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An exclusive publication of The Red Book and azredbook.com

The Arts Issue LEAP FOR JOY

Ballet Arizona dancers prepare for ‘first dance’

THE WIZARD OF AZ

Bobb Cooper builds VYT legacy

BEST OF THE SEASON 2016-17 arts fundraisers

CALENDAR

Fall’s social events

Drawn

from the

Land

Contemporary artists look to the West for inspiration

Circle Dream 37 Mayme Kratz, 2012 Mexican Bird of Paradise seeds and resin on panel 24" x 24"

September 2017 / 1


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content s

THE ARTS ISSUE

FEATURES 40 LEAP FOR JOY Ballet Arizona dancers’ busy off-season leads to ‘first dance’ 42 THE WIZARD OF AZ Bobb Cooper inspires young people to be their best, building a significant legacy for Valley Youth Theatre 46 DRAWN FROM THE LAND Contemporary artists look to the West for inspiration

46

Night Storm Mark Klett Gelatin silver print 16" x 20" Edition of 50

40 DEPARTMENTS STYLE 10 COVETED COLOR Fancy-colored diamonds are the flavor of the moment 12 ELEVATED ART Up your party game with high-scoring heels 14 CURATED TREASURES Enjoy reminders of your arts experience at home

CALENDAR 51 2016-17 arts fundraisers AFTER-PARTY 56 The Frank Lloyd Wright Spire ON THE COVER : Circle Dream 37 Mayme Kratz, 2012

PARTIES 17 BEST OF THE SEASON 2016-2017 Arts fundraisers PERSONALITIES 34 THE COLLECTOR Claudine Villardito collects and restores vintage designer clothing and accessories 36 THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR Lowell Pickett stages eclectic music at MIM Music Theater 37 THE PROGRAM DIRECTOR Mary Stephens finds way to cross borders through art 38 THE FILMMAKER Obsession drives Travis Mills to prolific moviemaking

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THE DAY-DATE 40 The international symbol of performance and success, reinterpreted with a modernized design and a new-generation mechanical movement. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

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W

elcome to the premiere issue of The Red Book Magazine. This publication is a natural extension of the 25-year-old Red Book, a resource for those involved in the social and philanthropic community, and azredbook.com. Each issue of The Red Book Magazine will have a single focus, and you can expect to receive three during the 2017-18 social season. To coincide with the start of the performing arts season, this premiere issue showcases the arts. We hope you enjoy the copy of ON Stage we have packaged with it. From Monument Valley to the Grand Canyon, from Sedona to Saguaro National Park and east to the Chiricahua Mountains, at every turn the landscape is dazzlingly diverse, breathtaking. Quite simply, Arizona inspires art – music, dance, photography, painting, sculpture. Our stories take a close look at specific artists, hoping to capture a glimpse of their lives and to understand the stories they relate through their 8 / TRBM

work. Some look to preserve the past; some envision social change; some seek beauty. We visit with two Ballet Arizona dancers who spent this past summer redoing their first house in preparation for their October marriage. We talk with Valley Youth Theatre’s Bobb Cooper about the character-and-confidencebuilding role performance plays in the lives of young people. We discuss clothing as art with a fashion collector, the art of the cinema with a filmmaker, what makes great concerts with the MIM Music Theater artistic director and how art can cross borders with the program director of ASU’s Performance in the Borderlands initiative. We also talk with Arnold Roy, the architect who in 2004 completed a spire Frank Lloyd Wright sketched in 1957. Deborah Sussman focuses “Drawn from the Land” on three contemporary artists whose work is intimately bound to, and springs from, their Western surroundings. Photographer Mark Klett, mixed media artist Mayme Kratz and multi-media artist and fourth generation farmer Matthew Moore have achieved renown as contemporary artists. Each looks to the land for inspiration; in many ways, as readers will discover, the land becomes their art. This concept is not new. The image above has a contemporary aesthetic, but was painted in 1940 by Swiss-born immigrant Conrad Buff. It is part of “Grand Canyon Grandeur,” an exhibition that opened in June and runs through the end of the year at Western Spirit: Scottsdale’s Museum of the West. If you haven’t yet visited this museum, you are in for a treat. Cindy Miller Managing Editor cmiller@azredbook.com

ARTWORK: CONRAD BUFF, DEAD HORSE POINT, COLORADO RIVER, ARIZONA, 1940, OIL; ON LOAN FROM THE A.P. HAYS COLLECTION. PHOTO COURTESY WESTERN SPIRIT: SCOTTSDALE’S MUSEUM OF THE WEST.

e d ito r ’s l et te r


Volume 1, Issue 1

Society • Culture • Luxury PUBLISHER AND CEO, ON MEDIA PUBLICATIONS

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PRESIDENT, ON MEDIA PUBLICATIONS

Todd Bresnahan

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Mark Kochman

MANAGING EDITOR

Cindy Miller

PR AND MARKETING MANAGER

Perrine Adams

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION

David Imes

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Mary Winters WRITERS

Perrine Adams Jennifer Dokes Anita Sheih Deborah H. Sussman

It’s one thing to help someone achieve success. It’s another to make it last. We help you do both.

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Long disregarded, fancy-colored diamonds are the flavor of the moment Text by Perrine Adams * Photos courtesy companies

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Bound By Heart and Paint

34'' x 34'' oil

Martin Grelle B o u n d b y H e a r t a n d Pa i n t S h ow & S a l e • S c o t t S da l e , a Z N ov e m b e r 1 1 , 2 0 1 7 PremieriNg 20 New PaiNtiNgS ATo view additional works for this show please visit www.legacygallery.com. Color catalogue available.

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ISSEY MIYAKE BAO BAO PLATINUM TOTE BAG, $1,295, Phoenix Art Museum, store.phxart.org

MARIA SAMORA DIAMONDS AND AQUAMARINE EARRINGS in 18-kt. yellow gold, $3,500, Heard Museum, heardmuseumshop.com

Curated Treasures Enjoy reminders of your arts experience at home

Text by Perrine Adams * Photos courtesy companies

STEEL BARREL CACTUS TORCH, $299.99, Desert Botanical Garden, gardenshop.dbg.org

HAND-PAINTED CERAMIC CHERRIES, $75, $95 and $185, The Store@Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts

STÉPHANE DUNOYER-CRAFTED LIMOGES PORCELAIN EGG MUSIC BOXES, $156, Musical Instrument Museum, themimstore.org 14 / TRBM


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T.C. CANNON T.C. Cannon (Kiowa/Caddo), 1946-1978. “Turn of the Century Dandy,” 1976, acrylic on canvas. Reproduced by permission of the Estate of T.C. Cannon. © 2017 Estate of T.C. Cannon.

JOIN US THIS SEASON 2017-2018 EXHIBITION AND EVENT HIGHLIGHTS: Of God and Mortal Men: Masterworks by T.C. Cannon from the Nancy and Richard Bloch Collection | Feature Exhibition | Oct. 7 – April 15 Indigenous Peoples’ Day | Event | Oct. 9 Awa Tsireh: Pueblo Painter and Metalsmith | Exhibition | Nov. 4 – July 15 Celebration of American Indian Veterans | Event | Nov. 6 28th Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest | Event | Feb. 10 & 11 60th Annual Indian Fair & Market | Signature Event | Mar. 3 & 4 16 / TRBM

V O T E D 2 0 1 7 B E S T M U S E U M , P H O E N I X M AG A Z I N E | V I S I T H E A R D . O R G


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2016-17 Arts Fundraisers OCT 21 APPLAUSE! GALA

Phoenix Theatre Phoenix Theatre supporters donned their Broadway best to celebrate the 2016 Applause Gala honorees. The unique event includes a cocktail reception, dinner and a one-timeonly performance that celebrates the honorees through their favorite musical theater songs. Proceeds support the organization’s work on stage as well as its education and community outreach programs. 1 2 3 4

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1. Susie Wesley and McKenna Wesley 2. Kory Leadon and Abby Traister 3. Bob Smith, Deanna Smith and Nan Howlett. 4. Carolyn and Craig Jackson 5. Jim Manley and Irma GonzĂĄlez Manley 6. Karrin Kunasek Taylor, Edward Robson and The Honorable Neil Giuliano

PHOTOS COURTESY Phoenix Theatre September 2017 / 17


party

2016-17 Arts Fundraisers OCT 22 MOONDANCE

Heard Museum It was a marvelous night for a “Moondance� in early fall at the Heard Museum. The annual fundraising event drew 425 guests for an artist tour, cocktail reception, dinner and dancing. The evening honored Paradise Valley residents Arlene and Giora Ben-Horin and native painter Kay WalkingStick. The party raised more than $300,000 for the general support of the museum.

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1. Becky Sawyer and David Connell 2. David Roche, Heard Museum director/ CEO; Wick Pilcher and Carol Ann Mackay 3. Beth and Dino DeConcini 4. Standing: Dawn Williams, Camille Loo, Carolyn Murphy, Nancy Gangelhoff and Ellise Porter. Seated: Carol Ann Mackay, Elva Graham and Patti Brown 5. Dr. Craig Cohen and Sharon Cohen 6. Arlene Ben-Horin and Susan Palmer-Hunter 7. Michelle Makanjuola and Chiko Swiney 8. Patti Hibbeler, Christy Vezolles and Gil Waldman

PHOTOS BY Haute Event Photography 18 / TRBM


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2016-17 Arts Fundraisers OCT 28 BRIGHT NIGHT Phoenix Art Museum Bright Night ushered in the fashion exhibition “Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic.” The evening offered a culinary and musical celebration with custom cocktails and fine wine, hors d’oeuvres and small plates, crafted by M Catering. The party raised more than $500,000 in support of Phoenix Art Museum.

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1. Lee Cohn 2. Amada Cruz, the Sybil Harrington Director, Phoenix Art Museum 3. Terry Roman, Dionne Najafi, Steve Roman and Robin Milne 4. Carol Clemmensen and Lauri Termansen 5. Matthew Boland and Katie Mueller 6. Brenda and Jim Howard 6

PHOTOS BY Haute Event Photography 20 / TRBM


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2016-17 Arts Fundraisers DEC 2 HOLIDAY PRELUDE XXXI Phoenix Theatre Guild, Phoenix Art Museum League and Phoenix Youth Symphony Holiday Prelude XXXI Luncheon and Fashion Show at JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn continued its tradition of kicking off the holiday season with a festive late-morning gathering to support Phoenix Theatre Guild, Phoenix Art Museum League and Phoenix Youth Symphony. The day included a dazzling array of boutiques and a runway presentation that showcased fashions by designers Lourdes Chavez and Ella Zahlan. 1

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1. Deborah Carstens and Debbie Gaby 2. Fashion by Lourdes Chavez 3. Tochia Levine and Judith Pearson 4. Pat Bondurant, Molly Stockley and Linda Herold

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5. Fashion by Ella Zahlan 6. Krystle Henderson and Lin Sue Cooney 7. Lila Harnett, Cindy White and Billie Jo Herberger 8. Lisa Pagel, Adrienne Schiffner and Mary Contreras

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PHOTOS BY Elena Thornton 22 / TRBM


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2016-17 Arts Fundraisers DEC 3 ARTRAGEOUS Scottsdale Arts Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts welcomed more than 500 guests for Scottsdale Arts’ ARTrageous Benefit Gala. The event had a Jazz Age theme, and guests dressed for the occasion, showcasing their best sequins, feathers and headbands. Multi-platinum-selling entertainer Michael Feinstein serenaded the crowd with beloved standards by artists from Fred Astaire to Frank Sinatra. Proceeds support performances and exhibitions, plus education and outreach programs.

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1. Guests in the Dayton Fowler Grafman Atrium 2. Honorary chairs Susie and Don Cogman 3. Oscar De las salas, Kristin Atwell Ford, Dennis Ford and Gary Jackson 4. Michael Feinstein 5. Linda Herold and Adrienne Schiffner 6. Dr. Mark Smith and Gerri Smith, gala chair and vice chair of Scottsdale Arts Board of Trustees

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7. Lori Singleton and Fred Tillman 8. Richard Hayslip, Joann Hayslip, Sandy Conners and Herb Zoloto 9. Judd and Billie Jo Herberger

PHOTOS BY Casey Sapio 24 / TRBM


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2016-17 Arts Fundraisers DEC 13 HOLIDAY LUNCHEON Arizona Costume Institute A sold-out crowd of 437 attended Arizona Costume Institute’s Holiday Luncheon at Phoenix Art Museum. Art historian Guillermo de Osma, founder of his eponymous gallery in Madrid and the world’s foremost specialist on artist/designer Mariano Fortuny, presented the program. The event raised funds to support the programs of the museum’s Fashion Design Collection.

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1. Vicki Vaughn and Camerone Elise Parker 2. Ronna Beeson 3. Guillermo de Osma 4. Emmanuelle Adkins, Lynne Love, Patty Adams and Chrissy Sayare

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5. Tana Herrington, Jacquie Dorrance and Harriet Friedland 6. Ina Manaster, Diane Halle and Sheila Zuieback 7. Erika Dickey and Cathy Dickey 8. Mary Ellen McKee

PHOTOS BY Haute Event Photography 26 / TRBM


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party

2016-17 Arts Fundraisers JAN 20 DANCE WITH ME Ballet Arizona More than 300 guests attended Ballet Arizona’s Dance With Me Gala at Phoenix Art Museum. The event honored long-time supporters Carol and Randy Schilling. The lively soiree combined a dance performance with dinner and dancing, and raised more than $450,000 toward the ballet’s education and community outreach programs.

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1. Durrell Hillis, Michelle Vagi, John and Ricki Dee Jennings and Francie Hanson 2. Rebecca Ailes-Fine and Peter Fine 3. Kolby Moffatt, Susan Palmer-Hunter, Jacquie Dorrance, Armity Simon, Penny Gunning, Catherine Jacobson and Anne-Marie Dobb with Ballet Arizona dancers 4. Christophe and Joanne Sevrain 5. Dancer Chelsea Teel and Peter Fine. 6. Students of The School of Ballet Arizona 7. Don Fowls and Amber Lewis

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PHOTOS BY Haute Event Photography 28 / TRBM


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2016-17 Arts Fundraisers JAN 27 SAVOR THE SYMPHONY The Phoenix Symphony Under the Streetlamp accompanied by The Phoenix Symphony entertained the 300 guests at the fifth annual ladies’ luncheon known as Savor the Symphony. The male performing group featured classic hits from the American Radio Songbook. Funds from the event support the symphony’s Music and Education Programming.

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1. Under the Streetlamp 2. Ambassador Barbara Barrett 3. Luncheon committee members Sharon Re and Diana Wilkinson 4. Dennis and Carolyn Eynon, Carol Miller, Jeanne Bingham and Jennifer Sands 5. DeeDee Vecchione, Missi Harrington, Martha Martin and Jamie Herzlinger 6. Adam Sheff, Andaz Scottsdale Resort & Spa executive chef, and Robin Sewell, emcee 7. Lecia Scaglione, Dana Van Loon, Ina Smeets and Alison Johnston 8. Under the Streetlamp

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PHOTOS BY Haute Event Photography 30 / TRBM


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2016-17 Arts Fundraisers APR 9 FRIDA KAHLO OPENING Heard Museum More than 600 guests enjoyed an indoor-outdoor evening at the Heard Museum to celebrate the opening of “Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection.” As its only North American stop on the tour, the exhibition ran through Aug. 20. The 150 VIP guests gained exclusive access to the exhibition ahead of the party, a private tequila tasting and an exhibition catalog.

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1. Mariachi Pasion 2. Christopher Ngbron and Scott Brown 3. Rich and Maryglenn Boals 4. Michael Massey, PetSmart CEO 5. Artist Marlowe Katoney and David Roche, Heard Museum director/CEO. 6. Colleen and John Lomax 7. AJ Dickey and Carol Schilling 8. Robert Sanchez, Sen. Catherine Miranda and Patsy Skyline Lowry

PHOTOS COURTESY Heard Museum 32 / TRBM


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Gray Christian Dior suit, circa 1954, completely restored by Claudine Villardito and part of her personal collection

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personalities The Collector / 34 The Artistic Director / 36 The Program Director / 37 The Filmmaker / 38

The Collector Text by Anita Sheih * Photo by Tina Celle

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nder protective lighting in her sterile, temperaturecontrolled workroom, Claudine Villardito labors tirelessly. Needle in hand, magnifying glasses in place, she bends over a stainless steel table on which lies her latest glittering find. Patiently, she reattaches sequin after sequin with surgical precision. Villardito is the owner of Black Cat Vintage, a highend online fashion boutique based in downtown Phoenix. The pieces she sells on blackcatvintage.com are among the finest of 3,000-plus in the collection she has been curating and restoring

Restored Spanish robe de style, circa 1924

since her college days. She suspects she inherited her penchant for collecting from her mother, who, she says, saved everything. In 2005, after she was involved in a car accident with an impaired driver, she was hospitalized for a period of time without full use of her hands. A writer,

she had to put that profession on pause. As her own form of physical therapy, she started restoring the vintage clothing she had collected, deconstructing and reconstructing pieces by hand. What she didn’t know – a certain stitching style or era of fashion – she doggedly researched and practiced.

Fashion is “the most democratic of all the arts” Soon, this pastime became her passion. She can describe in detail the background of each fabric or bead she uses and can recite the backstory of almost everything in her collection. Though sometimes one piece might

take several years to restore, under her skillful hands, the vintage pieces return to life. Villardito is careful never to impose her own interpretation of a designer’s intentions for a creation. Instead, she painstakingly matches patterns, colors and sewing techniques to the original. Her goal is to “pay respect to the original designer as an artist.” Like any other form of visual art, fashion, she says, manipulates shape, color, silhouette and dimension. In fact, Villardito says it is the “most democratic of all the arts because, while not everyone must enjoy a painting on a wall, everyone must wear, and thus can enjoy, clothing.” Consequently, her vision is not art for art’s sake: She intends

to make the clothing and accessories she restores wearable again. Her personal mission and the goal of her work is to “bring dignity back to dressing.” The glorious couture of the past, which enabled designers to work as autonomous artists creating fashion masterpieces, may indeed be dying in today’s high-profit oriented world of fashion. But Villardito says fashion is more than “just clothing.” She sees each piece as a treasure chest of information, a beloved memory or story. The style, cut, fabric, stitches and details inform the observer about the values, morals and technological advances of the culture during which each item was created. September 2017 / 35


personalities Lowell Pickett in the MIM Music Theater

D

uring 2016, the Musical Instrument Museum and Music Theater, located in north Phoenix, presented 259 concerts. One man, Lowell Pickett, can recite each performer’s history, inspiration and repertoire from memory. His knowledge of the musicians is encyclopedic, and his passion for the MIM Music Theater is boundless. Pickett schedules a diverse array of concerts from bluegrass to modern fusion. He has just one criterion: The music must be good. The performances bring to life the instruments

“Music is living and breathing and evolving.”

The Artistic Director Text by Anita Sheih * Photo by Tina Celle 36 / TRBM

exhibited in the museum from every country around the world. As he was growing up, he played a variety of instruments for brief periods of time. He admits, though, that his talent has its limitations. What he did develop was

an appreciation for music. After college, he rented venues and presented musical performances, eventually opening the Dakota Jazz Club in Minneapolis. It became a national jazz scene that still flourishes today. Because of his eclectic musical taste, the MIM asked him to advise with programming for the Music Theater. Five years ago, he became the artistic director. “The world is filled with interesting people,” Pickett says. “Some of them happen to play music, and some play at a very high level.” His job is to bring those who play at a high level to the MIM Music Theater. The artists appreciate the 300-seat theater as much as the audiences appreciate their music. Many performers have said it is “the best theater of its size in the country.” “Music is living and breathing and evolving,” Pickett says. “That’s exactly the special quality of the MIM, where you’re more than an observer. You are also a participant and reveler in the musical world.”


personalities Mary Stephens in downtown Phoenix in front of the Bird Mural, commissioned in 2007 by monOrchid Gallery owner Wayne Rainey. Additional murals by various artists

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ven when people can’t cross borders, art can,” says Mary Stephens, program director and curator of Arizona State University’s Performance in the Borderlands since 2012. One way art can cross borders is through the Bi-National Arts Residency, a program of the Borderlands initiative, a collaborative effort between artists from Phoenix and Sonora, Mexico. Cultural, theatrical and dance events hosted on the border bring these two communities together. The final show is staged on both sides of the fence,

“Art is first and foremost disruptive.”

The Program Director Text by Anita Sheih * Photo by Tina Celle

where people can see through to – and communicate with – the other side. With an educational background in theater and international peace and conflict resolution, Stephens decided to address the political tension she felt in 2009, and still feels, by combining

her two passions. Her goal was to create a safe space for people to discuss relevant and controversial issues. Her method was to use art. Performance in the Borderlands “fuses the arts with social issues in public spaces to foster dialogue,” Stephens says. The initiative began in 2005 as a small group, performing for audiences of 10 or so people in nontraditional spaces. Today, Borderlands hosts six theatrical performances a year and incorporates other types of art, including visual media, projections, poetry, murals and dance. Stephens says these art forms have the “ability to push us outside of what we see every day, to make us see things in a new way and care about things we didn’t know to care about. “Art has the power to break us out of the monotony of our lives, and in that tiny space of creativity, we can imagine a new possibility, a future we may not have known. It is first and foremost disruptive. Art should disrupt our daily lives.” September 2017 / 37


personalities Travis Mills in Globe, Ariz., during the filming of Bride of Violence

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ifty-two films in 52 weeks. This ambitious undertaking embodies indie filmmaker Travis Mills’ vision and drive. Mills was born in Ecuador, grew up in Africa, has lived in Europe and chose to launch his film company in Phoenix. Arriving in Arizona during his junior high years, the future filmmaker came to appreciate the state’s history and beauty. Through his films, he hopes to inspire others to do the same.

“You need to practice and play a lot of games before you make it to the championship.”

The Filmmaker Text by Anita Sheih * Photo by Nick Fornwalt 38 / TRBM

Mills has been obsessed with film since he was young. At heart a storyteller, he has found the best way to tell stories is through film. After graduating from Arizona State University with a film degree, he kept in touch with Gus Edwards, his favorite professor. They partnered in 2010

to start Running Wild Films. Their goal was to help create a community of indie filmmakers in Phoenix and achieve success by highlighting Arizona stories. Mills likes to mix it up, exploring different genres, from comedy and crime to Western and horror. In 2013, he directed and produced 52 short films in 52 weeks, all based off public-domain stories by wellknown authors. The process forced him to “work consistently for a whole year,” encountering the myriad problems any filmmaker might. The project, he said, improved his craft. Likening filmmaking to a sport, Mills says, “You need to practice and play a lot of games before you make it to the championship.” Mills wants to tell stories that entertain, activate minds and connect with people. One of his films, Durant’s Never Closes, premiered in Phoenix in January 2016. The film was based on the life of Jack Durant, the notorious owner of the downtown landmark restaurant Durant’s, which opened in 1950.


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The Arts Issue LEAP FOR JOY

Ballet Arizona dancers prepare for ‘first dance’

THE WIZARD OF AZ

Bobb Cooper builds VYT legacy

BEST OF THE SEASON 2016-17 arts fundraisers

CALENDAR

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culture

for

Text by Jennifer Dokes * Photographs by Jill Richards

40 / TRBM

JOY Ballet Arizona dancers’ busy off-season leads to ‘first dance’


generations of dancers require it, they say. “People don’t really know how difficult it is, and you have to look pretty doing it,” says Barrell, who joined Ballet Arizona in 2007. There is no grimacing or gasping for breath, even when the lifts, flips, twirls and body positions should certainly call for it. “We spend so much time and effort,” Barrell says. “Sometimes we have to remember that the majority of audience members don’t know, and they aren’t going to notice it. But we are going crazy spending so much time trying to perfect.” Iovino, who joined Ballet Arizona in 2012, follows Barrell’s lead on this point. “Even if people don’t understand, you want to make sure the art is moving

“Even if people don’t understand, you want to make sure the art is moving forward.”

Nayon Iovino

forward,” Iovino says. “It’s constantly improving. We’re hoping that we’re adding to the history of ballet so the next generations [of dancers] are going to be at a level that we couldn’t achieve.” During the season, dancers maintain a 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekday schedule with no break for lunch. The day is jam-packed with classes and performance rehearsals, after which time is spent massaging muscles to recover and to avoid injury. The off-season is a time to relax a bit, but just a little. “I’ve been going to work out and doing a few ballet classes here and there just to try to keep a certain level,” Iovino says shortly after the 2016-17 season ended. “If you stop and then try to come back, it’s really …”

© ROSALIE O’CONNOR PHOTOGRAPHY/COURTESY BALLET ARIZONA

We

stumbled into it.” It’s a rare occasion when a professional ballet dancer admits to stumbling and smiles happily about it. Ballet Arizona’s Jillian Barrell and Nayon Iovino stumbled into each other, fell hard and now are taking a big step that looks like one of the best moves of their lives. They’re all smiles. The veteran dancers will be newlyweds when the 2017-18 Ballet Arizona season opens Oct. 26 with Swan Lake. Simultaneously preparing for a wedding and the start of the new season will leave them breathless, but they take it in stride. The young lady from Delaware and the young man from Brazil are called to a life that to a life that is a near-daily grind of conditioning, training and education. It takes an extraordinary amount of hard work – physical, mental, emotional – to make ballet look easy. Ballet is not ballet without uncommon agility and elegant precision on stage, and blood, sweat and exhaustion, sometimes to the point of collapse, off stage. Along their shared journey of helping to build the legacy of Ballet Arizona, Barrell and Iovino bonded over prowess and pain. “We didn’t choose it,” Barrell says of their life partnership. “We stumbled into it,” Iovino says, completing her thought. Just as the dancers, who are often partnered for performances, move as one on stage, the lovers move through life on the same wavelength – so in sync they finish each other’s sentences. Barrell and Iovino achieve professional greatness by pursuing perfect technique, channeling intense passion to the art form and embracing a fitness regimen unique to a special breed of elite athletes. To them, success is so much about preparation, about sweating the details from head to toe. The weight of history of the ballet and the respect for advances of prior

Ballet Arizona Dancers Jillian Barrell and Nayon Iovino in Ib Andersen’s Romeo & Juliet

“Hard,” Barrell says, finishing her partner’s sentence. “You don’t want to take too much time off or else it’s so difficult to get back. I find it’s better to take a little bit of time [off] or just go every other day and take it down just a notch.” During a typical off-season there’s usually more time to devote to some of their favorite pastimes. She likes to sew. He likes to paint and play guitar. They both enjoy hiking and traveling. But this was no average off-season for the dancers. It was a grind, often quite literally. They spent the summer renovating their first house together. One of the big DIY projects involved ripping out flooring and polishing concrete floors. The house will be the site of the wedding rehearsal dinner. It must be in good shape before the biggest show of their off-stage lives. Their wedding will have some traditional elements, including a first dance. Iovino is making a name for himself as a choreographer as well a dancer, but they’re not planning a first dance with potential to go viral on YouTube. No lifts or flips. “I don’t know if I could do that in my wedding dress,” Barrell says. September 2017 / 41


TheWizard of AZ Bobb Cooper inspires young people to be the best they can be, building a significant legacy for Valley Youth Theatre Text by Perrine Adams * Photographs by Mark Lipczynski

42 / TRBM


culture

his past February Emma Stone became the first native Arizonan to win an Oscar. During the 89th Academy Awards ceremony, Stone took home the gold statue for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role for her work in the critically acclaimed film La La Land. As she collected the coveted prize on stage in front of millions of viewers, Stone thanked her family and friends along with Bobb Cooper, the longtime artistic director of Valley Youth Theatre in Phoenix. Prior to the Oscars, in a video released for Vanity Fair’s annual Hollywood issue, Stone gave a special shout-out to her Phoenix acting coach. In consideration of the question Who do you respect the most? Stone answered, “Bobb Cooper, who runs Valley Youth Theatre in Arizona. He was the first person to give me any role, [and] also a dramatic role.” Stone began her fairy tale in Phoenix as Emily, not Emma, a name she chose when she registered for the Screen Actors Guild. The young actress got her start at age 11 at VYT, where she

performed a variety of characters and productions over the course of several years. At age 15 she convinced her parents to move to Los Angeles to pursue a career in Tinseltown. Despite the distance, Stone and Cooper have remained close over the years. Founded in 1989, VYT is a professional theater company dedicated to helping young people achieve their full potential as stage actors. The theater produces six mainstage shows each season including three at the Herberger Theater Center. Any time guests see a VYT performance, there’s always the chance they could be watching a future star. The list of VYT alumni who have gone on to success both in Hollywood and on Broadway is impressive. Other famous VYT alumni include Kimiko Glenn of the Netflix hit series Orange Is the New Black, Jordin Sparks of American Idol, Chelsea Kane of ABC’s sitcom Baby Daddy, and Max Crumm and Nick Cartell, both recognized Broadway performers. PRESHOW Thanks to the Oscars, millions of spectators have now heard of Cooper and VYT. Producing artistic director, theater teacher and acting coach, Cooper is a triple theatrical threat. He wrote his first play when he was in 5th grade, and from an early age, acting became his life purpose. “If it wasn’t for theater, I wouldn’t have graduated high school. It’s something that kept me going, helped to educate me and inspired me,” says Cooper. Acting took a young Cooper from Detroit to the stage in NYC and to Los Angeles where he, then joined by his wife Karol, wrote and

produced magical musical shows for the children of numerous Hollywood stars including Arnold Schwarzenegger, Whoopi Goldberg and Jim Carrey. After a successful decade in California, the couple moved with their young daughter to Phoenix in 1994. It didn’t take long for Cooper to cross the path of VYT founding board chair Hope Ozer. Shortly after, in March 1996, Cooper joined the company. With the board, he established the theater’s mission to inspire young people to be the best they can be. “As an organization, we had to do everything we could to be the best we could be, in order to inspire. You have to be inspiring to inspire,” says Cooper. Back then, the theater, located in the basement of the Tower Plaza mall, had an annual budget of $100,000. Within five years, the budget had grown to $1 million. The theater, relocated into a larger playhouse, could finally reach more children, improve the quality of its programming and offer a deeper performing experience to the young artists. What made a great difference is the professional approach Cooper cultivated over the past two decades. VYT offers its performers high-level acting experience, quality production and the opportunity to perform not only at VYT but also at the Herberger Theater Center in downtown Phoenix. As a result, the child and teenage actors are no longer viewed as amateurs in the acting world. ONSTAGE Under Cooper’s leadership, VYT children acquire some of the tools necessary to become successful September 2017 / 43


THE LIST OF SUCCESSFUL individuals who have been involved onstage and backstage with VYT is long and not limited to the entertainment industry. Many remember how joining the VYT family greatly impacted their lives, both professionally and personally. Former VYT performer and stage manager Chandra Crudup, Ph.D., says many of her competencies were developed at the playhouse. “The professionalism I learned at VYT, along with various skills learned both performing and behind the scenes, has proven beneficial in my role as lecturer and faculty associate coordinator at Arizona State University,” Crudup says. Currently working as a litigator at Unilever in New York, Courtney Ozer believes one of the main reasons she went to law school was because of the training she had at VYT. “I always felt comfortable speaking in front of large audiences of people I didn’t know. In my profession, I am often thrown into new situations with new people and unique challenges, and my experiences at VYT have allowed me to handle all of this with grace and courage.” Having been involved in more than 20 VYT productions, Tyler Service, police officer in Chandler, Ariz., learned to work long hours, reach a deadline and organize large groups of volunteers. Service’s role at VYT was “to make sure [children] were safe doing the jobs they were tasked and instructed sufficiently on how to accomplish the them.” Cooper instilled in him a sense of self-worth when he needed it the most. “Because of Cooper’s help, I am a better husband, father and officer,” Service says.

Courtney Ozer, Tyler Service, Chandra Crudup 44 / TRBM

adults. They learn discipline, time management, teamwork, public speaking, positive attitude, respect, responsibility, confidence and encouragement. Potential is something everyone has, but it often takes the efforts of others to help realize how capable one can be. Cooper’s job doesn’t stop at producing theater; his goal is to foster self-esteem and self-talk so children feel safe to be themselves and set the heights they want to reach. “My role is to push the children to dig inside and a national organization Emma Stone find that magic promoting growth of accepts 2017 Oscar that is inside of professional nonprofit for La La Land. them and bring it theaters. to the surface. We VYT relies on don’t give them community partnerships talent; we help them find what and outreach programs. Its they have within them. The power Literacy and the Arts program is inside each of us,” Cooper encourages underserved innersays. Academy Award-winner city students to enhance their Emma Stone was no exception. reading and comprehension skills “We helped her find the tools as well as develop an appreciation to be successful. We had high for live theater. Its Sponsor-A-Seat expectations for her, and high program, inaugurated by Cooper, expectations of her for herself as provides the chance for at-risk we do for every person. And the youth across the Valley to attend a stars aligned for her.”   free performance. This year, VYT is undeniably in Cooper always stands with one the spotlight thanks to the Oscar foot in the future. One of his most buzz. It hasn’t always been easy cherished wishes is to create an to get respect, however, as a youth arts center for youth in downtown theater company. Typically, the Phoenix. Arts organizations such focus is on professional dance, as The Phoenix Symphony Youth music and theater organizations. Orchestra, Phoenix Children’s “What [the public] forgets is Chorus, Young Arts Arizona, that it starts with young people; Free Arts for Abused Children they are our future,” Cooper and Ballet Etudes could be says. Nonetheless VYT has brought together under one roof to produced nearly 200 shows since collaborate and share resources. its creation and won numerous “Ultimately, I would like to see this honors, including about 100 dream come true before I retire, National Youth Arts Awards. It is to have a unified arts center that the only youth theater of its kind is truly dedicated and focused on to be a member of the prestigious all young people of Phoenix and Theatre Communications Group, beyond,” Cooper says.

© STEVE GRANITZ/GETTY IMAGES

OFFSTAGE LEGACY


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September 2017 / 45


Matthew Moore

Drawn from the Land Contemporary artists look to the West for inspiration Text by Deborah H. Sussman * Portraits by Mark Lipczynski Artwork images courtesy artists and Lisa Sette Gallery, Phoenix 46 / TRBM


culture

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he American West has long served as a source of inspiration for artists and writers alike. Sometimes just the idea of the landscape was enough, as in the case of Karl May, one of the best-selling German authors of all time. May set his 19th century novels about Old Shatterhand and his friend Winnetou, an Apache warrior, in a mythical “Wild West,” although May himself never traveled west of New York. While May’s novels are still popular, anyone looking for a more representative glimpse of the American West, and Arizona in particular, would do well to check in with some of the contemporary visual artists living and working in the region. The interdisciplinary indigenous arts collective Postcommodity, for example, made international headlines last year with its land art piece “Repellent Fence,” a two-mile-long installation of giant red, yellow and black “scare eye” balloons that bisected the U.S.-Mexico border. This year the group’s video and installation work is featured in both the Whitney Biennial and documenta, two of the world’s most prestigious and selective exhibitions of contemporary art. CULTIVATING THOUGHTFUL DESIGN Arizona artist and food activist Matthew Moore, who has collaborated with members of Postcommodity on projects in the past, is a fourth-generation farmer in the Grand Canyon state, a lineage that informs both his life and his art. His approach to everything, he says, is “How do you cultivate something?” Not long after after he earned his Master of Fine Arts,

he embarked on several ambitious projects to physically represent the changes taking place in Surprise, Ariz., home of his family’s farm. “Rotations: Moore Estates” spanned 2005-06 and involved cultivating a field patterned after the planned lot map for a suburban community to be built on what had been a portion of his family’s land. Moore mapped out the “estate” at a third of its original scale, using a CAD program and a GPS surveying crew, and then planted 253 “houses” in sorghum and “roads” in seeded wheat. In the large-scale aerial photographs Moore produced once the fields had grown in, the “houses” appear dark green and the “roads” light brown. Today Moore helms Urban Plough Arts, a group of artists, designers and craftsmen housed in a low, flat building on McDowell Avenue in Phoenix. The group works together on large-scale public and private projects. In addition, Moore has launched Urban Plough Furniture in the same space. “We’re all committed to the idea that thoughtful design and creativity breed a better place for people in harsh conditions,” Moore

Rotations: Moore Estates 5 Matthew Moore, 35-acre project, sorghum and wheat, c-print Surprise, Ariz., 2006

September 2017 / 47


says of the team at Urban Plough, “whether it’s a coffee-shop table or an exhibition.” CONVERSING WITH HISTORY Photographer Mark Klett may not be an Arizona native – he’s originally from New York State, near Albany – but his work is very much identified with his adopted state. Originally hired by Arizona State University in the 48 / TRBM

1980s as a master printer in photography, he says the desert was “an eye opener” that he quickly came to love and the reason he’s stayed for 35 years. Among the 16 books Klett has authored or co-authored are Reconstructing the View: The Grand Canyon Photographs of Mark Klett and Byron Wolfe (University of California Press, 2012) and El Camino del Diablo (Radius Books, 2016). Both involve a kind of conversation with historical images and ideas about the Arizona landscape. In the case of the Camino del Diablo, or road of the devil, Klett retraced the steps of a young mining engineer named Raphael Pumpelly, who chronicled his journey through the dangerous Sonoran desert back in 1861. One hundred and fifty-two years later, much of the land the engineer once traversed is contained by the Barry M. Goldwater Bombing Range, and the border is a very different place. But in his photographs, Klett underlines the qualities that link Pumpelly’s Camino del Diablo with the contemporary landscape, evoking the Mark Klett desert’s beauty, danger and timelessness, and creating a poetic narrative that ties his own experience of the desert to Pumpelly’s. Today Klett is a Regents’ Professor and a Distinguished Sustainability Scholar at ASU. He says that while his tools and materials have changed – practice is now all digital – his interest in “time and place, history and culture” remains. “A lot of my work was and is done in collaboration,” he notes. For his most recent project, he teamed up once again with


photographer Byron Wolfe and writer Rebecca Solnit, this time on a book about Lake Powell, due out next year. CAPTURING A MICRO VIEW Like Klett, artist Mayme Kratz is also a transplant to the desert whose work has been transformed by it. Kratz grew up in the Julian Mountains, east of San Diego, and came to Arizona from New Mexico in 1986. “It took a while to get used to it here,” she says now. “I was kind of a reluctant resident for a while. Once I really started going out hiking

Reconstructing the view from the El Tovar to Yavapai Point using 19 postcards Mark Klett, Byron Wolfe Digital inkjet print Left panel 44" x 76"; right panel 44" x 68" 2008

and investigating the landscape, shortly after I moved here, my feelings about it changed.” So, too, did Kratz’s work. A painter when she got to Phoenix, she began incorporating elements from the desert into her paintings. “I was trying to preserve what I was collecting,” she says. “Tree parts or sticks or nests started finding their way onto the canvas, and the figure started disappearing. It was about 1990 that I started making sculpture, because the paintings had become so textural that the texture just leapt off the wall.” Eventually Kratz would come to make both sculpture and two-dimensional mixed media

ON THE HORIZON THE CONTEMPORARY ARTIST most associated with the Arizona landscape in the public imagination may be one who doesn’t actually live in the state most of the time. Originally from Los Angeles, James Turrell acquired the 400,000-year-old, two-mile-wide dormant cinder cone now known as Roden Crater 40 years ago. He has been at work on it ever since, creating what he calls “a gateway to the contemplation of light, time, and landscape” in the Painted Desert region near Flagstaff. A master of light and of space with roots in both the Quakerism and

perceptual psychology, Turrell is renowned for his otherworldly installations and contemplative “skyspaces.” Roden Crater is billed as “the magnum opus of Turrell’s career, a work that, besides being a monument to land art, functions as a naked eye observatory of earthly and celestial events.” The crater is not open to the public yet, as it is still a work in progress. Plans to open it have repeatedly been pushed

Roden Crater near Flagstaff, Ariz.

back, to the point where Turrell himself has had T-shirts printed with the tagline “Sooner or later … Roden Crater.” It has been compared by some who have experienced it to Stonehenge and the pyramids of Mexico. If this were any other artist, one might fear hyperbole. September 2017 / 49


pieces, using polymer resin to hold and preserve all manner of flora and fauna, from a seed pod to an insect to the remains of a snake. The pieces have grown more specific and minimal over time, but she says one element that’s remained the same is “a kind of reverence for whatever I’m commencing. That’s only increased as time has gone on. Initially as I was working, the paintings had a landscape element and a horizon line. Then I started looking at the objects I was collecting through the microscope, and it turned into a micro view of the landscape. In a way, these pieces are the landscape to me.”

Into the Face of Stars Mayme Kratz Resin, shells, bobcat claws, snake ribs and vertebrae on panel, 60" x 108" 2016

Mayme Kratz 50 / TRBM


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September 2017 / 51

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calendar

14 Rendez-Zoo

PHOTOS COURTESY ORGANIZATIONS

OCT

NOV

3

Fresh Start Charity Golf Classic

SEPT. 16 Wine Women & Shoes Fresh Start Women’s Foundation Chateau Luxe, 11 a.m. 602-261-7169

OCT. 6 Key to the Cure Tgen Foundation Saks Fifth Avenue, 8:30 a.m. 602-343-8681

OCT. 16 Community Luncheon Feeding Matters Arizona Biltmore, 11 a.m. 623-242-5234, Ext. 312

SEPT. 29 Schecterle Scholarship Scramble 100 Club of Arizona Kierland Golf Club, 12 p.m. 602-485-0100

OCT. 13 Project Pink Arizona Assistance in Healthcare The Wigwam, 11 a.m. 623-207-3009

OCT. 20 An Evening of Trends Trends Charitable Fund Arizona Biltmore, 5:30 p.m. trendscharitablefund.org

SEPT. 30 Schecterle Scholarship Ball Bubbles & Bling 100 Club of Arizona Westin Kierland Resort & Spa, 6 p.m. 602-485-0100

Off the Vine Vintage Wine Auction Hospice of the Valley Mountain Shadows Resort, 6 p.m. 602-636-6380 or 602-636-5314

Heels for Healing Florence Crittenton Flo’s on 7th, 8 a.m. 602-288-4581 OCT. 6 Salud! Gabriel’s Angels Fairmont Scottsdale Princess, 7 p.m. 602-266-0875 Connections of Hope Teen Lifeline Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 6 p.m. 480-664-1052

NiteFlite Scottsdale Active 20-30 Club McCormick Ranch Golf Club 6:30 p.m. 480-285-9252 Rendez-Zoo Phoenix Zoo, 6 p.m. 602-914-4362 OCT. 14 Night of Hope Gala Amanda Hope Rainbow Angel’s NOV Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 6 p.m. Herberger Festival 602-565-3589

For continually updated information, visit azredbook.com/calendar 52 / TRBM

4

of the Arts


NOV

11 Promise Ball OCT. 21 Applause! Gala Phoenix Theatre, 5:30 p.m. 602-889-6309 Hearts of Gold Gala Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health Arizona DoubleTree Paradise Valley Resort, 5:30 p.m. 480-889-0561 OCT. 28 Authors Luncheon Arizona Women’s Board JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa, 10:30 a.m. 480-951-2950 Moondance Heard Museum, 6 p.m. 602-251-0211 Night of Gold HonorHealth Foundation Arizona Biltmore, 6:30 p.m. 602-331-7858

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CopaBall Maricopa Health Foundation Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 6 p.m. 602-687-9031 NOV. 1 Every Child Matters Luncheon Free Arts for Abused Children of Arizona Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia, 11 a.m. 602-258-8100 For continually updated information, visit azredbook.com/calendar

Karen Grobman, PC 480.688.0688

www.ArizonasHotProperties.com September 2017 / 53


calendar

ANNOUNCING OUR 2017-2018 SEASON OUR 49TH YEAR Masterful Musicians Powerful Performances Cal Stewart Kellogg Music Director Conductor

Sundays 3 p.m. • November ~ March Valley Vista Performing Arts Center 15550 N. Parkview Place • Surprise

November 19, 2017 2 Symphonies, 1 Concert Beethoven~Mendelssohn

December 17, 2017 Happy Holidays

Holcombe~Tchaikovsky~Anderson

side-by-side with the West Valley Youth Orchestra

January 14, 2018 Fireworks for the New Year Berloiz~Brahms

Ravel: Concerto in G Major for piano and orchestra Guest Artist: Erin Hales

February 11, 2018 Let’s Talk Tchaikovsky

Rimsky-Korsakov~Tchaikovsky

March 11, 2018 Magnificent American Music Barber~Dvorak

Williams: Concerto for Saxophone and orchestra Guest Artist: Anna Marie Wytko Piazzolla: Esqualo Anna Marie Wytko & Joseph Wytko

westvalleysymphony.org

Mention Code TRB when ordering tickets

54 / TRBM

623-707-8844 Option 1

NOV

13

Old Bags Luncheon

NOV. 2 Driving Out Domestic Violence Golf Tournament Chrysalis Talking Stick Golf Club, 8 a.m. 602-955-9059 NOV. 3 Through the Eyes of a Child Luncheon Children’s Action Alliance Sheraton Downtown Phoenix, 11:30 a.m. 602-266-0707 Fresh Start Charity Golf Classic Fresh Start Women’s Foundation Kierland Golf Club, 8:30 a.m. 602-261-7169 Buckles & Bangles UMOM New Day Centers JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa, 6 p.m. 602-362-5848 Driving Out Domestic Violence Gala Chrysalis Jet Linx Scottsdale, 7 p.m. 602-955-9059 NOV. 4 Hot Night Fall Gala Phoenix Art Museum, 6:30 p.m. 602-307-2012

NOV

4

Herberger Festival of the Arts


Herberger Festival of the Arts Herberger Theater Center, 11:30 a.m. 602-254-7399, Ext. 105 NOV. 10 Dinner With Lincoln Sandra Day O’Connor Institute Arizona Biltmore, 6 p.m. 602-730-3300 R MBE A M E ission E M B E C O y free adm ll as njo we and e ll year, as d fu s an t n e v for a e , s . t rs un disco rs-only hou e memb

NOV. 11 Promise Ball JDRF Desert Southwest Chapter The Phoenician, 6 p.m. 602-224-1818 A McNight to Remember Ronald McDonald House Charities, JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa, 6 p.m. 602-798-5097 Beaux Arts Scottsdale Artists’ School, 6 p.m. 480-990-1422 NOV. 12 Live & Local Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale The District at Desert Ridge, 6 p.m. 480-344-5684

NOV

18

Heart Ball

NOV. 13 Old Bags Luncheon Homeward Bound Arizona Biltmore, 10:30 a.m. 602-374-8752 NOV. 16 PhotoBid Gala InFocus, Phoenix Art Museum, 6 p.m. 602-307-2079 NOV. 18 Heart Ball American Heart Association The Phoenician, 6:30 p.m. 602-414-5332

For continually updated information, visit azredbook.com/calendar

WELCOME TO

your GARDEN

Discover the beauty of the Southwest’s largest botanical garden, featuring 55,000 plants from around the world. Explore vibrant trails, festive events, worldclass exhibitions and fascinating classes.

1201 N. Galvin Parkway Phoenix, AZ 85008 480 941.1225 | dbg.org September 2017 / 55


a f te r- p a r t y

T

CORNER PIECE he startlingly blue spire at the corner of Scottsdale Road and Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard was sketched in the 1957 by Frank Lloyd Wright as part of his design for the state capitol. Arnold Roy, a Wright apprentice, accompanied the architect as he lobbied for the structure, but in the end, the state rejected the design. Wright died in 1959, and Taliesin Associated Architects, of which Roy became a part, was founded to carry on his vision. In 1991, the firm became Taliesin Architects. Developer Jim Pederson of the Pederson Group built The Promenade, Scottsdale at the southeast corner of Scottsdale Road and Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard in 1999. When the project was completed, he approached Roy with the idea of marking the northwest corner of the property with public art as his gift to the community. But what would it be? “I remembered the spire,” Roy says. He showed Pederson a photograph of the sketch, and the developer decided quickly. “That’s it.” The project was particularly appropriate because at that juncture, Phoenix lies on the west side of Scottsdale Road and Scottsdale on the east. The spire would serve as a gateway to Scottsdale, where Frank Lloyd Wright had been involved for so many years. Completed in 2004, the 125-foot spire was prefabricated in a Phoenix factory and trucked to the site. It is constructed of painted steel and features blue plastic panels that are lit from the inside by fluorescent tubes. Eleven feet by 8 feet at its base, the spire rests on an enormous footing to prevent it from being blown over – though that’s not likely, given that it weighs several tons. “It was a fun project,” Roy says. “How often do you get a chance to work on a spire? It’s absolutely non-utilitarian.” When Taliesin Architects dissolved in 2003, Roy continued working under his own name. He retired in 2016 at age 85.

56 / TRBM


Creative Problem Solvers. Self Advocates. Empathetic Leaders. ConďŹ dent Communicators.

Setting the stage for lifelong success.

Arts Schools Network Exemplary School 2017-2019 AZ Civic Engagement School of Excellence 2013-2017 FIRST Lego League Regional and State Robotics Challenge Champions

Engage Curiosity GOASA.ORG

#1 High School Mock Trial Team in Arizona September 2017 / 57


Walt Danley Christie’s International Real Estate

6BR | 6BA | 5,630 SQ FT $1,650,000 | MLS# 5609673

4BR | 4.5BA | 5,072 SQ FT $1,795,000 | MLS# 5642471

40409 North Echo Canyon Drive Cave Creek, Arizona Guy Donahue | 602.370.1492

9242 North 52nd Street P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Anita Best | 602.463.7143

4BR | 4.5BA | 5,384 SQ FT $2,250,000 | MLS# 5560890

6BR | 6.5BA | 7,241 SQ FT $2,600,000 | MLS # 5411861

7630 North Invergordon Road P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Karen Ganz | 602.469.6709

3410 East Rancho Drive P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Catherine Jacobson | 602.790.1992

5BR | 6.5BA | 7,487 SQ FT $4,500,000 | MLS# 5602409 6830 North Desert Fairways Drive P a r a d i s e Va l l e y , A r i z o n a Weston Broadrick | 602.628.1132

For More Photos and Information on These and 58 / TRBM Other Fine Properties, Visit WaltDanley.com

5BR | 7BA | 10,480 SQ FT $9,000,000 | MLS# 5486570 13950 East Bighorn Parkway Fountain Hills, Arizona Mark Lindabury | 602.663.1327

The Red Book Magazine Autumn 2017  

Society • Culture • Luxury