Issuu on Google+

CENTR A L CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSIT Y Wednesday, October 21, 2009

www.centralrecorder.com

Volume 106 No. 8

Emphasis on FYE Courses May Improve Retention Rates MATT KiERNAN ThE RECoRDER

Rallyers marched down from Maloney hall towards the student center mall Wednesday afternoon.

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Rally Goers: An Injury To One Is Injury to All MATT KiERNAN ThE RECoRDER

The NAACP and other campus organizations held a rally at the Student Center circle Wednesday to address racism on campus, and especially the allegation that a former cross country runner was forced to drink blood by his coach in the 20052006 season. Former athlete Charles Ngetich filed a lawsuit in September against his former coach George Kawecki and claims that in addition to subjecting him to racist remarks, the coach also forced him to drink blood in the presence of teammates. “This rally isn’t just about one issue, this is about a constant repetitive thing that happens on campus,” said Black Student Union President Patrick Williams. He emphasized that instead of concentrating on schoolwork, students find themselves having to fight for causes because racist acts keep occurring on campus. Signs were raised high reading, “Don’t just talk diversity, end racism in the university,” and, “The University must not remain silent,” with a mural of Malcolm X and a painting of a face wrapped up in bandages signifying the university’s quiet behavior on the matter near the back of the stage. Pages were passed around in support of the campus organization the Youth for Socialist Action and of comments left on the New Britain Herald Web site that

“This rally isn’t just about one issue, this is about a constant repetitive thing that happens on campus.” -BSU President Patrick Williams

were in support of former track and cross country coach Kawecki. “I believe in drinking the blood of Jesus, but not the blood of man,” New Britain NAACP President Ronald Davis said. Davis asked that the “wrappings” and “bandages” be taken off the face of the university to speak out on the matter. “If it doesn’t, it tells me that it encourages such activity,” said Davis, while he praised youth involvement with the crowd of students who gathered in the Student Center circle and said that the university needs that energy from its students. During the event, YSA President Marissa Blaszko began a chant by yelling, “When students rights are under attack!” The crowd responded with yells of, “Stand up and fight back!” A theme of the speakers who attended the event was that it’s not fine for people to ignore racist and discriminatory incidents on campus; they believed that an injury to one is an injury to all. “If it wasn’t for African-Americans, Latinos wouldn’t be here today,” said Vice President of the NAACP- CCSU chapter, Jasiel Leguisamon. Leguisamon recalled a time when he was jumped and beaten on campus and almost decided to transfer to another university because of it. President of the NAACP- CCSU chapter, Martine Bernadel mentioned that since the two years she’s attended CCSU,

To improve the low university graduation and retention rate, CCSU is narrowing its attention to first-year experience courses with the hope expanding them is a step in the right direction so that students may survive the next three to five years. University President Dr. Jack Miller explained that the administration must focus on first-year experience courses to ensure that new students remain students. As of the 20082009 numbers by the office of institutional research and assessment, CCSU’s six-year graduation and retention rate is 46 percent. Faculty and administrators of the four CSU system universities came together for a lecture and workshop directed by John N. Gardner Institute of North Carolina Vice President Dr. Betsy Barefoot to improve students’ first-year experiences. “I’m here to help you think about how you can be even more productive,” said Barefoot during the program in the Constitution Room in Memorial Hall entitled, “Defining and Measuring First-Year Experience.” While improving first-year experiences may help students, the institutions may see improvements in the increase of productivity of students, better campus organizations and an overall positive atmosphere. The old method of having students “sink-or-swim” has been found to be ineffective and it is very rare for a student to feel motivated to try harder after being told there’s a good chance they won’t survive college. “I think we have seen vast improvements in education, but we seem to have hit a glass ceiling of work where we can see the other side but don’t know how to get there,” said Barefoot. Attendees were given a survey to rate their institutions with questions asking about the degree to which their institution informs their first-year students about expectations; students’ understanding of the rationale behind general education courses; the institution’s collective sense of purpose. “I have to emphasize that no single person, department, or unit can improve the first year alone,” said Barefoot. She said that it must be up to the university as a whole to help in the process of improving their campuses. A nine-part model was shown which included improvements in learning, faculty being more involved with their students.

See Race Rally Page 3

See Emphasis on FYE Page 3

In The Recorder This Week: Personal Space Invaded: Diloreto Renovated Scared Silent: Mildred Muhammad’s Story

Page 2

Page 5

Not the Average Pizza Restaurant

Page 6

Podcast of the Week: Plant Money

Page 7

CCSU Shoots Down Seahawks

Page 10

FOR BREAKING NEWS VISIT: www.centralrecorder.com


News

2 THE RECORDER Wednesday, October 21, 2009

The Recorder

Student Center 1615 Stanley Street New Britain, CT 06050 T 860.832.3744 F 860.832.3747 editor@centralrecorder.com centralrecorder.com twitter.com/therecorder

Editor-in-Chief Melissa Traynor Managing Editor Edward Gaug Art Director Geoffrey Lewis News Editors Matt Kiernan Tonya Malinowski Entertainment Editor Michael Walsh Sports Editor Christopher Boulay Assistant Sports Editor Carmine Vetrano Lifestyles Editor Samantha Fournier Web Editor Alex Jarvis Staff Brittany Burke Kim Scroggins Ryan Perodeau Don Weber Timothy Farrell

About

The Recorder is a studentproduced publication of Central Connecticut State University and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of CCSU’s administrators, faculty or students. The Recorder articles, photographs and graphics are property of The Recorder and may not be reproduced or published without the written permission from the Editor-in-Chief. The purpose of The Recorder is to approach and define issues of importance to the students of Central Connecticut State University.

Scared Silent:

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

The Ex-Wife of D.C. Sniper Tells Her Story Faustine Colin The Recorder

Mildred Muhammad wanted the audience in Torp Theatre to know that her story is not just specific to her. She was a victim of domestic abuse, and is the ex-wife of the man called the D.C. sniper, John Allen Muhammad, who was convicted in on seven counts of murder and the perpetrator of a wave of sniper shootings that took the lives of 10 and wounded three. Though there was not enough evidence in court to uphold her prosecutor’s argument, Muhammad believes that her exhusband’s shooting sprees, along with a teenager named Lee Boyd Malvo, were a plot to kill her and the people around her. She spoke last Thursday and retold her story, an attempt to warn those listening of the signs and actions leading up to domestic abuse.

“Domestic violence has no race, no religion,” Mohammad advised on Thursday, which also marks the approximate seven-year anniversary of the shootings in the D.C. area. She encouraged people who find themselves the victims of domestic abuse to speak up. Her nightmare began when she asked for a divorce from John Allen Muhammad, who she explained had previously served in Iraq. She said that he wouldn’t let her go and began playing mind games. She said that the abuse doesn’t always have to be physical. He would also come in the middle of the night and scare her. Though she wasn’t completely aware of it at the time, he was already demonstrating violent and abusive behavior; he threw her new clothes away, he messed with her hair. Ultimately, he told her that she had become the enemy, in military terms, and he planned to kill her.

Muhammad also told the audience her ex-husband is evidence that war does have a real impact on the soldiers as well as on the family. When he returned from Iraq, he wasn’t the same and wore a an external “nice guy” mask, but internally he was looking for ways to control and upset the people around him. “It is not just a story; it is one of the many stories built on the experience of domestic violence and the depths of its terror,”Muhammad said. Her story continued when her then husband took their three children and left the country for 18 months, out of the reach of American authorities. He supposedly called her and ordered, “You either come back to me and die or you won’t see your children again.” When Muhammad had tried to seek help from her brother, telling

him that her husband threatened to kill her, he refused to believe it. When her then-husband returned to the country with her children, she departed from her home in Maryland, flew to Seattle, filed the necessary legal documents and regained custody of her children. But D.C. area the shootings began after their return home, which she believes were part of a plot to kill her and the people around her so Muhammad’s death would not seem targeted. She believed that his plot go kill her was also one to gain custody of their children as a result of her death. After 10 lives taken and four people injured, the police caught John Muhammad and Malvo. Mildred Muhmmad published a book title Scared Silent and established a non profit organization called afterthetrauma.org to aid survivors of domestic violence.

scene @ ccsu

A Weekly Stand-Alone Photo Captured at CCSU

Meetings for The Recorder are held on Mondays at 8 p.m. in the Blue and White Room in the student center.

Advertising

If interested in placing ads, please contact The Recorder’s Ad Manager at ads@centralrecorder. com. For more information including our rate card and more details, please visit www. centralrecorder.com/ advertising.

Comedian Seaton Smith entertains a large crowd in Semesters Monday evening.

Edward Gaug | The Recorder


3

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 21, 2009 / NEWS

EOP Holds Rally Goers: An Injury To Motivational Dinner One Is Injury to All Continued from page 1 she has seen terrible acts of racism and discrimination acted upon students and friends. She asked the crowd to think about how it would

feel to be far away from home and be treated in such a way that Ngetich has. “When do we stop relying on others to do the job for us?” asked Bernadel.

Students were asked to wear white t-shirts to the rally so that they could write their stories and promote peace on each other’s shirts.

Don Weber The Recorder

Central’s Educational Opportunity Program kicked off a meet and greet workshop last Thursday focused on improving students’ work in academics. The EOP, which recently celebrated its 40th anniversary, is a CCSU program that reaches out to high school students who need academic or financial aid in order to get to college. As part of EOP, students spend the summer before their freshman year of college so they know what to expect when their first semester begins. The program plays role in both the preparation and continuance of a student’s course to attaining their degree. Thursday night’s event in Memorial Hall’s Constitution Room was an informal scene with a relatively small group of students sitting at their tables. The motivational dinner and presentation was highlighted by a speech by former State Representative William Dyson. Dyson encouraged the students to make and maintain goals for

themselves. Achievements such as making the Dean’s List, volunteering and simply helping out fellow students were discussed. It could be something as personal as pulling off A’s throughout college or self-sacrificing such as giving back to the hometown community, or possibly just another community that could use help. “It’s what you put into the institution that you get back,” said Director of the university’s PreCollegiate and Access Services Awilda Reasco. Students in the EOP are always encouraged to put time into the school’s events, clubs and classes because they benefit from the time they put in, even if for résumé building; each one of those extra efforts is also another bullet on their experience and skills list. Program students were encouraged that even a five to six year stint for their degree was far more worth it than working with only a high school diploma for the rest of one’s life. Reasco affirmed that a bachelor’s degree shows dedication to education, provides connections, presents an expansive knowledge to a subject, and leads to higher pay.

Emphasis on FYE Courses May Improve Retention Rates Continued from page 1 Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Simple measures such as learning their students’ names were listed as a way to promote a deeper connection, as well as helping students know their purpose at the university. “I want to expand your view and think of the components that affect students’ transitions from first-year to second-year,” said Barefoot. There was a push to have more critical thinking implemented into first-year classes because of the lack of it and a move away from having students just take down notes and complete bubble tests. The impersonality of first-year classes is

fed by the fact that the classes can be large with too many students for a faculty member to get to know personally, which may not change. “We’ve stopped challenging them and studying them to see if they’re a good idea,” said Barefoot about changes that could be done to first-year classes. Often in the past, the first year for college students has been seen as a “cash cow” for universities because of the money that is being put into the school from tuition and the good possibility that a student may drop-out of college after that year. It is hoped that universities will move away from such methods and look towards trying to keep the students in the institutions.


4

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 21, 2009 / NEWS

CCSU Calendar 10.14 - 10.21 10.21 National Coming Out Day @ Student Center Circle 12 – 6 p.m. 10.21 Central Authors Presents: Practical Text Mining with Perl By Roger Bilisoly @ The Bookstore Student Center 12 p.m.

The Recorder On the Web SPORTS

Video: Post-Game Interviews with Coach Shaun Green (CCSU vs. Sacred Heart) Feature: The Two-Quarterback Game Plan

NEWS Through 11.14 Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, & Medicine Exhibit @ Elihu Burritt Library 8 a.m. – 9:45 p.m.

10.25 The Hangover @ Torp Theater 7 p.m.

Town & Gown Neighborhood Forum Video: Last Wednesday’s Rally Against Racism

ENTERTAINMENT Album Reviews: Flight of the Conchords Podcast of the Week: This Week in Tech 10.21 Bill Dyson Lecture @ Connecticut Room Memorial Hall 5 p.m. 10.21 A Little Night Music @ Welte Auditorium 7:30 p.m.

For breaking news and sports, visit www.centralrecorder.com.

10.22 Beecher Condom Carnival @ Vance Lawn 5 – 9 p.m. Through 10.29 Ghosts of Thadeus Torp & Students That Never Graduated @ Torp Theater 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

THE RIGHT COLLEGE THIS TIME. IF YOUR COLLEGE CHOICE ISN’T WORKING, YOU CAN STILL GET A FULL SEMESTER OF CREDITS WITH DEAN FALL II CLASSES. CLASSES START OCTOBER 26. APPLY NOW. Affordable accelerated sessions with financial aid available Take 3, 4 or 5 courses to earn up to a full semester of credits Study part-time or full-time toward a 2- or 4-year degree Live off-campus or on-campus in Franklin, Massachusetts Unparalleled academic support from faculty, mentors and peers For more information, contact Jim Fowler at 508-541-1547 or jfowler@dean.edu

dean.edu/fall2


Editorial/Opinion

THE RECORDER Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Editorial

NCAA Oversteps Boundries in Forsberg Dismissal Normally when student-athletes are dismissed from their team, it has to do with a violation of team policy or infractions having to do with their academic performance while on campus. In the case of Australian freshman Xavier Forsberg, a NCAA dismissal stems from the actions of three teammates from his Sydney Olympic Football Club team 10,001 miles away. The National Collegiate Athletic Association decided last week that Xavier Forsberg would have to sit out nearly two full seasons due to eligibility issues coming from investigations showing that three of Forsberg’s teammates received payment while playing on the

Sydney Olympic FC team, but not finding that Forsberg was ever included in the list of players being paid. Forsberg was “called-up” to play on Sydney Olympic’s professional team for three games, but never signed a contract team. This means Forsberg was never compensated for this time spent on the professional team. Despite never being given anything for his time spent on the professional team, the NCAA has determined that Forsberg is in violation of the association’s amateurism policy. Forsberg has stated that he was unaware of any players being paid for their stint with the professional team.

After a 10 week ordeal, the NCAA handed down a one season plus six game “suspension” for Forsberg due to these violations. This means that after packing up and moving his life to the US to play soccer, the NCAA determined he will not be able to do so until nearly a year from now. While the NCAA’s rules are understandable, it is also easy to see that said rules are being enforced in a very unique way that is different from what the rule was initially set up to do. A rule that keeps paidprofessional athletes from entering the amateur collegiate ranks is being enforced on a player that appeared in three games for a professional

club while being on the club’s youth team roster and never receiving a dime for his efforts. Not only is the enforcement of this rule being grossly overused in this circumstance, it might keep other international athletes from making the jump to the States to pursue a college career because they might be punished for playing at an elite level in their homeland. An award for outstanding play is being used to punish an athlete that is only looking to advance his athletic abilities at a new level that is Division I soccer. Playing at a professional level before the age 20 is a huge accomplishment and is the reason that our school decided to

recruit this talent to play for us. This ruling will definitely change the way CCSU soccer will have to look at recruiting international players in the future, making sure we don’t use scholarships on players that might be deemed ineligible due to previous playing commitments. The NCAA has clearly overstepped their bounds in their enforcement of the amateurism policy and should give great thought to reinstating Xavier Forsberg based on his appeal of their prior decision.

Personal Space Invaded: DiLoreto Renovations Can’t Come Soon Enough Christopher Machnich The Recorder

HAVE AN OPINION? Tell us what you think.

Send your letter to the editor at:

editor@centralrecorder.com xkcd.com

The year 2020 can not come fast enough, and for most of the students at Central Connecticut State University it won’t. Nearly two years ago, in 2007, Governor Jodi Rell signed the CSUS 2020 investment plan. This plan gives $950 million to the Connecticut State University System, which would finance plans for DiLoreto renovations of the current facility as well as a fourstory-in-fill addition that will attach it to Willard Hall. DiLoreto has not had a major renovation since it was built in 1969 and won’t see another until supposed completion in 2020. Overcrowding has plagued the classrooms for years, and it seems 2020 could be too late, as it will only continue to crowd. Since 1996 the number of full time students has increased 37 percent, and on top of that undergraduate enrollment is the highest it has been ever been. When will the crowding end? Probably not until after the reconstruction, 11 years away. Almost everybody on campus has attended class in DiLoreto, but the history and anthropology students have had to go in and out of this building just about every day for four years. For those of you that haven’t graced the building let me paint a picture for you. The outdated building alters the classroom experience for all of its students. The white washed walls, tan tile, combined with the dim classroom lighting reek of

lethargy and boredom. The environment truly tempts you to sleep. The only thing that keeps you awake is the fact that if you did happen to doze off, you would most likely fall into the side of a classmate on either side. The desks are no more nine inches apart, and most of the classrooms wedge nearly 40 desks into a classroom. Crowding and claustrophobia have become a way of life for the students of DiLoreto, and for the hour that your class congregates, academics are never the first thing on your mind. More often than not all you can concentrate is on the lingering aroma of the sweaty athlete straight out of track practice or the defining funk of the bushel of dread locks perched upon your neighbor’s head, both of whom are sitting practically in your lap. Personal space is an alien term in the classrooms of DiLoreto. If you are lucky enough to escape strange smells for a class period you can be sure you will be haunted by one of the following: somebody obnoxiously chewing their gum like they are in an audition for Juicy Fruit, the incessant clicking of a pen to the beat of Kanye’s “Love Lockdown,” or the constant shaking of a classmate’s leg. All of these would be exponentially less annoying if they weren’t going on in your personal space while you are trying to take notes. By far the most eye-catching feature to DiLoreto is the case of monkey heads. To the anthropology faculty and students, you can rest assured that these are more

than just monkey heads, and hold the key to human evolution. Unfortunately for the rest of the students the monkey heads are nothing more than that. Directly next to the case of monkey heads is a display of medieval weapons. Both of these cause first time students to stop, and more often than not you can hear your run of the mill “dazed and confused” student stop and say, “Dude sweet monkey heads.” Hopefully the new DiLoreto will have something more appealing. A nice statue, some LED monitors displaying upcoming events or office hours of the professors in the building, maybe even the full skeletal structure of a homo erectus? One can only hope. On top of all this once the renovation begins the plans will call to attach the current structures of DiLoreto and Willard Halls. A plan that wouldn’t lose class space during constructions seems nearly impossible, but by conjoining the two buildings it would potentially shut down an entire side of both buildings. In DiLoreto’s case, that is half of the building as it is only a single hall. Better find a new place to stick those history and anthropology students. Given the size of the current classrooms, they’d probably get used to a mop closet or the faculty bathroom. Maybe some students will be back for graduate programs in 2020, but cheers to all those students graduating after 2020 that will get to reap the benefits of those who suffered through their history and anthropology degree.


6

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 21, 2009 / UPGRADE

Cavos Not the Average Pizza Restaurant Samantha Fournier THE RECORDER

The Berlin Turnpike is home to countless local businesses and has something for everyone whether it be a night out at the bowling alley or an ice cream sundae. A little over a year ago the busy turnpike became the home of the cozy restaurant Cavos Tavern and Pizzaria, which serves both authentic Greek meals and pizza. A friendly server will greet you upon entry and escort you to one of the tables by the windows that look out on a patio surrounded by blue painted walls or to a comfortable booth in the small center of the restaurant. Light orange walls and welcoming staff give the restaurant a warm feel. You will realize that Cavos is not the average pizza joint upon glancing at the diverse menu. Greek cuisine such as the traditional gyro, meat served in a warm flatbread pita with a yogurt and cucumber sauce called tzaztiki, are offered for dinner as well as a number of other dishes and more than 20 appetizers. Be careful not to fill up if you do order an appetizer. The pikilia platter comes out of the kitchen plated on sky blue rimmed plates piled high with steaming pitas and lightly fried zucchini. The platter arrives with three small bowls filled with hummus, a thick and creamy

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

tzaztiki sauce, and cold roasted eggplant. This appetizer could easily a meal in itself. Enjoy the upbeat sounds of Greek music as you wait for your entrées. The Moussaka came out so hot the sauce was bubbling in the dish. Moussaka is similar to lasagna but lacks noodles. The moussaka was filled with layers of red skinned potatoes and roasted eggplant, covered in meat sauce, and topped with béchamel cream. Another entrée more than worth trying is the Greek Isles Special pizza. This white pie had a crisp crust and is topped with baby shrimp, fresh garlic, onions, crumbled feta cheese and capers. If you have room for dessert, Cavos has four desserts on the menu including baklava and galaktoburiko, which contains vanilla custard wrapped in phyllo dough soaked in a sweet sauce reminiscent of honey. If Cavos Tavern and Pizzeria haven’t hooked you yet with its delicious cuisine, then the sociable feel will. The owner of this family owned restaurant makes the rounds from table to table chatting with the regulars. Make sure to stop by Cavos if not for the Greek specialties, then for the fresh pizza. Prices are moderate. Cavos is open daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

REVIEWS

The Mag Seven Cotton Needle Sessions End Sounds October 6, 2009

feel never captivating your attention. Background music with a practice session feel to it. With that said, I definitely enjoyed the album as background music; it’s a result of all the tracks blending with each other. Coming in at any point in the album you can get the same feel that the other tracks had. I was a little puzzled with the harder feel of the later tracks as it was a departure from the majority of the album. I feel that these harder tracks took away from the floaty feel of the majority of the album. Anyone who needs to chill out or unwind can benefit from this album and the mood it creates.

Kalin Bucholz The recorder

Rammstein Liebe ist für alle da or Love Is there for All Universal October 20, 2009 Kim Scroggins The Recorder

Over the years it seems that Rammstein has never really been able to fit into a certain genre. Some consider them dance-metal; others call them industrial hard rock. Whatever genre you place them under; this group kicks the crap out of it. Their name, which translates to “ramming-stone,” is a perfect way to describe their sound. It’s hard and in your face. Since their first album, Rammstein has been known to mix heavy guitar riffs with other synthesized affects, thus creating that “dance” metal theme that people keep talking about. Overall the record played out almost exactly how I expected it to. But, as with practically every album, you get those few tracks that are complete misses. “Frühling in Paris”

sets itself outside of the norm for them. Normal isn’t even remotely close to a word I would typically use for these guys. In fact, I would say this song is almost painful. For those of you that are familiar with their music, you know that their slower songs are not their best. The slower the song, the more distorted lead singer Till Lindemann’s voice becomes. It’s almost as if he’s questioning himself: Should I really be singing this? But, we all have our flaws. Despite the few disappointments, the rest of the track list follows the traditional Rammstein fashion. The album opens up with an introduction that is slow to start but at about a minute in, all hell breaks loose. The first single off the album “Pussy” is sung in both English and German and no, they’re not singing about cats. For the most part this album is rather enjoyable with tracks like “Waidmanns Heil” easily getting stuck in your head. You don’t have to be a hardcore fan to get into Liebe ist für alle da you just have to approach it with an open mind and maybe a German dictionary.

When you listen to Cotton Needle Sessions it’s evident that these tracks will bring out a certain mood. The mood is that of a surf bum who has partied too hard the night before and needs to relax. For the majority of the album the tracks are almost melancholy. Hinting at sadness at times but still retaining an airy feel. The undertones of groove and the reverb of surf music are there and they don’t really become evident until the later half of the album. The majority of the album makes you feel like a detective walking the streets late at night. You expect the guitar to pick up at any time but it retains its melodic feel. I feel as if the band can play more with the variety of the mood but seems content to ride out the feel from the first track. Not until track seven, “Ether Cheeks,” does the guitar and feel of the album seem to gain momentum. But with only 10 tracks on the album, it seems like the album could use a few more extra tracks to capitalize on the new feel it generates. The talent is there, but absent are the hooks. I keep listening and expecting the song to pick up but it stays with a certain elevator music

Tegan & Sara Sainthood Sire / Wea October 27, 2009 Melissa Traynor The Recorder

Over the past few days, I’ve listened to this album at least 4 times, all the way through- that is 13 tracks, all around your average two and a half to three and a half minutes in length. I’m absolutely stunned that there were maybe three or four memorable moments on the entire record. This is not to say that Sainthood is any serious departure from typical Tegan & Sara. The record falls in line with the sweet and generally pleasant past releases like

If It Was You. But where are the standout tracks like “Living Room,” opened with delicate acoustic guitar pickings, or The Con’s “Back In Your Head”? Sainthood brings out the best of the pair’s characteristic correct combination of minor chords, simplistic electric guitar and folk rock, but it feels too generic for a Tegan & Sara album. We get a glimpse of their old tendencies in “Alligator.” It is a light and airy song, pushed gingerly forward by keys, that of a piano and of a xlyophone, but then the heavier drums and bass. You don’t have to pay any special attention to the lyrics, only notice that chorus chant “over you, over you” make the lyrics pop. It’s not especially dance-y, but carries with it by far the most upbeat label of the record. Tracks like “Northshore” and “Sentimental Tune” show hints of their brilliance, but ultimately really don’t deliver. They, like most of the rest of the album, lack spunk and character and really, it’s just not fair to fans. They also lack substance; there just is not that much to grab onto. It is my sincere hope that this album will grow on me, as many folk rock songs tend to do. In the meantime, I’m scrolling back in iTunes to look for Tegan & Sara’s older material.

Sick of reading album reviews for bands no one has heard of? Email suggestions to

editor@centralrecorder.com.


7

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 21, 2009 / UPGRADE

Not Just Nostalgia-Driven,

Where the Wild Things Are

Ignites Imagination

Photo | Warner Bros.

Michael Walsh THE RECORDER

Even before entering director Spike Jonze’s monster-inhabited fantasy island, Where the Wild Things Are sets the tone at home for what young Max’s upcoming adventure will be all about. A culmination of difficult issues inside a family, struggling to cope with the idea of being lonely and the pains of growing up send Max storming out of his house angry and confused after an incident with his mother, leading him to escape via imagination. Jonze has made a name for himself with other challenging, visually impressive and neardreamlike films like Adaptation and Being John Malkovich. But could adapting a 48-page book heavy with illustrations be his most challenging effort yet? Maurice Sendak, author of the classic children’s book of the same name, handpicked Jonze after feeling most connected to his work than the rest of the names on the long list of prospective directors.

And from there Jonze and writer Dave Eggers stretched the short book into a lengthy screenplay, all the while staying in touch with Sendak to ensure the author’s approval on nearly all fronts. From the moment Max touches land on the imaginary island the visual and emotional scope of Jonze’s film is realized. More melancholy than you might be prepared for, Where the Wild Things Are will leave children bewildered and adults absolutely satisfied. But that satisfaction isn’t just the nostalgia factor of seeing a classic childhood book come alive. Jonze’s film is a spirited affair that forces its viewers to use their imagination in joint fashion with Max’s. Even the most stubborn grown-ups must relinquish their inhibitions and revert their minds back to a freeing childlike state to really feel the sentimentality and emotion put into motion by Jonze and Eggers. So much of what Jonze and Eggers have to say about Max’s time spent with the monsters in his imaginary land can be traced back and related

to Max’s life at home, a relatable emotion for most viewers. An amazing source of this emotion springs forth from the inhabiting monsters themselves. Through a combination of live action, suitmation, animatronics and CGI, the monsters are brought to life in incredible fashion. It truly is remarkable how many effective displays of emotion and personality are pumped into and eventually out of these creatures. The decision to not rely solely on CGI really proves to be an excellent direction. By not depending on computers and leaving this sense of reality from the natural movements of actors in suits, the audience is even more drawn into Max’s imagination, and each monster is given a multi-faceted set of traits it can call its own. There is a sort of unspeakable believability instilled into the fantasy. Visually Jonze’s film transcends good and leaps into artistic brilliance. Careful cinematography helps capture the beauty of the various types of terrain and land growing inside Max’s imagination.

And one look at the fort built by Max and the monsters leaves the eyes in awe. Jonze uses a fresh palette of colors that relates to whatever the current mood of the film may be. In turbulent times a snowstorm sets in, while a beautiful bright sun can be seen in the more innocent and tender moments. Also speaking greatly for the mood of the film is the film’s soundtrack by Karen O, lead singer of rock band Yeah Yeah Yeahs and former girlfriend of Jonze. In her own innocent, childlike way, Karen O’s music speaks volumes for the tone. Karen O captures every raucous, playful and exciting moment like the enjoyable dirt clump fight but is also able to reflect on the more melancholy, experience-growing and sedative of Max’s experiences while away from the real world. There isn’t a moment in the film where her music doesn’t fit the scene, and for that her ability to ride the same wavelength as the film and resulting addition to the experience is just about as important as anything else.

A wonderful performance is put in by Max Records as central character Max. His innocence and determination is spellbinding. It’s a truly genuine performance and even more impressive when you consider the acting situation Records was put in, as the largest portion of the film is Records acting alongside actors in suits. Impressive voice acting was added to the project from the likes of Forest Whitaker, James Gandolfini, Paul Dano and Lauren Ambrose, all of whom help give the monsters their memorable personalities. Fears that Where the Wild Things Are would only succeed on a nostalgic level should be immediately forgotten. A spirited Jonze took to task and created this magical, endearing masterpiece of youthful and soulful exploration that while ultimately working better as adult fare, will still entertain young ones even though they might wonder why exactly those monsters get so darn angry.

P dcast of the Week: Planet Money Melissa Traynor The Recorder

You should recall that as part of a journalism conference held last year, Nation Public Radio’s Adam Davidson and Alex Blumberg visited campus to make a presentation of their “Giant Pool of Money” show as the analysis of the sub prime mortgage crisis of 2008. Unless you are an economics major, or very well acquainted with mortgage and banker speak, their subject may have seemed daunting at first. But then, once Blumberg and Davidson’s presentation got underway, it became clear that here were real masters of storytelling, and effective, clear storytelling at that. They interviewed the average Joe, the man on the street, all kinds of middle men, some greedy, some not, and broke through all they way up to the top, but they key is their skillful narration. Their language and the questions they asked made

it so easy for listeners to really understand these circumstances and how something so large, and seemingly distant would affect them. For now, listeners can get pieces of that show via podcast. They explore and breakdown different pieces of financial news in 15- to 25-minute podcasts, perfect for a commuter’s drive to school or making a colorful trip out of walking between classes. Over the last few weeks - and they’ve updated with a new podcast just about every two business days the Planet Money team’s Blumberg and Davidson, along with four other reporters, have been plowing through the health care issue. On a particular episode, they brought in Dr. Joseph Newhouse, a health care economist, to answer emailedin questions from everyday people who were confused about random charges and lines on their insurance or hospital bills. It’s safe to assume that Planet Money really delivered some tidbits of knowledge on that show; in

simply asking for a translation of their listeners’ very cloudy hospital bills, they transformed confusing, intimidating numbers into clear digits on a piece of paper. The podcasts have also investigated the rise of China, complete with thoughtful questions, such as bringing up the factors associated with the country’s economy, dependence on U.S. consumers, etc... But they are also not hesitant to ask the so-called ignorant or “dumb questions,” such as “what do Americans have to fear in a more powerful China?” In bringing the political jargon and abstract ideas down the level or the average listeners, the average constituent or consumer, Planet Money podcasts encapsulate the show and make it ready, mobile and digestible. Find NPR’s Planet Money on their blog www.npr.org/money, or subscribe to their free show in iTunes by searching for “Planet Money.” The Podcast of the Week is a new feature in The Recorder starting today.

We hope to bring our readers a guide to the best and informative podcasts out there, but would also like your input and suggestions. Do you subscribe to

podcasts, or listen to an online show routinely? Send us a line at editor@ centralrecorder.com and let us know what you think.

Planet Money’s Adam Davidson and Alex Blumberg.

Photo | Flickr.com


8

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 21, 2009 / SPORTS

SPORTS STARTS ON BACKPAGE

Volleyball Still Undefeated in NEC Brittany Burke The Recorder

Photo: CCSUBluedevils.com

After coming off a tough win against the Providence Friars on Wednesday, the CCSU Blue Devils were able to walk away with yet another win in a match against the St. Francis (N.Y.) Terriers. The NEC match against the Terriers (2-15, 1-6 NEC), helped elevate the Blue Devils in the rankings. After Sunday’s game against the Terriers, CCSU was undefeated in the Northeast Conference (6-0). After Wednesday’s hard fought victory against the Friars the Blue Devils were able to come back and regain the momentum and energy they seemed to be lacking, which led to a sweep against the Terriers. “[The energy] was there from the beginning,” said Head Coach Linda Sagnelli. “We’ve been working on that and we’ve been happy over the last couple of weeks because the team is focused on it. And now we’re really starting to play with momentum, play with energy, and it shows on the court.” The energy and intensity felt by all of the athletes carried into their level and play. The errors they were making against Providence seemed a distant memory as they stepped out on to the court. Their

ball control improved and there were minimal serving errors. The team was refusing to give up any easy points, which is what they were hoping for. “We wanted to work on some things today like ball control, because when we played against Providence we made a lot of unforced errors,” Sagnelli said. “We had very few unforced errors today and took care of the ball so I was very proud to see that.” The Blue Devils were able to incorporate every player in their three consecutive wins against the Terriers. It is that amount of team work that led CCSU to wins of 2511 and two games of 25-15. The CCSU athletes were consistently calling the balls they were after, moving as one unit and making steady passes to one another. “Everybody played well today; we were able to get everybody into the match. It was a total team effort as far as executing on the court,” said Coach Sagnelli. Freshman outside hitter Emily Cochran had an impressive game leading the team in kills. Sophomore Danielle Gasser (who, as of this match, leads the team in serves executed with 27) showed a lot of power in her serves, which is an area that Coach Sagnelli wanted improvement in.

The Terriers on the other hand were giving up points in open formations, running into one another and leaving balls untouched. Number five on the Terriers, setter Maria Kashavelova, was briefly taken out of the game after collapsing on the court holding her right leg. She was mildly injured after a run in with Terriers’ libero Liliana Rodriguez. “St. Francis did a good job today hustling. I think they are really fighters, and they really didn’t give up. But on the same note we really controlled the tempo and we controlled everything, which I absolutely love to see,” said Coach Sagnelli. A real test for the Blue Devils will come during the home stretch of the 2009 season, where they play all but one non-Northeast Conference match against Rhode Island. On Sunday, Oct. 18 the Blue Devils played Long Island University, the reigning NEC champions. They are back on their home court at CCSU on Halloween, Saturday, Oct. 31 at 4 p.m. against Robert Morris. That match up will be the second between CCSU and Robert Morris (CCSU won the first meeting 3-2).

Small Potatoes: Who Killed the USFL? Tim Farrell The Recorder

Who killed the USFL? What a great question. Filmmaker Mike Tollin created a short film for ESPN to help celebrate their 30th anniversary and to try and give us an answer. The film was called Small Potatoes: Who Killed the USFL? All this aside, I’m willing to bet that the majority of people out there have no clue what the USFL was, and how much of an impact it had on today’s professional football powerhouse, otherwise known as the National Football League. So let’s begin with a brief history lesson. USFL stands for United States Football League, and it was created with the basic intentions of feeding America’s love for pro football, which went beyond that of the NFL. The USFL’s seasons took place during the spring and summer months, which basically provided the fans with football all year long. The new startup league was created by David Dixon, an antique dealer from New Orleans, who had studied the two previous failed football leagues, the American Football League AFL and the World Football League WFL, and came up with plans to provide long-term success with the USFL. The USFL had a very promising start in 1983, including the signing of Heisman trophy winning running back, Herschel Walker, to the New York Generals. There were 12 teams in the league during the

had a monopoly on the television stations ABC, CBS and NBC, which did not allow them to air any USFL games during the fall. Well, the USFL did win the lawsuit, however they didn’t get exactly the dollar amount they were shooting for. Out of the $1.7 billion they went after, the jury awarded them $1.00. That one dollar was eventually tripled due to antitrust law, making the winnings $3.76, including interest during the trial. Needless to say, that check has never been cashed. The film came to an end with Tollin interviewing Trump asking him if he had any regrets or apologies to offer to the former executives from the USFL, to which he quickly replied, “We’re done here,” and eventually called the whole interview and the movie being made “Small potatoes”- the title. Photo | Flickr.com All in all, Small Donald Trump, and asked them Potatoes: Who Killed the USFL? how the USFL changed the face of really captures what went on professional football, and how it behind the scenes of the USFL, the NFL’s biggest rival in the field of came to an end. The consensus from former professional football. Who knows where or how far players and coaches was that the USFL came to end when it decided the USFL could have gone had they to challenge the NFL for football remained a spring/summer league. dominance. The man behind the I for one am excited at the idea of movement for the change was none more professional football, and I other than “The Hair,” otherwise think it would be safe to say that known as Donald Trump, then- so is the majority of football fans today. With new leagues like the owner of the New York Generals. The film showed how he had United Football League UFL and gained support from other team a planned comeback of the USFL owners and executives, eventually in 2011, America could be in store culminating in the famous USFL v. for more hard hittin’ gridiron action NFL anti-trust lawsuit. The USFL than we can handle, but then again, had sued the NFL saying that it there’s no such thing as too much football… first season, including the Michigan Panthers and the Philadelphia Stars, the only two teams to win a USFL championship game (Philadelphia won 2). However, all good things must come to an end, right? That’s where the documentary Small Potatoes: Who Killed the USFL? comes in. The piece centered on filmmaker Tollin and his connection with the league. He interviewed former USFL players and executives like Steve Young, Jim Kelly, and

Put your skills to work. The Recorder is hiring. Inquire or apply at The Recorder newsroom in the student center and sign up for an interview with the executive editors. More info at centralrecorder.com/jobs for job descriptions and applications.

The Recorder is hiring for the following positions: Managing Editor Copy Editor News Editor Assistant News Editor Assistant Web Editor Advertising Sales Representative


9

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 21, 2009 / SPORTS

Pick Your Poison

NFL Predictions for Week 6

Week 6 showed up with a ton of upsets and unexpected victories. No one saw Oakland beating Philly or New England putting up 59 points in the snow. This is why we keeping watching every week. The Recorder is in the process of determining this year’s grand prize. If you have any suggestions, please let us know. E-mail us at: editor@centralrecorder.com

christopher boulay Sports Editor

CARMINE VETRANO

Assistant Sports Editor

Edward Gaug

Managing / Photo Editor

Melissa traynor Editor-in-Chief

Indianapolis at St. Louis

Indianapolis

Indianapolis

Indianapolis

Indianapolis

New England at Tampa Bay

New England

New England

New England

New England

Green Bay at Cleveland

Green Bay

Green Bay

Green Bay

Green Bay

Minnesota at Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota

San Francisco at Houston

Houston

San Francisco

Houston

Houston

San Diego at Kansas City

San Diego

San Diego

San Diego

Kansas City

Buffalo at Carolina

Buffalo

Buffalo

Buffalo

Buffalo

NY Jets at Oakland

NY Jets

NY Jets

NY Jets

NY Jets

Atlanta at Dallas

Atlanta

Atlanta

Atlanta

Atlanta

New Orleans at Miami

New Orleans

New Orleans

New Orleans

New Orleans

Chicago at Cincinnati

Cincinnati

Chicago

Cincinnati

Chicago

Arizona at NY Giants Philadelphia at Washington

NY Giants

NY Giants

NY Giants

NY Giants

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

This Week’s NFL Pick’Em Leaderboard Rank

Name

Total Points

Current Week

1

Nicholas Menapace

63

11

1

Carmine Vetrano*

63

11

1

Marc Chouinard

63

9

4

Anthony Gonsalves

62

10

5

Joshua Davenport

60

8

5

Tonya Malinowski*

60

8

5

Brittany Burke

60

8

8

Chris Boulay*

59

10

8

Michael Walsh*

59

10

8

Ryan Kennedy

59

7

11

Matthew Kitson

58

11

11

Edward Gaug*

58

9

13

Michelle Traynor

48

9

14

Timothy Farrell

47

10

14

Kevin Dennis

47

0

16

Chris Culmone

45

7

17

Gary Berman

42

9

18

Melissa Traynor*

39

9

18

Nick Caiafa

39

9

20

Sean Chacho

38

9

21

Ryan Ibarra

33

7

22

Justin Martin

29

8


10

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 21, 2009 / SPORTS

Forsberg Declared Ineligible By NCAA

Continued from page 12

“It’s none of my business to know somebody is being paid or compensated, so personally, I think this ruling is unfair.” Even with the ban clouding his future with the team, Forsberg praised the coaching staff and believes his teammates can still go far in his absence.. “Coach [Shaun] Green and Coach [Paul] Wright gave me every opportunity to come here and saw my potential as a college player, and I’m thankful for that,” he said. “I know we have a good team and I have no doubt that we could win the NEC [Tournament]. They just have to try to pull it together. I just wish I could be a part of it.” Pincince also made clear that CCSU men’s soccer and the CCSU athletic department will not receive further sanctions by the NCAA beyond Forsberg’s ban. Forsberg was also a member of the Sydney Olympic F.C.’s youth outfit.

Sydney Olympic F.C. is a member of the New South Wales Premier League, the second tier of the Australian Soccer Pyramid, below the A-League. Forsberg is able to appeal the decision, but at the moment, no decision has been made to whether or not he will do this. “I am exploring all avenues at the moment,” Forsberg said. “My mind has been racing to try and work out what I am going to do, but I’ve gotta play. If that’s not here, I have to do it somewhere else.” Forsberg, a native of Green Point, Australia, is a transfer student from the University of Newcastle in Callaghan, Australia. He was the former captain of the Australian Schoolboy National Team. He has also made appearances for the Central Coast Lightning, a team in the New South Wales Super League, a level below the NSWPL, as well as the Marconi Stallions F.C., another NSWPL club.

Blue Devils Fight for the Win

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Brittany Burke The recorder

After a winning weekend against NEC opponents, St. Francis and Robert Morris, the CCSU Blue Devils were able to rally together and win against the Providence Friars (10-13) in game four of the Wednesday night match. The Blue Devils were able to beat the Red Flash (3-1) on Oct. 10 and the Colonials (3-2) on Oct. 11. Even with the team’s successful weekend CCSU seemed more lethargic than intense. They were following the ball rather than moving as a collective group, which caused holes in their formations. The gaps between players lead to the team giving up easy points to the Friars, even though the Blue Devils were able to come away from the first two games with a win. Games one and two were close with CCSU squeaking by with wins by two (27-25) in the first and the next by three (2522). Things started to fall apart for the Blue Devils in the third.

“We were able to win games one and two, even with not having great ball control,” said Head Coach Linda Sagnelli. “But when it translated in a loss in game three I think they realized ‘Hey we’ve got to play our game tonight because if we don’t then, you know Providence can sneak a win out of this.’” The Blue Devils were able to maintain the lead for most of the third game but after Providence tied it up at 20 the Blue Devils couldn’t seem to hold them. From that point on the two teams were tied a combined three times, at 20, 22 and 23. Eventually the Friars pulled out the win, defeating the Blue Devils by two at (25-23). The third game served as a wakeup call for the Blue Devils. CCSU came out strong in the fourth game, beginning the match by putting seven unanswered points on the board. “When they decided to go out there and handle the ball and make Providence make a play to earn a point; that is when it started to click from us,” said Coach Sagnelli. The team continued to stay strong while minimizing their mis-

takes. Their serving improved, the athletes continued to have good blocking at the net and the amount of ball control increased. The fourth game was a complete turnaround from not only the third game, but the first and second as well. “I think the whole level of focus changed in the fourth game when we realized, ‘Hey, you know what, if we do not execute this we could lose this match,” said Coach Sagnelli, who was surprised at the lack of intensity from her team, especially coming off of their back to back big wins over the weekend. The Blue Devils ended strong, finishing with the largest point deficit of the season, with a final score of (25-8). The Friars began to get nervous while fighting to stay in the running in the fourth, becoming sloppier and giving up easily preventable points to CCSU. A lot of the fourth game comeback had to do with CCSU’s strong start, a skill the team has been working on all season. CCSU tends to start the games slow, steadily catching up as time goes by, which is a problem that Coach Sagnelli and the team wanted to eliminate. “It needs to be player driven. Meaning we need to get pumped up, the players need to get pumped up in whatever little things that they’re gonna do. In order to bring that energy to the court is gonna be important over the long run,” said Coach Sagnelli of her team’s attitude for the rest of the season. “We need to take every opponent we can to be intense on the court, to celebrate points because it really does have an effect on the game.” The team faces a tough road towards the end of the season; eleven out of the Blue Devils’ final twelve games are NEC matches.

Wanket Leads Blue Devils to 31-24 Victory at Duquesne ccsubluedevils.com

Senior quarterback Hunter Wanket had a career day as the Blue Devils came from behind for the fourth straight game and defeated Duquesne 31-24 on Saturday afternoon in Pittsburgh.  Wanket completed 15-of-20 passes for 233 yards and a careerhigh three touchdowns as the Blue Devils improve to 5-1 overall and 3-0 in Northeast Conference play.  He threw for 200 yards and three scores after halftime as Central came from 11 points down for the victory.  CCSU is back in action on Saturday at Bryant beginning at 1 p.m. “I’ve taken teams out here for the last four years and it is always a tough trip,” head coach Jeff McInerney said following the victory.  “We did a great job of throwing the football in the second half and we responded in all aspects of the game.  Our offense fed our special teams which fed our defense.” The Blue Devils got on the board first as senior running back James Mallory rushed from 63-yards out on the third offensive play of the gave to give the visitors the quick 7-0 edge.  Duquesne answered with touchdowns on back-to-back possessions to lead 14-7 with 45 seconds to play before the end of the first quarter.  The first scoring drive was aided by a couple of CCSU penalties, once on a fourth down play, and Matthew Glose caught a four-yard pass from Sean Patterson to tie the game. The second scoring drive took just four plays and went 69 yards, taking just 1:37 off the clock, as Patterson hit Brooks Roorback on a 47-yard scoring play. Roorback caught the ball at

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Hunter Wanket followed up a strong performance aginst Robert Morris with another at Duquesne. the 20-yardline and appeared to be tackled around the 20, but it was ruled his knee never hit the ground and he ran into the end zone untouched for the Dukes’ first lead of the game. Central responded with a 13play, 63-yard scoring drive capped by a 21-yard field goal by junior kicker Joe Izzo to cut the lead to 1410.  The field goal was the second of the season for Izzo. On their next drive the Blue Devils had a touchdown run by Mallory called back because of a holding call down the field.  They ended the drive turning it over on

downs as they were stopped for the second time in the game on fourth down. The Blue Devils appeared to be driving before the half but after a completion to Rob Fisher, he fumbled the ball at the Dukes’ 20-yardline to end the scoring threat and send the game to halftime. The second half opened with a quick scoring drive by the Dukes and they took a 21-10 lead with 9:25 remaining in the third quarter. “We were down and knew we needed to make some big plays,” McInerney said.  “The play by Hunter and Josue helped fuel this

team in the second half.  Hunter had a great second half and used the whole field to move us into the end zone.” The Blue Devils answered with 21 unanswered points, on three second half scoring throws by Wanket, to take a 31-21 lead with 8:26 left in the fourth quarter.  Wanket hit three different receivers with his scoring throws as the Blue Devils rallied for the fourth straight week when trailing at halftime to win the game. Wanket hit Josue Paul on the second play of the first drive after

the Blue Devils went down 10 points.  The pass came from 64 yards out and capped the two-play scoring drive that covered 75 yards.  Paul made an impressive grab on a great throw by Wanket for the first score of the half. On the next offensive possession Wanket hit senior quarterback/ wide receiver Aubrey Norris from 14 yards out, the first receiving touchdown of Norris’s career, to give CCSU the lead for good, 2421.  The third scoring strike, which came following a blocked punt by London Lomax deep in Duquesne territory, came on a fourth down play.  Wanket hit senior Nick Colagiovanni from 20 yards out to put the Blue Devils ahead by 10. Wanket finished the day completing 15-of-20 passes for 233 yards and the three scores.  Mallory rushed 15 times for 121 yards and a touchdown.  Paul ended the day with eight catches for 142 yards and the touchdown while Norris also caught three balls for 48 yards and a score.  He was 7-of-8 for 160 yards and a pair of touchdowns in the third quarter alone.  In the second half he was 10-of-12 for 200 yards and three touchdowns.  It was the first time since October of 2005 that a Blue Devil quarterback has thrown for three touchdowns in a single game.  He hit three different receivers for scores in the game. “We moved the ball well and made the plays when we had to.  We dug ourselves a hole with the penalties in the first half but again we came alive in the second half,” McInerney said.  “We are headed home with a W, and we are still undefeated in the league which is what we wanted coming out here this weekend.”


11

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 21, 2009 / SPORTS

Six Second Half Goals Lead Blue Devils to Win

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Raphael Guimaraes is taken down by Denis Brunotte in the second half which resulted in two yellow cards.

Blue Devils Lose Physical Match to Sacred Heart Pioneers Continued from page 12 first start of the season in net for the Blue Devils, making four saves. Regarding going down 1-0 right before halftime, Green said, “The whole dynamics of the game changes now because [Sacred Heart] comes out of the locker room with something to fight for.” Both goals showed the glaring defensive lapses that have plagued the team this season. Defender Jessie Menzies was disappointed with the play from the back line and believes that the lack of composure in defense is costing points for the team.

“It’s not that they score on us, it’s our mistakes that cost us the goals,” Menzies said. “We have to stay focused, it’s what’s killed us every game. If we do that, and our forwards score more goals, then this could be a special season.” Jared Spieker received a yellow card in the 60th minute, when he held a Pioneer striker on a potential breakaway. Raphael Guimaraes and Sacred Heart midfielder Denis Brunotte were both given yellow cards for an altercation in the 71st minute. CCSU also lost at Fairleigh Dickinson Sunday, with the score 5-1.

The two losses leave the Blue Devils (6-5-1, 1-3-1) with four points in the conference out of a possible 15. CCSU’s lone goal came from Eduardo Ortiz goal assisted by Robert Cavener. Serge Zulu, Kenley Mathurin, Paul King, Dominic Reinold and Dragan Naumoski all scored for the Knights (5-8-1. 2-3-1). CCSU now sits ninth in the NEC standings as of print time, six points adrift of Sacred Heart, who currently hold fourth place and the last playoff spot.

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Cara Cavallari dribbles down the endline towards the goal.

Continued from page 12 “Our defense was playing good. We wanted to come out and continue to play hard and put the game away,” said Hilt. The only slip up CCSU had during the game came in the penalty count. The Blue Devils committed 11 fouls where Wagner only accounted for 1. Fortunately, the fouls didn’t hurt Central’s

chances of gaining three points and remaining tied at the top of the NEC with Monmouth University. CCSU will be at Monmouth this Friday afternoon. “It’s great to have the wins but we’re only half way there. We’re taking care of business with 5 more games left to go in the conference we need to stay focused to get the results that we need,” said coach D’Arcy.

Ice Hockey Loses Control of UMass Game Brittany Burke The recorder

The CCSU Blue Devils club hockey team fell short in the match against University of Massachusetts by a score of 8-6 at home late Saturday night. The Blue Devils were able to control most of the first period, scoring three goals and taking the lead 3-2. They scored early, the first goal coming from senior forward Matt Williams, less than three minutes into the first period. That first goal seemed to give added momentum to the CCSU who were already coming off of a win of 3-2 against Bryant College on Friday Oct. 16. They were able to build to upon that goal with two more, one coming off of a power play as UMass player, Brian Dragunas was in the box for cross checking. At the change of the periods CCSU started to fall out of step. The Blue Devils began to lose control about half way through the period despite the fact that they were able to come out and score only 24 seconds in. CCSU was able to increase their lead to a three point deficit at 5-3 but with the point increase also came an increase in penalties. In the second period alone CCSU and UMass doubled the amount of penalties to six apiece as opposed the three penalties each team received in the first. It was

hard for the teams to find any real flow in game play due to the stop and go nature of all the penalties. “It’s tough to get into a flow, it’s tough to role the lines when you’re in the box constantly playing man down,” said Head Coach Ben Adams. The penalties began to control the game, from both sides of the puck. Early in the second period a UMass player was given 10 minutes in the box for game misconduct along with a teammate who was put in for two minutes for cross checking. At any given time you could look to the penalty box and find two or three players serving their penalties. CCSU were also racking up their fair share of penalties. They had calls for too many men on the ice, roughing and contact to the head late into the second. While the teams were battling the whistle blows from the referees the Blue Devils also had to also begin fighting the dominant play of the UMass who began to up their game. Despite the fact that sophomore forward Jeff Pease scored his second goal at the top of the second and captain Joe Dabkowski, scored his first at 7:59 the team still lost their lead. With 2:55 left in the second period UMass tied up the game with three goals in less than five minutes. It looked like the two teams

were going to go into the locker room in for their between period break tied, but with 6.4 seconds left UMass scored again, upping their goals in the second alone to four and increasing their lead (65). “I think killing so many penalties puts a lot of strain on the guys and it does take a lot out of you. But that definitely hurt our chances for a third period push,” said Coach Adams of the amount of penalties occurring in the game. UMass continued to skate strong scoring two more goals in the third period and keeping penalties to a minimum. Things began to look up for the Blue Devils when senior Mike Diclemente scored an unassisted power play goal with 7:14 left but it wasn’t enough to win the game. As a result of the loss the team realized there are still some critical things that they need to work on in order to make it all the way. They need to improve upon the defense, making sure to clear the puck from in front of the net and then blocking the shots that are taken against them. “It’s going to be a tough hill climb. I think they have the talent to do it as long as they put everything together and play a full sixty minutes,” said Coach Adams. The Blue Devils are at their home rink for the next three games beginning with the University of Maine on Oct. 23 at 9:35 p.m.

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Jake Vitali lines up a hit on a UMass skater crossing the blue line.


12 THE RECORDER Wednesday, October 21 , 2009

Sports 10.21 Aussie Forsberg Declared Ineligible By NCAA

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Connor Smith heads a ball into Sacred Heart territory. Unfortunately, the Blue Devils couldn’t put the ball in the net, losing 2-0.

Blue Devils Lose Match, Cool at Sacred Heart Christopher Boulay THE RECORDER

FAIRFIELD, Conn. - CCSU men’s soccer team were beaten 2-0 in the first stop of their weekend road trip at Sacred Heart. Pioneer midfielder Norman Baer sealed the Blue Devils’ fate in the 70th minute when he scored off of a diving header from a Lusiano Dadario cross. “Until we stamp out those stupid goals that we keep giving away, we’re just going to keep losing. Simple as,” Cavener said. “It’s our own fault again. Alright, they won the

game, but they weren’t anything special. I thought we could have won the game, but it’s our own fault.” CCSU played with a new formation for the match, switching from a 4-4-2 to a 4-5-1, something that in the first half looked to be a good change. The Blue Devils had some opportunities, namely a beautiful piece of passing from Connor Smith and Eduardo Ortiz to captain Robert Cavener, but Cavener could not direct it into the net. With only one shot on goal in the first half, the momentum shifted permanently into Sacred Heart’s favor.

“We started off the game really well, I thought,” Coach Shaun Green said. “Until they scored I thought we dominated the play. We did everything but convert our opportunities.” Patrick Daka opened the scoring for the Pioneers (6-4-1, 3-1-1) in the 42nd minute on a pass from Nemanja Filimonovic on a breakaway that deflected off of a diving Chris Jones. Sacred Heart keeper Alex Jones made three saves for his shutout. Jones made his

in the 53rd and 54th minutes. “I was excited to see the girls score some goals the shout was very important as we’re continue moving forward in the season,” said D’Arcy. “The team work has been a excellent becomes a great one two combination.” With substitutes in the game, the Blue Devils tacked on four additional goals, while maintaining Caity Casey’s clean sheet in the process. Two goals came back-to-back off the foot of senior midfielder Karise Hilt in the 72nd and 73rd minutes. See Six Second Half Goals Page 11

See Aussie Forsberg Page 10

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Junior Erica Celini puts a shot on net from just outside the goal box. Celini scored her first goal of the season in the 79th minute.

The Central Connecticut State University women’s soccer team (7-6-2, 5-0-1) were running on all cylinders as they took on conference rivals Wagner College (1-11-2, 0-5-1) and erupting for an 8-0 shutout win. The Blue Devils dominated possession throughout the game, outshooting Wagner 25-4 and never allowing the game to get close. Scoring started early in the first half in the 10th minute when the team’s two forwards

Inside This Issue:

hooked up for a goal that was scored by Brittany Emin with an assist from Brittany Jackson making it a 1-0 game. In the 37th minute of the game, Lauran Silvia scored from teammate Clio Tregear to make the score 2-0 which would be the score at the end of the first 45 minutes of play. “It was important to get the goals in the first goals couple goals and the performance was good too” said Coach Mick D’Arcy. Central led the entire way, but in the second half CCSU became visibly unstoppable. Leah Blayney made her mark as she got back-toback assists on goals from Jackson and Tregear

Christopher Boulay THE RECORDER

Australian defender Xavier Forsberg has been ruled ineligible to play for the CCSU men’s soccer team by the NCAA due to violations of the amateurism policy. According to the statement by Tom Pincince, CCSU’s Sports Information Director, Forsberg was in violation of the amateurism policy because he took part in three matches with the Sydney Olympic F.C. first team, which “had other players that received more than actual and necessary expenses for playing on that team.” Forsberg he feels that the disciplinary action is unfair. “It’s really draining. Words can’t describe my anger,” he said. “At the end of the day, I am not happy unless I am playing soccer.” Because of his participation in the three matches with Sydney’s first team, the NCAA has applied a penalty on Forsberg that requires him to miss the entire 2009 season with the Blue Devils, as well as six games from the 2010 season. He has made no appearances for CCSU since he came to the school for the fall 2009 semester. The ban started at six games, but has increased to the current level. “Players like myself who haven’t been paid, but have played at a high level, aren’t able to compete here, which is really a pretty [bad] rule,” Forsberg said. “College soccer could be played at a much higher level if they let players like myself, and I am not trying to be cocky, but players like myself who have played at a high level, play here.” Forsberg is not only frustrated with the decision, but is also frustrated with the NCAA’s timing of their decision, something that has taken 10 weeks to finalize.

See Blue Devils Lose Physical Match Page 11

CCSU Shoots Down Seahawks 8-0

Adam Tulloch / Edward Gaug Special to The Recorder

Freshman defender Xavier Forsberg

NFL PICK ‘EMS How did you match up in Blue Devils Drop Game to UMass 8-6

See Ice Hockey Page 11

Week 6? See Pick Your Poison Page 9

CCSU Beats Duquesne on the Road 31-24

See Wanket Leads Blue Devils Page 10


Volume 106_08