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APRIL 4, 2014

REPORTING & ANALYSIS BY THERESE SULLIVAN

About my blog

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MOBILE TELECOM IN THE CONTEXT OF BIG BUILDINGS

THE ONTOLOGY VOID EXPLORING SEMANTIC WEB OF THINGS

MOBILE NETWORK OPERATORS EYE BUILDINGS BIZ

WHY PUB/SUB WINS LIGHTWEIGHT, BROADCAST COMM

B UILDING C ONTEXT

About buildingcontext.me I was schooled in whole building design principles and the integrated design process from American Institute of Architecture Fellows from EHDD Architecture and Integral Group. Basically, this process involves thinking about all the downstream impacts on sub-system design, construction and maintenance of the ultimate building – including comfort, energy and security goals – way upfront in the earliest phases of design. It means making

Covering Mobile Apps, Cloud Services, Wireless Broadband and M2M Wi-Fi services for buildings !1


APRIL 4, 2014

REPORTING & ANALYSIS BY THERESE SULLIVAN

a lot of the most important decisions as a cross-discipline team – architect, mechanical engineer, electrical engineer, daylight and lighting designer, general contractor and owner coming to agreement about the best way to move forward. All that stretching across specialties to understand another professional’s perspective can be arduous, but it’s the only way to get to a high performance building. My blog, BuildingContext.me was launched with the idea that siloed, bifurcated thinking also had to be challenged when it comes to consumer-versus-commercial/industrial ‘Thing Connectivity”. With part of my career spent marketing enterprise software for data management, I was there when the Bring-Your- Own-Device (BYOD) movement brought about fast and dramatic changes to how data and application services were delivered and supported. Data security was challenged, but new technologies and policies were put in place to adapt to the new reality. Today more and more work is being done on tablets and smart phones, with the more mobile workforce having less use for desktop and even laptop PCs and related applications. And mobile App culture and technology will permeate commercial building spaces, as it is now changing every other potential realm of connectivity - homes, cars, health, city services, the energy grid. BuildingContext.me is my opportunity to witness and write about the resulting waves of innovation. I think they are going to come fast!

Both Google and Apple are working on contextual Operating Systems

Apple adds iBeacon to the iOS operating system in mid 2013, and Application Developers like ShopKick are fast to build on the near-field technology with Apps field tested by the Christmas shopping season. Read full post

Contextual O/S is Coming Context drives the type of personalization that users expect in tomorrow’s smart cities and high-performance buildings. Developers can build powerful apps, given access to realtime data streams that pull together context like who is the user, where is the action, and what is the environment. Today’s building management systems are in the sweet spot when it comes to inside occupancy and environmental context like temperature, lighting, electrical load, water supply, door locks, elevator status etc. Also, they can monitor and aggregate any energy data whether its gridsupplied or from wind turbines and solar panels. A platform like the Tridium Niagara framework can be programmed to affordably monitor any number points and move the data to an analytics program for value creation. Splunk, BaseN, SAP, IBM and others offer visualization and analysis software. Contextual mobile operating systems from Apple and Google Android will be the browsers of the Internet of Things era.

Why did Google by Nest for over $3B. Read my analysis here.

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APRIL 4, 2014

REPORTING & ANALYSIS BY THERESE SULLIVAN

T HE O NTOLOGY V OID

To date, progress in bringing physical buildings into the digital world has been hampered by the fact that controls professionals and their collaborating architects, mechanical engineers, code officials, general contractors, building owners, facilities operators etc. have not had a common naming convention or means to express location. To put it in the words of computer scientists, the world lacks a building automation and control ontology. Everyone who services buildings would benefit from predefined and universally understood device names and the equivalent of a GPS in every BACnet controller. This would go a long way toward eliminating much of the mystery and error involved in interpreting building blueprints and control schematics today. Defining such a buildings-realm ontology and gaining consensus and The Web of Things stakeholder support for it is an enormous task—but, the work is happening. is a semanticallyNotably, it’s happening in the context of an even bigger effort, defining the aligned Internet of semantics of what some writers and researchers are calling the “Web of Things Things. The path (WoT).” to get there is a buildings In his April automatedbuildings.com column Toby Considine described the automation and “WoT as a semantically aligned Internet of Things.” He explains, “The Web of Things moves beyond the parochial standards that we keep inventing in control ontology buildings (and elsewhere) and to higher level i.e., more abstract semantics. !3


APRIL 4, 2014

REPORTING & ANALYSIS BY THERESE SULLIVAN

Like the Internet of Things, everything in the WoT has a Universal Resource Identifier, or URI—which is different than everything has an IP address. In simplest illustration, in the Web of Things, there is no BACnet Light, no ZigBee IP Light, and no KNX light, not even an X10 light, there is only a light. That light is slowly being placed into a context using standard ontological methods.”

Physical Location & Topology This BACnet ontology work is being augmented and hurried along by standards organizations like the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®). The OGC just released Sensor Model Language (SensorML) 2.0 Encoding Standard, which reflects naming and location conventions that combine Geographical Information Science (GIS) and mobile telecom’s location-based services (LBS). The OGC is working on a a full suite of Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards already used for satellite mission planning, monitoring and alerting, and intelligent cities and buildings around the world. OGC standardization efforts have strong backing from corporations with a stake in seeing markets for augmented reality and the Internet of Things develop. Note that Facebook just purchased an augmented reality headset maker for $2 billion - a data point to consider alongside Google’s purchase of the Nest thermostat company for over $3 billion. TM Forum, the international telecommunications industry trade group best known for the Frameworx suite of best practices and standards, has engaged with the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) to address location information issues because it recognizes them as barriers to wider adoption of smart grid, M2M networking and other services in the digital ecosystem. The OGC’s Sensor Web standards have momentum to be adopted for use in defining physical locations of building assets. However, the naming of topological locations is another issue, e.g. this sensor is downstream to that air handler. By definition, a building automation and control ontology needs to support both physical and topological identification. Ontology experts will likely build upon work like Project Haystack to crack this second part of the challenge. Project Haystack is an open source initiative within the building automation community that has developed tagging conventions and taxonomies for building equipment and operational data. This project augments the definitions for data normalization, data use and communication for building controls that can be found in internationally recognized and supported standards from ASHRAE, ISO and IEC, such as ISO 61499.

OGC sensor location standards are already used in smart grid, M2M networking and other digital ecosystems

The Smart Grid project won the “Most Innovative Catalyst” award at the 2013 Digital Disruption Conference. Read full post.

Cities that are pioneering new digital services like sensor-driven parking solutions may act like a center of gravity pulling buildings into the Web of Things. Read my analysis here.

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APRIL 4, 2014

REPORTING & ANALYSIS BY THERESE SULLIVAN

We cannot expect that there will not be bumps along the road or dead-ends tried and abandoned along the path to a semantically-aligned Internet of Things, or Web of Things. But, just getting to the point of industry agreement on a building automation and control ontology would be a huge boon. Imagine the day when building control and facility management personnel no longer need to lift ceiling tiles to read physical labels to figure out where all the assets attached to a building automation network reside, what they are called on blue prints and schematics, and how they connect to the rest of the system. We’re not far from the day when there will be mobile phone apps that enable you to point to an asset, then get a meaningful answer back from the cloud about its exact identity and any service needs.

Supported by the National Institute of Standards (NIST), the Ontology Summit Symposium including BACnet Hackathon review is happening April 28-29

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MNO S E YE B UILDINGS N EXT Mobile Network Operators (MNO) view building automation as a growth area for their businesses. Building operators are being pitched a multitude of cloud apps accessed by mobile devices for energy management, lighting control, physical security, etc. MNO’s are going to play a role in delivering these applications. But, will it be a matter of providing ‘dumb’ air waves and pipes? Or are MNO product and service contributions going to be more central and significant to the value chain? !5


APRIL 4, 2014

REPORTING & ANALYSIS BY THERESE SULLIVAN

Carriers have pushed into new businesses like cellular M2M (machine-to-machine) networking services, in part to compensate for the business revenue they've lost to Internet companies providing instant messaging and voice-over-internet protocol (VOIP) calling for free. The business case in M2M for the MNO is easy to make: they might only be able to charge pennies per connection for M2M deployments — compared to an Average Revenue Per Connection of up to $50 for person-to-person — but, the high volume of connections and low bandwidth requirements justify their costs in maintaining the back-end system for application development partners. That's how it's worked in the industrial verticals the MNOs have targeted thus far like utilities, transportation, automotive and consumer electronics. Building automation is next. While not growing as fast as earlier predicted, cellular M2M has been a good business for MNOs. According to Informa Telecoms & Media (ITM), 315 million public cellular M2M connections will be deployed by 2015, generating $12.81 billion in mobile network revenue. There have been some significant deals, like General Electric contracting with AT&T to build out its industrial internet. and Tesla working with TeliaSonera in the Nordic and Baltic countries and with AT&T in North America for its M2M Connected Car services. MNO executives are now sizing up the opportunity of selling M2M cellular services to their building owner and operator customers. Moreover, they are likely thinking about how M2M could help them compete for enterprise customers against other carriers in their regional markets as well as globally. They are looking to partner with application developers - and the building automation vertical is very attractive, as Automotive, Fleet Management and Smart Grid verticals are already crowded. A game changing product that exemplifies such a partnership is InferStack IoT software suite bundled with a family of Intellastar platforms. Debuting at the January 2014 AHR Conference in New York City, Intellastar is offering remote commissioning and monitoring of a BAS system based on a competitively priced data plan that leverages the nationwide M2M cellular networks of partners like Verizon Wireless and Vodafone. The InferStack server is designed to monitor and control heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC), energy, lighting, video security, fire, and other functions, for a single building or a whole campus.

Cellular carriers have partnered with companies like Intellastar to deliver their M2M services

Intellastar (formally SMARTCom) offers a VPN portal service that allows its customers to host their own VPN for real-time management of their cellular resources (modems and data plans). Intellastar also provides flexible plans where a typical systems integrator can roll multiple years of cellular coverage into a single payment to make budgeting for projects simpler to quote. Read more

To manage the large volume of connections in M2M deployments - every ballast in a building for a lighting control application, for !6


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example - a device connectivity platform is needed. The InferStack server performs this role, automating the initial provisioning of each connection, then fault monitoring and policy management during its working life, and eventually its decommissioning. Some big MNO’s, like Vodafone, have their own device connectivity platforms. Other providers are Jasper Wireless and Ericsson . (Ericsson provided this technology in the winning 2013 TM Forum Smart Grid Catalyst project that involved remote equipment monitoring.) Another relatively new business for telecom carriers and cable companies is home automation. You would have to be living an unplugged existence to have missed the recent advertising blitz for AT&T Digital Life, Verizon Home Monitoring and Control, and Comcast’s Xfinity Home. Just one example of how MNOs with big telecom company parents can be formidable marketing partners! Google-Nest will be going up against these brands to capture its share of the connected home market. Another notable fact: Google has also recently launched an Internet infrastructure business known as Google Fiber. In select U.S. markets like Kansas City, Missouri, and Provo, Utah, subscribers can get gigabit-broadband and TV service - and soon Nest home automation services - all from Google. By becoming a carrier, Google has improved its competitive position in the Connected Home and, more generally, the Internet of Things. As with the Connected Car, Connected Home and Smart Grid markets, mobile network operators have a valuable role to play in bringing more cloud services to the commercial buildings industry. Yet, an M2M backend network is not worth much without an Application Development Community with deep understanding of the connectivity needs of the vertical market being targeted. So 2014 should bring many partnership opportunities between MNOs and systems integration and existing Building Automation industry companies.

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No one likes to be left hanging by their carrier. Some enterprises are investing in Owned Wi-Fi networks that now operate at Gigabyte speeds.

Offering a 10X speed improvement over existing Wi-Fi by opening the 5 Ghz band, 802.11ac could upend conventional wisdom about the use of Wi-Fi in building automation applications. Owned Wi-Fi is becoming the norm in any building or campus that needs to accommodate a large and growing number of concurrent smart device users, plus M2M traffic, in a finite space like school campuses, sports complexes, healthcare facilities, military bases, shopping malls, etc. Read the full post at automatedbuildings.com.

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APRIL 4, 2014

REPORTING & ANALYSIS BY THERESE SULLIVAN

P UB /S UB C OMMUNICATIONS R ULE

!Rick Huijbregts of Cisco wrote a prophetic post in July of 2012: My Building Tweets and has Friends on Facebook. His predictions about the social-media-ization of buildings are certainly starting to come true. In “the Internet of Things for Real Estate Development" Sandy Apgar of the Urban Land Institute posted on similar trends on display at the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show. Facility managers, building system integrators, and other stakeholders in automated building operations should take note: mobile App technology is changing the industry. ‘Internet of Things’ is A good place to start grounding oneself on this new terrain is through a a misnomer. Things better understanding of notifications. Pub/Sub is a routing style designed are not actually for broadcasting out notifications one-to-many, listening for responses communicating on the back from unknown sources, and compensating for the sometimes TCP/IP-defined intermittent service of wireless networks. Francis daCosta in his book Internet; they are Rethinking the Internet of Things: A Scalable Approach to Connecting messaging each other Everything also foresees Pub/Sub as the communications model for the on mobile M2M Internet of Things. He says, "Fundamentally, traditional IP-based peer-tonetworks using light, peer relationships lock out much of the potential richness of the Internet of notification protocols. Things. There will be vast streams of data flowing, many of which are

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unknown or unplanned. Only a publish/subscribe architecture allows us to !8


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tap into this knowledge by discovering interesting data flows and relationships. And only a publish/subscribe network can scale to the tremendous size of the coming Internet of Things. So appliances, sensors, and actuators must use self-classified traffic schemes to allow for discovery and creation of information ‘neighborhoods’."

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MQTT is one lightweight Pub/Sub protocol that has strong open-source community support and that underlies popular mobile Apps like Facebook Messenger. The same underlying publisher/subscriber technology is ideal for sensor communications in buildings. In fact, the MQTT open source community is working on a specification with ultralight capabilities just for sensors — MQTT-SN, ideal for routing on familiar building wireless protocols like Zigbee.

The Direction is toward Open Standards for M2M and IoT.

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Consider the mobile App category of Friend Finders. One use-case is the scenario whereby you are walking past a pub wondering if you have any friends already inside or nearby. You click on your Friend Finder app to get an answer. You send out a notification to call a quorum. You are the publisher when you message out “I'm here.” All friends that get that message on their App-equipped phones - or PC computers (it doesn't matter; notifications are hardware-agnostic) - are the ‘subscribers.’ Any one or number of those parties may then message back.

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Then consider how home automation developers like those involved in the Eclipse SmartHome project are using Pub/Sub communications to overcome the current lack of interoperability among connected-home products: A homeowner’s fitness wrist band publishes out the encrypted message “Gone to sleep.” The subscribing alarm, lighting and HVAC systems get the message and adjust accordingly. All they need is the notification, the settings are preprogrammed. When the homeowner wakes in the middle of the night for a trip to the kitchen or water closet, a presence sensor publishes “Up and moving” and the subscribing lighting system brightens all the right lights instantaneously. Then the mobile calendar App publishes a calculated wake-up time based on appointments and travel time factoring in traffic and weather. The subscribing HVAC system uses this to determine the right moment to initiate its warm-up cycle, etc.

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In the pub/sub model, publishers control their subscriber feeds; and subscribers have the power to weed out feeds they don't want. Regarding the privacy and security of Pub/Sub feeds, work is underway on a Federated Identity Management system with open source community support. Is Federated Identity the answer to how the data flows coming from building equipment subsystems will be owned and managed in the future? This is a topic to watch.

There is no one ideal protocol for all purposes in IoT communications. But, it is clearly best to go with a protocol supported by the collective energy of an open source community, like the Eclipse Foundation. MQTT was originally developed by IBM, but in November 2011 IBM contributed all the code to the open Eclipse Paho Project. The collective energy of this open source community is advancing the robustness and security of this messaging standard, as well as others. The big names in big data want stable and widely supported open standard protocols so they can build their own IoT platform on top. Read more about the value of ‘Open’ in the April 2014 edition of automatedbuildings.com. !9

Buildingcontextmagazine  

Covering Mobile Apps, Cloud Services, Wireless Broadband and M2M Wi-Fi services for buildings automation and control

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