Page 1

An exclusive publication of The Red Book and azredbook.com

FASHION FORWARD

Pushing the Valley into the spotlight

CHANGING FACES

‘Old World’ architecture yields to modern

PLUS

5 People Who Make Life Sweeter, Gifts for Him, Gifts for Her, Party Highlights, Social Calendar

and more

Arabian Tales

A love affair with the equestrian lifestyle


L U X U R Y

E X PA N S I O N

-

V I S I T

FA S H I O N S Q U A R E . C O M

BO

ST

DI OMEGA

S A LVAT O R E


DAVID YURMAN

CARTIER

M I C H A E L KO R S M E N

NEIMAN MARCUS

JOHNNY WAS

MONTBLANC

E S C A D A

M I C H A E L S TA R S

GUCCI

C A R T I E R

ST. JOHN O

N E I M A N

SPLENDID

M E G A

M A R C U S

I

L

PARIS OPTIQUE S U R

O

R

I

L A TA B

M A X M A R

CH CAROLINALEGACY HERRERA OF LUXURY BUILDING ON A

M I C H A E L KO R S

PRADA

TORY BURCH

BVLGA R I MITCHELL GOLD + BOB WILLIAM A L L S A I N T S

M I C H A E L KO R S M E N O M E G A

BURBERRY

A LVAT O R E O S S H U G O B O SS S TED

BAKER

BOTTEGA VENETA

T I F FA N Y & C O.

TUART

F E R R AG A M O

KATE SPADE

WEITZMAN

A N E VO N F U R S T E N B E R G S P L E N M I C H A E L S TA R S JOHNNY WAS FREE PEOPLE

LOUIS VUIT TON

ST. J O H N

NEIMAN MARCUS, NORDSTROM, DILLARD’S, MACY’S & MORE THAN 240 SPECIALTY STORES & RESTAURANTS

C

O

A

C

H

Located at Scottsdale & Camelback Roads | 480.941.2140 | QUESTIONS? TEXT CONCIERGE: 480.568.5568.


椀渀猀瀀椀爀攀搀 昀甀爀渀椀琀甀爀攀Ⰰ   

2 / TRBM

㄀㔀㄀㈀㔀 一⸀ 䠀愀礀搀攀渀 刀漀愀搀Ⰰ 匀琀攀 ㄀  Ⰰ 匀挀漀琀琀猀搀愀氀攀Ⰰ 䄀娀  㠀㔀㈀㘀  眀眀眀⸀吀栀椀渀最稀䌀漀渀琀攀洀瀀漀爀愀爀礀⸀挀漀洀


氀椀最栀琀椀渀最 愀渀搀 搀攀挀漀爀

㄀㌀㠀 ㈀ 一 匀挀漀琀琀猀搀愀氀攀 刀漀愀搀Ⰰ 匀琀攀 ㄀㌀㐀Ⰰ 匀挀漀琀琀猀搀愀氀攀Ⰰ 䄀娀  㠀㔀㈀㔀㐀 眀眀眀⸀䈀漀甀氀攀瘀愀爀搀唀爀戀愀渀䰀椀瘀椀渀最⸀挀漀洀

December 2017 / 3


content s December 2017

FEATURES 44 CHANGING FACES Valley architecture turns from Old World to a modern aesthetic 52 FASHIONED IN ARIZONA Local insiders push the Phoenix fashion industry forward 60 ARABIAN TALES The horse breed with a legendary history thrives in modern-day Arizona

52 60 DEPARTMENTS STYLE 8 INDULGE HER Amaze even the most discriminating woman on your gift list

16

10 IMPRESS HIM Spoil him with gifts of useful luxury 12 TOUCH OF TEXTURE Carry your life in stylish murses and purses 14 CONTEMPORARY GLAM Master the metallic mix of gold and silver

PARTIES 16 FALL FUNDRAISERS

32 PERSONALITIES 7 people who make life sweeter 66 CALENDAR Winter social events 70 CULTURE Dinosaurs, butterflies and surprises 72 AFTER-PARTY Appreciating the preserve 4 / TRBM

ON THE COVER Fashion by Antoaneta Balabanova Jewelry by Lana May Photographed by Emanuel Vaceanu at Bisch Equestrian at Los Cedros USA in Scottsdale


THE DAY-DATE 40 The international symbol of performance and success, reinterpreted with a modernized design and a new-generation mechanical movement. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

OYSTER PERPETUAL DAY-DATE 40

rolex

oyster perpetual and day-date are ÂŽ trademarks.


e d ito r ’s l et te r Peterson, along with Realtor Walt Danley, embrace the less busy style and welcome the fresh look. Nancy Erdmann traces this evolution in her story “Changing Faces,” p. 44. She also speaks with a homeowner who loves the uncluttered lifestyle her new residence with its modern vibe affords her. Fashionistas are also changing the face of the Valley as they push Arizona forward in other ways. With fashion weeks, local designers who are receiving global attention, fashion programs being added to the curriculums of higher education institutions and manufacturing resources being made available to designers, the Valley is poised to become a fashion hub. That’s good news all around. Perrine Adams puts it all together in her story “Fashioned in Arizona,” p. 52. This is the Valley’s “High Season”: holidays, fundraising galas, the BarrettJackson Collector Car Auction, the Waste Management Phoenix Open and the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show. Whatever your interest, there’s something fun to do that is unique to the Valley. In this issue, Jake Poinier focuses on the Arabian horse industry. For equine lovers – trainers, riders, breeders, owners – it’s a passion and a lifestyle. See “Arabian Tales,” p. 60. Finally: What is that image at the top of the page? you ask. It’s a hand-glazed cast bronze Head, and it’s installed along with Tanuki raccoon-dogs and Dangos amid the plantings at Desert Botanical Garden. The exhibition of colorful and whimsical sculptures by Jun Kaneko will be displayed through May 13 and is free with your admission to the garden. Enjoy! And check out the other cultural attractions on p. 70.

H

ouses. Fashion. Horses. These are a few of our favorite things, and it was fun to delve into each as we prepared this issue of The Red Book Magazine. Valley homes are changing faces. Have you noticed? We asked industry experts about the emergence of modern architecture where Tuscan villas once had been. Their theories vary on the “why,” but architects Mark Candelaria and Erik

6 / TRBM

Cindy Miller Managing Editor cmiller@azredbook.com

ARTWORK: JUN KANEKO, VELOCITY, HEAD, 2009, CAST BRONZE AND ENAMEL PAINT. PHOTO COURTESY DESERT BOTANICAL GARDEN

JUN KANEKO, VELOCITY, HEAD, 2009, CAST BRONZE AND ENAMEL PAINT


Volume 1, Issue 2

Society • Culture • Luxury PUBLISHER AND CEO, ON MEDIA PUBLICATIONS

Linda “Mac” Perlich

It’s one thing to help someone achieve success. It’s another to make it last. We help you do both.

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Mark Kochman

MANAGING EDITOR

Cindy Miller

PR AND MARKETING MANAGER

Perrine Adams

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION

David Imes

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Mary Winters WRITERS

Perrine Adams Jennifer Dokes Nancy Erdmann Karen Fernau Lee Jordan Jake Poinier PHOTOGRAPHERS

James Almanza Tina Celle Mark Lipczynski Chris Loomis Ashley Lowery Emanuel Vaceanu Ryan Walsh Katina Patriquin

SENIOR ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES

Lisa Grannis Robyn Lambert Julie Osten Deidra Viberg

NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Jody Bartel

ACCOUNTING COORDINATOR

Cindy Blaisure

Whether planning for a secure retirement, addressing the needs of succeeding generations,

Copyright 2017 by ON Media Publications. All rights reserved. No part of this publication can be reprinted or reproduced without the publisher’s permission. The Red Book Magazine assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. Statements and opinions printed in The Red Book Magazine are those of the authors and not necessarily of The Red Book Magazine.

or crafting a philanthropic strategy, we focus on your most critical challenges and opportunities by providing sound wealth management combined with intelligent investment strategies.

910 E. Osborn Road, Suite C, Phoenix, AZ 85014 Reach Us 602-445-7168 | info@azredbook.com | azredbook.com

2394 E. Camelback Rd. Suite 100 Phoenix, AZ 85016

602.635.3760 866.303.2347 versantcm.com


style

I. REISS 14-KT YELLOW GOLD CUFF BRACELET with 0.12 ct. white diamonds, $4,200, London Gold, londongold.com

ETRO REVERSIBLE FRINGE PAISLEY PRINT SCARF, $690, Neiman Marcus, neimanmarcus.com

Indulge

Her

Amaze even the most discriminating on your list Text by Perrine Adams * Photos courtesy companies

GLAZED CERAMIC CORSET VASE with gold Swarovski crystal mesh, $1,625, del Adora, deladora.com

90-MINUTE SIGNATURE WAKAI RENEWAL, $235 Mon. – Thurs.; $245 Fri. – Sun., Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain Resort & Spa, sanctuaryoncamelback.com 8 / TRBM


ROUGE LOUBOUTIN SHEER VOILE LIP COLOUR, $90, Neiman Marcus, neimanmarcus.com, and Saks Fifth Avenue, saksfifthavenue.com

18-KT YELLOW GOLD NUDE GEODE SLICE ROSECUT DIAMOND NECKLACE with Oco geode agate slice and .54 ct. white rose-cut diamonds, $2,700, Meredith Young Collection, meredithyoungjewelry.com


style

DAVID YURMAN SWISS ARMY KNIFE with Tiger’s Eye in silver, $495, David Yurman, davidyurman.com, Neiman Marcus, neimanmarcus.com, and Saks Fifth Avenue, saksfifthavenue.com

Impress Him Spoil him with useful luxury

Text by Perrine Adams * Photos courtesy companies

10 / TRBM

ULYSSE NARDIN DIVER CHRONOMETER with 18-kt. rose gold case, sapphire crystals and rubber strap, $31,700, E.D. Marshall Jewelers, edmarshalljewelers.com

ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA MW 60 PELLE TESSUTA ALUMINUM WIRELESS HEADPHONES AND STAND, $650, Neiman Marcus, neimanmarcus.com

2006 FORD GT with 650 miles, owned by Ford racing legend Bill Kolb Jr., on sale at Barrett-Jackson 47th Annual Scottsdale Auction, barrettjackson.com


CUSTOM-BUILT WINE CELLAR, starting at $20,000 for racking, refrigeration and glass, Innovative Wine Cellar Designs, winecellardesigns.biz

JONATHAN ADLER ACRYLIC CHESS SET, $795, Neiman Marcus, neimanmarcus.com, and Saks Fifth Avenue, saksfifthavenue.com

del Adora HOME

THE FINEST IN LUXURIOUS LINEN December 2017 / 11 The Shops at La Mirada • 8936 East Pinnacle Peak Road • Scottsdale, Arizona • 480.563.1579 deladora.com


style

PERRIN LE CABRIOLET GLOVE STRAP CLUTCH, $995, Intermix, intermixonline.com

Touch of

Texture

HERMÈS BORDEAUX POROSUS CROCODILE BIRKIN 35cm, $79,900, To Be Continued, tbcconsignment.com

Carry your life in stylish murses and purses

BOTTEGA VENETA NERO LEATHER BRIEFCASE, $3,150, Saks Fifth Avenue, saksfifthavenue.com

Text by Perrine Adams * Photos courtesy companies

ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA PELLE TESSUTA PORTFOLIO CASE, $1,650, Neiman Marcus, neimanmarcus.com SARAH’S BAG RIBBON GOLD FRAMED, price upon request, Stephanie’s, shopstephanies.com

12 / TRBM


Arizona’s Largest Selection of Fine Jewelry & Diamonds Authorized Agent for 15 Brands of the Finest Swiss Watches

Expert Watch Repair

Certified Gem Ruby & Emerald


style

21-LIGHT BEL MONDO CHANDELIER, $3,309.95, Hinkley’s Lighting Factory, hinkleyslighting.com

PARALLEL CONSOLE with solid American black walnut top and chrome legs, $3,070 – $4,220, Peter Thomas Designs, peterthomasdesigns.com

BANDHINI DESIGN PEARL BAND SILVER LUMBER CUSHION, $175, The Linen Tree, thelinentree.com

Contemporary

Glam

Master the metallic mix of gold and silver Text by Perrine Adams * Photos courtesy companies

SACHA LAKIC BUBBLE 4-SEAT SOFA, $9,735, Roche Bobois, roche-bobois.com

14 / TRBM

MOE’S HOME COLLECTION AMOEBA SIDE TABLE in gold aluminium, $369, Boulevard Urban Living, boulevardurbanliving.com


Scottsdale Art Auction Presents the

Leanin’ Tree Museum Collection January 19-20, 2018

Gerard Curtis delano estimate: $150,000 - 250,000

Fritz sCHolder estimate: $35,000 - 55,000

30" x 36" oil

80" x 68" oil

GeorGe Carlson estimate: $40,000 - 60,000

ed mell estimate: $25,000 - 30,000

48"H Bronze

48" x 48" oil

Auctioning over 500 Works of Important Western, Landscape & Wildlife Paintings and Sculpture, Including 28 Works from the Sculpture Garden

For more information please call (480)945-0225 or visit www.LeaninTreeMuseumAuction.com

7176 MAIN STREET • SCOTTSDALE ARIZONA 85251 • 480 945-0225 • www.scottsdaleartauction.com


party

Fall Fundraisers OCT 6 KEY TO THE CURE

Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) The 19th annual Key to the Cure at Saks Fifth Avenue in Biltmore Fashion Park showcased the fall 2017 ETRO collection, accessorized with Coomi jewelry. Proceeds benefit the ongoing research in women’s cancers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). Carole Moreno, Jacquie Dorrance and Katie Mueller served as co-chairs.

1 2 3

4

1. Kim Thomas and Char Hubble 2. Angela Zdrale, marketing manager, Saks Fifth Avenue 3. Jacquie Dorrance, Katie Mueller and Carole Moreno 4. Saks model

PHOTOS BY Haute Event Photography 16 / TRBM


THE AUTOMOTIVE EVENT OF THE YEAR

JANUARY 13-21 | WESTWORLD

PURCHASE YOUR VIP PACKAGE TODAY Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale VIP Packages can include: Tickets to the Opening Night Gala, a complimentary bidder badge (with approved application), reserved seating, VIP suite with gourmet food, premium open bar and more!

Consign. Bid. Experience. Barrett-Jackson.com


party

Fall Fundraisers OCT 13 PROJECT PINK

Arizona Assistance in Healthcare Arizona Assistance in Healthcare’s fourth annual Project Pink drew 400 guests to The Wigwam Resort. The $51,000 they raised will help the nonprofit organization reduce the financial burden cancer patients often bear during treatments. During the luncheon, Lea Haben-Woodford, honorary chair, spoke about her experience with melanoma, and contestants in the Miss Arizona USA pageant modeled fashions by Marciano and Glam Squad Couture on the runway.

1 2

3 4

5 6

1. Meredith McGuire, Arizona Assistance in Healthcare president 2. Contestant from Miss Arizona USA 3. Maryan Muhina 4. Sheri Jackson, Bridget Argana, Laura Dannerbeck and Mirav Bradsha 5. Molly Stockley, Cancer Treatment Centers of America; Donna Johnson and Beth McRae 6. Ricky Rodriguez and David Lewis PHOTOS BY Lori Krenzen 18 / TRBM


DESIGN

BUILD

I N S TA L L AT I O N

R E F R I G E RAT I O N

Imagine

the Possibilities 8340 E. Raintree Drive I Suite B-9 I Scottsdale, AZ 85260 Phone: 480.538.1288 www.winecellardesigns.biz 3001 E. Skyline Drive I Suite 109 I Tucson, AZ 85718 Phone: 520.638.7821 ROC#299785


party

Fall Fundraisers OCT 14 NITEFLITE GALA

Scottsdale Active 20-30 Club The Scottsdale Active 20-30 Club’s 28th annual NiteFlite kicked off Oct. 13 with the NiteFlite Golf Tournament at McCormick Ranch Golf Club. More than 1,500 people attended the formal gala at the W Scottsdale the following evening. The combined events raised more than $411,000 for local children’s charities, including the event’s primary charity partner, Playworks.

1. Event performer 2. Scott and Stephanie Ellsworth 3. Joe and Caroline Conner with event performers 4. Jose and Jordan Moreno 5. Skyler Irvine, event chair; Ben McRae and Chris Maderazzo

1 2 3

4 5

PHOTOS COURTESY OF Renzler Media 20 / TRBM


THE WARMTH OF CENTURIES-OLD RECLAIMED WOOD MEETS SLEEK MODERN DESIGN Peter’s attention is drawn to the clean lines of architectural forms contrasted by the organic shapes found in nature, which serve as the inspiration for his modern furniture collections. The cast bronze medallion embedded subtly into each piece of furniture is Peter’s commitment to another masterfully crafted work of art. Using both 150-year-old reclaimed wood and modern American black walnut with modern bases, the newest collections represent enduring beauty that will make its own place in your home and your heart for generations to come.

INTRODUCING OUR NEWEST COLLECTIONS

pa r a ll el

b eam

in d u strial

H A N D C R A F T E D . E L E G A N T. E N D U R I N G .

6 0 2 . 5 5 9 . 4 9 8 7 | P E T E RT H O M A S D E S I G N S . C O M

cotto n


party

Fall Fundraisers OCT 13 OFF THE VINE

Hospice of the Valley Nearly 200 guests attended Hospice of the Valley’s 16th annual Off the Vine Vintage Wine Auction at Mountain Shadows Resort. The auction featured wines, dining experiences and vineyard trips, netting more than $113,000. Funds will support care for patients and families. Raini Keyser and Liz Gerlach co-chaired the event. 2 3

4

1 1. Chef-created desserts 2. Regina Curiale and Raini Keyser, event co-chair 3. Debbie Shumway, Hospice of the Valley executive director, with Jim and Joellen Feltham 4. Bidding in the live auction 5. Daniel Johnson 6. Chef Cullen Campbell, right, of Crudo 5 6

PHOTOS COURTESY OF Hospice of the Valley 22 / TRBM


The coverage you need. The service you deserve. You’ve amassed great success by making smart decisions. It’s time to make one more. PURE and Lovitt & Touché understand the unique challenges and situations facing affluent individuals and families. Together we offer custom insurance and risk management solutions that have seen us garner a 96% retention rate. Discover the partnership that is changing the high net worth insurance market.

For more information: Laurie Haas, CAPI Vice President Private Risk Services lhaas@lovitt-touche.com | 602-778-7042


party

Fall Fundraisers OCT 14 RENDEZ-ZOO

The Phoenix Zoo More than 600 Phoenix Zoo supporters attended Rendez-Zoo. The evening featured the return of the ZooFari format. VIP guests enjoyed a seated dinner, and ZooFari partygoers sampled an array of food and beverages as they strolled the zoo. All attendees came together to dance to the sounds of Boogie Knights. Yvonne and Steve Betts chaired the evening, with Marlene and Grant Woods serving as honorary chairs. Funds benefit Phoenix Zoo’s conservation initiatives, educational programs and mission.

1. Karol Pacheco 2. AJ and Krysten Dobson, Lauren Gardner and Colleen Sweet 3. Kelly Light, Josh Peterson, Randy Josselyn and Jessie Mueller 4. Christian and Alison Lester 5. Daniel and Wendy Valenzuela

1 2 3

4 5

PHOTOS BY Tina Celle 24 / TRBM


Cancer is smart. It pushes us. We push back. Finding smarter solutions. Like precision cancer treatment. Intelligent technology that helps us find and target it. We’re not just fighting cancer.

We’re outsmarting it.

At Cancer Treatment Centers of America®, we’re forging ahead with advancements in medicine that weren’t available to cancer patients just a short time ago, including advanced genomic testing and immunotherapy. To learn more about the ways we are fighting cancer, call or visit us online.

Located in Goodyear. 888.214.9488 I cancercenter.com/outsmart © 2017 Rising Tide


party

Fall Fundraisers OCT 21 APPLAUSE! GALA

Phoenix Theatre Nearly 400 guests attended Phoenix Theatre’s 2017 Applause! Gala to honor Billie Jo and Judd Herberger, Nan Howlett, Dr. P. David Adelson, Jill and George Garcia, and Dr. Oliver Harper and Sharon Harper. The all-in-good-fun evening included the arrests of Valley philanthropists Nancy Hanley, Lynne Love and Martha Martin for being “vertically challenged.” Michelle King Robson and Deanna Clarkson Smith co-chaired the event, which raised more than $430,000.

1 2 3

1. Gala decor 2. Holly Weaver, Matt Schaefer and Elizabeth Caruana 3. Andrew West, Lennon Gergen, Audie Moberly and Slaven Subotic 4. Missi Harrington and DeeDee Vecchione 5. Phoenix Theatre board chair Jason Kush and his wife, Jennifer

4 5

PHOTOS BY Reg Madison Photography 26 / TRBM


Creative Problem Solvers. Self Advocates. Empathetic Leaders. ConďŹ dent Communicators.

Setting the stage for lifelong success.

Arts Schools Network Exemplary School 2017-2019 AZ Civic Engagement School of Excellence 2013-2017 FIRST Lego League Regional and State Robotics Challenge Champions

Engage Curiosity GOASA.ORG

#1 High School Mock Trial Team in Arizona


party

Fall Fundraisers OCT 20 EVENING OF TRENDS

Trends Charitable Fund Evening of Trends at the Arizona Biltmore was themed “An Evening in Central Park.” The event celebrated nine Trendsetters, in addition to one Fabulous Phoenician. This year’s Fabulous Phoenician was Laura Grafman, a trustee of the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust and the executive vice president of HonorHealth Foundation. More than 300 guests attended the event, raising $200,000plus for Streetlight USA, Fresh Start Women’s Foundation and Family Promise – Greater Phoenix. 2

1

5 6

3 4

1. Trendsetter Kristine Thompson, escorted by her husband Shane Thompson 2.Trendsetter Cherl Londen, escorted by her son, Alex 3. Trendsetter Billie Jo Herberger, escorted by Oscar De Las Salas 4. Trendsetter Deborah Pshebniski, escorted by her son, Ben 5. Tim and Lori Braun, Hillary Sher and Steven Schellhaas 6. Fabulous Phoenician Laura Grafman, escorted by her daugher Lynn Lancaster

PHOTOS BY Tina Celle 28 / TRBM


CANDELARIA inspiring living

www.candelariadesign.com 602-604-2001

Watch us on The Design Network December 2017 / 29

thedesignnetwork.com/series/sketch


party

Fall Fundraisers OCT 28 MOONDANCE

Heard Museum The Heard Museum raised close to $500,000 at Moondance, its annual fundraiser. The event honored Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona and N. Scott Momaday, a Pulitzer Prizewinning author. Guests decked themselves in Southwest jewelry for the occasion, where they viewed the exhibition “Of God and Mortal Men: Masterworks by T.C. Cannon from the Nancy and Richard Bloch Collection” and enjoyed dinner on the Freeport McMoRan Plaza. Carol and Randy Schilling served as honorary chairs. 2 3

1. Polka dots donned the plaza walls, inspired by Cannon’s decorative patterns 2. Jerry and Megan Greer 3. Russ Dickey, Alice J. Dickey and Erika Dickey 4. Sue Glawe, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, with the honoree award 5. The Dickey Family Director and CEO David M. Roche poses with sunglasses given to all guests inspired by artist T.C. Cannon’s habitual shade accessory 6. Miss Indian Arizona Moriah Sharpe and Ruth Bohnee

1

4

5 6

PHOTOS BY Haute Event Photography 30 / TRBM


WELCOME HOME 20 Years 4100 Aneurysm Surgeries 700 Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Surgeries 7000 Case Treatments 3 Textbooks 400 Scientific Articles 1 Homecoming

T

wenty years after completing his neurosurgical residency and fellowship, Barrow Neurological Institute welcomes Dr. Michael Lawton home as its new President and CEO. With a mission of moving Barrow from an institute of icons to an iconic institution, he will accelerate the accomplishments of each of the many talented clinicians at Barrow and weave together an iconic organization that is recognized as the world’s leading neuroscience institute. We celebrate a homecoming that will help us take the next step in our journey to provide the research and treatment that will save human lives. Welcome home Dr. Lawton. We look forward to beginning this new journey together.

SupportBarrow.org


Life is sweet

who make 7 people it even sweeter —

32 / TRBM


34

36 38

40 42

December 2017 / 33


personalities

Crème Gourmet

Eugenia Theodosopoulos is Greek, but she bakes like the French

Text by Karen Fernau * Photo by Mark Lipczynski

E

ugenia Theodosopoulos makes Phoenix taste a bit like Paris, more croissant than tortilla. As owner of Essence Bakery and Café on Indian School Road in Arcadia, she’s also more classic than trendy. Let others push the limits. This Francophile prefers a straightforward quiche and, for dessert, her signature macaroons. “I feel it’s important to stick

34 / TRBM

with craft, not change what you know best. There’s no need for me to get wild and crazy,” she says. Theodosopoulos was 26 and working in Boston’s tech industry when she moved to Paris to study pastry at L’École Lenôtre. “I started baking pies when I was a kid working seven days a week in my family’s Greek diner. I wanted back in the kitchen to bake, so I followed my heart.” In Paris, she felt at home in the hard churning, well-

disciplined kitchens. French chefs shared the values of Theo’s, a no-frills diner her grandfather opened in 1931 in Ohio. Work hard. Use only the best ingredients. Waste nothing. Teach others. At Essence, she buys from local organic farmers. Leftover melon rinds become chicken feed. And she teaches young women, many from nearby Camelback High School, to bake like a French woman. “I love to mentor

and teach, give other women a craft that lasts their lifetime. It’s my way of giving back,” says Theodosopoulos, who along with husband, Gilles Combs, plans to open a cooking school next door. When not up to her elbows in flour, she follows the advice of her 90-year-old parents and talks with customers. “Our customers want to feel a sense of community, feel like they know us. Their smiles are my reward.”


Work hard. Use only the best ingredients. Waste nothing. Teach others.

December 2017 / 35


personaliti

Turf to Surf

Mastro brothers move from beef to seafood with Ocean 44 Text by Karen Fernau * Photo by Ashley Lowery

Jeff and Mike Mastro

M

ike and Jeff Mastro grew up on well-crafted Italian food. Although they often polish off bowls of pasta, the restaurateurs built their first-class reputation on another favorite: wetaged prime beef impeccably grilled. “Yes, we really like beef, and when deciding on what kind of restaurants to own, we went classic steakhouse that never goes out of style,” says Mike, whose father, Dennis Mastro, started the family steakhouse holdings in the 1970s with

36 / TRBM

a What’s Your Beef. In late 2018, the owners of Steak 44 in Phoenix and Dominick’s Steakhouse in Scottsdale will shift from turf to surf.

“They understand the luxury customer, the high-end diner, better than anyone else” With their father, Dennis, and partner, Scott Troilo, the Mastros are opening Ocean 44, a seafood

restaurant, on the former site of Harkins Camelview. The brothers, graduates of Brophy College Preparatory, expect their latest venture to be as successful as their others, including Steak 48 in Chicago and Houston. The name pays homage to Arizona as the 48th state. By late fall, they were busy finalizing the menu at the dinner-only eatery. “We have so many ideas. Our challenge is whittling them down,” says younger brother Jeff. The contemporary-styled Ocean 44 with floor-toceiling windows, a high-

energy bar and intimate dining will include freshcaught fish, a raw bar and, of course, steaks. Ocean 44’s opening coincides with the renovation of the west end of Scottsdale Fashion Square into a luxury wing. Mall executive Kim Choukalas says Fashion Square sought out the Mastros to complement the makeover. “They understand the luxury customer, the highend diner, better than anyone else,” she says. “We have no doubt Ocean 44 will be special.”


Buffalo Collection A STATE OF MIND & A WAY OF LIFE

A M E R IC A N BU F FA LO L E AT H E R F U R N I T U R E Experience the ultimate in luxury, comfort & design with furniture from Buffalo Collection. Our furniture is hand-made in America using the finest materials & methods of old world craftsmanship. Let us enrich your lifestyle by creating timeless custom furnishings of the highest quality for your home.

Specializing in Custom Orders

F U R N I T U R E • A R T • A C C E S S O R I E S • TA B L E S • L I G H T I N G • H A N D B A G S 7 0 4 4 E . 5 TH AV E N U E , S C O T T S D A L E , A Z

4 8 0.9 4 6. 39 03

WORLDWIDE SHIPPING • MADE IN THE USA

BuffaloCollection.com


Yard Maestro 38 / TRBM


personalities

Jeff Berghoff taps into education and experience to create beautiful Valley gardens Text by Lee Jordan * Photo by Ashley Lowery

A

s trends in home design change, so do trends in landscape design. “Today’s look is all about letting the light in, keeping homes open. The same thing carries to the outside. We’ve reset the bar on how gardens can be,” says Jeff Berghoff, owner of Berghoff Design, a 20-year Valley landscape design firm. If you don’t count his lawn-mowing business as a kid, Berghoff started his company out of his home after graduating from ASU with a bachelor’s degree in architecture. For a time, he had worked on golf course projects, resorts and big communities with other firms, but he wanted to work where his heart was: collaborating directly with the client. It wasn’t long before

he received his first large landscape commission for a home in Arcadia. He was off and running, growing Berghoff Design into a multimillion-dollar operation. Today, 20 years later, he has 300 employees, and the company is housed in what was formerly a

“We’ve reset the bar on how gardens can be” car dealership along McDowell Road in Scottsdale. To function as efficiently as he wants, he utilizes every inch of the large space. He stocks his own maintenance parts for sprinkling systems and services his 30 trucks on-site. He receives his plants (custom ordered for each client) directly

from California twice weekly, and sources pots and other design elements from around the world, storing them at his location until the project is ready for installation. Berghoff even has his own ice machines to keep each truck supplied with ice water for the day’s work. When the ice melts, it is used to water the plants. “I want us to have everything ready when clients need something,” he says. “I don’t want my employees to have to waste time looking for parts or going to buy ice.” While Berghoff’s clients appreciate his efficiency, they hire him for his knowledge and creativity. With his architecture degree and experience in both home and landscape design, Berghoff represents

a combination of education and experience. “What it comes down to,” he says, “is executing, driving the project from sketch to completion.” Berghoff’s clients have high expectations. The homes for which he designs gardens are large and often come with outdoor spaces to match. His outdoor designs relate to the architecture of the home. For example, if a home has stone details, he will incorporate that feature into the garden. Today, myriad materials are considered. “In the past, no one would have thought of using pea gravel,” Berghoff says. “But it creates a very al fresco feel, a wonderful Europeaninspired look. It’s fun to bring in materials people don’t expect.” December 2017 / 39


personalities

Open Season on Giving Tournament chair Carlos Sugich hopes to hit a long drive for charity Text by Karen Fernau * Photo by Mark Lipczynski

S

hortly after moving here 16 years ago, attorney Carlos Sugich spent a glorious day at the Phoenix Open. “I bought a general admission ticket, and it was amazing,” he says of the PGA tournament known for its rollicking 16th hole. Today, as tournament chairman of the Waste Management Phoenix Open, Sugich is dedicated to insuring the 650,000-plus fans at the 2018 Open experience the same. Or even better.

“We stand as much for giving as golf” It’s an ambition he shares with 54 other active Thunderbirds, an organization that has run the “Greatest Show on Grass” since 1939. To reach their goal, the Thunderbirds have added 700 40 / TRBM

new bleacher seats on the 17th hole and 50 on the 18th at TPC Scottsdale. They’ve built a second level of corporate sky boxes on the 17th, doubling the total to 60. Additional perks: expanded menus and seating at Cove 17 and El Rancho. “We are pushing the envelope to make it more appealing,” Sugich says. “We’re building future golfers and fans.” Sugich, a partner in Snell & Wilmer’s real estate and commercial finance group, expects to log 1,500 hours on the Open. And, like all Thunderbirds, he’s working for more than just golf. He’s helping the less fortunate. Last year, Thunderbirds Charities donated a record $10 million from the Open to Arizona nonprofit organizations, bringing their total giving to $122 million. “This is our way of giving back to the community, to those less fortunate,” says Sugich, who again will proudly wear the group’s signature blue velvet tunic and silver concho belt at the Open from Jan. 29 to Feb. 4. “We stand as much for giving as golf.”


PA R K C I T Y

MOUNTAIN LIVING Re-Imagined NOTHING COMPARES WITH PROMONTORY

12 SIGNATURE AMENITIES • 30 MINUTES FROM SALT LAKE CITY • 6,400 ACRES

435-333-CLUB • P R O M O N T O R Y C L U B . C O M Obtain the property report, required by federal or state law, and read it before signing anything. No federal or state agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. Plans subject to change without notice. © 2017 Promontory Development, LLC. Each individual office is Independently Owned and Operated.

December 2017 / 41


personalities

Third Space

Susan and Jake Potje create magic in tricked-out tents where artists’ studios meet gallery Text by Jennifer Dokes * Photo by Tina Celle

T

I magination blooms when an artist’s brush lands in a visitor’s hand

42 / TRBM

he late Tom Morrow, founder of Celebration of Fine Art, once said the key to the Scottsdale tradition’s success was finding its mojo early on. Today, his daughter Susan Morrow Potje, and her husband, Jake, work to ensure the celebration and magic continue. “We never rest on the laurels,” Susan says. “It’s always, ‘OK, how can we do better?’ And that’s never based on how can we be better than someone else. It’s ‘how can we be better at serving our visitors and artists?’ ” For art lovers, seeing the iconic white tents of Celebration of Fine Art go up in December sets a seasonal clock. They know what’s coming, except they really don’t know what’s coming. And that’s why they come. Tradition maintains a setup of a unique, welcoming “third space,” where artists’ studios meet gallery in 40,000 square feet of tricked-out tents. What happens inside the tents, among and between artists and visitors, is what makes no Celebration of Fine Art the same. “Artists feed off the visitors as much as visitors are inspired by artists,” Susan says. Magical moments occur when a collector’s input inspires an artistic touch; imagination blooms when an artist’s brush or a piece of clay lands in a visitor’s hand, she says. By design of Morrow and his wife, Ann, the celebration defies sameness by putting juried artists and passionate art lovers in close, cozy contact with each other during the creativity process. The 28th annual Celebration of Fine Art is Jan. 13 through March 25 at the southwest corner of Hayden Road and Loop 101. It will feature 98 artists who commit to working every day on-site. The Potjes have been part of the celebration from Day 1. They embrace evolution as essential to preserving tradition and mojo. They make changes so the celebration stays the same – different every day.


dignityhealth.org/arizona

Physicians Nurses Hospitals


Changing 44 / TRBM

Faces

Valley architecture moves from an Old World to a modern aesthetic Text by Nancy Erdmann


D

esign styles come and go, but some are more enduring than others. This was particularly evident over the past 25 years in Phoenix’s fast-growing metropolitan areas. In the late ’80s and early ’90s, Southwest/Santa Fe-style architecture was everywhere, and transplants from other regions of the country couldn’t get enough of it. These neutral-hued homes, with their low profiles,

PHOTO COURTESY MARK CANDELARIA DESIGN ASSOCIATES

An open living space in the Village at Mountain Shadows community

small windows and dark interiors, suited the desert climate, and were often characterized by red-tiled roofs, terra-cotta flooring, brightly painted cabinetry and latilla-covered patios. Near the end of the ’90s, when homeowners were ready for something new, the Old World/ Tuscan aesthetic began showing up in some of Scottsdale’s newer mountain communities and clubhouses. “I remember clients bringing in books featuring homes from Provence and Tuscany,” says architect Mark Candelaria, who has been designing Valley residences for more than 36 years. “Everyone was tired of the Santa Fe and Southwest styles, and they wanted something fresh.” December 2017 / 45


PHOTO COURTESY MARK CANDELARIA DESIGN ASSOCIATES

The outdoors blends with the indoors in this master bedroom in the Village at Mountain Shadows

OLD WORLD IN THE NEW WORLD The design of Desert Mountain’s newly built Italian-themed community clubhouse in north Scottsdale helped start things rolling, as did the inception of nearby Silverleaf, “an entire village of Italian-inspired homes,” notes longtime Valley architect Erik Peterson. “The whole Mediterranean/Spanish Colonial look became the new hot thing.” Soon, the architects of these projects, such as Don Ziebell, as well as other influential architects like George Christensen, were sought after by their influential clientele throughout the Valley, to help them recreate the look of a Tuscan villa. The elements of European ambience and charm seen in these residences, which were generally large, dark and heavy, took off, and eventually could be found just about everywhere. “A lot of people from the Midwest like that more traditional look because it gives 46 / TRBM

them a sense of comfort,” Peterson notes. While all styles have their own lifespan, when the Great Recession hit in 2007, there was a dramatic shift away from the Old World dynamic that coincided with the market downturn, says Realtor Walt Danley, who has been selling luxury homes in the Valley since 1977. Homeowners wanted smaller houses, less upkeep and simpler lives. Dark colors, heavy textures and massive stone fireplaces began disappearing, and lighter, more open floor plans were being developed. “The Old World/Tuscan look coincided with the boom/ bust of the last decade, so I think the shift to the light and bright look that is popular today could be seen as a metaphor for us shaking off the heavy and dark feeling the recession created,” Danley observes. Thus began the transition into the contemporary movement that continues to this day.


PHOTO COURTESY PHX ARCHITECTURE

Rendering of Ritz-Carlton Residences in Paradise Valley

“The kind of contemporary, or transitional, look we’re seeing today is not so stylespecific”

OPEN AND SIMPLE specific,” he continues, noting Peterson believes that stores like that designers are still using Restoration Hardware played a traditional materials, but in ways role in influencing clients who were that are not so over-the-top. drawn to luxury home furnishings “When a house has simple bones, collections that parlay a mostly homeowners can still bring their gray and white color scheme into own personality into it and create elegant finishes, updated classics their own style. A contemporary and minimalist looks. Today’s look can still incorporate antiques contemporary homes tend to have or traditional pieces.” Erik Peterson more appropriately sized spaces, For Daryl and Chip Weil, who President, PHX Architecture and are more open and less formal. recently moved into the newly They feature fewer columns and long hallways. built Village at Mountain Shadows community Floors are lighter, beams are more refined and in Paradise Valley, downsizing was their main cabinetry is often painted rather than stained. reason for relocating from the Biltmore area. “I “It’s a less busy style with lots of natural light was intrigued by the setup,” Daryl Weil admits. and a sense of the indoors and outdoors coming The pair transitioned from a traditional onetogether,” remarks Peterson. story slump-block adobe to a two-story modern “The kind of contemporary, or transitional, residence with a Frank Lloyd Wright ambience. look we’re seeing today is not so style“Our new home is soft modern with some December 2017 / 47


celebration of fine art 2018

Open Daily 10am-6pm | Jan. 13-Mar. 25, 2018 Loop 101 & Hayden rd, Scottsdale, Az 480.443.7695 Tickets Available At

celebrateart.com

For 28 years, the Celebration of Fine Art has been the place where art lovers and artists connect. Meet 100 of the finest artists in the country, watch them work and share in the creative process. 48 / TRBM

Where Art Lovers & Artists Connect

Craig Pursley, The Blue Kimono


PHOTO: MARK LIPCZYNSKI

Daryl and Chip Weil on the carefree patio of their new home in the Village at Mountain Shadows

“What we like best is that there is less of everything. There’s a clean, uncluttered, calming feeling”

traditional touches. The space is very open, very urban, very studioesque.” While she says this is a new lifestyle for them with much smaller spaces than they were used to, the couple enjoy beautiful views, a smaller footprint and less maintenance. “There is no huge yard to maintain, no grass to mow, no pool to care for and no second garage. What we like best is that there is less of everything. There’s a clean, uncluttered, calming Daryl Weil feeling.” homeowner Candelaria, whose firm Candelaria Design Associates designed the Village at Mountain Shadows on the original site of the old Marriott Mountain Shadows hotel, says the 40-parcel community features one- and two-story contemporary-style patio homes that embrace the indoor/outdoor feel. With multi-slide or pocketing door and window systems, and Camelback Mountain as

a backdrop, homeowners are embracing the simplicity of the community’s design. “We are still doing plenty of the Old World and European styles in our other work,” says Candelaria. “Only now they are with a contemporary or transitional twist to them.” Another resort-like community in the works with a modern aesthetic is the Ritz-Carlton Residences in Paradise Valley, along Scottsdale Road at Lincoln Drive. Designed by Peterson’s company, PHX Architecture, the project began about 10 years ago but was put on hold by the recession. Originally conceived to be more like the iconic Royal Palms Resort and Spa a few miles away, with its more traditional, Mediterranean feel, the project’s concept changed when it was recently resurrected. “A fresh design was born with a very clean, more contemporary feel,” says Peterson. December 2017 / 49


PHOTO COURTESY MARK CANDELARIA DESIGN ASSOCIATES

Simple, clean lines become a focal point in this master bath in the Village at Mountain Shadows

The architecture features floor-to-ceiling windows, seamless transitions to indoor and outdoor spaces, and a lush desert setting. Peterson says he is currently seeing a resurgence in home renovations, including those at the 17-yearold Silverleaf. “The homeowners have adopted a more modern Mediterranean vernacular,” he notes. “Now many of these houses are getting facelifts and are being lightened and brightened.” The architect is also finding more regionalism appearing in residential designs, with an increase in natural stone, local materials, deep overhangs and materials that work best in the desert environment. Technology, too, has made an impact. Many of the electronics of yesterday (such as TVs, stereo speakers and kitchen appliances) are being hidden from view, helping to declutter the home. “Smart technology, whether in an Old World home or a contemporary residence, is not in your face, but incorporated in a sexy, subtle way,” remarks Candelaria. 50 / TRBM

Landscapes, as well, continue to evolve, with homeowners adapting to a more respectful use of water. “I think people want less of a footprint, but the footprint they do want is first class,” Candelaria says. Danley adds that families still want big yards for the kids, but move-down buyers and empty nesters are gravitating more toward xeriscaping and low-maintenance grounds. “Synthetic turf has made great strides in recent years, and we’re seeing more and more of it.” For homeowners like Daryl and Chip Weil, who now have less “stuff” to deal with, the contemporary lifestyle affords them more time to appreciate their surroundings. “We have a lovely backyard with artificial grass. It is actually our second living room,” Daryl Weil says. “With our great weather, mountain vistas, comfortable outdoor furnishings and frequent wildlife sightings, life is good. It all feels so happy and welcoming.”


Yas Couture at Phoenix Fashion Week 2017

FASHIONED Is Phoenix on its way to becoming a fashion hub?

52 / TRBM


F

Text by Perrine Adams

rom its blooming independent and designer boutiques to luxurious department stores, the Valley is a fashion shoppers’ mecca. But over the past 10 years, industry insiders have been trying to push local fashion beyond retail.

PHOTO BY JAMES ALMANZA PHOTOGRAPHY

in ARIZONA

December 2017 / 53


RUNWAY CRED Evidence of this trend can be seen in runway shows, especially at fashion weeks. These industry events bring together fashion brands, buyers and media. Phoenix and Scottsdale both have major shows that annually provide glitz and glam to the Valley. Created in 2008, Phoenix Fashion Week features quality regional, national and international designers. Each evening presents a curated selection of five emerging designers and four established ones. This past October, designers to the stars Yas Couture and Rocky Gathercole showed their latest collections. Numerous Hollywood celebrities, including Carrie Underwood, Gwen Stefani and Jennifer Lopez, have worn their Galina Mihaleva spectacular gowns on the red Galina Couture carpet. Through educational emerging-designer and model boot camps, year-round events and charitable partnerships, Phoenix Fashion Week has gained rapid acclaim for its efforts to support the business of fashion. “Phoenix Fashion Week is built on three pillars: fashion, education and community. We are pushing Arizona fashion forward by being the launch pad for designers looking to successfully scale their brands for long-term business success,” says Brian Hill, Phoenix Fashion Week executive director. Up-andcoming designers value the opportunity to show at Phoenix Fashion Week. Scottsdale Fashion Week is mostly consumer based, bringing in the latest collections from leading national and international designers each spring. After years dormant, Scottsdale Fashion Week returned in 2016. Steve Levine Entertainment teamed up with J Group Media and Ford/Robert Black Agency to resurrect the annual event. Their goal is to help expand Arizona’s fashion industry beyond retail by combining runway shows, innovative showcases and celebrity engagement. Iconic British fashion

“I concentrate on the customer’s needs and desire, mixing traditional and innovative techniques. I create unique outfits that perfectly fit the body and its movements.”

54 / TRBM

designer Zandra Rhodes not only opened the event last spring but also served as keynote speaker at the Scottsdale Fashion Week brunch. “Scottsdale Fashion Week brings top-tier fashion designers, makeup artists and beauty professionals to the Valley,” says Steve Levine, chief entertainment officer at Steve Levine Entertainment. “We are providing Arizona residents with the opportunity to experience, and interact with, the best in high fashion right in their backyard.”

TOMORROW’S TALENT With growing and evolving fashion weeks and a thriving retail business environment, the foundation has been laid for the Phoenix area to become a fashion hub in the near future. The passion for fashion has deep-rooted origins in the Valley. Arizona Costume Institute was founded in 1966 to support Phoenix Art Museum’s fashion design department in the acquisition and preservation of garments and accessories of historical and aesthetic significance. ACI also promotes appreciation of fashion design through programs and support of the museum’s exhibitions. This appreciation foreseeably could spark career aspiration. And that starts with education. Today, the Art Institute of Phoenix, Phoenix College, Mesa Community College and now Arizona State University offer fashion programs. In addition to her position as The Jacquie Dorrance Curator of Fashion Design at Phoenix Art Museum, Dennita Sewell also leads the new fashion degree program in the School of Art at ASU’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. The first-of-its-kind degree program for ASU offers a fashion focus on topics ranging from textiles to wearable technology to merchandising. At Phoenix Art Museum, Sewell currently oversees one of the premier collections of fashion in the country with more than 7,000 pieces dating from the 18th century to the present. The museum’s collection will be utilized for classes in the ASU fashion program. The museum’s active program of lectures by fashion industry professionals will also be available for students. Sewell sees the ASU program as an opportunity to keep fashion talent in the state. “The ultimate goal is to help students find their place in the fashion industry,” Sewell says. “We are


PHOTO BY CHRIS LOOMIS

Galina Couture Sense interactive smart dress, handcrafted with sustainable polyester produced from plastic bottles

December 2017 / 55


Society • Culture • Luxury

To be added to our mailing list or for information on advertising, visit azredbook.com, call 602-445-7168 or email info@azredbook.com.

Published By ON Media Publications


PHOTO BY RYAN WALSH

THE BUSINESS OF FASHION

Technical designer Tabitha Holmes with EVIT student Nicole Begay at F.A.B.R.I.C.

excited that students will be able to remain in Phoenix to pursue their interest in fashion across a diverse spectrum of the industry. Our goal is to elevate the possibilities for fashion locally through ASU’s high standards for achievement and research.”

TECH COUTURE Parallel to this recent appetite to study fashion design, a handful of designers call the Copper State home. Arizona’s unique aesthetic inspires jewelers and couturiers. Galina Mihaleva of Galina Couture couples unconventional fabrics with traditional tailoring. A graduate from the National Academy of Art in Sofia, Bulgaria, she has been creating custom-designed dresses in her boutique in Old Town Scottsdale since 2007. The philosophy of Galina Couture is to focus on slow fashion, a bespoke garment for each customer. “I concentrate on the customer’s needs and desire, mixing traditional and innovative techniques,” says Mihaleva. “I create unique outfits that perfectly fit the body and its movements.” Local connoisseurs, including Billie Jo Herberger, Vicki Vaughn and Jordan Rose, acknowledge her talent by wearing Galina Couture gowns at galas and balls.

While Mihaleva uses traditional and artistic apparel techniques to perfection, the future offers a great source of inspiration for her designs as well. In 2011, the designer enhanced her knowledge in smart and innovative textiles by returning to the National Academy of Art in Sofia to pursue a doctoral thesis. Today, her designs reflect her ongoing experimentation of versatile shape-shifting techniques on different materials and fabrics. Advances in technology allow the inclusion of the use of thermoplastics with origami and heat-setting Japanese Shibori techniques, hand-painted DuPont Tyvek fabric, 3D-printed textiles and felt laser cutting. In addition to the materials exploration, Mihaleva’s wearable technology pieces are embedded with sensors that interact with the wearer or the environment, reflecting on global or personal issues and emotions. Mihaleva’s work has been shown at Paris Fashion Week, Festival de Cannes and Look Forward Fashion Tech Festival in France, as well as in Belgium, Brazil, Singapore, Japan and at Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art in Scottsdale. The avant-garde designer has been serving as professor at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore for five years, teaching fashion art and technology.

FASHION IS ONE of the past decade’s true economic success stories. Over that period, the industry has grown at 5.5 percent annually, according to the McKinsey Global Fashion Index, to now be worth an estimated $2.4 trillion. Fashion might be a trillion-dollar growth industry but it remains an industry that exerts minimal economic impact on Arizona and most other states. By far the two largest fashion hubs in the United States are New York City and Los Angeles. Those two centers account for a vast majority of fashion designers, prestigious design schools and apparel manufacturing. Several other cities have recently emerged as secondary fashion hubs such as San Francisco, Dallas and Miami.

December 2017 / 57


PHOTO BY KATINA PATRIQUIN

SJ Couture off-theshoulder Belle wedding gown, handmade with silk satin and silk charmeuse

58 / TRBM


This past August, she joined ASU’s faculty where she is now sharing her knowledge in clothing construction, wearable technologies and sustainability in the new fashion program.

MANUFACTURING INCUBATOR Domestic apparel manufacturing jobs have decreased considerably in the past few decades. Most of those positions have moved overseas, to China, Vietnam, Bangladesh and Indonesia. Mainly couture pieces are still assembled in the United States. While Phoenix, its fashion weeks and school programs are an excellent starting point and platform, most fashion professionals have had to move to more established cities to get high-level experience. Designers need more than shows to remain in Arizona; they need the ability to manufacture their products locally, and graduates of local design programs need to find jobs. The Valley might not have the same creative groundwork as New York or Los Angeles, but in Tempe, it is finally getting the support infrastructure it was lacking. In 2003, clothing designer Angela Johnson created LabelHorde, offering a directory for the local fashion industry as well as design classes and development services. For years, Johnson has cultivated the idea to create an emerging designer incubator that would foster Phoenix-based talent. She wanted to connect designers to manufacturing resources and emphasize local production, creativity and quality. Johnson always sensed a strong desire among local fashion designers to make clothing here. In 2016, the City of Tempe loaned a building to LabelHorde, AZ Fashion Source and Arizona Apparel Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to fostering the Arizona fashion industry. Founded by Sherri Barry, AZ Fashion Source is the manufacturing arm of LabelHorde that offers a no-minimum

production as well as event space, design offices and photo studio rentals. The city’s gesture was part of an economic development initiative to generate growth of the local fashion manufacturing industry. This renovated fashion incubator, formerly the Tempe Performing Arts Center, is now called F.A.B.R.I.C.: Fashion and Business Resource and Innovation Center. In addition to LabelHorde, AZ Fashion Source and Arizona Apparel Foundation, nearly 20 additional fashion related businesses are located in the 23,000-square-foot building. The combined skills will support local visionaries and entrepreneurs by taking fashion from beginning to end, including everything from business consulting to design services and apparel manufacturing. With this resource, the Valley is now part of the current reshoring initiative whose mission is to bring good, well-paying manufacturing jobs back to the United States. If more resident designers conceive and produce locally, the Valley has a real opportunity to make its mark on the fashion map. One company, Scottsdale-based SJ Couture, creates original, vintage inspired wedding gowns. SJ Couture previously manufactured Jeanne Hankerson exclusively in New York SJ Couture City. Founder and designer Jeanne Hankerson is, however, reconsidering her manufacturing strategy. Great detail goes into the fashioning of an SJ Couture bridal gown, from the finest European fabric choices to garment construction and flawless production. “I have started producing a few pieces at F.A.B.R.I.C. in Tempe. It makes quality control easier. I would hope to eventually bring more of my production to Arizona as it grows,” Hankerson says. The confluence of industry, creativity and audience is crucial for any fashion scene to succeed. These three elements exist in the Valley today. Becoming a fashion hub requires more than glitter and sequins. The other requisite elements – talent, hard work and patience – are also here. In abundance.

“I have started producing a few pieces at F.A.B.R.I.C. in Tempe. I would hope to eventually bring more of my production to Arizona as it grows.”

December 2017 / 59


Bisch Equestrian at Los Cedros USA

Arabian Tales The horse breed with a legendary history thrives in modern-day Arizona Text by Jake Poinier

60 / TRBM


PHOTO BY EMANUEL VACEANU

T

he Arabian horse story began thousands of years ago in the

Middle East, in environment even hotter and more humid than our own Sonoran Desert. Between natural selection in the harsh conditions and controlled breeding by the nomadic Bedouin, Arabian horses evolved to have large nostrils, wide-set eyes and long, arching necks that helped them survive in the challenging sand and rock terrain. Whether used in battle or for work and travel, they also developed the traits that make them so popular with horse enthusiasts today: intelligence, trainability, speed, stamina and a desire to connect with their owners. “What makes Arabians different is they lived in the tents of Bedouins and were treated like a member of the family,” says Eileen Verdieck, head of marketing for Bisch Equestrian at Los Cedros USA in Scottsdale. “The result is that they have an affinity for people that other horses don’t have. Walk into a stall and they’ll come up and visit you. They’re curious, bright and spirited, and good horses for children or adults.” December 2017 / 61


PHOTO BY OSTEEN-SHATZBERG PHOTOGRAPHY

Bailey Mirmelli competes on the junior circuit

Combining athleticism and intelligence, Arabians are the jack-of-all-trades in the equine world. “Arabians can be cutting horses, working Western, Western pleasure or English show, where they’re judged for motion and beauty,” says Dede Bisch of Bisch Equestrian at Los Cedros. “There are Arabians that jump, do dressage or race. Endurance is their thing, since no other breed can really compete at 100 miles in a day.” It’s no secret that equestrian sports aren’t inexpensive, but an Arabian can be purchased for as little as $1,500 or so. The prices can escalate quickly from there, of course. The 2017 Marquise Auction at the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show, for example, had an average price of $242,846, and top-end breeding horses may command a market value as high as $15 million. “They’re like living art,” says Bisch. THE LIFE OF LUXURY While Arabians may no longer

command a spot in human living quarters, life on a farm in Arizona is quite a bit cushier than their ancestors experienced – and many owners and breeders have bought second or third ranches in Arizona in order to keep their horses here for part or all of the year. The Los Cedros facility, for example, was designed and built by Chilean businessman Miguel Sfeir in 2000 for the ultimate in horse comfort. Constructed like a citadel around a main courtyard, Los Cedros includes 99 stalls with outside views for the horses, multiple arenas for events and lessons, training and breeding facilities, and a 9-foot-deep circular pool for the horses to take a swim. Although more for human enjoyment than for the horses, custom doors, sconces, intricate domed ceilings, stained glass and decorative saddles throughout the complex and offices were imported from Morocco. Some of the biggest advances in the industry have occurred

11TH ANNUAL ARABHORSE FARM TOUR FOR THE 11TH YEAR, New Year’s weekend, Dec. 29, 2017, to Jan. 1, 2018, offers a rare opportunity to experience the beauty, history and lifestyle of the Arabian horse industry up close. Founded by David Cains and Scott Bailey, the ArabHorse Farm Tour attracts people from around the country to the Valley. Ten farms throughout north Scottsdale will open their properties to the public to showcase world-renowned Arabian horses. Guests will see the elegant animals in the 62 / TRBM

ring and also enjoy their friendly, gentle nature up close. Each farm is scheduled for a specific time during the four days, and guests may visit one farm or multiple farms. Each participating farm offers festivities and educational opportunities. While the event is free, guests will have an opportunity to help support Healing Hearts Animal Rescue and Phoenix Children’s Hospital. For more information and a schedule, visit arabhorsefarmtours.com.


SHOW TIME! One of the best places in the world to see Arabians in action is in our own backyard at the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show, which will celebrate its 63rd annual event at WestWorld of Scottsdale on Feb. 15 – 25, 2018. From its modest beginnings with 50 horses in 1955 – on the grounds of the Arizona

PHOTO BY EMANUEL VACEANU

in nutrition and veterinary care. “Our horses here have dentists, massage therapists, acupuncturists and farriers for each kind of work they do. They even get chiropractic adjustments,” says Bisch. “Traditionally, we used largeanimal vets, but now they specialize in surgery, reproduction and even ophthalmology.” To keep up with worldwide demand while maintaining Arabians’ best characteristics, breeding is another aspect that has continued to advance. “As a breeder, I look at many of the same things as when I judge,” says Janice McCrea Wight, who keeps four to six brood mares as well as a stallion, Rahere. “A good foundation is very important, so I’m into good legs and feet and correct skeletal structure – that’s what makes the horse. Form to function is very important to me.” Most breeding is done by artificial insemination rather than live coverage, and semen is often frozen for storage or to be sent to another state or country. “They’re still marketing stallions that have been dead for 40 or 50 years,” says Verdieck. “The benefit is you get to use hindsight, which allows you to figure out the best ways to use the bloodlines.”

December 2017 / 63


Lee Courtney with her 11-year-old horse Ssequin

“There’s nothing like being out in the desert, the open air and cool crispness of fall mornings” Arabian owner Lee Courtney

Biltmore – the show draws a global audience and has grown to more than 2,400 horses, 300,000 spectators and more than $2.5 million in prize money. Famous attendees have included Steve Young, Patrick Swayze, Al Jardine, Tanya Tucker, Mike Nichols, Wayne Newton, Armand Assante, Madonna, Shakira, Bo Derrick and Charlie Watts, to name a few. In addition to showing off the skills and beauty of about 1,000 classes of horses, popular additions to last year’s show will return, including pony rides, camel rides and a petting zoo. As always, people can participate in the meet-a-horse program, sitting on an Arabian and getting a free photo taken while wearing native attire. The behind-the64 / TRBM

scenes barn tour gives attendees an opportunity to meet competitors and their horses. “For 63 years, the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show has brought the most amazing horses and people from around the world to Scottsdale,” says Taryl O’Shea, executive director. “Each year, we try to build upon what has worked in order to make it a fun family event. Scottsdale is a destination that people want to come to, with nice resorts, great restaurants and the best shopping. It fits nicely with what the Arabian horse people want – a unique experience where they can be a part of something special. In addition, over the history of this event, we’ve helped Scottsdale weather some tough economic times.”

THE ARABIAN LIFESTYLE With numerous Arabian farms and events, pleasant weather for much of the year and endless miles of trails to explore, many consider the Valley the center of the Arabian horse universe. The Arabian is a breed that also takes owners, competitors and judges to competitions across the United States and even around the world. “I remember the first time getting on an Arabian, when I was 10,” says Bailey Mirmelli, a competitor on the junior circuit. “Other horses, especially when I was little, were harder to get going, while the Arabians were a lot more sensitive and tolerant.” Now 18, Mirmelli has competed in classes such as hunt seat, hunter pleasure and sidesaddle at local, regional and national events from California to Oklahoma – notching two reserve championship titles at the Arabian Horse Association’s Youth Nationals. “For me, showing Arabians has been a great experience, and taught me how to deal with competition, even when the results can be unpredictable,” she says. Wight, who grew up showing Arabians and living on a small breeding farm, became a judge in 1981 and has since traveled all over the world – including national championships in 22 different countries. In October, she went to Morocco to judge the country’s national show for King Mohammed VI. While Arabian owner Lee Courtney has done some in-


PHOTO BY EMANUEL VACEANU

Bisch Equestrian at Los Cedros USA

state competing in halter and Western pleasure with her 11-year-old horse, Ssequin, her favorite pastime remains trail riding. “There’s nothing like being out in the desert, the open air and cool crispness of fall mornings,” she says. “There’s that great smell, and the horses love it, too. My greatest bond with her is when she’s turned out and can meet and engage with people. I absolutely love owning a

GIVING BACK

horse. It’s the best decision I’ve ever made.” Seventy years ago, horses were more vital to everyday life, but the appeal of Arabians remains as strong as ever. “Today, we recognize that they make you healthier and help you build mental and emotional skills,” says Verdieck. “There are lots of easy entry levels, so you don’t need to be shy. It will change your life.”

You can’t talk about the Arabian horse community without noting their philanthropic efforts across the Valley. Each year, the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show donates more than $100,000 to various charities, including March of Dimes, Cox Charities, Child Crisis Arizona and Arabian Horseman’s Distress Fund. In recent years, Los Cedros has hosted events raising money for Make-A-Wish Arizona, as well as bringing horses on-site at Phoenix Children’s Hospital and to programs for challenged children and abused women. In September, Royal Arabians in Scottsdale hosted a Horses and Hot Rods for Hearts event, raising money for the Phoenix Heart Ball. “As a member of the Heart Ball committee, I suggested we do something at the farm to introduce the horse world and Heart Ball to each other,” says Arabian owner Lee Courtney. “With 300 attendees, it was a raging success. We sold a horse, with the proceeds going to directly to the American Heart Association, and the Arabian community got an amazing new family.” December 2017 / 65


DEC

2

PHOTOS COURTESY ORGANIZATIONS

calendar

DEC

ARTrageous

2

White Christmas

DEC. 1 65 Roses & Wine Gala Cystic Fibrosis Foundation The Scottsdale Plaza Resort, 5:30 p.m. cff.org/arizona

DEC. 3 Nutcracker Sweets Tea Scottsdale Ballet Foundation Chateau Luxe, 11 a.m. scottsdaleballetfoundation.org

Passport to a Cure Gala Muscular Dystrophy Association The Camby, 6:30 p.m. mdapassport.com

7th Annual Holiday Champagne Brunch & Auction Lost Our Home Pet Rescue Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 11 a.m. lostourhome.org

DEC. 2 RED Brunch Aunt Rita’s Foundation Sheraton Grand Phoenix 10 a.m. auntritasevents.org Heritage Award Gala Arizona Jewish Historical Society Cutler-Plotkin Jewish Heritage Center, 6 p.m. azjhs.org ARTrageous Scottsdale Arts Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts 6 p.m. scottsdalearts.org The Pulse of the City Soiree Banner Health Foundation Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa, 6 p.m. bannerhealth.com White Christmas Ryan House Arizona Biltmore, 6:30 p.m. ryanhouse.org

DEC. 4 ACI Holiday Luncheon Arizona Costume Institute Phoenix Art Museum, 11 a.m. arizonacostumeinstitute.org DEC. 8 Prelude XXXII Phoenix Theatre Guild and Phoenix Youth Symphony JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn 10 a.m. DEC. 9 Family Holiday Party Historical League Phoenix Theatre, 12:30 p.m. historicalleague.org 3rd Annual Phoenix Knuckle Ball The Joe Niekro Foundation Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 6 p.m. joeniekrofoundation.com

For continually updated information, visit azredbook.com/calendar 66 / TRBM

DEC. 16 The 64th Annual Fashion Show Luncheon The Board of Visitors Arizona Biltmore, 11 a.m. boardofvisitors.org DEC. 22 52nd Annual Desert Ball Desert Foundation Auxiliary The Phoenician, 6:30 p.m. desertfoundationauxiliary.org DEC. 31 The Anniversary Gala: 70 Never Sounded So Good The Phoenix Symphony Arizona Biltmore, 8 p.m. phoenixsymphony.org JAN. 13 Drive the Dream Gala Childhelp Arizona Biltmore, 5:30 p.m. childhelp.org A Supreme Evening of Jazz Sandra Day O’Connor Institute Tempe Center for the Arts, 6 p.m. oconnorinstitute.org JAN. 19 Savor the Symphony Women’s Luncheon The Phoenix Symphony Symphony Hall, 10:30 a.m. phoenixsymphony.org Dance With Me Ballet Arizona Phoenix Art Museum, 6:30 p.m. balletaz.org


JAN. 20 Barrow Grand Ball Women’s Board of Barrow Neurological Foundation Arizona Biltmore, 6:30 p.m. supportbarrow.org 50th Anniversary Golden Masquerade Ball Back to School Clothing Drive Phoenix Art Museum, 6 p.m. backtoschoolclothingdrive.com JAN. 30 Independent Woman Luncheon Phoenix Art Museum, 10 a.m. phxart.org FEB. 3 A Love Not Forgotten Gala Alzheimer’s Association Desert Southwest Chapter JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 5:30 p.m. act.alz.org Galaxy Gala 2018: Pompeii Arizona Science Center, 6 p.m. azscience.org FEB. 5 Ewing Post Open Desert Voices Oral Learning Center TPC Stadium Course, 7 a.m. desert-voices.org FEB. 9 Tribute to Leadership Arizona YWCA Metropolitan Phoenix Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 11 a.m. ywcaaz.org Faces of Success Arizona Women’s Education & Employment PERA Club, 6 p.m. awee.org

JAN

13 Drive the Dream For continually updated information, visit azredbook.com/calendar

0 0 0 , 0 0 t $5,3

d a 21 e r e f f e, O n Driv

Hu,

ng n ed Bi nyo nown acre canyo a e C -r y t l l s a + n o 9 d o . L n i t t E rt a 55 ser rna 10500 le, AZ 852 rafted by intehe Sonoran Dbestructed desteyle yard t c a uno sd y in ort-s me, Scott temporary hoity and privac amic views of t kitchen, ressuite with e e con panor seren ourm guest and state Uniqu harmony, site 360° atures a g attached ion ui fe n, ng omat offeri te with exq This home oor kitche TOTAL aut d si rs ut ts. home g city ligh and o e offe t energy. l, spa . This hom in l o -cos k o n p w i o r tw wate itchenette elivering l t l a s with and k tem d room er sys living t sun pow ar of the

Karen Grobman, PC 480.688.0688

www.ArizonasHotProperties.com


Be among the Garden’s most generous supporters while getting exclusive access to Garden exhibits, programs and events with a Patrons Circle membership. Visit dbg.org/patrons-circle or call 480.481.8179 to sign up today.

FEB

24 Evening of Dreams Gala FEB. 10 Hearts of Gold Save the Family JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 6 p.m. savethefamily.org Child Crisis and the Friends Annual Gala Child Crisis Arizona Sheraton Grand Phoenix, 6 p.m. childcrisisaz.org FEB. 23 Go Red for Women Luncheon American Heart Association/American Stroke Association JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 10 a.m. heart.org Colleen’s Dream Golf Tournament Colleen’s Dream Foundation Arizona Biltmore Golf Club, 10:30 a.m. colleensdream.org Celebrate Youth at Blue Door Ball Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa, 5:30 p.m. bgcs.org FEB. 24 Evening of Dreams Gala Colleen’s Dream Foundation JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa, 5:30 p.m. colleensdream.org Bon Santé Ball Banner Health Foundation The Phoenician, 6 p.m. bannerhealth.com 68 / TRBM

1201 N. Galvin Parkway Phoenix, AZ 85008 480 941.1225 | dbg.org


A NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOL ARSHIP

HELP GRAND CANYON UNIVERSITY PROVIDE SCHOLARSHIP PACKAGES TO QUALIFIED HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS COVERING FULL TUITION AND FEES!

STUDENTS INSPIRING STUDENTS SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS: • Must be a high school senior admissible to GCU* • Attending a GCU participant school • Complete 100 hours of study time at the GCU Learning Lounge • 3.5 GPA or above, weighted or unweighted • Demonstrate a financial need† • Submit a personal narrative

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON HOW TO DONATE, VISIT: gcuscholarshipfoundation.org

*Admissibility Requirements: 3.0 unweighted GPA, 19 ACT, or 920 SAT (includes math and reading scores only) †Financial need is determined by the Office of Financial Aid. Students must apply for the FAFSA. If eligible, PELL Grant, along with all other gift aid, including federal and state grants and loans, as well as private scholarships, are subtracted from student’s tuition and fees unless they are being used for costs not covered in the scholarship program such as housing and meal plans. The remaining cost of tuition and fees up to a maximum of $18,000 will be covered by this scholarship package. 17GCU0089


RELIVE AUG. 24, 79 A.D. IN POMPEII Arizona Science Center transports guests to the bustling commercial port and strategic military and trading center of Pompeii, the way it was 1,700 years ago before the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius. “Pompeii, The Exhibition,” on loan from the collection of the Naples National Archaeological Museum in Italy, displays artifacts and body casts of victims. “Pompeii, The Exhibition” Through May 28, 2018 Arizona Science Center

Tanuki raccoon-dogs by Jun Kaneko, Desert Botanical Garden

First century A.D. gold bracelets from Pompeii

Things Noted From dinosaurs that move to body casts from Pompeii, 4 exhibitions that have it all

ENGAGE WITH COLORFUL NATIVE AMERICAN MASTERPIECES The Heard Museum welcomes “Of God and Mortal Men: Masterworks by T.C. Cannon.” The exhibition speaks to Cannon’s themes – his early mastery of color, his compelling twist on the Plains warrior motif and Kiowa history, his regard for family heritage and his tribute to the power of music. “Of God and Mortal Men: Masterworks by T.C. Cannon from the Nancy and Richard Bloch Collection” Through April 15, 2018, Heard Museum 70 / TRBM

EXPERIENCE MONUMENTAL JAPANESE-INSPIRED SCULPTURES Desert Botanical Garden uncovers JapaneseAmerican artist Jun Kaneko’s colorful glazed ceramic and bronze forms in the backdrop of the garden’s desert flora. Visitors wander among the installation of Dangos and whimisical Tanuki raccoon-dogs. “Jun Kaneko at Desert Botanical Garden” Through May 13, 2018 Desert Botanical Garden STROLL AMONG LIFE-SIZE DINOSAURS Phoenix Zoo’s Desert Lives Trail displays 23 realsize dinosaurs scattered throughout the scenic path, with 17 who move, make sound and even spit water. “Dinosaurs in the Desert” Through April 30, 2018 Phoenix Zoo

Animatronic tyrannosaurus rex structure, Phoenix Zoo

PHOTOS COURTESY ORGANIZATIONS

culture


WE WE ARE ARE BROADCASTING HOME STORIES BROADCASTING HOME STORIES


PHOTO BY JOHN LOLEIT

a f te r- p a r t y

Y-Crack Boulder at Pinnacle Peak Park

I

HAPPY TRAILS n addition to resorts, golf and other worldclass amenities, Scottsdale has become a hiking destination. People have always appreciated the landscape, especially in the beautiful McDowell Mountains – riding horses, hiking, biking, taking target practice. Previous to the ’90s, these activities often took place by trespassing on private or government-owned land. Early in that decade, the people spoke: They wanted to set aside a significant portion of the city’s square mileage as a preserve, an area that would remain free of housing developments and commerce. Activists doubled down on their efforts through the nonprofit McDowell Sonoran Land Trust (now known as the McDowell Sonoran Conservancy). In 1994, the preserve was created.

72 / TRBM

In 1995, a sales tax was passed to fund expansion. Scottsdale began acquiring land, first from private owners and then more than 15,000 acres from the state. The preserve is now 30,580 acres. Creating the trail system took 20-plus years. Today the preserve has 190 miles of trails, and new trails still are being developed. Planners use aerial maps to draw where they want a trail; then they walk it repeatedly to determine how to provide a recreational opportunity and at the same time reduce fragmentation for wildlife. Their goals are not to isolate any habitat and for all open spaces to connect. Almost a third of the city’s 147,000 square miles are in the preserve. For a downloadable preserve trail map, visit scottsdaleaz.gov/preserve


Traditional performances, artist demonstrations & art activities for the whole family. Plus, live music in our central courtyard!

2017 WORLD YOUTH CHAMPION, KAILAYNE JENSEN (NAVAJO/MARICOPA); PHOTO: JEWEL CLARK, HEARD MUSEUM

CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAY SEASON WITH ART, MUSIC, FOOD & SHOPPING. TUES. DEC. 26 – SAT. DEC. 30

2301 N. CENTRAL AVE. PHOENIX, AZ 85004 602.252.8848 | HEARD.ORG


Walt Danley Christie’s International Real Estate

4BR | 5BA | 5,267 SQ FT $2,295,000 | MLS# 5653560

4BR | 6.5BA | 6,308 SQ FT $2,500,000 | MLS# 5619836

6702 East Paradise Drive Scottsdale, Arizona Anita Best | 602.463.7143

5555 East Palo Verde Drive P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Christy Dean | 602.327.0697

7BR | 9BA | 7,370 SQ FT $2,850,000 | Private Inventory

5BR | 7BA | 8,752 SQ FT $4,500,000 | MLS# 5670355

7421 North Las Brisas Lane P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Jill Brenenstuhl | 602.524.1677

5102 North Wilkinson Road P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Karen Pratte | 602.228.4377

4BR | 7BA | 11,610 SQ FT $6,500,000 | MLS# 5611579 6045 E Foothill Drive P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Catherine Jacobson | 602.790.1992

For More Photos and Information on These and Other Fine Properties, Visit WaltDanley.com

6BR | 11BA | 15,006 SQ FT $8,000,000 | MLS# 5366418 5315 North Wilkinson Road P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Libby Cohen | 602.291.1446

The Red Book Magazine Dec. 2017  
The Red Book Magazine Dec. 2017  

Society • Culture • Luxury