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Theresa Kaplan | Selected Works tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949 90 Sullivan Pl., Apt 5C, Brooklyn, NY 11225 Master of Architecture + Master of Engineering in Construction Management December 2018 | University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture + Urban Planning | College of Engineering


Theresa E. Kaplan

tekaplan@umich.edu | 90 Sullivan Pl, Apt 5C, Brooklyn, NY 11225| (510) 684-1949

Education

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

December 2018

Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning | College of Engineering M. Arch / M. Eng CEM | Dual Degree

GPA: 3.8/4.0 May 2014 GPA: 3.7/4.0

Barnard College, Columbia University, New York, NY

B.A. in Architecture | Minor in Ancient Studies

Spring 2013

Columbia in Paris, Reid Hall, Paris, France

Work Experience

Taubman College, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Built model and drew plans and diagrams for Agence Ter’s final Designer:

Research Assistant: Fabrication Lab Coordinator:

Gallery Exhibition Assistant:

Graduate Student Instructor:

presentation and exhibition in the DIA Plaza competition. Researched the history and representation of vases in canonical architectural texts for Walter B. Sanders Fellow. Led staff of fourteen lab assistants as CNC coordinator and staff of four as 3D print lab coordinator. Coordinated completion of CNC milling, water jet cutting, and 3D print models for entire Taubman College student body and faculty. Supported exhibition director in installation of architecture exhibitions at Taubman College and Liberty Annex galleries. Led a ten-student discussion section, teaching architectural history. Responsible for grading papers and exams.

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Grader: Developed rubric and graded exams and assignments for graduate

Winter 2019 Spring 2018 2015-2018

2015-2018 Spring 2017 Fall 2018

level construction cost engineering course.

Boulder Associates, Boulder, CO Architectural Intern: Prepared contract documents for oncology pharmacy tenant

Summer 2018

Valerio Dewalt Train Associates, San Francisco, CA Architectural Intern: Prepared contract documents for technology campus renovation.

Summer 2017

improvement project. Worked on schematic design for 100,000 sq ft children’s hospital renovation.

Gensler, San Jose, CA

Architectural Intern:

MADE, Brooklyn, NY Architectural Intern:

Designed custom ceiling feature for building lobby.

Created schematic workplace designs for technology clients. Produced design development presentation package for a start-up campus. Revised contract drawings to incorporate custom design elements for local corporate campus. Overhauled and cataloged material specifications and samples in a materials library and database. Created material samples, mock-ups, and renderings of custom furniture for client approval. Corresponded with manufacturers to determine project materials.

Summer 2016

Summer 2013-2014

Leadership

Barnard Committee on Arts, New York, NY Co-Chair: Coordinated university-wide art exhibitions and installations

showcasing student talent. Collaborated with college administrators and student artists to produce the first student-designed mural on campus.

Skills

Digital Skills:

Analog Skills:

Proficient in Revit, AutoCAD, Rhinoceros, Adobe Creative Suite, CNC Mastercam, ABS 3D printers, and Microsoft Suite. Experienced in art installation, model making; project scheduling, and cost estimating; conversational in French.

2013-2014


Table of Contents

01_The Cores.................................................................................4-13

02_Marbled Middle.....................................................................14-19

03_Vaulted Row House...............................................................20-25

04_Fabric Museum.....................................................................26-35

05_Fabricated Entrement...........................................................36-39

06_Flat! The Musical..................................................................40-53

07_Professional Work.................................................................54-63


The Cores Fall 2017 |Systems Studio Critics: Claudia Wigger and Craig Borum Collaborators: Melanie Stepanicich and Vanessa Flebbe Site: Detroit, MI This 40-story apartment building, located at the New Center in Detroit, offers a range of residential unit types and shared programs to bring together the diverse demographics and lifestyles of the area. Four unit types are interspersed throughout the building. These are periodically broken up by recreational programs that are open to the public. These varied housing types and programs are connected via chrome-plated vertical cores which span the height of the building and house its plumbing walls and associated programs. As these cores meet each floor, they expand, contract, and change shape to accommodate its program. The cores create unity across the floors within the building, and cast reflections of the interior outward, opening the building to the surrounding neighborhood. The use of operable perforated screens and external mesh curtains as shading devices gives residents the opportunity for privacy, while articulating the presence of individuals through a continually changing facade. The conversation between the screens and the reflective cores yields a shifting and dynamic interplay between public and private space. This is reinforced by the massing of the building which is refined at the top, but dissolves into the site, spreading out into pavilions that shape walkways between the business and transit hubs of the New Center.

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Retail Gym

Residential

Market Auditorium Daycare Bar Residential Residential Residential

01_The Cores | Detroit, MI

Central core provides lateral bracing and egress

Plumbing cores expand and contract with adjacent program

Chrome-plated plumbing cores span the height of the building

The lateral structure of the building creates a central core which contains egress, and allows the chrome-plated plumbing cores to expand and contract freely with the programs on each floor. The chrome cores visually unify the disparate floors of the building, forming 40-story tall sculptural elements which can be seen from the surrounding area. The building has 102 units (6 duplex, 44 single family, 35 communal units, and 17 communal housing) which are dispersed throughout the building. The variety of unit types accommodates a broad range of residents, from students, to multi-generational families, to senior citizens. In addition to the visual unity of the cores, the recreational programs dispersed throughout the building foster community both among residents, and with the broader community. Above: Diagrams of the cores as the building’s formal driver Right: Exterior perspective of the Cores Facing: Four types of residential unit accommodate a range of lifestyles and family types

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Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


Wigger + Borum | Fall 2017

Duplex

Single family

Communal unit

Communal housing

Taubman College | University of Michigan

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01_The Cores | Detroit, MI

A

X Y A B

X

B

Y Y X

AB

H

IOUS

S

DELICIOU

DELIC

HOT

HOT

FRESH

FRES

X Y A B

X Y A B

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X Y A B

FRES H

HOT DELIC IOUS

FRESH X Y A B

HOT DELICIOU S

X Y

A B

FRES H

HOT DELIC IOUS

Y X AB

Above: Typical plan of communal floor Facing: Wall section through duplex, single family apartment, and daycare 8

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


Wigger + Borum | Fall 2017

Double glazed glass Vapor barrier and CertaWrap weather wrap

Perforated metal screen

Kitchen integrated into plumbing core

Glass railing

Exposed 4” thick concrete floor Concrete 5’x5’ waffle slab Chromeplated core contains plumbing wall

Typical partition with 5/8” GWB and XPS

GWB ceiling Air ducts

Wood flooring 4’x8’ floor sheathing

Isokorb structural thermal break

Taubman College | University of Michigan

92


01_The Cores | Detroit, MI

S DELICIOU

HOT FRESH

X Y A B

X Y A B X Y A B

X Y A B

X Y A B

X Y A B

YB X Y A B

Y B X A

X Y A B

Level two X Y A B

X Y A B

X Y A B

X Y A B

FRESH

HOT DELICIO

X Y A B

Y B X A

X YB A

Y B X A

US

X Y A B

X Y A B

X Y A B

Level one FRESH

HOT DELICIO US

Above: Typical plans of duplex Facing: Interior perspective of duplex 10

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949

X Y A B

X Y A B


Wigger + Borum | Fall 2017

Taubman College | University of Michigan

11 2


01_The Cores | Detroit, MI Daycare plan

9 E

7 6 5

The daycare center, situated in the top third of the tower, is available to all residents of the Cores. It serves as a central meeting point for young families, fostering community within the building. The four quarters of the floor house activities to accommodate children of different ages.

C B

4

N P A M 9 10 8 67 5 4 23 1

3 2 1

10 F T

D

L

H

G

R Q

Y O S

K

I Z

J X

9 10 8 67 5 4 23 1

8

Spa plan The spa is one floor above the daycare and is an amenity shared by residents and members of the broader Detroit community. Locating the spa in the upper third of the building engages the neighborhood by inviting people beyond the retail floors at its base.

Auditorium plan

REMO

Above: Plans of shared amenities Facing: Interior perspective of daycare 12

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949

Gibraltar

EVANS

Gibraltar

REMO

REMO

The auditorium is located halfway up the Cores and provides space for informal performances and entertainment. The space is flexible to allow for structured events open to the neighborhood, or impromptu activities among the building residents.


Wigger + Borum | Fall 2017

Taubman College | University of Michigan

13


Marbled Middle Fall 2016 | Institutions Critic: John McMorrough Site: Ann Arbor, MI The design for Clague Middle School allows students to join one of four houses based on their academic interests in order to promote cross-grade community. Programmatically, the building is divided into four wings separated by axes that converge in a shared central library. The circulation is demarcated by a colonnade which is also used to create a monumental facade. The building is marbleized in pink and the colonnade is flipped vertically to create a wavy, ornamental parapet around the roof, bringing levity and humor to the grid and symmetry of the building.

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02_Marbled Middle | Ann Arbor, MI

Field of columns

Bisect along axes

Adjust quadrants

The central circulation axes of the middle school carry the lines of the surrounding streets through the building. Meanwhile, they separate the program into four wings which are unified by a central library. Four staircases cut into the library providing access to the classrooms on the second floor of the building when the library is open. Each wing is anchored by a central program associated with a house’s area of academic focus. These spaces are accessible from the first floor, and remain open to the community when school is not in session. Left: Formation diagram Below Right: Alternate use and circulation diagram Below Center: Longitudinal section Facing Lower: First floor plan Facing Upper: Second floor plan Following: Isometric view with the roof removed

Colonnade Swim lessons

Food bank

Puncture

Organize program

Basketball camp

Longitudinal section 1 16

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949

Community theater


McMorrough | Fall 2016

Level two

Level one

Taubman College | University of Michigan

2 17


02_Marbled Middle | Ann Arbor, MI

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Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


McMorrough | Fall 2016

Taubman College | University of Michigan

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Vaulted Row House Winter 2018 | High Performance Building Systems Critic: Lars Junghans Collaborators: Lindsey Karasik and Eileen Arcos Site: Detroit, MI This net-zero energy house integrates active and passive design strategies into a cohesive architecture of vaulted spaces carved from a monolithic solid. The compact form retains the dimensions of a traditional Detroit row house, while thick walls reduce air infiltration, house insulation, and accommodate carved out shelving and storage. Recessed southern-facing windows follow the profile of the carved vaults, opening the house to the street while capturing sunlight and integrating shading from the thickened walls.

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03_Vaulted Row House | Detroit, MI

Site in the Corktown neighborhood of Detroit

Level two

Active and passive design strategies were tested using C and C software and the Diva plug-in for Grasshopper. This ensured that the building’s energy demands could be met using photovoltaic panels on the roof. Above: Site of the house Right: Plans of the Vaulted Row House Below: Renewable energy strategy Facing: Window and wall section

Level one

Tesla Power Wall

Renewable energy: Photovoltaic panels

Energy storage: Tesla Power Wall 22

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949

Consumer use

Electrical grid


Junghans | Winter 2018

Wall detail: 12” precast concrete on stainless steel anchors 1.5” ventilation cavity 7” XPS thermal insulation

Triple glazing: 1/4” toughened glass 3/8” cavity 1/4” float 3/8” cavity 1/4” toughened glass

Taubman College | University of Michigan

23


03_Vaulted Row House | Detroit, MI

Water is captured on the roof and collected underneath the house. Direct cooling and a heat recovery system reduce the house’s energy demand. Warm water is used for radiant floor heating.

The air handling unit is centrally located.

Stored water is heated with a geothermal heat pump.

Above: Building systems diagram Below: C+C comparison of construction methods’ annual energy demands Facing: Interior perspective

Windows make up 10% of the building’s northern wall. 24

A mechanical heat recovery system reduces the building’s energy demand.

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949

A geothermal heat pump is the house’s primary heat source.

Triple-glazed windows provide a U-value of 0.7.


Junghans | Winter 2018

Taubman College | University of Michigan

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Fabric Museum Winter 2017 | Propositions Critic: Claudia Wigger Site: New York, New York Looking to Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s tented room at the Charlottenhof Palace as a precedent, each floor of the six-story Fabric Museum uses fabric architecturally to create an immersive exhibition space. Each space considers a different way that properties of fabric can be brought into architecture, either by treating the fabric as an architectural material itself, or by introducing the creases, folds, textures, and seams of fabric into architectural materials. In this way, the Fabric Museum creates a taxonomy of the myriad ways fabric can function architecturally.

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04_Fabric Museum | New York, NY

Pleated clay

Pleated concrete

Site at Columbus Circle, New York City Stacking a series of immersive exhibition spaces that use fabric architecturally, whether by treating it to remain solid, inflating it like a balloon, or pitching it as a tent, showcases the range of ways that fabric can create space. Furthermore, using fabric as formwork captures its texture and fluidity in traditional architectural materials. Plaster-coated fabric

Above: Axonometric of museum in site Right: Fabric wall tests Bottom Right: Sectional perspective of precedent Facing: Interior perspective of museum Tented Room at Charlottenhof Palace 28

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949

Plaster-coated mesh


Wigger | Winter 2017

Taubman College | University of Michigan

29


04_Fabric Museum |New York, NY

Level two: solid and movable curtains shape a flexible exhibition space

Above: Axonometric plans Facing: Building section 30

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949

Level one: fabric-cast concrete columns retain seams and creases from formwork


Wigger | Winter 2017

Longitudinal section Taubman College | University of Michigan

31 2


04_Fabric Museum | New York, NY

The third floor of the museum is a maze of interconnected felt pods. The acoustical properties of felt make this a quiet space for people to read or work. The scale of the pods lets them function as a series of rooms, while their softness and curvature encourages their use as furniture. Above: Interior perspective of felt pod floor Facing: Axonometric plan 32

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


Wigger | Winter 2017

Level three: felt pod reading rooms

Taubman College | University of Michigan

33


04_Fabric Museum | New York, NY

Level five: projections cast onto a fabric bubble create an immersive environment

Above + Facing: Axonometric plans 34

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949

Level four: solidified fabric and fabric-cast concrete form a wrinkled topography


Wigger | Winter 2017

Roof option two: single large tent for events

Roof option one: field of small tents for individuals Taubman College | University of Michigan

35


Fabricated Entrements Fall 2018 | Independent Project

These dessert molds were digitally fabricated using a three-axis CNC router. This made it possible to precisely execute custom designs with complex curvature. In consideration of the limits of the router, the positives of the molds were designed without undercuts or creases narrower than the minimum bit diameter. Similarly, the molds were scaled to account for the thickness and texture of common dessert components, such as cake and fruit, to ensure even spacing in section.

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05_Fabricated Entrements | Ann Arbor, MI Digitally fabricated positives were used to form silicon dessert molds. The molds were then used to cast coconut whipped cream around a swirl of marzipan and chocolate, chocolate coconut croustillante, and almond macaron. In section these components are stacked, nested, and deconstructed to form a series of possible interiors for the entrements.

Polysurface positives

Left: Dessert mold fabrication process Below: Entrement sections Facing Left: Axonometric construction diagram Facing Upper: Entrement sections Facing Lower: Molded entrements

CNC-milled positives

Foam positives

Silicon molds 38

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


Independent | Fall 2018

Macaron base

Marzipan swirl

Croustillante

Whipped cream

Mold Taubman College | University of Michigan

39


REC


Flat! The Musical Fall 2017 + Winter 2018 | Thesis Critic: Julia McMorrough Site: Toronto, ON These films and this design of a production studio look to the way movie musicals celebrate their medium by creating loose boundaries between narratives, sets, and perspectives. This interchangeability is introduced to the architecture of the production studio as a kit of flat panels that can be arranged to form the sets of movies. An initial series of films and drawings considers the ways that flat surfaces, abstraction, and framing views can be used in performance to convey and subsequently undermine ideas of architectural function or style. The final film layers sets and frames them at different scales to create a series of interiors that tell the story of a man navigating a train station that is continually shifting and reorienting itself to different orthographic projections. The ambiguity of the surfaces and spaces is amplified by a chorus of characters in costumes that mimic the abstract patterns of the sets, and set them into motion. The design of the production studio proposes a series of set configurations which take on different architectural functions and programs depending on the scale of the set piece and its proximity to others. The sets form surface patterns, low reliefs, and small storage spaces when closely packed, and pavilions, dressing rooms, and sound stages when spread apart. Thus the versatility of the sets yields versatile architecture.

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06_Flat! The Musical | Toronto, ON

1 42

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


McMorrough | Winter 2018

This pop-up book uses paper to create spatial depth through relief. Drawing from Raymond Queneau’s Exercises du Style, each spread presents the same garden folly in a different architectural style. At the end, the protagonist rips up one of the follies, acknowledging the existence of the story within the medium of the book. The next iteration of follies abstracts the architectural elements of columns and stairs from previous iterations and layers them like stage sets. In this way, the layering that was treated as a given in the pop up book format, is now a means of creating theatrical space. Above: Poster for mini musical Facing: Stills from movie Taubman College | University of Michigan

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06_Flat! The Musical | Toronto, ON

Esther Williams + Walter Gropius’ Total Theater + live action

In this drawing series, the choreography from the Bathing Beauty water ballet is introduced into Walter Gropius’ Total Theater. The drawing is broken into nine squares which show portions of the space in either plan or section. Diagrammatic arrows show the movement of the camera and swimmers throughout the space and duration of the performance.

Above + Facing: Nine-square “meet cute” of a performance, theater, and production style 44

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


McMorrough | Winter 2018

Bauhaus performances +Roman theater + claymation

Dancers from Oskar Schlemmer’s Triadic Ballet move through an abstracted Roman theater. The dancers, themselves abstracted by their costumes, are transposed from Schlemmer’s minimal sets of lines and fields of color to the orthogonal projections of the theater. In this way, the theater takes on qualities of Schlemmer’s sets.

Taubman College | University of Michigan

45


06_Flat! The Musical | Taubman College Loose Boundaries: Viewer In Bathing Beauty, the water ballet is choreographed for the film’s audience, but presented as a theatrical performance. In the left panel, the swimmers perform for a theater audience. On the right, the choreography of the water ballet is intended for a film viewer.

Loose Boundaries: Narrative In For Me and My Gal, the plot of the movie is reinforced by performances within the story. Here, Judy Garland performs a song lamenting the inevitable abandonment of her lover. Offstage, she tries to prevent her partner from leaving her for another act.

Loose Boundaries: Objects In The Gang’s All Here, fruit appears on Carmen Miranda’s costume and as stage sets. It also merges the two when the backdrop of the final scene is painted to make the costume’s hat appear to grow to impossible proportions.

Loose Boundaries: Scenography In the film set of The Bandwagon, the theater sets from Oedipus Rex run perpendicular to the backstage space, perfectly framing an impromptu dance number Right: Diagrams of loose boundaries in movie musicals Facing Upper: Collage of hybrid reliefs Facing Lower: Reliefs of hybrid urban and performance spaces Following: Film stills from Flat! The Musical 46

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


McMorrough | Winter 2018

Subway station + Swimming pool

Restroom + Film Set

Row houses + TIFF Bell Lightbox

Construction site + The Second City

Taubman College | University of Michigan

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06_Flat! The Musical | Taubman College

48

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


McMorrough | Winter 2018

Taubman College | University of Michigan

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06_Flat! The Musical | Toronto, ON

The production studio is formed from a kit of flat panels which can be configured as sets, or to accommodate architectural program. The space is open to the public, allowing people to watch productions being made, or reconfigure the space to make their own films.

Above: Interior isometric of production studio Facing: Panel arrangement at three scales Following: Interior isometric of production studio 50

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


McMorrough | Winter 2018

Small

Medium

Large Taubman College | University of Michigan

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06_Flat! The Musical | Toronto, ON

52

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


McMorrough | Winter 2018

Taubman College | University of Michigan

53


Professional Work

Gensler | Workplace Studio| 2016.................................................56-57

Valerio Dewalt Train Associates | 2017........................................58-59

Akoaki Architecture and Design| 2019........................................60-63

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Map

O

07_Development Research | San Jose, CA Amenities

DOwNTOwN SAN JOSE | INfO

ONS IN E: GROCERY STORE

MEDICAL FACILITY

Property Owners

MOVIE THEATER

DOwNTOwN SAN JOSE | DEVELOPERS, LLC, CA,ETC.

1/2 Mile

1 Mile

COFFEE SHOP

Property Owners 1 Mile

RESTAURANT

1/2 Mile

DOwNTOwN SAN JOSE | DEVELOPERS, LLC, CA,ETC. BAR

GYM

Property Owners

URE N

Distance from anticipated Downtown DOwNTOwN SAN JOSE | DEVELOPERS, LLC, CA,ETC. San Property Owners

Jose transit hub

LLC

Amenities

DOwNTOwN SAN JOSE | DEVELOPERS, LLC, CA,ETC.

24% LLC 24% 19%

fEDERAL GOVERNMENT

fEDERAL GOVERNMENT

RELIGIOUS GROUP

LLC

DEVELOPERS

UNKNOwN

24%LLC DEVELOPERS

DEVELOPERS

Owned by developers

State of California

24%

DEVELOPERS

RELIGIOUS GROUP

UNKNOwN

PROPERTY OWNERS

PR O

STATE Of CALIfORNIA

PROPERTY OWNERS STATE Of CALIfORNIA

Owned by the State of California STATE Of CALIfORNIA LLC

| 00.9935.000 | SAN JOSE INTERN PROJECT | 08.12.16 | ©2016

STATE Of CALIfORNIA

Developers

16% Major Owners

Small Business

Large Corporation

Trust Company

Corporate

Residential

Private Owners This research project took inventory of the property owners and existing businesses within a one-mile radius of the anticipated location of a Downtown San Jose BART station. It sought to determine Developers potential opportunities for local development. Owned by an LLC

56

LLC

16%

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949

| 00.9935.000 | SAN JOSE INTERN PROJECT | 08.12.16 | ©2016

S

Developers

PRO OW


Stryker Lobby | Summer 2016

This product display area showcases Stryker Endoscopy’s medical technology in the building lobby. The ceiling is sloped in two directions, and the light box above abuts a second story wall. The Revit model for this custom design required extensive detailing during design development to accurately represent the complex geometry of the ceiling and sloped profiles of the glazing.

Above: Product display for Stryker Endoscopy Facing Upper: Site analysis of Downtown San Jose, California Facing Lower: Property ownership analysis Gensler | San Jose, CA

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07_Technology Campus | Palo Alto, CA

The tenant improvement project for a technology campus in Palo Alto, California required an open workspace broken up by pods containing conference rooms, private phone booths, storage closets, and mechanical rooms. The pods were enclosed by storefront glazing, and were distinguished by their panel design and mullion finishes. To counter the loud noise of an open workspace, fabric baffles were integrated into the ceiling as a custom design element. These drawings were produced in Revit during design development in order to determine the time frame and cost of producing these custom elements. Above: Reflected ceiling plan showing fabric baffles Facing: Interior elevations of conference room pods 58

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


Technology Campus | Summer 2017

Valerio Dewalt Train Associates | San Francisco, CA

59


07_Detroit Square | Detroit, MI

1 60

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949


Competition Entry | Winter 2019

Akoaki | Ann Arbor, MI

2 61


07_Detroit Square | Detroit, MI

UP DN

Theresa Kaplan | M. Arch+M. Eng | tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949

UP

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Competition Entry | Winter 2019

This entry for the Detroit Institute of Art Plaza competition proposes a unifying landscape to integrate the institutions of the Detroit Cultural Center. Additionally, architectural interventions enliven the institutions, by opening them to the local community. The landscape is bounded by a square, demarcating the borders of the cultural center, and is unified by a path that weaves through plazas and around the institutions, expanding to take on programs like sculpture gardens, and playgrounds. Above: Data Jockey booth controls lighting and sound across Detroit Square Facing Upper: A winding path leads through the landscape to outdoor cafes Facing Lower: Architectural interventions for cultural institutions Previous: Model of proposal for Detroit Square Akoaki | Ann Arbor, MI

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Theresa Kaplan tekaplan@umich.edu | 510.684.1949 90 Sullivan Pl., Apt 5C, Brooklyn, NY 11225

Profile for Theresa Kaplan

Theresa Kaplan | Selected Works  

Theresa Kaplan | Selected Works  

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