircut and read too many books. His brand of genius was useful rather than incomprehensible. He was a doer rather than a talker and I suspect he never went on any management or gender awareness courses, for these were very different times. Mr Turner was born on the night of Thursday the 24th of January 1901 in Southwark, South London. Over the River Thames King Edward VII acceded to the throne as Baby Edward Turner was accepted into a family of seven, a number necessitated by high infant mortality rates. Indeed his own life could have come to a very swift end when his nervous father dropped him at birth. Bruises aside, Baby Edward was born into comparatively happy times. Whilst the lot of the working class was not great by modern standards, it was better than it had been under the Victorians. They were dieing from fewer avoidable diseases, could vote, go to the Music Hall and occasionally take the train. Significantly, in a few years they would even have their own transport when bruised baby Edward from Southwark would come into his own. The people from ‘below stairs’ were emerging to leave behind those conditioned only to serve their feudal masters, like Mundy the manservant in TH

White’s novel Farewell Victoria, who found his skills: ...increasingly redundant ones in (his) later life. For after a spell in the Green Howards that included the bloody Zulu wars, he returned to a changing world. Gay King Edward made motoring fashionable; grooms and coachmen were a dying race. Mundy lived on, pathetically, in a world that had little place for him. Soon a whole generation caught the whiff of petrol fumes down country lanes that had previously hummed with insects during the summertime and little else. The past is not another country, it is another planet and Britons even spoke a different language. Self-belief shaped their every opinion and in an age before revisionist historians had to revise on pain of unemployment, there were a range of commonly held views that were unshakable. Into this world strode Mr Turner, as Baby Edward became known, carried along by his purposeful gait. Mr Turner and his generation were amongst the last in a long lineage for whom adolescence and bayonets went together. For over a century, men of a certain age


had found themselves stuffed uncomfortably into military uniform to engage in mortal struggle and button polishing. Mr Turner was not immune from these trappings despite the speculation that he was related to the 18th Century artist JMW Turner. Whatever his distant ancestors got up to, the current Turner family were engineers and Mr Turner was the best of them. His talents were first brought to the public’s attention when the patrons of the local cinema were plunged into darkness. The cause had been Mr Turner’s homemade welder in his father’s neighbouring engineering works. He was a young man with little regard for the dimming of household lighting across the capital.

It was the start of a long hard road on which Mr Turner would build an icon fit for the coolest alpha males of several generations spanning Lee Marvin to Richard Gere. So satisfied was another customer called Bob Dylan that he wore his Triumph t-shirt on the cover of his best selling Highway 61 Revisited album; such a move would later be called ‘product placement’ by advertising executives. But for now, Bob just loved his motorcycle. And even the Queen gave her seal of approval by allowing Triumph to produce a limited edition to commemorate her silver jubilee. But in 1953 Mr Turner had no ‘fancy ideas’ over and above building the best motorcycle in the world.

Those engineering talents left their mark on Nelsons Column, as his Lordship remains protected by four cast iron lions and some curious modern creations that largely go unnoticed. That he still stands there today is thanks to the Turner family business, for it was they who made the lightning conductor that runs its entire length. All of which left the Turner family modestly successful. And then came every parent’s nightmare: a motorcycle. As a consequence Mr Turner experienced in quick succession, racing at Brooklands, a night in a police cell and a job in the motorcycle industry before acquiring a very pretty wife. It was 1929 and Mr Turner was twenty-eight. In the same way that today’s bright young things go to the City to seek their fortunes, then they went to Coventry. Amazing but true. A quarter of a century later Nelson remained gloriously strike free and about his feet was the rumbling of motorcycles and cars that Mr Turner had designed, for by then Mr Turner was ‘the boss’ of Triumph motorcycles and no one dared to call him Edward.

Before the obsession with fashion, Britain lived in austere and functional times and motorcycles sold on economy and reliability. To demonstrate both Mr Turner selected his smallest model from the production line and proposed to ride it from Land’s End to John O’Groats. He would ride a motorcycle designed by him, made in a factory run by him over 1,008 miles. Thus on Monday 5th of October 1953, the doorman promptly opened the doors of the Triumph offices in Meriden, Warwickshire: the place, which Mr Turner always called his ‘little factory in England’. Three riders immaculately clad in brand new Barbour suits emerged from under the huge Triumph sign and gently fluttering Union Jack that always flew from the factory’s flagpole. Three smart new Triumph Terrier motorcycles awaited Mr Turner, managing director, Robert Fearon, works director and Alec St John Masters, chief designer. Behind them was Colin Swaisland, a cameraman from ESSO Petroleum on a larger 500cc speed twin, Mr Turner’s long suffering driver, Frank Griffith behind the wheel of a Sunbeam Talbot motorcar and the ACU’s official observer John McNulty who shared the driving of the factory estate car with Triumph’s Eric Headlam.

In ‘those days’, as we call the past, cottage industries were almost the norm. A haphazard but enthusiastic network of individual businesses feeding everything from a war effort to an Empire. And Triumph motorcycles did all that in a changing world. The first signs of the biggest change was the emergence of that still deferential but increasingly mobile populace from ‘below stairs’. Only mass production could meet their needs for which Triumph would need someone with vision, drive and the patronage of a super rich proprietor. Cometh the man, cometh the hour. By 1935 Mr Turner had stamped his mark on Triumph motorcycles and designed one of the milestones in motorcycle development; the speed twin. It was fast, cheap and caught the eye of every ‘flash Harry’ up and down the Kingdom. Mr Turner had brought to the masses the type of performance that WO.Bentley could only provide in return for a blank cheque. Mr Turner had ‘the knack’ and kept it all his life. If the nation wanted speed he gave it. If war intervened and they needed service they got it. If austerity followed victory, so did Mr Turner, particularly in the Coronation year of 1953.

The sweep round drive that bordered Triumph’s finely manicured lawns lead to two wrought iron gates. They sport the logo of the best motorcycle in the world. When this particular factory finally closed in 1983, a former Triumph draughtsman moved in and bought them for his business premises with a speed that befits the world speed record holder that he is. They still hang today at Norman Hyde Enterprises Limited and they were one of a number of all British sponsors of my subsequent recreation of Mr Turner’s ride. All three riders had been weighed, the oil and petrol levels had been checked in the presence of observer McNulty. It would be the last time Mr Turner would see the factory to which he had devoted his life and talents for a full week. The engines were started and moments later the convoy swept through Triumph’s famous gates and headed due south. The Gaffer’s Gallop had begun. © Nigel C Winter

121


T HE L ECONFIELD

R ESTAURANT

At the cafe we’re welcoming the month of May with a new summer menu and extended opening hours to enjoy longer days. Join us for a delicious breakfast before heading to work, or end-of-the-day cava and tapas, or a tasty bowl of Hungry Guest pasta. In the shop we are celebrating National Honey Week - wonderful on our Hungry Guest bread. As the temperature rises don’t forget that we stock a great range of ‘house’ sausages and great meat cuts, along with chutneys and dips to make your BBQ go with a bang. Speak to staff in the shop about our great Summer Tasting event this month. B O T H S H O P A N D C A F É A R E O P E N 7 D AY S A W E E K V I S I T U S O N W W W . T H E H U N G R Y G U E S T. C O M M I D D L E S T R E E T & L O M B A R D S T R E E T, P E T W O R T H

May sees the arrival of asparagus, cockles, samphire and mackerel. Fabulous fresh oysters, crab and lobster as well as the best of Spring lamb. Thinking of celebrating a special occasion? We have three unique dining areas upstairs - great for both corporate and private functions. Make sure you book our lovely courtyard for a relaxing light lunch. New in May join us for our £10 Fish and Fizz nights on a Tuesday - a great way to welcome in the week. The Leconfield | New Street | Petworth | GU28 0AS | t: 01798 345111 e: reservations@theleconfield.co.uk | w: www.theleconfield.co.uk


what’s on?

brighton fashion WEEK Brighton 30 May to 3 June brightonfashionweek.co.uk

The thrill of fashion comes to Brighton at the end of May with three catwalks, The Zeitgeist Show, Brighton Frocks Show and the Ready to Wear Shows. Fresh faces and innovative design will be on display as well as exhibitions. This is a must go to event for fashion lovers and you will see all the latest trends for the coming seasons.

123


what’s on?

foodies festival Hove Lawns, Hove 25 to 27 May 2012 foodiesfestival.com/brighton

Hove lawns will host live cooking demonstrations, tasting sessions, cocktail making classes and cookingfor-kids master classes as part of the Foodies Festival. There will also be cuisine from around the world and a wine village. If you love food, this is the perfect event for you.


wheely good weekend Fishers Farm Park, Wisborough Green 5 to 7 May 2012 fishersfarmpark.co.uk

Take the children down to Fishers Farm for a Wheely good weekend as there will be vintage cars, motorbikes and tractors on show and Fireman Sam will be visiting on all three days. Heroes from the local Fire Station will also be there and they will be bringing their real fire engine with them. Fun days out for the whole family.

125


1

2

3

4

5


what’s on? 1. ladies day at plumpton races Plumpton Racecourse, Plumpton 13 May 2012 plumptonracecourse.co.uk

It’s ladies day at Plumpton Racecourse and there will be a day of fun, fizz and fashion on offer. Bring the family along as it’s free admission for under 18’s and there will be competitions, live music, a funfair and a shopping village that’s perfect for the ladies and of course seven races. There will be prizes for the best dressed ladies, men and children so get your favourite clothes on and head down there.

2. lucky seven Leconfield Hall, Petworth 25 May 2012 leconfieldhall.org.uk

Drama company Castaway are based near Pulborough and have put together a play, Lucky Seven, by Alexis Zegerman. The production is a satirical comedy portraying the love, disappointments and hopes of three fictional characters between the ages of seven and forty nine, and with a mix of multimedia. It looks at the effects reality TV has on their lives. It’s based on the TV series ‘Seven Up’, and described by the Guardian as having ‘wit and flair’. Tickets are available from Petworth Bookshop or by calling 0800 411 8881 (Brown Paper Tickets).

3. murder mystery afternoon

4. bluebell specials

5. my first sleeping beauty

Go along to Petworth House for an afternoon of mystery. There has been a hideous murder at Petworth house and you are needed to solve this crime using your detective skills. The event will run from 2-3.30pm and if free, you’ll just need to pay the admittance to the venue. Will you be able to work out whodunit?

Explore the beautiful bluebells for which this venue is so famous. You will get impressive panoramic views from the observation carriage of not only the bluebells but an array of other spring flowers and plants. Plus there is plenty to do before and after the ride at the Bluebell Railway.

The My First... series of productions give children the chance to experience the ballet early on and enjoy some of the world’s most renowned shows and performances. They are put together by the English National Ballet so the standard is extremely high. Coming up at The Hawth this month is Sleeping Beauty.

Petworth House and Park, Petworth 13 May 2012 nationaltrust.org.uk/petworth-house

Sheffield Park Station 8 to 11 May 2012 bluebell-railway.co.uk

The Hawth, Crawley 11 and 12 May 2012 thehawth.co.uk

127


STAND BY y1our3 MAY POLES

The Resident columnist, Bridget James, talks the start of summer, community spirit and a moisturiser you might not have tried

B

elieve it or not, the mild month of May used to be the third month in the early Roman calendar. Later when ancient Romans changed their calendar to begin on 1 January, May claimed its much more suitable position of fifth month in the year. There are various beliefs as to how this month earned its name. The most widely accepted is that it was named after Maia, the Roman goddess of spring and growth. The Anglo Saxon name for May was Tri-Milchi in recognition of the fact that with the lush, new green grass of this time of year, cows could be milked up to three times a day. It was first called May around 1430. Well that’s the science bit done. For myself May can be one of the most beautiful, hopeful months of the year, depending on global warming of course, when the plants seem to be in a constant state of to bud or not to bud. It brings life to the garden and hope that the grey days of winter are at last coming to an end. It also brings the first of the village fetes. Ah yes, those charming affairs which have been so lovingly pulled together by various volunteer committees. We can expect quaint stalls brimming over with homemade produce, May Pole dancing and traditional arts and crafts. Well we can expect but so often now, sadly, we don’t get. We seem to have lost our identity and the traditional cultures that have defined our heritage for centuries. The May Pole, like so many other historical symbols, has been thrown on to the fire of modernism in case anyone, heaven forbid, might “hurt themselves” whilst dancing round it.

In olden days this communal symbol brought the local community together. Poorer parishes would often join up with the more prosperous ones to obtain and erect a pole for a joint village fete celebration. There was the occasional down turn when neighbouring ones would also steal May Poles which could lead to the occasional outbreak of violence - which initially put a dampener on proceedings. The boys and girls of the villages would weave in, out and around the pole dressed in garlands and generally everyone would have a great time – without an iPod, iPad, iPhone or iSomething else in sight. Now I’m not saying there aren’t any great fetes around. There are still some which reflect the care and attention that has gone into planning them from year to year, with great stalls, traditional games like tug of war, bat the rat, coconut shies and, of course, the not-to-be-forgotten raffle, with the proceeds going to a worthwhile village cause. But there are also the rather sorry affairs which amount to no more than a jumble sale where you can reclaim the McDonald’s toys you contributed earlier while enjoying a soggy burger without a hope of nice slice of homemade Victoria Sponge. So come on, it’s May, let’s poke those Morris dancers in the ribs and step up the music and celebrate the coming of summer. By the way I’ve heard that first thing in the morning of May 1, young girls used to rush out into the garden to wash their faces in the May dew which supposedly has magic properties to ensure a beautiful complexion all through the year. So long, Elizabeth Arden. 128


g arin e H nal ay atio th M N e 11 g th ay to n i r du h M t us ek 8t i s i e v and ness W e Com Aware If you are having trouble hearing clearly, why not do something about it? Local company Hearcentres are able to test and examine your ears and prescribe the very latest technology hearing instruments. They can offer you an unrivalled service and the results can be life-changing! Hearing loss affects one in seven of the population and particularly affects the over-fifty age group. Modern hearing instruments are very discreet and the technology inside them better than ever. Digital, high-definition sound quality is now available in easy to wear devices. Hearcentres are a small group of established, local hearing centres manned by experienced hearing care professionals. Both their local centres have been established for nearly seventeen years. To find out more about their service, why not call them or call in to one of their dedicated Hearing Centres in Horsham or Reigate.

To improve your hearing, call your local Hearcentre on 01403 218700 (Horsham) or 01737 221196 (Reigate). Mention THE RESIDENT magazine and receive complimentary batteries for a year!

 Clinical Earcare (wax removal)  Comprehensive Ear Examinations and Hearing Tests  Complete range of the latest Hearing instruments  All makes and models supplied and serviced  Complete range of batteries and accessories  Hearing protection and communication products  Comprehensive aftercare and support service  Home visit service available across the area

Horsham Hearing Centre

Reigate Hearing Centre

(incorporating Ormerod Hearing)

(incorporating Ormerod Hearing)

22 Worthing Road Horsham West Sussex RH12 1SL

5 Church Street Reigate Surrey RH2 0AA

T: 01403 218700

T: 01737 221196


Bolney Stoves Ltd VICTORIAN PICNIC 30th June and 1st July 2012 Enjoy an evening of song and dance as well as a train ride from Horsted Keynes Station to Sheffield Park with a hamper, wine and soft drinks. The train departs at 6.30pm from Horsted Keynes station and is formed of nine carriages each over 100 years old! After your train ride enjoy a traditional music hall show.

Southern at War 2012 Turn the clocks back to the 1940’s Concert Party shows, Afternoon Band concerts, Wartime cinema, Sussex home Guard, Fire Brigade watch room, Military vehicles, Home Front displays

For a large showroom display, a wealth of knowledge and a warm welcome assured

Main agents :

Scan

For more information or to book tickets 01825 720800 110x148

4/18/12

www.bluebell-railway.com 4:11 PM

Page 1

u

Jøtul

01444 871815

May 25, 26 & 27

www.foodiesfestival.com

Hwam

www.bolneystoves.co.uk

VIP

TICKE S ON SAT LE NOW

Sponsored by:

K O TS BO KE W C TI NO

Brighton Hove Lawns

0844 995 1111

u

The Farmers sTores, GaTehouse Lane, Goddards Green, hassocks, WesT sussex Bn6 9Le

FOOD & DRINK FESTIVAL

Book advance tickets

Morsø

68 display models

Foodies Festival H WATC ELIN H C I M TAR S S CHEFING K O CO IVE L

u


Fly with Elite Helicopters and experience a truly first-class, personal and professional service. Relax, unwind and let us take care of all your helicopter requirements. Preferred helicopter operator for the Goodwood Estate Company Group.

www.elitehelicopters.co.uk

Elite Helicopters Goodwood Aerodrome Goodwood West Sussex PO18 0PH

Tel: 01243 530165 Email: ops@elitehelicopters.co.uk Web: www.elitehelicopters.co.uk

Undoubtedly the most desirable way to travel • Helicopter Charter – Transfers To Special Events • Pilot Training • Corporate Events • Aerial Photography & Filming


Frédéric Schwebel ably handles his role in the "slot" position within the Breitling Jet Team, the toughest of them all. When performing with no obvious escape route, mistakes are just not an option. Strapped to his wrist is the Chronomat, powered by the world’s most high-performance chronograph movement, Breitling Caliber 01, chronometer-certified by the COSC (Swiss Official Chronometer Testing Institute), an exceptional "motor" entirely developed and built by Breitling. Ultra-sturdy, ultrareliable and ultra-watertight to 500 m, the Chronomat stands out for its unique design and its incredible concern for details. For Frédéric Schwebel, it is quite simply the world’s best chronograph. 5-YEAR BREITLING WARRANTY £ 6760*

49 West Street, Horsham, West Sussex, RH12 1PP Telephone: 01403 258582

*RRP. Subject to change without notice.

"WHEN YOUR MISSION IS TO FLY AT 800 KM/H LESS THAN TWO METERS FROM OTHER TEAM AIRCRAFT, YOU ONLY TRUST THE CHRONOMETRIC PRECISION OF THE WORLD’S BEST CHRONOGRAPH."


The Resident Magazine - May 2012