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CENTR A L CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSIT Y Wednesday, October 7, 2009

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Volume 106 No. 6

Charges Dropped for G-20 Protester ToNyA MALiNoWSki THE RECORDER

The charges against the CCSU student arrested at the Group of 20 talks two weeks ago will be dropped pending the completion of 50 hours of community service sentenced at his court date last Wednesday. Jeff Bartos, 24, protested the G-20 talks in Pittsburgh when he was arrested with about 200 others and charged with disorderly conduct and failure to disperse. Bartos, the founder of the Connecticut chapter of Iraq Veterans against the war, was detained for 19 hours in Allegheny County Jail, according to his Connecticut contact, Chris Hutchinson. Huchinson said there was a national callin to the Pittsburgh police departments and Allegheny county jail. Friends, family, and See Charges Dropped Page 4

CCSU Professor Considers Racial Profiling Suit MATT kiERNAN THE RECORDER

Edward gaug | The Recorder

CCSU poet-in-residence and associate professor of English Ravi Shankar made a trip to Manhattan, N.Y. in July, not realizing he would face blatant racism and spend time in jail for a mistaken identity. He is now preparing a mistaken identity lawsuit against the City of New York and the New York City Police Department for $10 million. In the claim against the city and police department, the nature of the claim is to recover money damages for pecuniary loss, defamation of character, conscious pain and suffering and related damages for the recklessness and carelessness of both. “What happened to the professor goes against all of the rights and protections for all the people of this great country,” said Shankar’s attorney Bruce Baron of Baron Associates in Brooklyn, N.Y. “Police acted with the utmost disrespect and carelessness.” Shankar claimed he is a victim of racial profiling at the hands of NYPD and endured unnecessary time in holding after police arrested him with a warrant intended for another Ravi Shankar. “I want to tell my story to help others who may have gone or will go through the same sort of thing,” said Shankar. CCSU’s Shankar found himself in Manhattan on the night of July 10 to promote his online journal of art and literature drunkenboat.com where he spent the night at a Chelsea Gallery and had dinner with fellow writers and visual artists. Afterwards he and his cousin decided it was time to drive home back to Connecticut. See CCSU Professor Page 2

Director of Health Service Dr. Christopher Diamond discusses H1N1 situations on campus with professors, including precautions to take.

University Health Service: Spread Awareness to Prevent Flu MATT kiERNAN THE RECORDER

Health Service Director Dr. Christopher Diamond and Provost Carl Lovitt provided a forum for faculty to discuss the H1N1 virus and what students and faculty should be doing to take care of themselves and look out for the well-being of others. “How to keep the campus healthy has been the main focus since we’ve been here,” said Diamond. Lovitt suggested that faculty should be more flexible during this season because of student illnesses and that if a professor allows a student to stay home for days at a time while being able to make up assignments, it would stop other students from becoming sick. “We do encourage students who are sick to stay away from the classroom,” said Lovitt. Make-up exams or pushing back deadlines would keep students from falling behind in their grades and studies as well as students having the ability to turn in late assignments. Study groups or fellow colleagues of students would also be an option to help a sick classmate with what is assigned during class or helping with notes. “The reason we want them to stay away is

to keep them from getting other students sick in the classroom,” said Lovitt. A possible benefit from having this flexibility is that students wouldn’t need to hand in a note explaining why they were absent for a period of time. Students would need to make sure they weren’t ill anymore which would likely be qualified as no longer having a fever because of the decrease in chances of illnesses being spread when one doesn’t have a fever. Faculty and staff were urged to get flu shots from their health care providers. Health Services has been seeing a rise in students coming in looking for care with an estimated five times the amount seen last year. “Students need to stay away from the dorms if they are sick because that’s where people are more susceptible to illnesses,” said Diamond. “Social distance” teaching is something that could be considered for professors, which would be a way for professors to post portions of notes from classes online but in an informative and meaningful way. The online application Blackboard Vista is a tool professors currently use to post portions of notes and assignments, but a call is being made for more professors to use it.

Diamond said that we are currently in the fourth phase of an epidemic, which would be human to human transmission of influenza. The first phase involves influenza that harms animals, but without transmission to humans. “We have a pandemic but we’re living in a healthy community and healthy environment,” said Diamond. Although the forum was composed of a very sparse audience in the Constitution Room of Memorial Hall, it was designed to provide information and context. Past epidemics such as the Hong Kong flu, Asian flu, and Spanish flu during the past century had many fatalities that reached up to the millions. Concern for faculty may be that if a professor gets sick there won’t be anyone qualified to fill their position for a short period of time. Many professors specialize in specific fields and areas that most others wouldn’t be prepared to teach in higher-level courses. The administration hopes that faculty members will report if they’re seeing large amounts of students absent from classes to gain a clear idea of how many students may be ill.

In The Recorder This Week:

Is School Spirit in the Air? Race Commemorates a CCSU Track Legend

Page 3

Page 5

Album and Movie Reviews

Page 10

Trail of Terror Makes You Laugh and Shriek

Page 10

Shaun Green Celebrates 25 Years at CCSU

Page 15

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News

2 THE RECORDER Wednesday, October 7, 2009

The Recorder

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The Recorder is a studentproduced publication of Central Connecticut State University and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of CCSU’s administrators, faculty or students. The Recorder articles, photographs and graphics are property of The Recorder and may not be reproduced or published without the written permission from the Editor-in-Chief. The purpose of The Recorder is to approach and define issues of importance to the students of Central Connecticut State University.

CCSU Professor Considers Racial Profiling Suit Continued from page 1

Latin Sweets Bring the Treats Tonya Malinowski THE RECORDER

The Latin American Students Organization will celebrate their heritage with traditional desserts and music in Alumni Hall this Thursday. The annual Latin Sweets celebration is focusing on ancestry, with themes from the Aztecs and other ancient Latin cultures. Desserts will be accompanied by explanations about its origins. “We try and tackle the cultural aspect from different angles and keep the heritage alive,” LASO President Alex Rodriquez said. “We want to bring in students who aren’t Latino and show them about our culture and then remind Latino students about where we come from.” Rodriquez has started a new program this year, Jr. LASO, which brings smaller forms of the organization to area high schools. Members of the CCSU chapter set up organization structure and find a meeting space and faculty advisor for the high school students. The first program is currently being organized at East Hartford High. “Latinos are the fastest growing minority in the U.S. but also the leas educated,” Rodriquez said. “We want to get out to these high schools and try to improve graduation rates.” The Latin Sweets celebration is sponsored by LASO and will be held from 11-3 on Thursday.

While turning onto 6th Avenue, a police car flashed its lights and an officer on a megaphone asked him to pull over. The officer then walked up to his car with a flashlight and asked for his license and registration and whether he was drinking that night. Shankar said that he had a couple glasses of wine a few hours before and was fine and asked why he was being pulled over, which, according to Shankar, caused the officer to become irritable. Shankar said the officer told him he would “find out later.” After two other officers arrived, Shankar was given sobriety tests, such as walking a straight line and a breathalyzer and passed. “[An officer] came back after talking with the other officers and said, ‘I have good news and bad news. You passed the test but there’s a warrant out for your arrest,’” explained Shankar. The warrant was out for a Ravi Shankar who was caucasian, 5’10” and weighed 140 pounds, whereas professor Shankar is of Indian descent, 6’2” and weighs 200 pounds. “It’s always a great day when you can bag a sand nigger,” said one of the officers, Shankar alleged, after he was handcuffed. When he arrived at the precinct he tried to explain the man they were looking for wasn’t him where the officer allegedly said, “Tough shit. Talk to the judge.” Shankar was sent to the 14th precinct in Midtown and spent some time in a holding cell with around 30 men who he believed were in holding for more serious

crimes. He was told he’d have to wait until the next morning and was transported to a communal jail cell after being chained to six other men and teased by other officers singing “Here Comes the Bride.” All of Saturday passed by without Shankar’s name being called to see a judge and was allowed a phone call to his wife to tell her where he was. The cell he stayed in was of bare concrete walls, three concrete benches, an open-air urinal and an atmosphere that made it almost impossible to sleep. Sunday morning he was moved to another cell where his name was called to see a judge. After using a public defender to explain that the warrant was for a different man, the judge was upset that he wasn’t using a hired attorney, according to Shankar. He was told he’d have to pay a $75 fine and all charges would be dismissed. He paid and went home. Shankar has one year and three months to have a suit settled and said he and his lawyer are seriously considering it. Shankar expects to receive much less than the $10 million he plans to file for, with an estimated $10,000 payout. Shankar is on a sabbatical for the fall semester working on his book of nature and perception poems Seamless Matter and will return during the spring semester and spend time in Cypress, Greece to work at the CCSU partnered university Eastern Mediterranean University.

Ravi Shankar

Adult Arrest & Citation Log by the CCSUPD 9.24 - 10.1 On Sept. 24 after 11:47 p.m., Officer Orlando Oliveira arrested the following individuals: Dante L. Bacote, 20, of Meriden, Ryan R. Beaule, 20, of Windsor, Desmond D. Boxley, 20, Jordan C. Faucette-Spezzano, 20, of Greenwich, Nicole E. Leblanc, 20, of Ludlow, Mass., Bommie L. Fontaine, 21, of Ludlow, Mass., Rachel Nardone, 19, of Stafford Springs, Adam G. Tulloch, 20, of Windsor and Edward C. Ubalke, 20 of Meriden. All were charged with possession of a controlled substance of less than 4 oz. of marijuana and both Tulloch and Beaule were charged with possession of alcohol by a minor on a public street. All are scheduled to appear in court on Oct. 7. At 10:15 p.m. on Sept. 25, Brian A. Chrostowski, 18, of Darien, was arrested for use and possession of drug paraphernalia, as well as possession of a controlled substance or less than 4 oz. of marijuana. He is scheduled to appear Oct. 7. Nicholas G. Dragon, 18, of Ridgefield was arrested on Sept. 25 at 9:55 p.m. for use and possession of drug paraphernalia. Dragon has an Oct. 7 court date. On Sept. 29 at 9:30 a.m. Kevin D. Kapushinski, 18, of West Hartford, was charged with evading responsibility and has an Oct. 13 court date. Soto Neftali, 27, of Hartford, was arrested on Sept. 29 at 9:14 a.m. on charges of burglary in the sixth degree and larceny in the third degree.

scene @ ccsu A Weekly Stand-Alone Photo Captured at CCSU

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Candace Lecco anticipates the completion of her caricature.

Melissa Traynor | The Recorder


3

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 7, 2009 / NEWS

City Might Drop Charges for Students Caught in G-20 Protests Liz Navratil and Lindsay Carroll The Pitt News University of Pittsburgh

Photo courtesy of: Runner’s World

Ray Crothers, left, is being honored at the Oct. 25 race.

Machester Race to Commemorate CCSU Track Legend Matt Kiernan THE RECORDER

The Ray Crothers Memorial 5k road race will be conducted in Crothers’ memory for his contributions to the sport of track and field and will be used to benefit the track and field team at CCSU. Crothers (1942-2008) was a graduate of CCSU and became a member of the CCSU Athletic Hall of Fame in 1983. He was well known within the community for his contributions to the CCSU campus and lifelong participation in the sports of track and field and cross-country. “It all depends on if the race is a success and how many people participate,” said men’s crosscountry and track Coach Eric Blake. The event, which is to take place in Wickham Park in Manchester, Conn. on Sunday, Oct. 25 at 9:30 a.m., is being organized by the CCSU Alumni Foundation who will use the proceeds toward the Ray Crothers Scholarship Fund. People of all ages are invited to participate

in the race. The event is being divided into two races with the first being the kid’s 800 meter race at 9:30 a.m. and the adult’s 5k race at 10:30 a.m. The event is being sponsored by the Silk City Striders, a running club in Manchester, The Run In, a running equipment store in Rocky Hill and Runners World. Those who register before Oct. 9th will receive a Ray Crothers 5k Memorial shirt. The Crothers race will be run consecutively with the American Cancer Society walk to promote skin cancer awareness. Participants of the ACS walk will need to pay a $10.00 minimum fee. Those who decide to participate will need to pay a $5.00 parking fee to enter the park or find other parking arrangements. Winners of the race will receive trophies for the top two runners of the each age group and the top three runners of the men’s and women’s corporate teams. Participants can register for the race until Oct. 24th on www.active. com.

(UWIRE) - Deputy City Police Chief Paul Donaldson said Monday if University of Pittsburgh students prove they were “caught up” with protesters, the police will dismiss charges against them. Following the announcement, a Pitt spokesman said the university wants to “treat people fairly” but is still trying to determine how to refer students to its Judicial Board, which can suspend or expel students. “If we do determine that anyone was a student and merely caught up with the people down the street, then we’ll move to dismiss the charges,” Donaldson said. He didn’t elaborate on how students could prove they were “caught up” with protesters. A group of city officials��� including Mayor Luke Ravenstahl, County Chief Executive Dan Onorato, Chief of Police Nate Harper and Donaldson—joined for a press conference in the mayor’s office at the City-County building yesterday afternoon. They recapped successes from the G-20 Summit and answered questions about the Oakland protests when prompted by reporters. Shortly after, in a reversal of its previous stance, the university said it might not send all Pitt students who were arrested in Oakland Thursday or Friday to its Judicial Board. Fedele said he can’t make “a blanket statement” about which students will be sent to the Judicial Board, which has the power to suspend or expel students. But he did say, “I don’t think

being arrested is a violation of student code. Being arrested does not mean you did the crime, so simply being arrested is not a violation of the student code.” Fedele added, however, that if students are found guilty of crimes, they’ve likely violated the Student Code of Conduct and thus will be sent to the Judicial Board. Fedele said he wasn’t sure whether the university will wait until after the city police decide whether to drop students’ charges to review students’ cases. “It’s the type of thing that will probably be handled on an individual basis,” he said. Fedele said university representatives have contacted city officials regarding their “shared desire to ensure that students caught up in the activities of Thursday and Friday evening be treated fairly.” Fedele declined to comment on the way the police acted Thursday and Friday. “It would be premature to offer our own assessment at this point,” he said. Ravenstahl said he thought police responded admirably, but that during an evaluation of the entire G-20 event and planning, they would also consider the use of police force. “We will have that evaluation done and take a look at all the actions that took place,” Ravenstahl said. “But as a whole, I think the event delivered well.” “You look at the demonstrations that took place, I think it was 13 of them that were peaceful, one that got out of hand and I think that’s a credit to the people here in Pittsburgh,” he said. The mayor said that he thinks the

number of public safety officers— 3,078—who were in the city was an appropriate number. “There were no major injuries at all. None, which is unprecedented for an event of this time and I think speaks volumes to the planning effort that went into this event,” Ravenstahl said. Donaldson said police gave the order to disperse in Schenley Plaza on Thursday because of the crowd size and the G-20 activity at Pitt. He said on Friday night that they meant to allow protesters to stay until 11 p.m. “Then the order was given, but at 10:42, conditions had deteriorated and the decision was made to break the crowd up at that time,” Donaldson said. He said police were concerned that there would be a repeat of Thursday night, when businesses’ windows were broken along Forbes Avenue and Craig Street. When asked about students who might have been trapped or felt they had no place to disperse to, Donaldson said he “can’t understand that.” “We didn’t see any movement on the protesters to disperse until after we started [to arrest people],” he said. “When that happened, then many of them tried to flee. And I think at that time, they were not really dispersing—they were eluding prosecution. They were running away to get away from there.” Donaldson estimated 700 to 800 people were in the area, although the Post-Gazette and The New York Times have estimates of 400 to 500. He guessed 85 percent of individuals were able to leave the area.


4

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 7, 2009 / NEWS

Bowling Green State U. Making an Effort to Keep up With Other Green Schools Liz Chafetz The BG News Bowling Green State U.

(U-WIRE) - “The first duty of the human race is to control the earth it lives upon.” Those are the words of Gifford Pinchot, the first chief of the United States Forest Service, in 1910. Almost a century later, this is still a common belief held by many universities around the country, including Bowling Green State University. In a recent poll by the Sierra Club, nearly 60 percent of students applying to colleges look for green schools. The Sierra Club, a grassroots environmental organization, does an annual study of universities nationwide in an attempt to find the “greenest schools.” Their list takes into account eight different categories, such as energy, food and transportation, and then gives each university (of the 135 schools studied) a final score and grade. BGSU was not one of the Universities studied. Even though they are not part of the list, Nick Hennessy, director of sustainability at the University, said the University is doing well at going green. “BG is making a serious effort,” he said. “That’s what my job’s about. Every state school in Ohio now has somebody who’s full time job is like mine, or they at least dedicate a decent amount of time to it.” A new program about to start at the University to help go green is Friday Night Lights. Friday Night Lights, or what

might be called Friday Night Lights Out, will be part of a program where volunteers go into the classrooms on Friday nights to make sure the lights have been turned out after everyone has left, Hennessy said. This will hopefully cut back on the amount of electricity used because otherwise the lights are left on all weekend, he said. Gary Silverman, director of environment and sustainability at the University, said he hopes the University can work to become more green. “Right now we’re about in the middle,” he said. “We’re not at the bottom, but we’re also not in the lead. It’d be good to get there.” Silverman said he hopes for the University to get on top like they were in 1992 after they first implemented the recycling program. “We were the first to do it,” he said, “and the first to do it so well.” A reason for the University to try to jump in the lead is House Bill 251. The bill states that universities must reduce their energy intensity by 20 percent by 2014, compared to 2004. “We’re going to easily meet that goal,” Hennessy said. One way the University could get in the lead would be to sign the American College and University President Climate Commitment, Silverman said. The commitment would be to become climate neutral within two years, integrate sustainability into the curriculum, complete the emissions inventory and make an action plan, and help make

inventory and progress reports publicly available. Through this, each university overall reduces emissions and helps make sure graduates are knowledgeable about sustainability. “It’s an issue that involves everyone,” Silverman said. “It’s not just the little things.” This initiative started in 2007 and now has 653 signatories from different universities nationwide. The only way for the University to join the program would be for President Cartwright to sign the University up for the challenge. “It’s a very ambitious goal,” Silverman said. In signing the commitment, it would then be up to the University as to whether to keep to the agreement. But if the University were to fail, it would not be the first time. In 1992, President Olscamp signed the Talloires declaration, a declaration which is a ten-point action plan for incorporating sustainability and environmental literacy, and has been signed by more than 350 university presidents and chancellors in over 40 countries. However, the University hasn’t kept up with its promise, Silverman said. “We’ve signed the agreement but we haven’t done much to uphold it,” he said. A resource willing to work with the University is Kevin Maynard, the utilities director in the city of Bowling Green. “We’d be more than happy to help the University achieve that goal,” he said. “We help any client as much as we can.”

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Charges Dropped for Student Arrested at G20

Continued from page 1

IVAW members called to find out where Bartos was being held and demanded he be set free. “By 6 a.m. he was still detained after mostly all of the people he was arrested with were released,” Hutchinson said. “So we put out the notice to our whole anti-war list to start calling and demanding some answers.” Bartos was released after 19 hours of detention, at which time another call-in was initiated to request the charges be dropped. “He was just helping someone else rinse out their eyes after they had all been sprayed with tear gas and pepper spray,” Hutchinson said. “He was singled out and the police took all of his medic gear and bound him very tightly.”

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The IVAW has organized a protest against the war on October 17 in Boston as part of a series of protests across the country. Bartos will be speaking about his experience. Bartos could not be reached, but Hutchinson said there is no legal action currently planned. When asked if he believed unnecessary and excessive force was used, Huchinson answered, “absolutely.” According to the Pittsburgh Municipal Court, Bartos’ file is under review and subsequently unavailable, but his community service can be served in Connecticut and all charges will be dropped upon their completion before his next court date in January.

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Editorial/Opinion

5 THE RECORDER Wednesday, October 7, 2009

Editorial

Glimpses of What Could Be School Spirit The campus looked especially active this week. An impressive homecoming schedule of events - the quintessential fall football game, good use of outdoor activities and a famous R&B artist - is the obvious reason, but there may be something more. For the first time since the beginning of school, or maybe even earlier, the CCSU clubs and organizations had put on worthy shows and activities with good

turnout to validate them. Also, that’s what happens when the school drops a couple thousand dollars probably more - on national music acts. It felt like the student presence was real and sincere unlike other events where free shirts and food are tossed out. Student plans attracted students, and that is key in understanding why homecoming weekend brought in the people and the spirited atmosphere for the first time this semester. The

ladies of Central Connecticut A Capella Society performed a small set at the pep rally on the Vance lawn, and while many of the students participants had become passers-by, the group enjoyed cheers and singers-along well into Homecoming Eve. Earlier in the week, the student center circle was consumed by students wrapped up in blankets roasting s’mores. Students even managed to hold a line for a few hours in the student

Letters to the Editor

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This may sound rude, but that’s not my intention.   I guess back when I was at CCSU I was more interesting in which restaurant had the best Chinese, what bands released a new album, and recent movie reviews than current political/world events, or even editorials of student perspective on such events. A while back there were a few articles regarding a “hate crime” (though some argued it was not) and I found those to be very interesting in that student’s were able to express their views on a very important cultural issue. Yes, I think there should be articles on the CCSU football team’s latest victory (or likely loss), but I also encourage you to broaden the range of articles in the paper.  Take a look at even just the home page of UConn’s paper, it includes an array of topics. Thanks for reading. Luke Martona

We are living in the middle of a Technological Renaissance. How COOL is that?!
Information is rapidly available to masses of people as never before! Printed Encyclopedias and Newspapers lose some of their old clout in the wake of internet news and other forms of upto-the-minute current events media.
 With all the activity and growth, it seems to follow that people will develop accordinglyI simply stand in wonder at who these New Renaissance Men and Women are/will be?
 How is the great shift in technology, the “Big Bang of Information Access”, affecting the Arts, culture, music, etc.? How is the statification of society changing as a result of the massive input available to human beings

all over the globe now via the internet age?
 We now have a class of cultured, educated people with low to medium economic means- anyone who can afford a computer, laptop or other device with wifi or internet access can pull down every form of intelligence from a concrete, accessible collective unconsciousness such as Jung may have never concieved of. Because of the Information Age we have much of human learning at our fingertips, any hour of the day. Literacy has certainly come a long way from monks scribing single copies of religious texts, cloistered out in the hills. In the Future, I’d imagine there might be more peace, understanding, and pacifism than ever in the face of so much information to empower the individual to rise above the group mind of hate, fear and politically controlled warfare to fulfill the agendas of a few. I really think think we shall become closer to the Angels with this new power. I wonder how the intelligentsia is networking in modern times- If it were the 1960’s all over again would the Beat generation be facebooking eachother?
“Hey Kerouac, it’s Ginsberg. How are things on the east coast with your mom?” If it were the 1930’s now would Lenin be twittering communist propaganda and emailing LeonTrotsky@yahoo. com or JosephStalin@gmail. com?
 There is so much more potential for mankind to rise above his limits now than ever before, and I cannot help but be filled with optimism in the ever-recognizable potential of the human soul. Amy DesRoches Student

center to see what likeness the caricaturist would churn out for them.With the variety of events, some small and some sold-out, CCSU came out of its shell and it’s something students should be proud of. It came out in full force actually, even if maybe it did take sharing a beer at the Arute parking lot. And so homecoming week closed with Saturday’s football game, where the home team defended their turf against Sacred Heart, complete a with dramatic

100- yard touchdown return. Last week proved that maybe CCSU has more to it than a suitcase college reputation. We’re of the opinion that it definitely has potential, so why not pack every week’s schedule with school spirit-instilling functions? It can’t be just the home football games.

U. of Texas Arlington Should Not Ban Smoking on Campus Rebecca Counts Daily Texan University of Texas

(UWIRE) - The University of Texas Arlington is the latest government entity ready to stop you from lighting up that cigarette. The university is considering banning smoking on campus. A recent New York Times article reports that New York City and the state of California are considering a smoking ban in all areas of city parks, ostensibly to protect people from secondhand smoke. But some supporters justify the ban because children shouldn’t have to see people lighting up. Los Angeles and Chicago have already passed such a ban. UT Arlington’s ban would be one of the most extensive nonsmoking bans in the country, according to the Fort Worth StarTelegram. Smoking would be banned in all areas of campus, including previously designated smoking areas. Even smoking in a privately-owned vehicle parked on campus would be outlawed. After banning smoking indoors and banishing outdoor smokers to designated smoking areas, haven’t we done enough to discourage people from smoking? According to the Houston Chronicle, UT Arlington claims that the goal of the ban is to promote a “healthy workplace.” But where are the studies linking smoking in the most well-ventilated place available — outside — to secondhand harm? And the Chronicle reports that the

university plans to ban all tobacco use, not just smoking. UT Arlington’s justification doesn’t hold up. The university isn’t interested in protecting its students and employees from secondhand smoke as much as preventing students and staff from smoking at all. UT Arlington wants to control the behavior of its students and staff. Even those of us who want to breath smoke-free air can admit that a line should be drawn somewhere. Adult smokers should have the right to light up in places where their actions don’t cause substantial and direct harm to others — like outside on a university campus, where even New York City’s flimsy justification of protecting children from seeing someone smoke can’t hold water. I like to breathe smoke-free air as much as anyone else. From being an asthmatic child, I have a special appreciation for the health concerns caused by being trapped in a room full of smoke. There is sense to banning smoking in University buildings and requesting that Jester residents light up in the designated smoking areas rather than the whole courtyard. But stopping an adult from doing something that directly harms no one but the actor in the name of “a healthy workplace” is a new low and a dangerous precedent. State and local governments should give up their crusade to prevent adults from hurting themselves. Educational establishments like UT Arlington should focus on teaching students to make their own choices rather than dictating those choices.


6 THE RECORDER Wednesday, October 7, 2009

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Homecoming Spirit Not Daunted by Weather Kim Scroggins THE RECORDER

Now that the semester is underway and the new students are well adjusted, CCSU’s Homecoming Week managed to draw quite a crowd of both students and alumni. The campus hosted a variety of activities this past week from carnivals to comedians. Almost anything and everything was free: food, shirts, and as the weekend

approached, anything supporting CCSU football. The real treat, though, was Homecoming weekend. Homecoming weekend at Central Connecticut means sports outings, concerts, and football. Every year CCSU features a variety of performances and activities for the students. This year, the weekend highlights included a pep rally, football game and a concert featuring R&B artist Trey Songz.

The weekend was met with bad weather. Friday’s Fall Fest and pep rally managed to have a good turn out despite the mud. Moon bounces, free food and drinks and performances from the band and both the cheerleading and dance teams were what made the night. Unlike past years, the rally lacked fireworks, but they didn’t seem missed. Saturday at noon, the football team took on Sacred Heart

University. This game – which was Central’s first home game of the season – was played in a mix of clouds and rain. Pregame consisted of the Blue Devil walk where fans had the opportunity to join the band and cheer on the team as they entered the locker rooms. At halftime a show which featured a performance from the Blue Devil’s Marching Band took place and after, a postgame party in Semesters that included music and

a cash bar. At 8 p.m. students filed into Welte Auditorium for the sold out performance of Trey Songz and opening band The Smyrk. Sunday’s events were a little more relaxed. The CCSU Car Club put on a show in the Student Center Lot and a men’s soccer reunion celebrating their 40th Anniversary. Despite the rain, Homecoming was still a success. Maybe next year’s will be a little warmer.

Celebrate Connecticut’s Autumn with Fairs Samantha Fournier THE RECORDER

Fairs bring a sense of nostalgia to mind at the first whiff of fried dough and popcorn and the sounds of laughter and rides starting, stopping, and whizzing by. They bring us back to a time when cotton candy could be considered dinner and when each ride looked like a bigger and better conquest than the last. If you haven’t gotten your dose of local fairs, make sure to check out the last fairs of the season. The 10th Annual Portland Fair With over 25,000 fair-goers last year, this year the Portland fair promises a visit from the Boston Red Sox mascot Wally the Green Monster, the 1st Portland Fair 5k Road Race on Sunday for runners and walkers alike, and the annual hot rod and classic auto show Saturday, in addition to the various exhibits (photography, needlework, baking) being held. There will be live music from musicians such as the Michael Cleary Band on Friday, The Bernadettes on Saturday and Charlene Marie and Nashville Bound on Sunday. Open Friday 5 to 11 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission fees are seven dollars for adults, five dollars for seniors, and children under ten are free. Celebration of the 100th Annual Riverton Fair The Riverton Fair is also being held October 9 to 11. Besides the usual amusements and fair food it promises pie eating contests, gar-

den tractor pulls, exhibits (needlework, breads, etc.), a wood chopping sawing, and axe throwing contest and live performances by the Old Tyme Fiddlers on Saturday and Mad River crossing on Sunday. Open Friday 4 to 9 p.m., Saturday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Southington Apple Harvest Each fall the Southington Apple Harvest is held for two weekends and boasts a parade, arts and crafts, venders that sell jewelry to sports memorabilia, a variety of cuisine from Thai to Polish foods, and live entertainment from local musicians. While each of these makes the Southington Apple Festival special in its own right, the most memorable vendor sells unforgettable apple fritters that will have your mouth watering and keep you coming back for more each season. Held from October 2 to 4 and 9 to 11. Open 5 to 9 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, and 12 to 5 p.m. Sunday. Connecticut Renaissance Fair If you’re looking for something a little different, attend the Connecticut Renaissance Fair which is going on each weekend through October 18. Here you will find jousting, storytelling actors, musicians, Renaissance foods, and shopping at this 16th Century Fair. Whether you attend in costume or not, this fair is sure to be memorable event. Admission is $16 for Adults age 13 and older and $8 for children ages five to twelve. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

The Connecticut Renaissance Fair has something for everyone, including jesters, turkey legs and the Pope.

H1N1 Awareness on Campuses Turns Into “Pig Puns”

Amanda Sopko UWIRE.com

(UWIRE) - “Pig puns” are spreading faster than the Swine Flu on college campuses.  Although the American College Health Association  reports that 91 percent of surveyed schools have cases of H1N1, it doesn’t look like students are taking the illness too seriously.  At Emory University, where more than 200 cases of H1N1 were reported within the first two weeks of school, infected students were placed in a separate dorm while they recovered. But quarantine didn’t stop them from having fun with their illness.  “They had all sorts of funny names for it,” said Emory senior

Desi Gonzalez of the ‘self-isolation’ building. “Quarantine, swine house, or the pig pen…. And then we called the truck that goes around, we called that ‘The Flying Pig.’”  The fun doesn’t stop with comical names. Swine Flu mask parties are popping up across the country, and students at George Washington University and Penn State advertised Swine Flu theme parties on Facebook.  “Come and celebrate the start of the new school year with Lambda Chi in your finest, doctor, nurse, or pig outfit,” said the event listing posted by a fraternity member at George Washington. The event had 139 guests confirmed according to the invite on Facebook.  Sarah Burton, the creator of a “night of mayhem” party at Penn

State wrote, “If you can’t beat it, join it!” Students aren’t the only ones having a little fun with swine flu satire; administrators are taking part in the H1N1 jokes as well. In an effort to educate students in a creative way, the Communications and Public Affairs office at Johns Hopkins University published an online glossary that includes terms like “hog tide” and “boar war.”  “We were hitting people over the head with the messages and we wanted to do something in a lighthearted way,” said Dennis O’Shea, director of communications and public affairs at Johns Hopkins. O’Shea said the idea for the glossary came about when he sneezed into his sleeve at work and gave birth to the term “sleeze.” He

and his colleagues brainstormed more Swine Flu terms, and the final list was e-mailed to students in one of the school’s daily electronic announcements.  While the glossary takes a more upbeat approach to the serious threat of Swine Flu, its purpose is to reach and inform students so they can protect themselves from the virus. “Sometimes the most effective way to reach someone is through laughter and not by hitting them over the head with a two-by-four,” said O’Shea. “It’s important to do whatever you can in a situation like this in as many different ways as you can to get people to pay attention.” In conjunction with the humorous methods, Johns Hopkins administrators plan to use serious

posters and e-mailings to continue delivering H1N1 information to students. Emory University hosts town hall meetings to educate their community on the illness and its risks, since they feel that Swine Flu is still a significant risk, particularly because of the upcoming cold weather.  “People do need to realize that the flu is a problem, especially during the winter months,” said Emory EMT Ashley Lauria.   As of Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control has recorded more than 21,000 cases of H1N1 on college campuses.  UWIRE’s Shelby contributed to this story.

Holliday


7

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 7, 2009 / UPGRADE

Homecoming concert @ Welte Auditorium

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Get Stationary (or Mobile) at RECentral’s Fitness Classes Samantha Fournier THE RECORDER

The song “Sweet Caroline” blared from the speakers inside the little white-walled cycling room on this early Thursday morning. The wheel on the shiny silver stationary bikes hadn’t stopped turning for more than forty five minutes and the class wasn’t over yet. The energy in the room was high, even as the group rode a “hill” on gear four. “It’s a fun way to workout because it’s not just like going to the gym or going for a run. You get to listen to music. I feel like it works me out better too,” Amanda Carpentino said of the 7:30 a.m. RECentral cycling class. This wasn’t Carpentino’s first cycling class or first class with RECentral. Currently RECentral, CCSU’s recreation department, offers more than 50 fitness classes per week for students, faculty and staff. Classes range from zumba, a type of dance fitness program, to yoga and self defense. Last year, about 10 classes were offered each week. This semester RECentral offered 29 classes the first week of school, which is a big improvement from last year when classes weren’t offered the first week of school. “One of our goals this year was to beef up our fitness program,” said the Fitness Specialist, Ken DeStefanis. This is an improvement was made possible due to the hard work of Fitness Director, Marissa Perrone  and staff over the summer. RECentral has about 20 fitness teachers that work to keep up their busy schedule of classes. Perrone, who has always been interested in fitness, found most of the teachers through an ad she put up on Central Pipeline. Those who were interested would come in and demo a class for her.

“I love getting people hooked on coming to class and getting people hooked on wanting to teach,” Perrone said of being excited about what she does for her new position in the RECentral office. “I don’t think a lot of people like to do cardio and if we can get people to do it in a fun way, why not?” Cassy Cox, an exercise science major and soon to be fitness teacher, said of the fitness classes. The friendly Sista True, who teaches African Dance Wednesday nights at 7:15 p.m., said that she teaches because “when I feel like I learn something good I have a responsibility to pass it on.” In True’s class, girls dance about freely with smiles on their faces. True doesn’t only teach dance, but also health and wellness principles. Just before True’s class is “Hips Don’t Lie” class led by COLADA member, Rachel Gibney. “They’re fun and energetic. Just to get you in shape,” Megan Rasmussen, CCSU student with a history in dance, said of the “Hips Don’t Lie” and the “Jazz it Up” RECentral classes. Courtney Perrin, CCSU student and fellow dance enthusiast, also said she attends classes because they provide a fun way to get in shape. Perrone said that “Hips Don’t Lie” class has been one of the most popular classes offered along with yoga, cycling, zumba and pilates. “We’re getting great feedback. Our yoga class had over fifty people,” Assistant Recreation Director, Liz Urcinas. Whether you’re more comfortable on the dance floor or on a stationary bike, RECentral has a class to peak your interest and keep you active. You can checkout an updated schedule on the RECentral Web site, http://stdctr. ccsu.edu/recentral.

Above: Lead singer Doron Flake of opening act The Smyrk, the band that won the Battle of the Bands last year and opened for Streetlight Manifesto during Spring Week. Below: R&B singer Trey Songz makes the front row swoon. Photos by: Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Land of the Zombies, Home of the Dead, Zombieland Is a First Rate Zom-Com Michael Walsh THE RECORDER

Most folks tend to believe that placing zombies into any old situation can make for a watchable film, so long as you apply enough splatters of blood and gnawing of human flesh in between. I might watch it because of the zombies, but there’s no promising that it won’t be a piece of crap. Ever since George A. Romero changed the way we looked at zombies in film with his 1968 classic Night of the Living Dead, the zombie has arguably been America’s favorite monster alongside the classic vampires and werewolves. Since then the genre has been nearly beaten to death, with just about everyone trying to get in on the phenomenon of our neighbors coming back to life to eat us. Some of those trying to get into the genre just don’t belong there. It’s very easy to mess up a zombie film. As someone who began to love film with Romero’s Dawn of the Dead, I hold my breath every time Hollywood dips its fingers into the mix, praying they don’t ruin zombies the way they’ve begun to ruin vampires, turning them into emotional teenagers who care far too much about each others feelings. “I’m coming to console you, Barbara!” says the teenage heartthrob zombie to his human love interest in a Twilight-inspired

zombie chick flick. But oh boy was I able to exhale quickly at the sight of Ruben Fleischer’s Zombieland, a film that from the look of just its trailer seemed to get it. Briefly, Zombieland is America’s Shaun of the Dead. It’s a clever, smart and downright funny ode to the zombie infestation of our beautiful country. The land of the zombies, the home of the dead, is what you might want to change those national anthem lyrics to

now. A real brilliant idea and the source of much of the film’s humor comes from the knocking down of the fourth wall between Jesse Eisenberg’s character and the audience. His list of rules for surviving the zombie apocalypse and handing out of “zombie kill of the week” includes the audience in the storytelling as he speaks directly to us. Eisenberg’s shut-in character

Photo courtesy of Sony Pictures

works well with Woody Harrelson’s, the machismo zombie killer extraordinaire known only as Tallahassee. The two play off each other brilliantly, as Harrelson’s testosterone-fueled ambitions and Eisenberg’s safer and more timid nature present an ideal odd couple. All four characters, which includes Emma Stone and Abigail Breslin on the female side of the operation, are developed just enough to separate them from being boring cardboard

characters, which is important for this film’s progression and key to becoming a memorable classic. The character relationships are a huge part of the film, and might get overlooked by most viewers. At a brisk but perfect 80 minutes, Zombieland is a gut-buster all the way through. Sometimes literally. The zombie kills are fairly inventive and vary greatly. I don’t want to get stuck on this facet of the film for too long, but gore is really an important part of a good zombie film, and the team behind it all here has hit the mark. There are enough absolutely satisfying kills from the hands of Tallahassee and company to please veterans and newcomers of the genre alike. If you aren’t saying “Oooh!” at just about every zombie slaying, you’re most likely watching a dull film. Not the case here. And with all the zombie brain smashing and all the funny and witty one-liners, Zombieland is a complete joyride, and one of the most fun films of its kind. This is proof enough that there are still shimmers of hope within the zombie genre. It’s a smart film that knows exactly what it wants to achieve and successfully does so, a best of both worlds of zombies and comedy. It has since dawned on me that Zombieland is the kind of film that you really have to try to hate. Not to get overly confident with my opinion, but if you don’t enjoy this film you might be as soulless as the zombies that inhabit it.


Mallory Drives Stake Through Sacred Heart Senior Running Back Leads Blue Devils to NEC Win

Continued from page 16 lobbed a pass down the right sideline, only to be intercepted by senior Marcus Dorsey, and returned 100 yards for a touchdown. With that play, Dorsey had both set a school record for longest interception return for a touchdown as well as secure the victory for Central. “In the end I came back, played my assignment, made the big play and scored,” Dorsey said. “I was just trying to help my team win.”

The 24-12 come-from-behind victory was the sixth consecutive win at home for CCSU, dating back to Aug. 30, 2008 against Bryant. Also, the Blue Devils have outscored their opponents this season 51-10 in the second half, 37-0 in the last two games. Leading the Pioneers of Sacred Heart was Fink, who went 17-for38 for 259 yards and 2 touchdowns, including a 34-yard pass, which was tipped in the end zone to SHU

receiver Steve Tedesco at halftime with the clock expiring. Fink was also sacked 5 times and threw the only interception of the game. Some of the major concerns CCSU has had in the past two games include penalties and a lack of scoring. In their win over Columbia last week, the Blue Devils committed 11 penalties for 100 yards, and this past weekend against Sacred Heart they had 8 for 90 yards.

“Too many 15 yard penalties,” Coach Jeff McInerney said. “We’re not going to win a championship doing that stuff.” From a scoring standpoint, last season they defeated Sacred Heart 49-14. Along with that victory, CCSU had 5 other games in which they put up 35 or more points. This season they have yet to crack 30. “I wanted to get up on these guys,” said McInerney. “I’m tired of waiting till halftime. The recipe to

[Division]1-AA football is to get up and score.” With this win, CCSU is now 3-1 on the season and 1-0 in the conference. The Blue Devils play at home again on Saturday at noon against conference opponent Robert Morris, who come in with an 0-5 overall record, 0-2 in conference play.


“We’re a veteran team, and we realize that there are four quarters in football, and if something doesn’t work in the first half, you just have to grind it out.” - James Mallory


10

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 7, 2009 / UPGRADE

REVIEWS Dead Man’s Bones Dead Man’s Bones Anti Records October 6, 2009

Buckethead
 Needle in a Slunk Stack
 TDRS Music 
September 24, 2009

Backstreet Boys This Is Us Jive September 30, 2009

Melissa Traynor THE RECORDER

This album more likely than not will complete its intent - delivering a fresh, creepy and overall enjoyable approach to an over-saturated market of holiday music.  Dead Man’s Bones’ self-titled debut and the band itself, the duo Ryan Gosling (The Notebook) and Zach Shields, has so many noteworthy pieces and back-stories that they almost take away from production. The record, 12 tracks of mostly gimmick-free fun, is two parts graveyard music and odes to dead lovers mixed with danceable anthems, one part eerie vocal stylings of Gosling and another two parts of children noises. In this case, Dead Man’s Bones looks to the Silverlake Conservatory Michael Walsh THE RECORDER

I’m never going to stop listening to and loving Buckethead. But something is amiss in his last few albums, and this continues into his latest offering, Needle in a Slunk Stack, his twenty-eighth studio album. Don’t get me wrong, like all his albums, this one shreds, and does so in the most experimental ways. And while the technical ability of Buckethead is still to be found, the

Kim Scroggins THE RECORDER

Not to compare, but it seems that the Backstreet Boys have followed the same road as those other artists that have struggled in the whole “sell out scene.” That first reaction led me to think of groups like the Spice Girls and N’Sync. You know, the bands that were big in ‘90s, but then lost their touch after the trend of becoming a solo artist drowned them out. The Backstreet Boys have always appealed to the younger

of Music Children’s Choir to give most of the songs the inherently unearthly sounds of children (set to music), who usually sing backup, but sometimes laugh and chant, and make other inexplicably creepy sounds that only children make. Blogger-loved “My Body’s a Zombie for You” is a new take on our Halloween favorites from the past. It takes the joyful familiarity of “Monster Mash” and twists it into something a little darker, but still very listenable. The same can be said for the title track, though the former gets the point across more clearly. “My Body’s A Zombie for You” highlights the choir in their whimpering “oh-oh-aoh-ohs” and chorus yelling as the song progresses. The track  begins with light bass drum thumps, tambourine rattles and faint background humming

like a barbershop quartet as the children’s and Gosling’s vocals come in. He does a thoroughly swell job if he intends to imitate Elvis Presley’s baritone with tendencies like Devendra Banhart’s voice; Gosling’s is soft and soothing to provide a nice contrast to the shrill of children. Once the chorus hits, the kids scream out “My body’s a zombie for you!” adding extra stress on “youuu” in a kind of whiny plea. A little alarming at first, it becomes a natural transition into the following refrain of a snare drum and maybe a wind instrument. The single and the record’s other stand-out track is “In the Room Where You Sleep,” which has two very different, but equally pleasant versions.

The first one I encountered was a video posted on the band’s MySpace. It’s footage of a dressed up Goslin hunched over a piano with the choir in their Halloween gear in the background of what looks like a play house. The video resembles the aforementioned “My Body’s a Zombie for You” much more closely than the record version. The video version is piano- driven and very organized, despite the fact that it looks like the band and the kids decided to record it spur-of-themoment, and it’s a lot more fun. Considering the serious subject, the record actually benefits when it captures the slips and faulty tracks. They embrace their own amateurish ways. At the same time, that obvious inexperience makes the record all the more honest and original.

playful fun of his older work isn’t. Giant Robot was the first album I ever listened to from the guitar virtuoso and that album, unlike his more recent efforts, is one I do find myself going back to more often. I don’t know, maybe nostalgia is getting to me. Yes, nostalgia of four years. I still just don’t think Buckethead’s latest work is as enjoyable for me as his earlier stuff. I personally don’t think he’s had a truly classic and great album since Inbred Mountain came out back in 2005 and Crime Slunk Scene in 2006, even though he has

produced a plethora of work since then. But don’t take this as a negative review for this latest offering. It’s simply more of what we Buckethead fans love the guy for. He shreds and does so different than anyone else in the game can. And for that, a never ending respect and appreciation of the artist forms, even if at times I yearn for something else. Perhaps more experimental than most of his other recent work, Needle in a Slunk Stack is vastly different than the most beloved albums from Buckethead such

as Colma or Population Override. Tracks like “Interview With The Double Man” and the two-part “Wormwood’s Workshop” are most definitely welcome pieces. The worst thing I could do here is be unappreciative of this artist. He loves music, loves his fans, and shows it by his nonstop releases of explored styles. I’ll take all I can get from Buckethead. Is there a limit to how much one can take? Probably, but I don’t think we’ve reached it yet.

crowds, and with the return of four of the original five members and the release of This Is Us, they maintain that boy band standing even though they claim to have matured. As with past albums, this one mostly consists of power ballads and odes of heartbreak. But, why shouldn’t it? After all, that’s what they were known for. Only now, songs like “Quit Playing Games (With My Heart)” and “I Want It That Way” have been replaced with “Shattered” and “This Is Us.” This time around, the Backstreet Boys added a little something extra

to the mix. Dance beats. The lyrics - which are of the typical BSB style, corny and cases under-developed, are placed on a backdrop of synthesizers and drums. In fact, the music outweighs the lyrical value on this record. You find yourself more in tuned to it than the repetitive chorus lines. “Straight Through My Heart” is the album’s first single, and rightly so. The song masters the slow intro which works its way into a dramatic chorus. The rhythm of the song never changes but it fits well with the music making it work as a song

overall. The boys at least know how to start an album off right. There is no doubt that This Is Us will outdo their last release. It’s clear that as a group they’ve really worked to switch their style just enough that they fit with what’s out there now and there is no surprise that they’ve worked with artists like Akon and T-Pain (Songs like “PDA” are proof). However, I am disappointed that I didn’t get to listen to their European bonus track. I think Backstreet Boys featuring Pitbull would be an interesting mix.

Trail of Terror Delivers Laughs and Screams

Photo Courtesy of: Trail of Terror

Tonya Malinowski THE RECORDER

It’s a cool fall night, everyone is chattering happily while waiting in line until a single, deafening gunshot makes the crowd gasp and fall silent. It’s not a real gun, just a blank shot fired by one of the volunteers at Wallingford’s Trail of Terror,

which kicked off its month-long season last weekend. Voted the best outdoor attraction in the nation by Fright Time’s magazine, the trail is the most elaborate I’ve ever seen. Guests can usually expect up to a 4-hour wait unless you purchase a speed pass for an extra $10. Looking back, it’s well worth the extra few bucks to beat the 3.5

hours we waited. But once inside, the 45-minute trail delivers. Separated into different parts and themes, the trail offers every kind of scene from a haunted circus to a Texas Chainsaw remake. No detail is spared in any of the scenes and the effect is alternately hilarious and bone chilling. Creator Wayne Barneschi says he’s amazed at what the trail has become. “We started as a yard

haunt about 15 years ago in the backyard of my house and more and more people started coming,” he said. “So we decided to do something for charity and move it out of the house since it was killing my grass.” Proceeds from the trail benefit the American Red Cross and Barneschi said they usually raise over $100,000. The volunteer actors in the trail are fantastically into their character and make you laugh, scream, and sometimes just shudder. Their make-up and costumes make the characters even more real. Although they aren’t allowed to touch you, there is one scene when verbal berating seems to be perfectly allowed. During one scene where a character stands guard of a slide, she decides who will go down first. After asking if there were any Jews in the room and saying the “filthy Jews” should go down first, she realized there were none and instead told me to go first since I had obviously “been on my knees before.”  Barneschi and volunteers begin setting up the trail in July and work 16-hour days to make sure it is all ready in time. This year, the trail

has four new scenes that each took a month to build. “I never expected it to be anything like it is now,” Barneschi said. “I have ideas for next year already.” The trail is the best haunt I’ve ever seen. The impeccable attention to detail and quality characters make it a great weekend activity to get in the Halloween spirit. Tickets are $10 for general admission and $20 for the speed pass, which is a smart move to avoid the annoyance and frustration of a three or four-hour wait. I would have liked to see more entertainment during the wait, though there are characters walking amongst the line to scare unsuspecting people and a movie screen playing clips from inside the trail and classic horror movies. Tickets are available at the trail, but get there early because they sometimes sell out by 8 or 9, even though the trail is open until midnight.You can also buy a speedpass online at www.trailofterror.com. Barneschi said all the months of hard work is worth it to him. “I guess my favorite part is hearing the screams,” he said.


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THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 7, 2009 / UPGRADE

Calendar 9.30 - 10.7 MUSIC 10.11 The Flaming Tsunamis @ UU Church Stratford, Conn. $8 / 6 p.m.

10.11 – 10.13 The Cove @ Cinestudio Hartford, Conn. $7 / 7:30 p.m.

Radiohead. Added to that thick and intriguing sound are a series of dark and ironic lyrics, combining the mood and tone of Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds with the narrative force of The Decemberists or a short story by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Langhorne Slim is a folk singer originally hailing from Langhorne, Pennsylvania. He began to gain public notice through several years of touring with the Trachtenburg Family Slideshow Players and an appearance at the Bonnaroo Music Festival. His song Electric Love Letter was chosen as the number 5 on the Rolling Stone editor’s top ten picks and was also in the movie Waitress. He has been seen on tours with Cake, The Avett Brothers, Murder By Death, Jeffrey Lewis, The Violent Femmes, Lucero, Rocky Votolato, the Woes, Josh Ritter, and The Low Anthem. This makes for an unmissable show by Connecticut standards.

CCSU grad Kathryn Bigelow - one of the few women directors in Hollywood - it follows Delta Company as they pursue their dangerous assignment: to find and defuse I.E.D.s on the streets of Baghdad. The conflicted and vulnerable young soldiers are led by wild card Staff Sgt. William James ( Jeremy Renner), who takes a Zen master’s satisfaction in seeking out and dismantling the little bundles of death. Without being overtly political, Bigelow’s triumph is showing the “drug” of warfare, with or without any ethical justification. 10.9 – 10.14 Big Fan @ Real Art Ways Hartford, Conn. $6.25 / 7 p.m.

10.13 AFI @ The Webster Hartford, Conn. $27.50 / 7 p.m. 10.14 Murder By Death w/ Langhorne Slim and Kiss Kiss @ Daniel Street Milford, Conn.

10.15 All Time Low w/ We The Kings @ The Webster Hartford, Conn. $20 / 6 p.m.

FILM $14 / 8 p.m. Indiana’s Murder by Death layers the vocal sounds of an old saloon with the haunting strings of a Hungarian folk dance and the hard driving rhythms of pure rock ‘n’ roll, producing what Stuff magazine has called “lush, orchestrated songs,” somehow simultaneously reminiscent of Johnny Cash and

Through 10.10 The Hurt Locker @ Cinestudio Hartford, Conn. $7 / 7:30 p.m. Widely praised as the best film to come out of the Iraq War, The Hurt Locker is also the best thriller to come out of the summer of 2009. Directed by Columbia Film School

relationship has its soundtrack, director Mark Webb told Rolling Stone, and the music that drives his movie includes Regina Spektor, Feist, The Pixies, Nancy Sinatra, The Smiths, and She & Him (Zooey Deschanel’s band), with their own version of Morrissey’s classic “Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want.” 96 min.

“Straight out of Staten Island comes the aggressively grubby, darkly funny Big Fan, the very fine feature directing debut from Robert Siegel, who wrote The Wrestler and was an editor at The Onion. A cautionary tale about the limits and perils of love, Big Fan centers on Paul (Patton Oswalt, terrific and fearless)” - Manhola Dargis, New York Times “Robert Siegel, in a directing debut of potent promise, turns Big Fan into something funny, touching and vital without ever resorting to snark or condescension. And Oswalt delivers a portrait in full of a life in which fandom is one man’s personal defense against loneliness. This one’s a keeper.”- Peter Travers, Rolling Stone The self-proclaimed “world’s biggest N.Y. Giants fan” (Patton Oswalt) has his devotion tested when the team’s star player beats him up.

Eco-warrior Louie Psihoyos sneaked into a idyllic seaside village of Japan, camera in hand, to document an outrageous act perpetrated each year by local fishermen. The crime? The killing of dolphins, as well as their capture, to supply zoos and water parks around the world. Playing like a thriller with Psihoyos on the run from shadowy businessmen and weapon-wielding security, The Cove is an enlightening call to action. Joining the fired-up director are an unlikely crew of allies: champion divers, former Canadian Army helicopter pilots, and brave Japanese councilmen. Perhaps most poignant is Ric O’Barry, dolphin trainer for the once-popular tv show Flipper, who explains “I am focused like a laser beam on the dolphin captivity issue, because I helped create this mess.” Winner of the Audience Award, Sundance Film Festival. Robbins Barstow, Director Emeritus of The Cetacean Society International, will introduce the The Cove.

10.8 Health Care Reform: How Can We Succeed? @ Philbrick-Camp Room, student center 11 a.m. The panel will be moderated by Michael Critelli, expert on employer based health care programs, who has spearheaded a wellness program at Pitney Bowes. He will discuss his views on what is needed to successfully reform health care. Mr. Critelli’s presentation will be followed by commentary from the panel of experts.This panel is a timely consideration of how health care can be successfully reformed in these turbulent times. This is an excellent opportunity to hear and discuss the most important issues facing the U.S. health care system today. 10.8 Ethan Bronner: Israel and Palestine @ Vance 105 5 p.m.

10.14 (500) Days of Summer @ Cinestudio Hartford, Conn. $7 / 7:30 p.m.

Check out a rare romantic comedy that gets equal raves from both sexes. He is a greeting card writer who believes that life isn’t complete until you hook up with ‘the one.’ She is a free spirit named Summer who shares his fixation on The Smiths, but doesn’t believe in the existence of true love. By the time the 500 days of their relationship are shown out of order like a pack of cards thrown in the air, you will have experienced a love story that is honest, original and real. “Every

New York Times Israel Bureau Chief Ethan Bronner will be speaking on what happens in Israel and Palestine in 2009. Bronner is a Pulitzer Prizewinning journalist. Free and open to the public. 10.14 Magic in the Renaissance Worldview, a discussion as it relates to the Harry Potter books @ Vance 105 7 p.m.

NBC’s Community A Place for Funny Losers Matt Kiernan THE RECORDER

Beating the negative stigma of community college, NBC’s new hit sitcom Community proves that it deserves the attention that it’s been given recently with a cast of characters who are quirky in their own ways and are looking for their place in the world. The lead role of Jeff Winger, played by The Soup star Joel McHale, is an arrogant lawyer who has been disbarred for having his law degree determined invalid and must attend Greendale Community College in order to gain a valid degree. While attending the college he meets people of unusual ,backgrounds who have found themselves at the

community college looking to face the realities of their lives. Chevy Chase returns into a steady role after being seen in bitparts on different sitcoms and seems to be making a strong comeback as the businessman looking for love, Pierce. Chase brings back his talent for physical comedy as seen during his time on SNL and movies, and shows his determination for laughs when his arm catches on fire during a silent protest in the second episode. The character of the strongwilled Britta, played by up-andcoming actress Gillian Jacobs, gives a balance to the sarcastic attitude of McHale who are both too caught up in their own social appearances to make a move for each other. A

breakthrough in the relationship is seen in the third episode after a film teacher assigns McHale to “seize the day” and she decides to help him with the assignment. Perhaps one of the funniest characters on the show is Spanish teacher Senor Chang, played by actor in Knocked Up and The Hangover, Ken Jeong. Jeong’s sense of comedy flows very naturally as a teacher who wants respect from his students and who’s not willing to take crap from anyone. The show is filled with popculture references, most likely contributed to by McHale’s knowledge of television and culture in general. As seen in the commercials, Abed, played by Danny Pudi, is a strange movie-

obsessed individual who quotes movies such as in the pilot when he re-enacts Bender’s rant and screams “Smoke up Johnny!” as taken from the 80s classic the Breakfast Club it’s almost appropriate because they are stuck in a library, facing a similar, revelation-like moment. Other characters such as the recently divorced Shirley, played by Yvette Nicole Brown, the selfconscious Annie, played by Alison Brie and ex-high school football star Troy, played by Donald Glover work to even out the cast. With two episodes aired in the next two weeks, it would seem that the episodes will be dedicated to bringing these other characters into the spotlight with central storylines.

McHale’s character’s old friend and professor of the college Dr. Ian Duncan, played by Daily Show star John Oliver, attempts to help McHale change his ways. Oliver teaches McHale a lesson in the pilot episode to show him that he must work hard in order to succeed in life. Community has shown so far that it can produce episodes that are funny and heartfelt at the same time, and looks to have a strong following of viewers that will want to see what will happen to the characters as they attend a community college. Community airs on Thursdays at 8 p.m. on NBC.


12

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 7, 2009 / SPORTS

SPORTS STARTS ON BACKPAGE

CCSU Outplays Red Flash, Game Ends Deadlocked Christopher Boulay The Recorder

Jared Spieker scored a 90 minute goal to give the Blue Devils a 1-1 draw as well as a point in their first conference opportunity of the season This is the second time this season that Spieker has scored in a critical situation for CCSU. “We were down 1-0 and there was only a few minutes left, I told [Captain Robert Cavener] that I was going to push forward. He gave me the okay,” Spieker said. “I just lingered at the top of the box and I saw the cross come. I told Hadji [Diop] to leave it, and it fell right to my feet.” Freshman Taylor Morgan had the assist on Spieker’s goal, his third of the season. CCSU (5-2-1, 0-0-1) outshot St. Francis (4-5-1, 0-0-1) 37-12, but their missed opportunities joined th

with Red Flash keeper Darius Motazed’s 12 saves made scoring a near impossibility. The overtime periods showed more promise from CCSU, but more of the same poor finishing doomed the match to a 1-1 draw. “I’m delighted with the performance from everybody,” Cavener said. “It would have been nice to start with a victory, but at least it didn’t start with a defeat.” The Blue Devils looked like the better side for the entire match, but it was all for naught when David Butler scored for the Red Flash in the 18th minute of play, striking the ball off of a deflection. “It’s a frustrating game for us. We dominated possession and had three or four fantastic opportunities in the first half,” Coach Shaun Green said. “It could have been 3-0 at halftime, but we just didn’t finish our chances.”

Green was impressed by Motazed’s display in net and believes that he was a big part of the reason that the Blue Devils had such difficulty scoring despite having the advantage in shots on goal. “Some of the shots looked like we hit it right to him, but it was a good performance from [Motazed], Green said. “The result wasn’t exactly what we wanted, but that sometimes happens in soccer.” CCSU keeper Paul Armstrong had six saves for the Blue Devils, some of which were absolutely vital in order to salvage the much needed point. “I’m not unhappy with the way we played,” Green said. “We did everything but put the ball over the goal line.”

RECentral Fitness Class Schedule Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

10:30am Jazz it up w/ Michelle(KFR)

7:30am Cycling* w/ Marissa (KFR)

10:30am Jazz it up w/ Michelle (KFR)

7:30am Cycling* w/ Marissa (KFR)

10:15am Pilates w/ Janelle (KFR)

12:00pm Cycling* w/ Gina (KFR)

8:30am Total Body Tone w/ Janelle (DS)

11:30am Zumba w/ Janelle (KFR)

11:00am Pilates w/ Janelle (KFR)

11:00am Yoga w/ Tarinii (DS)

1:00pm Zumba w/ Janelle (KFR)

9:00am Hips Don't Lie w/ Rachael (DS)

12:15pm (30 min)* Cycling Lite w/ Gina (KFR)

12:00pm Cycling* w/ Ken & Liz (KFR)

11:00am Cardio Kickbox w/ Janelle (KFR)

1:45pm Pilates w/ Janelle (KFR)

9:30am-10:30am REC90X w/ Andrew (KFC)

12:15pm 1:00pm Pilates Yoga w/ Janelle (Kaiser 131) w/ Tarinii (KFR)

12:00pm Cycling* w/ Gina (KFR)

2:30pm All Abs w/ Amanda (KFR)

12pm Cycling* w/ Ken & Liz (KFR)

1:00pm Hip Hop Groove w/ Amy (KFR)

2:30pm 8 Minute Abs w/ Jay Hops (KFR)

1:15pm Water Aerobics w/ Amanda

3:00pm

1:00pm

3:30pm

3:00pm

Sunday

Cardio Kickbox w/ Marissa (KFR)

Yoga w/ Tarinii (KFR)

Jump on it* (trampoline) w/ Cassie (BUB)

Hit me with your best shot w/ Michelle (KFR)

7:30pm Cycling* w/ Cassie (KFR)

4:00pm Cycling* w/ Marissa (KFR)

2:30pm 8 Minute Abs w/ Jay Hops (KFR)

4:00pm Cycling* w/ Marissa (KFR)

4:30pm Cycling* w/Gina (KFR)

4:00pm Yoga w/ Tarinii (DS)

5:00pm Jazz it up w/ Michelle (BUB)

5:00pm Yoga w/ Tarinii (DS)

5:15pm Move, Shake, Drop w/ Bre (DS) (Starts 10/19)

5:30pm Cycling* w/ Anne (KFR)

5:00pm Location Key Hips Don't Lie DS- Dance Studio w/ Rachael (Kaiser 131) KFR- Kaiser Fitness Room 5:30pm Bub- Bubble Cycling* Kaiser Hall w/ Anne (KFR) KFC-Kaiser Fitness Center 7:30pm Gym -Kaiser Gym Muay Thai Boxing w/ Arianna (KFR)

5:00pm Jump on it* (trampoline) w/ Mike (BUB) 5:30pm Cycling* (KFR) w/ Staff

6:00pm Hit me w/ your best shot w/ Michelle (BUB) 7:30pm Muay Thai Boxing w/ Arianna(KFR)

(Starts 10/18)

5:30pm Cycling* w/ Staff 6:15pm Hips Don't Lie w/ Rachael (DS) 7:15pm African Dance w/ Sista True (KFR) 8:00pm Smartbells (KFR)

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Comeback: CCSU Defeats RMU Continued from page 16

Bowman doubled the scoreline in the 64th minute on an assist from Neil Shaffer. Sophomore Eduardo Ortiz brought the Blue Devils back to level terms in the 73rd minute off of a Cavener corner, with sophomore Aaron Durr adding another assist. Jared Spieker left the game early with ankle injury, but should be ready for the Blue Devils next match. “I thought that we dominated them in terms of attacking possession,” Green said. “I’m very pleased. Especially with Spieker going out early, hes been instrumental for us the past few

games.” Keeper Paul Armstrong had three saves in a winning effort. Bolaji also had three saves for the Colonials, as well as a yellow card in the 76th minute for dissent. Senior Midfielder Mersad Sahanic did not suit up for the match because he violated a team rule. CCSU outshot Robert Morris 23-9 and the Blue Devils had 11 corners to the Colonials’ two. CCSU now heads out on a road trip to play Bryant, Sacred Heart and Fairleigh Dickinson before returning home for a match against St. Francis (N.Y.) on Friday, October 23 at 3 p.m.

Fitness Classes at RECentral Cycling- This forty five minute cardio workout takes place on a stationary bicycle. Your instructor will use a variety of motivating music in order to get you to challenge yourself in rides that consist of hills, flats and other spinning training tools. Beware!

Hips Don’t Lie/ Zumba- Both classes are based upon the upbeat international rhythms of the world. You will learn and move to all styles of dance including salsa, meringue and Kumbia. The dance moves are simple but fun.

Jazz It Up- In this hour you will spend roughly forty minutes doing a variety of simple yet fun dance moves set to upbeat music. This class will finish up with some strength training using light weights and light stretches to bring that heart rate back down.

Total Body Tone- Get a complete body workout including ranging from strength to cardio. The class includes a combination of resistance training, with high and low intervals. As well as a yoga inspired cool down.

Hip Hop Groove/Move Shake Drop- Mix it up with a new way to sweat. These classes incorporate yoga, cardio, toning and some funky dance moves! You will not only get the blood pumping to all sorts of new beats, but you will learn some moves to show off on the dance floor! Pilates- Based on the teaching of Joseph Pilates this class will strengthen your core muscles while improving your posture at the same time. Pilates will increase your flexibility and balance but it will improve muscular stamina as well. Focused breathing and mind control will allow you to perform a series of toning exercises. Cardio Kickboxing- This class uses a variety of punches, kicks and blocks in order to keep you on your toes and working hard. Kickboxing is a perfect class to relieve some stress and take it on some punching pads. Your instructor will keep you moving and you will feel the burn in no time! Yoga- The instructor begins with a short meditation that will help with breathing awareness and to prepare the student to move efficiently and center the body and mind. As the class progresses, students will develop strength and awareness by exploring different yoga postures and stretches. The class ends with a deep relaxation that allows the body to release any unwanted stress. Jump On It- This class is done on your own personal trampoline, need I say more? This class will use a variety of different themes ranging from Latin dance, hip hop, and even kickboxing. Bounce your way to that muscular and toned physique you always wanted. *Limited equipment (15).

Hit Me with your BEST SHOT- This is a self defense style class. Learn how to properly throw punches, elbows, knees, and kicks with good form. You will be a lean mean confident machine after this one! Muay Thai Boxing- This class will teach you the basics of Muay Thai boxing while getting an intense workout. This is a mixture of boxing, kickboxing and other martial arts that will get you that lean and trim body while boosting self confidence! All Abs/ 8 Minute Abs- All abs is roughly twenty minute of both on the floor and off the floor abdominal exercises. 8 minute Abs will start with a short demonstration of a series of exercises. When the timer goes you have a non-stop 8 minutes of Abs burning moves to keep your tummy flat! Smart Bells- Smart bell is a weight with handles that is curved to provide for fluidity of movement. The instructor will lead you through a series of body toning exercises to upbeat music. Water Aerobics- Looking for a workout that will build strength but be easy on your joints? Water Aerobics is for you! You will be in the pool doing a variety of cardio and muscle building activities. REC 90-X- Just like the latest craze you will confuse your muscles by performing a wide variety of strength and conditioning exercises. You will use, dumbbells, resistance bands, and jump ropes to get that ripped effect! Relax More Stress Less- School getting you stresses? This class will use a variety of different relaxation techniques like mediation and stretching in order to calm the mind and relax the body. Your stress will melt away instantly!


THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 7, 2009 / SPORTS

13

CCSU Blue Devils Sweep the Hartford Hawks

Continued from page 16

once they began to pick up, the Blue Devils made it difficult for the Hawks to come back. CCSU was eventually able to come back from that early point gap and defeat the Hawks in the second game with a score of (25-18). Hartford also made some key errors throughout the match that helped propel the Blue Devils to victory. “Hartford wound up giving up a lot of points. They missed a lot of serves and they were out of system a lot,” Coach Sagnelli said. “Their hitter that they like to go to is in the middle, number fourteen (Erin Macro), they didn’t pass well enough I don’t think to keep her in system to get the ball to her to affect the game.” The Hawks were also playing at a disadvantage with a different lineup than in the previous match as well as dealing with new personnel. Their starting libero was injured. Even with their few setbacks the Hawks were able to give CCSU a run for their money in the third game. “That last game I thought we lost our focus a little bit and were just sitting back,” said Coach Sagnelli. In the end the Blue Devils were able to refocus and come out with a win ending the game and entire match at (25-22). “I think we really played together as a team well tonight. We pulled it out at the end right there, but otherwise we played really good I think,” said freshman outside hitter Emily Cochran. Cochran is a new addition to the team this season and is already proving herself to be an up and coming player. She led CCSU in kills with nine and only had one hitting error on 28 attempts, ending the game with a percentage of .286 percent, which is a great percentage for an outside hitter. “She is really becoming a very steady

Photo Courtesy of: CCSUBlueDevils.com

player on the court, which is nice to see in a game where things were getting a little sloppy here and there,” said Coach Sagnelli. The team as a whole is working well together this season, and it is reflected in their record. The Blue Devils are currently

undefeated in the NEC and are looking to improve upon that record as the season progresses and they play more Northeast Conference games. “We’re really looking forward to the conference,” said Cochran. “We started out

(2-0), so that’s really good, and hopefully we can continue it.” The Blue Devils are back on their home court Wednesday, Oct. 14 against Providence at 7 p.m.

Jamie Baumert: Clock is Ticking on Conference Win “Jamie is one of those players who is self-motivated and possesses a wonderful work ethic. This shows through both in the academic work that she produces and in her work on the volleyball court.” -Coach Linda Sagnelli.

Brittany Burke THE RECORDER

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Jamie Baumert looks to lead the Blue Devils volleyball team to a NEC championship.

Senior middle blocker and co-captain Jamie Baumert went from risk to top player over the span of her four years as a CCSU Blue Devil. While she has had an impressive run on the volleyball team, there is still some more she would like to accomplish before walking away from the game. “I really want us to do well in our conference and it would be my dream to win the conference,” said Baumert. “That would be our ultimate goal.” Baumert was recruited to Central Connecticut State University from Elkhorn, Nebraska where she didn’t start playing volleyball until she was 14 years, old and in the seventh grade. “I was in softball, soccer and basketball. I just did everything but I just really liked it (volleyball) so I just kept playing it and was successful at it in high school.” During high school, Baumert was a part of two championship teams, a memory that she will always look upon as one of the best times in her career along with receiving attention from multiple colleges.

Unfortunately, in her senior year, she broke her back due the strain of competing in volleyball and track simultaneously. The doctors were not even sure if she would be able to play again. She was able to recover, but the injury still left some of the schools a little wary. “The other schools that were offering me scholarships took it away because they were uncertain. Central was one of the only few that was like ‘No, we’ll take a risk on you, you can still play here.’” Taking a chance on Baumert was well worth it. In the 2008 season alone, she led the NEC in blocks, with 114 and was third on the team for kills with 214. She was an all-NEC second team selection and was voted to the ESPN the Magazine Academic All-District second team. She was recently given the NEC weekly honors, along with freshman Emily Cochran for their efforts in this past week’s (3-1) run. “Jamie is one of those players who is selfmotivated and possesses a wonderful work ethic. This shows through both in the academic work ( Jamie is an elementary education major) that she produces and in her work on the volleyball court,” said her coach Linda Sagnelli. “She has a high level of integrity and responsibility which has served her well in her role as co-captain of our team.” Baumert brings her strength to the team, but is quick to thank teammates. “I have really, really great teammates and they’ve always been there to support me in whatever I do so I think that really helps,” she said, “- just having a positive environment to come to everyday and like, people who are always there to support you.” Now that her seasons as a Blue Devil are coming to a close, Baumert is beginning to accept that her competitive volleyball career will soon be over as well. “I am OK with not doing volleyball anymore,” she said. “I might coach. That may be ideal because I am very injury-prone.” She added that she’s considering playing in a recreational league, but nothing competitive. For right now, Baumert is just focusing on pushing her team to win the conference and enjoying the game. She mentioned that her younger sister has been attracting some attention by schools for volleyball recruiting, so she is looking forward to being able to sit back and cheer her on.


THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 7, 2009 / SPORTS

SPORTS STARTS ON BACKPAGE

Pick Your Poison

NFL Predictions for Week 4

After four full weeks, Marc is still in the lead and Joshua is trying to keep it close. There aren’t a lot of hard games to pick this week, with the exception of the Patriots/Broncos and possibly Browns/Bills games. We will be announcing this year’s prize in the upcoming weeks. If you want to join in on the fun, go to our Web site: www.centralrecorder.com/nflpicks

christopher boulay Sports Editor

CARMINE VETRANO

Assistant Sports Editor

Edward Gaug

Managing / Photo Editor

Mike walsh

Entertainment Editor

Cincinnati at Baltimore

Baltimore

Baltimore

Baltimore

Baltimore

Oakland at NY Giants

NY Giants

NY Giants

NY Giants

NY Giants

Dallas at Kansas City Washington at Carolina Minnesota at St. Louis Tampa Bay at Philadelphia Pittsburgh at Detroit Cleveland at Buffalo Atlanta at San Francisco Houston at Arizona New England at Denver

Dallas

Dallas

Dallas

Dallas

Carolina

Carolina

Washington

Carolina

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh

Cleveland

Buffalo

Buffalo

Cleveland

San Francisco

Atlanta

San Francisco

San Francisco

Houston

Arizona

Houston

Houston

New England

New England

New England

Denver

Jacksonville at Seattle

Jacksonville

Jacksonville

Seattle

Seattle

Indianapolis at Tennessee

Indianapolis

Indianapolis

Indianapolis

Indianapolis

NY Jets

Miami

NY Jets

NY Jets

NY Jets at Miami

This Week’s NFL Pick’Em Leaderboard Rank

Name

Total Points

Current Week

1

Marc Chouinard

45

11

2

Nicholas Menapace

44

13

3

Joshua Davenport

43

11

3

Tonya Malinowski*

43

12

5

Brittany Burke

42

11

5

Edward Gaug*

42

11

5

Ryan Kennedy

42

12

5

Carmine Vetrano*

42

12

5

Anthony Gonsalves

42

12

10

Chris Boulay*

41

9

11

Michael Walsh*

39

8

12

Matthew Kitson

37

9

12

Kevin Dennis

37

11

14

Michelle Traynor

30

0

14

Melissa Traynor*

30

9

14

Nick Caiafa

30

10

17

Chris Culmone

29

10

17

Timothy Farrell

29

11

19

Gary Berman

26

1

20

Chris DaCosta

22

12

21

Chris Wendt

21

0

21

Sean Chacho

21

9

21

Justin Martin

21

10

24

Ian Cole

19

0

24

Kim Gaity

19

0

26

Tyler Boling

18

0

26

Brian Coscina

18

0

28

Ryan Ibarra

18

8

29

Marissa Catanzaro

6

6


THE RECORDER / Wednesday, October 7, 2009 / SPORTS

15

25 Years: Coach Green Reaches Milestone Christopher Boulay The Recorder

There is no coach at CCSU that has been around and has seen so much as men’s soccer coach Shaun Green. Green celebrated his 25th anniversary as coach of the CCSU soccer team this weekend, on Alumni Day, with a full slate of festivities: the Alumni Game Sunday morning, the Blue Devils victory over Robert Morris and a low-key celebration at Chili’s - seemingly the epicenter of soccer post-game celebrations. In attendance were some of the most important players in the history of CCSU soccer. From the older players like Everton Barrington, Paul Wright and Gareth Wilkinson, as well as some of the recent graduates, namely Yan Klukowski and David Tyrie, everyone had some sort of special memory and something good to say about Green. Green was hired while still in his spring semester of senior year at Davis & Elkins College in Elkins, West Virginia. Green always wanted to coach. Before college, he was an assistant at Brown University for a year. He started coaching at age 15 in England and when Green started at CCSU, he was the youngest coach in the nation, at age 25. “I had offers to be an assistant coach and a graduate assistant, but I wanted to be a head coach,” Green said. “[CCSU] offered me the head coaching job straight out of college.” The job at CCSU at the time was only a part-time job. Green worked two other jobs: one in a video store, and one in a health spa where he taught women’s aerobics. He’s come pretty far since then. CCSU finished the first season under Green with a record of 10-10, and he was given the full time job after his first year. Now, Green is a tenured associate professor, works as head coach of the soccer team and has a wife and kids. Not too shabby for 25 years’ work. “Winning is important, but you can’t be judged solely on your win and loss record,” Green said. “There’s so many factors for a school like Central Connecticut. It’s hard to compete in recruiting because we don’t have the resources that UConn do. And we are trying to compete on a national stage.” CCSU Men’s Soccer has been ranked nationally 14 times in the past three years. “That’s a lot for a school like Central Connecticut,” Green said.

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Shaun Green celebrates his 25th year as coach of the CCSU Blue Devils men’s soccer team. When asked about his future, Green said with a grin, “I want to win the lotto and retire.” “I want to continue to do what I enjoy doing, which is coaching,” Green said. Despite his upbeat demeanor, Green did get serious. Three years ago, he suffered a massive heart attack; something that has made him appreciate what he has here and keeps him grounded. “I nearly died. I’m lucky to be here,” he said. “I don’t look too far down the road. I use it as a metaphor, but I never fill my tank of gas. I never fill it because I don’t know if I’ll be here. Every week is a blessing, I love what I’m doing.” CCSU went further than any team before them in 2007, when the soccer team reached the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Men’s Soccer Tournament. Tyrie, a key member of that 2007 squad,

praised Green and truly believes in what he has done at CCSU. “They were the four best years I had of my entire life, Tyrie said. “There are very few human beings I hold in higher regard.” Co-Captain and junior Robert Cavener, also from the Newcastle, England area, had nothing but positive words for his fellow Tynesider. “It was him who brought me here, Cavener said. “He’s always encouraging, and he never has a bad word to say about anybody.” With both Green and Cavener from the same area of North East Region, they both have much in common, including the love for their local soccer team, Newcastle United F.C. “It’s good to be able to relate to him, and talk about England with him,” Cavener said. Regarding their local connection, Cavener said that it does have advantages.

“It makes me feel a lot more appreciated,” Cavener said. “I’ll always be in his debt because he’s the one who has given me this opportunity.” The alumni gave Green a present: a Newcastle kit with his name on the back and the number 25 stitched on. “I love it. Soccer is the only profession I’ve ever wanted to do,” Green said. “When I look around and see all of the alumni, you realize how many lives you affect.” Wilkinson, a Belfast, Northern Ireland native, who captained the Northern Irish Schoolboy National Team, played for Coach Green from 1999-2002 and is extremely grateful for the opportunity to not only come to CCSU, but also to spend four years under the tutelage of Green. “I’m just thankful for the opportunity,” Wilkinson said, “Bringing me over here, not only to get a degree, but to play for a competitive D-I school.” Wilkinson’s time with the Blue Devils started off slow, with the team struggling to finish higher than ninth in the NEC, but during his senior season, the Blue Devils climbed to a respectable sixth place finish in the conference standings. “There was a great balance, with not only playing soccer, but playing and having fun at the same time,” Wilkinson said. He was also impressed with the turnout of alumni and how Green has really made waves in creating a soccer atmosphere in New Britain and at CCSU. “He knows how to have a good time,” Wilkinson said. “You get old, you move on, you get your job, and you come back and find the guys still doing the same thing every year with different kids. It’s just a very enjoyable experience.” Wright, a former four-year player (1995-98) and current assistant coach of the Blue Devils, is very close to Green, and it isn’t only for tying the NCAA single-game scoring record while playing at CCSU when he scored eight against Maryland-Eastern Shore, in his freshman year. “I have a lot of respect for Shaun. He gave me the opportunity as a player, and I enjoyed my four years very much, then he gave me the opportunity to coach,” Wright said. “He has a great passion for the game. 25 years in and he still loves the game. “He’s still on the touch line and you can see his blood pressure is still right up there every game. You can see what it means to him.”

Keeping Blue Devil Strengths Alive, Mallory is Unstoppable Don Weber THE RECORDER

The CCSU football team has had a mean running game for some years now and this year’s no different. The last three starting running backs were NFL-bound Justise Hairston, workhorse Jo Jo Freeman, and now James Mallory has taken on the responsibility. Mallory, a senior has made his name known in the past two years. Listed at 5’10” and 200 lbs, the opposing team’s usual game plan week in and week out is to simply stop Mallory. Already into his fifth year at CCSU, Mallory is just over 1,000 rushing yards shy of the program-best 3,347 yards set by running back Stan House, CCSU ‘99. And considering he pumped out the majority of his career rushing yards in the last 15 games, Mallory’s looking at a bright future ahead. Success is nothing new to the Buffalo, N.Y. native. Before arriving in New Britain, Mallory accumulated an eight-game season of over 2,100 rush yards and 32 touchdowns. Mallory and the CCSU football team still have seven more games left of the season, and after game four they maintain a 3-1 record, 1-0 in the Northeast Conference. Mallory, a fifth-season Blue Devil, believes this year has the most potential yet. “Of my years here, this year’s team looks the best,” he said. He considers the 3-1 record an accomplishment, but is quick to point out that the team is anticipating bigger games. “Our ultimate goal is the Gridiron Classic,” Mallory said, referring to the game between the Northeast Conference and Pioneer Football League champions.

In his most recent game versus Sacred Heart this past Saturday, Mallory picked up both offensive touchdowns. While he did turnover a key fumble, he also picked up 108 total yards in the 24-12 win over their rival opponent. Coach Jeff McInerney noted that he can count on Mallory’s work ethic every game, and at every game the crowd can expect hard-earned touchdowns by the senior team leader. “He’s like an energizer bunny,” McInerny said. “He makes the runs, he makes the plays, and he scores.” And the Coach believes Mallory can take his skills beyond CCSU: “He has a real chance to play at the next level. He’s the type of player that can run, catch, take kick returns wherever you need him.” As far as his future goes, Mallory keeps reality in check, but admits to ambitions of being drafted into the National Football League. “I’d be lying if I said I didn’t think about it. I think about it every day,” Mallory said. “It would be a dream to get drafted by an NFL team.” On the ground and in his studies, he is a social work major and has an internship with Clark University set in Hartford, Conn. The senior running back has quickly become a Blue Devil icon, whether his helmet will be soon perched in those Kaiser trophy cases or not. He’ll see plenty more opportunities with another home game against Robert Morris next Saturday at noon. This football season could become quite memorable for the entire program, including Mallory with the no. 2 jersey.

Edward Gaug | The Recorder


16 THE RECORDER Wednesday, October 7 , 2009

Sports 10.7

Comeback:

CCSU Gets Three Unanswered, Defeats RMU

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Christopher Boulay THE RECORDER

yards into the end zone on CCSU’s ensuing possession to give them the lead, 17-12. Junior Brian Fowler, a key member of the CCSU running attack, had a key play near the end of the third quarter when he broke a 58 yard rush up the middle, setting up a Joe Izzo 26 yard field goal. Not to be outdone, quarterback Hunter Wanket kept the team alive with a series of short passes down the sidelines, setting up the ground game for Mallory. With 6:41 to go in the game, Sacred Heart mounted an 11-play, 54-yard drive in an attempt to regain control, after giving up 17 unanswered points. Pioneer quarterback Dale Fink who had yet to make a bad decision on the day, dropped back under pressure and

Two goals from Taylor Morgan helped the Blue Devils avoid failure in the opening weekend of the NEC season, with a 3-2 win over Robert Morris University. Morgan scored the winner less than four minutes from time when captain Robert Cavener caused a turnover at the top of the Colonials’ (0-10-1, 0-1-1) box, and fed the ball to Morgan for a goal in an open net. Morgan got the Blue Devils on the board in the 68th minute off of a Cavener corner. Morgan struck the ball from left to right, out of reach for Robert Morris’ keeper Toba Bolaji. CCSU (6-2-1, 1-0-1) is now tied at the top of the NEC standings with Monmouth, Quinnipiac and Sacred Heart. All four teams have four points each. Coach Shaun Green was proud of the team’s effort, but did worry about the possibility of a disastrous start to the Blue Devils’ conference season. “I felt that we had a four-minute window to score, and that was it,” Green said. “As soon as they scored, we’ve got to get it back to 2-1 straight away. We got it back to 2-1 and we had a fighting chance.” Regarding coming back from a 2-0 hole, Morgan preached persistence. “You have to be patient and take the opportunities,” Morgan said. “We just gott to keep doing what we’re doing.” Scoring opened in the 29th minute when Shane Beharry scored from an assist by Henry Montano. The shocking play from Robert

See Mallory Drives Page 8

See Comeback Page 12

Dorsey Picks Apart Pioneers

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Timothy Farrell Special to The Recorder

The Blue Devils put together some late game magic to start off their conference schedule with a bang and defend their turf by putting up 24 unanswered points to silence Sacred Heart for homecoming. The Pioneers had a 12-0 lead and controlled the game heading into halftime. CCSU’s offense sputtered along in the first half, being forced to punt the ball away five times. Fortunately for the Blue Devils, senior James Mallory and the offense finally found the end zone about halfway through the third quarter with a one-yard touchdown run, bringing the score to 12-7. Mallory, who had been held in check all

first half, was able to put two touchdowns on the board for CCSU, moving him to fourth all-time in school history with 152 points. The Blue Devils were only able to put up 23 yards rushing in the first half, but then they exploded for 161 in the second. “We wore them down,” Mallory said. “We’re a veteran team, and we realize that there are four quarters in football, and if something doesn’t work in the first half, you just have to grind it out.” Oddly enough, possibly the biggest play that Mallory made was on the defensive side of the ball. In the fourth quarter, on a 4th and 18, Sacred Heart punter Brian Friedman bobbled the snap and was taken down by the Blue Devil running back at the Pioneer’s nine-yard line. Mallory then took the ball nine

CCSU Blue Devils Volleyball Sweeps Hartford Hawks Brittany Burke THE RECORDER

Photo Courtesy of: CCSUBlueDevils.com

Captain Jamie Baumert lead the Blue Devils to a 3-0 sweep of the Hartford Hawks.

Inside This Issue:

In their second match-up of the season the CCSU women’s volleyball team was able to defeat the Hartford Hawks in three games, ending the match at 3-0 and improving their record to 7-8. The Blue Devils (7-8, 2-0 NEC) and the Hartford Hawks (6-9) played each other at the beginning of the season in the CCSU Blue Devil Invitational, where the CCSU was also able to take the win in three. Head Coach Linda Sagnelli was really happy to see her team win in three. “It showed us we can just put a team away,” she said. While the Blue Devils were able to sweep

the match, they got off to a slow start. In game two, the team’s defense allowed for the Hawks to score five unanswered points before they got anything on the board. Struggling to find their momentum and rhythm is a problem that the Blue Devils have had to deal with in past matches. “It’s something we are very well aware of and we’re really working hard to be able to start off not only in games but also in some drills that we have done in practice,” said Sagnelli. “We’ve also been a little slow starting and then they get full steam ahead. We need to be full steam ahead when the official blows the whistle for the beginning of the match.” Even though CCSU got off to a slow start, See CCSU Blue Devils Page 13

NFL PICK ‘EMS How did you match up in Senior Captain Jamie Baumert leads CCSU to

See Baumert Page 13

Week 4? See Pick Your Poison Page 14

Running Back Mallory is Unstoppable

See Keeping Blue Devil Page 15


Volume 106 issue 5