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CENTR A L CONNECTICUT STATE UNIVERSIT Y Wednesday, September 23, 2009

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Volume 106 No. 4

Modern Languages Professor Remembered

House Passes Largest Student Aid Investment In U.S. History

TERENCE STEWART THE RECORDER

ToNYA MALiNoWSKi THE RECORDER

More than 100 people crammed into Memorial Hall’s Connecticut Room last Tuesday to pay tribute to an associate professor in the Modern Languages Department at CCSU. Gloria Marie Caliendo died unexpectedly of unknown causes at her home in Dayville, Conn., on July 23. Although many were saddened by Caliendo’s untimely death, the hour-long memorial service wasn’t a somber occasion. Instead, it was an event that celebrated the life of a selfless woman who devoted herself to her students and the campus community. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen [Gloria] happier than when we had our annual student recognition ceremony,” said moderator Lillian Uribe, who’s also the chair of CCSU’s Department of Modern Languages. “For nothing gave her greater joy than having the opportunity to tell her students how wonderful teachers they had become.” The audience, which was composed of faculty and students, listened intently as Uribe finished her opening remarks. Debra Silva, Caliendo’s youngest sister, was the only family member who attended the service. “Gloria spent her whole professional life working for her students to help them become the best teachers they could be. She touched the lives of her students in a way that nobody but her could have done,” Uribe said. Caliendo, 57, was also remembered as being committed to advancing the field of education. She was a two-time Fulbright Scholar and the associate director of CCSU’s Center for Caribbean and Latin American Studies. In addition, she was the founder of the Teaching Education Centers in El Salvador and Ecuador and served on the executive board of The International Desuggestology, an organization that promotes a teaching method called accelerated learning. Caliendo’s passion for teaching inspired many of her pupils to become educators, including those who didn’t want to teach. “I told [my daughter] about [one of] CCSU’s classes and she

Congressman Christopher Murphy came to CCSU Friday to discuss the Fiscal Aid and Responsibility Act passed by the House of Representatives this week. The bill allocates $87 billion over ten years in federal funding for higher education and an increase for Pell grants and is the largest investment in student aid in the history of the United States. “As a Connecticut resident who is currently paying back student loans, my wife and I both understand the burden of student loans on young families,” said Murphy, representative of Connecticut’s fifth district. The bill removes subsidy programs through private lenders and instead allows student loans to go directly through the government. Because the government no longer has to pay these subsidies, the savings go directly back into higher education. “It’s done through absolutely no cost to the taxpayers of this country,” said Murphy. “It also puts the $10 billion left over back into the deficit.” The Pell Grant, currently capped at $5,350 per student per academic year will be raised to $5,500 next year and nearly $7,000 by 2019. It also indexes the grant to the cost of living, with the maximum rising along with the Consumer Price Index plus an additional one percent. “We pat the House of Representatives on the back for helping make college more affordable,” said Dennis Williams, associate director of financial aid. The bill passed by a 253 to 171 vote and is expected to pass through senate rather quickly. All colleges would then be required to have the direct loan program in use by July 1, 2010. Ten million dollars of the act is reserved exclusively for community college funding, and another $10 billion for early childhood education programs. Murphy, in his second term as congressman, believes that there need to be even more colleges investing in this program and even more federal funding given to states to help control the price of tuition

See Modern Languages Page 43

Former Athlete Alleges Coach Made Him Drink Blood Student Sues Coach for Five Semesters of Harassment ToNYA MALiNoWSKi AND MELiSSA TRAYNoR - THE RECORDER PhoTo iLLuSTRATioN BY EDWARD GAuG - THE RECORDER

A former CCSU cross country athlete has filed a lawsuit against the university, seeking at least $15,000 in damages after his coach allegedly made him drink blood and, along with teammates, harassed him on several other occasions from 2005 to 2008. Charles Ngetich, a Kenyan student studying in the United States on a student visa, was attending Central on full NCAA scholarship. He was withdrawn from the university in the beginning of this academic semester due to outstanding loans after he was removed from the track team and lost his scholarship in fall 2007. He approached the CCSU Office of Diversity and Equity in January 2009 due to financial stress. According to a source close to the matter, who only agreed to speak to The Recorder on condition of anonymity, Ngetich originally went to the office because he was afraid he could not pay for tuition without a scholarship.

The CCSU office of Diversity is a program for monitoring affirmative action procedures on campus. Dr. Moises Salinas, CCSU’s chief diversity officer, refused to comment. When the Office of Diversity’s staff became concerned and decided to press the issue further for investigation, Ngetich opened up and reported that he was harassed by track and cross country coach George Kawecki. The coach, who retired recently after a 23-year career with track and field and cross country at CCSU, is listed as another defendant in the lawsuit. The lawsuit, which was filed on Sept. 14 in the New Britain Superior Court, details a series of interactions between Ngetich, Kawecki and other cross country team members from 2005 to 2007, when Ngetich was kicked off the cross country team. Ngetich’s attorney Josephine Miller could not be reached for comment.

See House Passes Page 4

In The Recorder This Week: Opinion:

CCSU Professor Receives Dance Award

Page 4

Campus Diversity Moving Forward Page 2

‘Strong Sense of Place’ Found at CCSU Gallery

Page 2

Movie, Album and Game Reviews

Page 6

Blue Devils Shut Out By Saints

FOR BREAKING NEWS VISIT: www.centralrecorder.com

Page 16


News

2 THE RECORDER Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Former Cross Country Athlete Alleges Coach Made Him Drink Blood

Continued from page 1

According to the lawsuit, around October or November of 2005, Kawecki told Ngetich that he saw a documentary where an ethnic group in Kenya drank blood as a tribal ritual and would like to see him drink blood. Ngetich refused, and two weeks later Kawecki produced a cup of blood at a team meeting, and told Ngetich to drink it because he was “too thin [and] needed calcium.” Feeling he had no other option, Ngetich drank the blood in the presence of Kawecki and approximately 10 other team members. In the following weeks, Kawecki gave Ngetich additional bottles of blood to take home and drink, but Ngetich affirms that he only discarded the bottles. The lawsuit also states that Kawecki continued to harass or

publicly embarrass Ngetich and outlined specific incidents that reach beyond December 2006. At a team practice, a former female teammate had a puppy on a leash. Kawecki allegedly pointed to the puppy and asked Ngetich, “How many people can you feed with this?” Also cited in the suit is an incident that occurred at a cross country team barbecue at Kawecki’s home in New Britain, where a hot dog was dropped on the ground and a member of the team said “he’s from Africa - Charles can eat that.” The source close to Ngetich’s case stated that Ngetich’s bouts of depression and declining performance in academics and on the cross country team is a direct result of the two and a half years of abuse and embarrassment by Kawecki.

Fall 2005: Ngetich begins attending class and the cross country team at CCSU.

Kawecki produced a cup of blood at a team meeting, and told Ngetich to drink it because he was “too thin, needed calcium.” of 2007. The source said that when they had reason enough to kick him off the team, it became conve-

nient for the department to “throw him away like a piece of garbage.” With the exception of directing inquiries to university spokesperson Mark McLaughlin, administrative officials, including the office of Student Affairs and those surrounding, have been instructed not to speak to press regarding the issue. CCSU’s marketing and communications office released a statement saying that because CCSU is committed to diversity, they are “especially pained” that they cannot comment on the matter and have redirected the issue to the Attorney General’s office. “The University and its employees are bound by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, and we cannot and should not violate the student’s right to privacy,” McLaughlin’s email read. “...

We welcome this process through which all of the facts of the case will come out.” The suit was served on the Attorney General’s Office Sept. 4, the same day that Ngetich was withdrawn from all of his classes. Though the lawsuit made its way to Blumenthal’s office earlier, the Attorney General said last Friday that his office had not yet committed to looking into it. “We haven’t yet become involved or reviewed the legal papers,” Attorney General Richard Blumenthal said. “We have no plans to make a statement.” The lawsuit states that Ngetich has an East Hartford address. If he was not withdrawn from the university this semester, Ngetich would have been on course to graduate in May 2010.

Fall 2007: CCSU reduces Ngetich’s NCAA scholarship from 100 percent to 60 percent.

Fall 2007: Kawecki unduly persuaded Ngetich to change his major from

October/ November, 2005: Coach George Kawecki tells Ngetich

Nov. 2007: Ngetich met with Kawecki, where Kawecki said that he needed him to train harder in order to stay on the team. Ngetich affirms that the coach told him it was okay to keep him on the team because Kawecki believed it was similar to feeding a hungry child.

TIMELINE OF EVENTS May 12, 2005: Ngetich is awarded full NCAA scholarship for cross country.

When the athletics department became concerned, they removed Ngetich from the cross country team through Kawecki in the fall

about a TV documentary he saw in which an ethnic group in Kenya drinks blood as a tribal ritual. Kawecki stated that he would like to see Ngetich drink blood. Ngetich declines, assuming that Kawecki was joking. Two weeks later, Kawecki produces a cup of blood at a track team meeting and under “undue influence” by Kawecki, Ngetich drinks the blood in front of approximately 10 teammates.

mathematics to engineering, because he “could not use a math degree in Africa.”

Through Kawecki, the CCSU athletics department removed Ngetich from the cross country team

May 12, 2005 Fall 2005 October/ November, 2005 Fall 2006 December 2006 October 2007 Fall 2007 April/ May, 2008 January, 2009 March, 2009 September 4, 2009 September 14, 2009

Fall 2006: Kawecki holds a meeting about team members missing

practice. He lectured team members implying that if they lost their NCAA scholarships, they would suffer severe financial stress and should not walk around campus “as though they were rich kings” and should fulfill their obligations to the scholarship by attending practice. Ngetich believes that Kawecki singled him out and made jokes implying that Ngetich was personally suffering through poverty.

December 2006: Kawecki continues to embarrass Ngetich in front of teammates, including an incident that involves asking Ngetich whether Kenyans eat dogs and “how many people [could one dog feed].”

October 2007: Ngetich affirms that, due to influence, the coach led his teammates to believe it was acceptable to humiliate Ngetich. In the lawsuit he cited another incident during a team cookout at Kawecki’s home, where a teammate dropped a hot dog on the ground and others said that they should give it to Charles to eat because “he’s from Africa- Charles can eat that.”

scene @ ccsu A Weekly Stand-Alone Photo Captured at CCSU

April/ May, 2008: CCSU reduces Ngetich’s NCAA scholarship from 60 percent to nothing.

January, 2009: Ngetich seeks

counseling from the CCSU Office of Diversity and Equity while he was suffering from financial stress and said he had trouble paying for tuition.

March, 2009: Ngetich reports to the Office of Diversity and Equity his experiences with Kawecki spanning from Fall 2005

September 4, 2009: Ngetich is removed from CCSU.

September 14, 2009: Ngetich

and attorney Joesphine Miller file civil suit against defendants CCSU and Kawecki with New Britain Superior Court.

@CENTRALRECORDER.COM Post-Game Analysis Video: Men’s soccer coach Shaun Green talks defense weaknesses after the team took a 4-0 beating from Sienna. The Walkmen Play Northampton NY-based band mixes songs from their celebrated 2008 record You & Me and unreleased material from upcoming 2010 album. Not Fit For Print is the third floor-installation of the LGBt center in the student center ironic? Yay or Nay album review including Why?, Brand new and Pains of Being Pure at Heart

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Frontman Jimi Mann, of the local band High Tide sings to a small crowd outside of Memorial Hall this past Thursday. Despite the presence of rain, Mann and High Tide continued to play through their entire set.


3

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, September 23, 2009 / NEWS

CCSU Police Department Arrest and Citation Log 9.10 - 9.17 In the early hours of Sept. 10, both Oneillia J. Campbell, 20, and Tameika Davis, 18, were arrested for breach of peace. They were scheduled to appeal in court on Sept. 18. Ramono M. Cancel, 47, was charged with operating an unregistered vehicle, improper use of marker/ license/registration, no insurance and operating without a license on Sept. 16. On Sept. 13, Daniel J. Galvin, 18, was charged with creating a public disturbance. At press time, a court date has not been set. Chaunte Green, 21, was arrested on Sept. 12 for breach of peace. She was schedule to appear on Sept. 18. Nana O. Korankye, 22, was charged with operating an unregistered vehicle, misuse of plates, no insurance and operating under suspension on Sept. 14. On Sept. 13, Daniel Joseph Rossley, 20, was arrested for breach of peace and interfering with an officer. He was scheduled to appear on Sept. 21. Asia L. Smith, 20 was arrested on Sept. 13 for assault in the third degree. Smith was scheduled to appear Sept. 21.

Modern Languages Professor Remembered

Continued from page 1

signed up for it,” wrote Jeanne Dunnet in a letter that was read at the service. “She told me later that she didn’t understand why she was doing it because she absolutely didn’t want to teach any more. So, she took the class and Dr. Caliendo was her teacher. She loved it. She remembered why she wanted to teach. She realized that this is what she loved to do. It changed her life around.” One by one, Caliendo’s colleagues,

including President Jack Miller, approached the lecturn to reflect on the impact Caliendo had on their lives during her 19-year career at CCSU. Although many stories were told, Caliendo’s compassion and humanitarian efforts were a recurring theme. As an educator and minister, Caliendo traveled to many countries to promote peace and tolerance. She was also an active member of the Faculty Senate Diversity Committee where she explored ways to promote diversity

at CCSU. Caliendo was survived by two brothers, Marco E. Caspoli of Central Falls, R.I. and Richard Caspoli of Lebanon, C.T.; one sister, Debra L. Silva of Pawtucket, R.I. and a slew of nieces and nephews. Those who were unable to attend the memorial service can e-mail their condolences to the Modern Language Department. Letters will be displayed on the department’s Web site.

Arrest in Yale Homicide Prompts Questions About Employee Screenings JAMiE MCMAhoN AND RYAN hEBEL UWIRE

(UWIRE) - Last Thursday’s arrest of Yale University employee Raymond Clark for the murder of Yale graduate student Annie Le — as well as conflicting reports regarding Clark’s character — have led some to question how Yale could hire a man capable of such a horrific crime in the first place. Descriptions of Clark, whose DNA matches evidence found at the crime scene, according to New Haven Police Department, have ranged from “a normal guy” to a controlling boyfriend with anger issues. His supervisor reported that “nothing in the history of his employment at the university gave an indication that his involvement in such a crime might be possible,” according to an e-mail sent Thursday to students by Yale President Richard C. Levin. The fact that Clark’s allegedly violent nature went unnoticed may suggest that, no matter how hard it tries, a university that employs thousands can never completely ensure the safety of its student employees from non-student workers. Levin said in his e-mail that the case “says more about the dark side of the human soul than it does about the extent of security measures.” Still, some will question whether Yale failed to pick up on any indications that Clark was dangerous. According to the university’s Web site, Yale employs background checks on candidates for positions ranging from “management and professional positions, clerical and technical positions and service and maintenance positions.” Levin did not say in his e-mail whether Clark was screened. Yale last updated its screening policy in 2007, long after Clark began work in 2004.

Questions Wednesday to Yale’s Human Resources and Administration about its background policy were referred the Office of Public Affairs, which referred to the Web site. The Office of Public Affairs also said it was not discussing the case. “A thorough and reliable background check is vital in determining whether your candidate will be an asset or a liability to your department,” the Web site says. “As the largest employer in New Haven County, Yale hired over 2,289 new staff members in 2006. Preemployment screening will help to ensure that we continue to hire the right people, for the right jobs, at the right time.” The screenings include, among other things, social security number verification, a criminal history check, and employment verification from three previous employers. Yale contracts ADP, which describes itself as “one of the world’s largest providers of business outsourcing solutions,” to do the screenings. Mandy King, who has worked as a medical assistant at Yale’s School of Medicine for two years, said she had to complete a thorough background check before she was hired. “After all of my interviews, and approval for hire, it was almost a full week before the extensive background check came back,” King said. “I will say that the security is tight in the research labs, [and] that is one of the things that has upset us the most in the Yale Community.” King, who works with both students and researchers, said she and fellow employees are deeply saddened that Le was presumably killed “by someone who was one of us.” “We are so saddened that such a bright, young person as seen such a tragic end of her life,” she said. Like many institutions, universities usually perform background checks for employees

working in secure locations such as Le’s lab. No matter the school and extent of the screening, background checks inevitably represent the “overarching goal of ensuring a safe environment for students, faculty, staff, patients and guests,” according to Phil Hampton, assistant director of UCLA’s Media Relations and Public Outreach. UCLA takes its screening process “very seriously,” Hampton said, and takes specific care when the employee will be working around students. Applicants with a criminal record are reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Kathy Bryant, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill communications director, said UNC also pays close attention to criminal records. “Each check that’s returned with a criminal conviction is reviewed on a case-by-case basis,” she said. “The relationship of any conviction to the position for which the individual is being considered is taken into consideration as a part of that. So you might have a situation where someone had a financial conviction on their records and they’re applying for an accounting position. That’s something that would’ve been taken into consideration as part of the decision making process as to whether a conviction would arise to a level that would keep a person from being employed.” Even when workers are thoroughly screened prior to employment, student employees must extend a level of trust to the people with whom they interact every day. “The work of the university requires us to engage with each other in the classroom, to collaborate in the laboratory, and to trust one another in workplaces across the campus,” Levin said in his e-mail. “In many, even most respects, this university is a model of citizenship and civility. It will take the efforts of everyone to maintain that standard.”

HEALTHY MEN WHO HAVE 5 OR MORE DRINKS PER OCCASION NEEDED FOR ALCOHOL STUDY

Healthy males, 21-45 years old, who drink 5 or more drinks per occasion on several days per month, and have no history of substance dependence or psychiatric illness, are needed for a UConn Health Center study to evaluate an FDA approved medication, dutasteride, and common genetic variation on the effects of a moderate dose of alcohol. Dutasteride (Avodart TM) is not FDA approved for the purpose of this study. Participation involves blood samples, interviews, questionnaires, 7 brief study visits and 4 full day laboratory sessions where you will be asked to consume placebo or alcohol drinks based on your body weight. $555 paid for full participation.

For information call 860-679-4186 or go towww. uchcalcoholstudy.com (refer to study #2) IRB approved on 4/20/09 (valid through 3/10/10)


4 The Recorder

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Editor-in-Chief Melissa Traynor Managing Editor Edward Gaug Art Director Geoffrey Lewis News Editors Matt Kiernan Tonya Malinowski Entertainment Editor Michael Walsh Sports Editor Christopher Boulay Assistant Sports Editor Carmine Vetrano Lifestyles Editor Samantha Fournier Web Editor Alex Jarvis Staff Nick Kane Anders Nils Pierson Kim Gaity Kim Scroggins P.J. Decoteau Ryan Perodeau Don Weber

About

The Recorder is a studentproduced publication of Central Connecticut State University and does not necessarily represent, in whole or in part, the views of CCSU’s administrators, faculty or students. The Recorder articles, photographs and graphics are property of The Recorder and may not be reproduced or published without the written permission from the Editor-in-Chief. The purpose of The Recorder is to approach and define issues of importance to the students of Central Connecticut State University. Meetings for The Recorder are held on Mondays at 8 p.m. in the Blue and White Room in the student center.

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THE RECORDER / Wednesday, September 23, 2009 / NEWS

CCSU Prof Receives Dance Award Matt Kiernan THE RECORDER

Professor and Dance Program Director Catherine J. Fellows has been awarded the 2009 Distinguished Achievement Award by the Connecticut Dance Alliance for the contributions she’s provided to the art of dancing. “It’s very interesting to win an award for what you love to do so it was very easy,” said Fellows. The award of prestigious acclaim is only given to a select number of members in the dance community and has only been awarded to 17 others since the organization’s establishment in 1999. Much of the dance program at CCSU has been designed by Fellows since she became a full-time faculty member in 1976. She has dedicated herself to choreography and teaching

students the different forms of dance while putting together performances. “What makes me the happiest is being able to go in and work with our students,” she said. She asserts that art is a necessity and not a luxury and that being able to move around should make all people happy. Being happy and healthy are the two things she feels people need to have a successful life and that by carrying dancing into the world it will bring balance into it. Fellows is one of the three awardees honored, the other two being prominent members of the field of dance Kathy Borteck Gersten and Olivia Sabulao Llano-

House Passes Largest Student Aid Investment In U.S. History Continued from page 1

at public universities. “I don’t think there even is a downside to this,” Murphy said. “I hope with this we can get more students through the doors here at CCSU.” Subsidized and unsubsidized Stafford loans are maintained by the act, but the interest rates will become fixed at 3.4 percent. “I’m amazed at what it’s doing,” Student Government Association President Andrew Froning said. “It will make FAFSA so much easier

and help students be able to actually get through it and be able to access that money.”  The bill also has allotments for tuition abatement and scholarships for veterans along with the increase in funding for the Pell Grant, which currently helps over 12,000 students in the state Connecticut. Murphy said the most important thing is being proactive in getting the bill passed by Senate and getting into action as quickly as possible. “We will not just keep our fingers crossed that this bill passes,” he said.

Davis. Gersten is the Associate Artistic Director of the Judy Dworin Performance Ensemble in Hartford and Davis is the Artistic Director of Spectrum in Motion Dance Theater Ensemble in Hartford and Stretching for Life Dance Program. While making attempts at improving the education system, Fellows is on the CT Dance Task Force Committee, which worked for the approval of CT Dance Teacher Certification. CCSU is a school that offers the certification and many of the students who graduate pursue a career in teaching dance in the New England area. Performances in the CCSU

dance works Gratitude and Migrant Mother have included Fellows. Her choreography skills have led her to create her own ballets that include Barefoot and Fullswing. Bringing outside sources and teachers has been a major part in the contributions that she’s brought to the school. Renowned dancers and choreographers have made appearances at the university that include the Martha Graham Dance Ensemble, Merce Cunningham and Hubbard Street. Included in the group of past winners of the award are Jennifer Tipton, a renowned master of lighting for theatre stages and Martha Myers who has been a host of the American Dance Festival. The ceremony was held on Sep. 19 at the Mort and Irma Handle Performing Arts Center in Hartford.

“I hope with this we can get more students through the doors here at CCSU.” - Chris Murphy

Tonya Malinowski | The Recorder

Write for The Recorder Meetings every Monday night at 8 p.m. in the Blue & White Room in the student center.


Editorial/Opinion

5

THE RECORDER Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Editorial

University Should Come Clean Given CCSU’s history with diversity, anti-prejudice and any other instances dealing with the acceptance of students and those in the campus community, now is the time to be forthcoming. With recent allegations against former cross country and track and field coach George Kawecki that claim he forced former CCSU athlete Charles Ngetich to drink blood in front of teammates, it is especially important that the university avoid making the situation worse. The lawsuit filed by Ngetich against the former coach could potentially uncover ugly details about the athletics department and ultimately the inner workings of the university. Not much aside from the lawsuit

itself reveals any information about the circumstances surrounding Ngetich, and statements, such as those made to The Recorder, indicate that that there is a concerted effort to bar certain university officials from speaking to the press. Even without avoiding news outlets, no substantial statement has been released from CCSU since the story broke on Thursday. In terms of responding to the lawsuit, it is still early in the process. Though, seeing as the alleged events began over two years ago, and this is not the first time Ngetich’s story has been brought to the university’s attention, CCSU should have taken a more active role in disseminating information about the case. Ngetich’s tale adds to an

Letters to the Editor In response to Mr. Dorau’s reply to my article, “A Humble Proposition,” I ask, is there anyone else with a more serious rebuttal? Mr. Dorau’s primary argument rests upon the athletic department justifying its own existence by providing “free advertising” for the school. In this, he is correct, but has failed to recognize or mention that this advertising appeals primarily to those who wish to attend CCSU for the athletics, not academics. Will an aspiring scientist, teacher or historian be wowed by the fact that CCSU beat Sacred Heart in some ultimately meaningless game? Doubtful. We have seen the result of this: cast a stray glance around campus and chances are you will stumble upon the “socks and sandals” brigade, who no doubt, were wowed by the incredibly impressive athletic showings and decided that they too must attend CCSU. In effect, this advertising is “self contained,” i.e. the advertising garnered from athletic events benefits only the athletic department. Further, Mr. Dorau contends that since “CCSU isn’t Harvard, Stanford or Yale,” we should not try to “fake it” in aspiring to become something more prestigious. Again, he is partially correct, CCSU is not a top tier school, but that does not mean that we should remain

complacent and accepting of the situation at hand. There was nothing “utopian” about my proposal, nor was I advocating for something out of reach. We are fully able to lift ourselves out of the athletic-centered mire that we are in. To expect something more out of my school is not something to be lambasted for. Since arguments and logic are not things one is able to punt or throw, Mr. Dorau would do well to stay out of adult conversations. Joe Zajac

To the editors of the Recorder As student leaders, we believe it is our responsibility to fight for the rights and safety of the students we represent, both in our clubs and in our larger community. We are preparing for a campus-wide action and although we are still working on the details, our aim is to educate both the students and faculty about not only the nature of racism, but how we can fight it. The students and faculty of this campus will soon make it clear that we reject racism in all of its forms. Aaron McAuliffe, Pride Gigi Neama, ASO Marissa Blaszko, YSA Mary-Jo Callaghan, Phi Sigma Sigma Autumn Cloud Ingram, ASO

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already unstable reputation with diversity and racism prevention here at CCSU. While we are aware that those who live in glass houses should not cast stones, this is undoubtedly the situation that calls for immediate action, not sweeping it further under the rug. Ensuring an accepting and open campus for students, especially, extends to openness of information. Though unfortunate, Ngetich’s experiences are something the whole campus can learn from and encourage students undergoing similar treatment or abuse (or any kind) to speak up. Similarly, if the university holds involved and guilty parties responsible for Ngetich’s suffering, it would set a clear and harsh example for anyone

in the CCSU community who believes they can take advantage of another person, regardless of the circumstances. Even if on selfish terms to preserve reputation and cast a favorable light on itself, the university should have leapt at the opportunity to come clean when it had the chance since March. Surely, a student’s plea for help after describing abusive and racist behavior cannot go unnoticed through the hierarchy of the administration. The scenario may spell out public relations disaster, especially because employees of the university inevitably reflect upon CCSU as a whole, but it is not too late to soften the blow and save face.

And further, though the legal entanglements may prevent the university from dealing with Ngetich’s allegations on its own, CCSU should direct its attention towards addressing the cross country team, former coach and any other involved. Instead passing off responsibilities and awaiting the results, the administration should not remain mum. Ngetich’s case is an unexpected test on the university’s ability to locate and mend diversity problems and until now, it has been handled poorly. This is now the opportunity to prove that it is flexible and dedicated to addressing diversity issues.

Campus Diversity Moving Forward Don Weber THE RECORDER

A steady issue at CCSU, campus diversity has been a topic of discussion for many years now. Student organizations create long strides for diversifying this campus, but faculty has been working behind closed doors as well. Campus diversity has become a major work in progress for CCSU students and faculty. At first glance, the word diversity typically leads people to think of two opposites whether it be ethnic, religious or about sexual orientation. However, if you take the time to look over the student circle you can see that CCSU has a pretty diverse group of students. This is what the faculty wants to focus on, the overall collection of students that Central has attained

over the years. Chief Diversity Officer Dr. Moises Salinas pointed out that the Office of Diversity and Equity has been spreading the goals for campus diversity. “We initially focus on the terms of climate or the environment on campus,” Salinas said. What they hear or see on campus is what gets the most attention first, for example the opening of the LGBT Center or the Center for Africana Studies. Professor Salinas also noted that ideas such as campus daycare facilities and gender-neutral bathrooms are considered. Something they have thought about previously that is receiving more attention now. Working with Salinas is University Ombudsperson Dr. Antonio Garcia-Lozada. “We want to provide the skills to deal with each other,” Garcia-

Lozada said, referring to faculty and students. Garcia-Lozada considers himself a bridge between the students and staff, and was quick to point out that President Jack Miller has helped a lot by supporting their efforts in campus diversity. Students and faculty continue to support campus diversity together. Events are posted on the student center walls of club and campus events, including some of Professor Salinas’ own projects. When asked if he was genuinely happy with the effort, Salinas said “We’ve made good progress, but we are nowhere near done yet.” Both Salinas and Garcia-Lozada agree that the changes seen around campus so far are only the beginning. Certainly the CCSU student body can expect good progression for the topic of campus diversity to come.

Balancing Classes and, You Know, a Life Cassondra Becking Mustang Daily Cal Poly

It’s back-to-school time and everyone is attempting to organize their lives into perfectly colorcoded bins purchased from Bed Bath & Beyond — only they have yet to find out that one thing doesn’t fit quite so perfectly into these bins, namely, your relationships (or lack thereof). It’s hard to meet new people, be the responsible student, make the most of your day and still have time to be alone. The dilemma here is how to start a school year successfully, while still keeping your options open for possibly beginning a new relationship or keeping the one you already have. The solution is simple, but does require balance. Balance isn’t just a term used in your yoga class or to describe your diet; it should also be used to organize your relationship bin. Life in general will be better when you use balance as your guide in your school work, social as well as sex life and well being. This doesn’t mean that in one

day you can’t sleep in late, go to an all-day party, find some cool girl to hang out with all night and barely make it home at 3 a.m. You just have to ensure that the next day you get all your homework finished, all your laundry cleaned, and that you study for your midterm. In other words, everyone’s concept of balance is going to look the same; some need to fit all of their hookups and sleepovers into their weekend, while others seem to have no problem weaving them in throughout the week’s tasks. It also means you don’t have to find that significant other right in the beginning of the quarter. If your life requires focus on school in the beginning and a social life later, follow through with that. If that person is right for you, he or she will most likely still be waiting next month. And if you’re already in a serious relationship, a lot of that back-to-school stress won’t affect you since you’ve both already learned how to make a relationship work. If the balance isn’t really there, it might be time to try something new. For example, if studying on

the bed is too tempting for you, try going to the library or making goals for one another. When a goal is reached, give each other some sort of reward. This way you’ll get stuff done as well as enjoying each other’s company. Not everyone can be lucky enough to find the perfect boyfriend who just so happens to live right across the hall; it might take a little more work than that. Getting involved in as many things as possible is your best bet for finding that perfect relationship at any time of the year. You don’t have to be the life of the party; you just have to be at some parties. Don’t be afraid to join clubs, run, swim and bike for the triathlon team or even cheer for the football team from the bleachers. You’re guaranteed to meet the most people by just putting yourself out there and doing new things. So, while keeping up with your responsibilities when school begins, don’t forget to put yourself out there and do things you’ve never done, because you never know who you might meet and what adventures you will have.


6 THE RECORDER Wednesday, September 23, 2009

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Photo courtest of Warner Bros.

Damon Leads Strong in Soderbergh’s Quirky Tattle-tale Michael Walsh THE RECORDER

Steven Soderbergh rides along on a wavelength that is all to himself. It’s impossible to directly liken him to another name in cinema. In fact, the one constant that runs along all the films in his filmography is that outside of the Ocean’s series, no one film is truly like another. And Soderbergh’s quietly funny satire The Informant! is only an extension of the variance his films have contained ever since he broke into the business with his industry changing film Sex, Lies and Videotape. Based on a true story, The Informant! is the story of a lysine price-fixing conspiracy

centered on the company ADM. Highranking Mark Whitacre (Matt Damon) plays whistleblower on the whole situation, but things just don’t work out the way the bipolar executive envisions them to. Certainly nothing about a man’s turmoil in life due to a bipolar disorder is funny, but this film, which happens to focus on such a thing, certainly is. Damon’s performance as antihero Mark Whitacre is a charismatic and indulging turn, and probably one of the actor’s best ever. And this perfect portrayal of a delusional, reckless-with-words man that Damon had to gain 20 to 30 pounds for is one of the reasons the film has such a high level of satirical, ironic and subtle sense of humor. Most of the funny

business here flies low under the radar and the facade of the whole thing. While I remain true to my no two Soderbergh films are the same mantra, those that have seen Soderbergh’s earlier comedy about office plight, Schizopolis, will know better than anyone else what to expect with this film. While not as strange as the experimental Schizopolis, the film is certainly not straight on its rocker, much like the main character. This goes for the film’s pacing and interludes of Whitacre’s random bipolar induced thoughts, which makes for some of the funniest dialogue in the film. “How do polar bears know their noses are black?” Whitacre wonders mid conversation.

Without Soderbergh’s consistently ironic tone or Damon’s outrageous performance that builds and builds and pulls the audience back into the story with each additional lie, what’s left is a rather average web of intrigue story. I wouldn’t be shocked to see a few people feel left out. The Informant! could be comedy’s best kept secret. The Informant! isn’t going to be remembered as a masterpiece mostly because it won’t appeal to everyone, and that’s fine, but for Soderbergh-ites like me, it truly is what’s expected and wanted when he attacks humor. If this film doesn’t successfully sneak up on everyone else, The Informant! is likely destined for cult status.

A Strong Sense of Place Found at CCSU Gallery Samantha Fournier THE RECORDER

Upon entering the Samuel T. Chen Gallery on Thursday for the opening reception of “A Sense of Place,” later visitors were greeted by a room full of people already admiring the large structural paintings on the wall and unglazed clay sculptures sitting atop podiums throughout the room. In the inner gallery, “Inspirations from the Hill-Stead Museum” also opened that afternoon. “A Sense of Place” exhibition will continue to stay open until Oct. 15, Monday through Friday from one to four p.m. Sculptor John Brickels and painter Antonio Masi made their rounds throughout the room speaking with onlookers, as well as partaking in a few filmed interviews. “I love curating around a theme and a sense of place was interesting to me,” said the director of the show, Professor Cassandra Broadus-Garcia. She said that when we look at Brickels’ sculpture of the Vermont cottage or Masi’s painting of the Queens Borough Bridge, we feel as though we are there. It is as though we are able to feel what Brickels and Masi felt as they created the pieces. “I’m influenced by where I’ve lived and where I live now,” Brickels said of his work. He used to live in Ohio and was inspired to create the deteriorating barns that would be perfect to make out of clay. Brickels also has family in New York City and was inspired by brownstones. Since taking Ceramics 101 in college, Brickels said “I took to hand building. I made a house and I got positive reinforcement and I just kept building sculptures that I make to sell.” He said a piece like Akron Aggregate, which looks like an old run down factory and includes details such as boarded up windows, a half broken smoke stack, and a carefully crafted brick walls, can take around 60 hours to make. “The texture and the medium he’s using is such a fragile medium,” CCSU student,

Brittany Kilburn as she noted the small details in Brickman’s sculptures. Abby Jensen, a recent CCSU graduate, said she agreed that the amount of texture in detail in each piece also captured her attention. Jensen also thought that the sculptures worked against the paintings, which she thought that “were so saturated with color that they look like pastels from far away.” Though most of Masi’s paintings are dominated by a gray scale, he applies watercolor thickly to give his paintings that strong, saturated feel. “It just seemed like the most natural medium to me,” Masi added about using watercolor as a medium. Masi, like Brickels, also found inspiration from his childhood after he moved from Italy to the United States in 1947 at the age of seven. “The idea of bridges was in my family because my grandfather, Francesco, was one of the builders of the Queens Borough Bridge,” Masi said. The same strong emotions that overcame Masi when he first visited the Queens Borough Bridge at age eight can be experienced through his massive paintings, which command attention. Most of the pieces in the inner gallery are also dominated by gray, black, and white, as Masi’s paintings are. These naturefocused pieces were created by students, faculty, and staff that had the opportunity to use Farmington’s Hill-Stead Museum as inspiration and a classroom. This took place over the summer and was part of the CCSU Strategic Planning Initiative Grant, which helps students find ways to contribute to the community as they learn. Whether students visit the Brickel’s textured sculptures that have a dreamlike sense of movement, Masi’s evocative NYC bridges, or Hill-Stead motivated CCSU paintings, they’ll find their own sense of place among the artists’. Sculptor John Brickels and his “Akron Aggregate.”

Edward Gaug | The Recorder


7

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, September 23, 2009 / UPGRADE

Vivian Girls Everything Goes Wrong In the Red Sept. 8, 2009 After gaining the praise of indie fans across the map, the Vivian Girls return with the release of Everything Goes Wrong, an album that could have had so much potential but fails with simplistic mediocrity. No changes in sound were made from the Girls’ first release to their latest, which may seem like the best path to go down after having success from their self-titled, but the magic and originality that the first album had has been stripped away from their latest outing. What separates the Vivian Girls from the rest of their noise-rock counterparts is their

ability to communicate what would normally be pop songs, covered in distortion and noise. What the second album needs are catchier choruses that draw listeners in and better songwriting. The songs are much too simplistic to have any worth, and while listening to the album one can hear the lack of good recording techniques. The songwriting seems to have been rushed and it may have paid off better if the Girls took the time to sit down and write them properly. The album does have it’s moments with tracks such as “Can’t Get Over You,” “The End” and “When I’m Gone.” The first falls a little bit flat midway through, though, because of the very weak solo that seems to only interrupt the chords of the verses. “The End” is a track that includes the usual clattering of cymbals and harmony of vocals that makes the band enjoyable to listen to. “When I’m Gone” is marked by the lead singer calling out for a lover to realize what lies ahead and one of the more interesting guitar playing on the album. Solos are major factors that show the signs of how the songwriting quality was lacking. The band seems to embrace the idea that girls can really rock out too, but throw away the chance to show off their skills with solos that only cover a few notes. The Vivian Girls’ new album may have benefited from higher quality recording and more time given to creating the songs and is one of the more forgettable releases they’ve put out. Matt Kiernan THE RECORDER

Finely Tuned ‘NHL 10’ Deserves To Hoist Cup Michael Walsh The Recorder

One look at NHL 10 and you might easily mistake it for NHL 09. Play through one game of NHL 10 and you’ll begin to realize that this is no clone. The latest hockey offering from EA Sports looks just about the same as last year’s edition, but the inside workings of this beast are completely fine tuned and reworked. The team at EA Canada could have easily spent their time tweaking the presentation or changing a few items in the cosmetic area of the game, but they instead stayed dedicated to what the fans wanted, a tuned tweaking to what has become known as one of the most pure sports experiences in all of video games. The authentic gameplay of NHL 09 has become even more similar to a real life NHL game in NHL 10. Developers claimed during production that over 200 gameplay changes were made over the course of development. Whether this is true or not is irrelevant, for the core gameplay of NHL 10 feels completely more true to the sport of hockey and is nearly an impeccable product. Because of the preciseness of the actual sport, the NHL video games, for the time being, will probably never be able to get it 100 percent right. You’re still going to find the occasional hiccup in gameplay, the rare but still beyond stupid lapse by the goalie, and a few very strange bounces of the puck. What’s most important is that when EA said they would fix the glitch goals cheesers abused online, they did. They followed up on important promises like the reduction of cheap goals and many other fallacies in last year’s game that all add to the raising of the level of gameplay to be as close to the real thing as possible. And while true hockey fans and purists will find NHL 10 to be an addictive simulation of the sport they love, casual fans might struggle to learn the ropes. The game involves strategy like no other sports game has before, and the control scheme might be one of the trickiest we’ve seen yet. Passing takes the right touch from the trigger finger and shooting requires spot-on aim. If you don’t know hockey, you might find yourself a bit out of the water. The learning curve is large, one a veteran

might have to relearn for the new year, but can be at least partially mastered by anyone who concentrates and puts their mind to it. And with that comes the reward. NHL 10 is the most realistic sports video game I’ve ever played, a title previously held by last years game. The new title only ups the ante, with more realistic player animations, including goalies that make miraculous saves not seen in video games before, and a new board play feature, that while sometimes feels almost random at outcome, is a beautiful implemented feature for hardcore hockey fans to really allow them to achieve a supreme forecheck on their opponent. The additions didn’t only come on the ice, as EA reworked and added new features off the ice, too. Be a GM mode improves on what was previously known as the franchise mode. More control is given to the player as the general manager of the team, and there’s more to control. Computer AI has been upped significantly in the trade department. No longer will struggling teams trade away young talent for an aging veteran simply because their ratings are similar. Make an offer like that in NHL 10 and you’ll find that your GM will begin to lose respect amongst his colleagues. Returning for another year is the EA Sports Hockey League, a creation that forever changed sports gaming when it was introduced last year. The EASHL allows you to create a player, be it yourself or a fictional character, and start a club of your own or join one that has already been created. As you control just your single character, the EASHL allows for up to six players to be active in one game on each team, making for deep and absolutely rewarding gameplay. It appears EA has taken care of all of last years glitch goals, which means no more passes that goes through two defensemen, right past the goalie who stands motionless in his crease, and to the opponent’s teammate who’s waiting on the other side for an easy tap in. The developers behind NHL 10 continue to prove the age old belief that sports games are simply recycled and slightly tweaked versions every year. This game is not simply a roster update with a cosmetic buffer and a few new game modes, it’s a finely tuned piece of dedicated work, and one of the greatest sports

Porcupine Tree The Incident Roadrunner Records September 15, 2009 Consider the fact that progressive rock band Porcupine Tree has found itself testing the waters of almost every related genre. From their early pulsing trance induced tracks to spacey Pink Floyd-like psychedelic rock to their later heavy metal influenced work, the band has woven itself a collective work as vast as one could imagine. And then listen to The Incident. In what can only be described as a great culmination of their works, the band’s latest album, which works as a 55-minute song cycle, draws from a bit of everything the band has been known for. The album does replicate the feel of the band’s last few albums more than anything else, and there’s certainly nothing as strange as what’s found on the first cassette founder and front man Steven Wilson ever released, Tarquin’s Seaweed Farm, but the legacy and groundwork of this band can be found in some way or another all across this ambitious and surreal concept album. Wilson found the concept for the album after realizing how detaching the commonly used word “incident” was for situations that

were really so destructive and traumatic for the ones involved. The strong theme carries straight through all 14 parts of The Incident as each song, although very different, has apart of another inside it as the entire 55-minute experience seamlessly flows by. The album certainly has its inspirations, perhaps most prevalent on the album’s longest track, “Time Flies,” which feels a lot like Pink Floyd’s “Dogs” right from the start. Of course, the two songs are very different, as each are made up of a different kind of musicianship. Meanwhile, instrumental “Circle of Manias” is about as heavy as the album gets, and perhaps draws from experimental progressive rock artists like Meshuggah. And rightly enough this track goes right into the deliriously beautiful “I Drive the Hearse”, a contender for best somber Porcupine Tree song. Title track “The Incident” might very well be the most impressive track on the album while the preceding track “Drawing the Line” hits hard with a powerful refrain from Wilson. Playing as tight-knit as they ever have, the musicianship of Porcupine Tree continues to be one of their most impressive aspects. Drummer Gavin Harrison continues to prove why he deserves to be considered one of the best and most influential drummers alive and Colin Edwin’s bass and Richard Barbieri’s keyboards and synth fill up the atmosphere. And it can almost go unsaid, but Steven Wilson is still himself with guitar in hand, his spacey but heavy riffs give the band a true identity. Dare I say that The Incident is Porcupine Tree’s undisputed masterpiece? It just might be. While I’ll forever always love the band’s early and mind intruding work such as The Sky Moves Sideways as much as anything else the band puts out, The Incident could be looked at as being their defining work and perhaps as the greatest example of their brilliant musicianship when all is laid to rest. Michael Walsh THE RECORDER

Twitter @ Twain House

games of all time.

What Would Twain Tweet?

A panel of four Connecticut Internet personalities mulled over this question, and whether the famous author would use social media last Tuesday at the Mark Twain House in Hartford, Conn.

More at centralrecorder.com


8

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, September 23, 2009 / UPGRADE

Calendar 9.23 - 9.30 MUSIC 9.25 Dear and the Headlights w/ A Great Big Pile of Leaves @ The Space Hamden, Conn. $12 / 7 p.m.

9.25 The Bled w/ Alesana, Asking Alexandria, Broadway @ Webster Theater Hartford, Conn. $13 / 6:30 p.m. 9.25 The Light and Heavies w/ Camp Calamity, The Kelvins @ The Webster Underground Hartford, Conn. $10 / 6 p.m. 9.26 Rusted Root w/ The Kin @ Webster Theater Hartford, Conn. $25 / 7 p.m. Multi-instrumentalist group Rusted Root integrate the Grateful Dead’s jam-heavy rock with percussion influences based on the music of Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. The six-piece formed in Pittsburgh in 1990 with Michael Glabicki (vocals, guitar), Liz Berlin (vocals, percussion), Patrick Norman (bass, vocals), and Jim Donovan (drums, percussion) as the initial lineup, though John Buynak (percussion, winds) and Jim DiSpirito (percussion) joined later that year.

Dear and the Headlights is an indie rock band from Tempe/Chandler, Arizona. After being signed to Equal Vision Records in 2006, they have released their first full-length record “Small Steps, Heavy Hooves” (February 2007), produced by Bob Hoag. They have previously toured with the likes of Circa Survive, Fear Before the March of Flames, As Tall as Lions, Mae, Paramore, Jimmy Eat World, and are currently participating in Warped Tour 2009. 9.25 Jonathan Coulton w/ Paul and Storm @ Toad’s Place New Haven, Conn. $20 (Discount with college ID) / 6 p.m.

“Jonathan Coulton is the funniest singer who will ever make you cry. The saddest song in the world is called “Code Monkey” and it’s by Jonathan Coulton. The Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter is something of an anomaly in the pop world.” – Washington Post 9.25 The Weird Beards + Live Jello Wrestling @ High Noon Saloon Norwich, Conn. $5 / 9 p.m. ($1 Jello Shots + $1 Pabst Blue Ribbon) THE WEIRD BEARDS thrive in the Land of Crazyness that is New London, Connecticut with a BARITONE UKULELE, ACOUSTIC GUITAR, STAND-UP BASS and DRUMS with occasional harmonicas, djembe, electric guitar, puppets, roboshades, robots, plaid pants, a rude blue dude, arreakas and a wheel on an upside down bicycle.

9.26 Edison w/ Full Tilt, Liam and Me @ The Webster Underground Hartford, Conn. $10 / 7:30 p.m. 9.26 WHY? w/ AU, Dark Dark Dark @ Daniel Street Milford, Conn. $12 / 7:00 p.m. 9.30 Shwayze w/ B.o.B. @ Toad’s Place New Haven, Conn. $20 / 8:00 p.m. Malibu. It’s where Mathew McConaughey flexes his pecs for paparazzi while shirtless on the beach. It’s where Courtney Cox and husband David Arquette recently sold their home for the modest asking price of more than $30 million to Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt. It’s where Julia Roberts built her multimillion dollar, eco-friendly estate as a tribute to Green living. And it’s where Cher, Jennifer Aniston and Mel Gibson share the same 310 area code as the Malibu trailer park community that brought us Shwayze. Alright, alright, so Malibu trailer parks aren’t exactly the things Detroit’s Eight Mile urban legends are made of, but they’re still not cued for a “Lifestyle of the Rich and Famous” special. Either way, Shwayze has no complaints.

ART 
 Through 10.15

“A Sense of Place” Art Exhibition @ Chen Gallery Maloney Hall, CCSU FREE / 4 p.m. The exhibition “A Sense of Place” will open on Thursday, Sept. 17 at Maloney Hall, from 4 - 7 p.m. And it’s free. Antonio Masi’s paintings of New York city bridges and John Brickels’ clay sculptural

works will be displayed in the larger gallery, with works depicting the Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington in the Inner Gallery. Through 01.03.10 The MATRIX Effect @ Wadsworth Atheneum Hartford, Conn. $10 / 6 p.m. For Christian Jankowski’s MATRIX exhibition in 2000, the German artist was commissioned to create a new video work. Given that the year also marked the 25-year anniversary of the Wadsworth Atheneum’s groundbreaking MATRIX exhibition series, Jankowski ultimately focused his project on the history of the seminal contemporary art program in The MATRIX Effect (2000). The 26-minute video work whimsically combines elements of historical documentary with childhood fairytale in a charming, informative, and entertaining narrative. Jankowski culled the script from interviews with Jim Elliott and Andrea Miller-Keller—MATRIX’s founding director and curator, respectively—as well as a diverse selection of MATRIX artists. In the video, Elliott, Miller-Keller, and the artists are played by children (not professional actors) who speak their words. The transformational “effect” of fresh art and ideas becomes eternal youth and boundless creativity.

The ‘funniest movie to come out of the Iraq War’ is right up there with the best of political black comedies, from Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove to the Marx Brothers’ Duck Soup. The frighteningly believable lunacy begins when a rather thick Cabinet minister (Tom Hollander) blurts out that a Middle East conflict is “unforeseeable.” He is instantly attacked by all sides: supporters and opponents of war, the press, a bullying Pentagon general ( James Gandolfini), an angry voter (comedian Steve Coogan), and the minister’s hilariously foul-mouthed spin doctor (Peter Capaldi). Armando Iannuci’s all too plausible satire of the march to war is deliciously pointed and profane.

FILM 9.23 - 9.26 In the Loop Cinestudio Hartford, Conn. $7 / 7:30 p.m. 9.25 - 10.01 Herb & Dorothy @ Real Art Ways Hartford, Conn. $6.25 / 7 p.m. In the early 1960s, when very little attention was paid to Minimalist and Conceptual Art, Herb and Dorothy Vogel quietly began purchasing the works of unknown artists.


9

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, September 23, 2009 / SPORTS

SPORTS STARTS ON BACKPAGE

Blayney Looks Forward to Last Season as a Blue Devil Carmine Vetrano THE RECORDER

The distance traveled to New Britain for senior mid-fielder Leah Blayney was far different than the miles voyaged for most CCSU students. Blayney was not just coming from a different country, she was coming from a different hemisphere to take her place on the Central women’s soccer team and in the student community.  Blayney traveled from Australia, making her mark by producing an outstanding career on the soccer field and in the classroom. Blayney transferred to CCSU after her freshman year at Auburn University. Prior, she played her high school soccer at Katoomba High, which is in Blue Mountains, Australia. She has been a member of the Australian full National Team since she was 16 and has played in two youth World Cups in Thailand and Russia serving as assistant captain. To keep herself in the soccer shape Blayney plays for SoccerPlus CT, in the Women’s Premier Soccer League for the past three summers. Since arriving at CCSU in her sophomore year, Blayney’s impressive soccer background has made her a two-time First Team AllNEC selection. In her first season with the Blue Devils in 2007, she started all 19 games and finished fourth on the

team in points with eight. Blayney picked up where she left off by finishing second on the team in points with 19 while starting in 22 in 2008. These past two seasons have made Blayney fired up for her senior year. “I feel like going into my senior year I am playing the strongest I have for CCSU,” Blayney said. “I learned a lot from my playing experience over the summer and my time spent during the previous seasons with CCSU. I feel as though it is all coming together this semester.” Blayney has grown fond of her head coach Mick D’Arcy, who has been nothing but inspirational for Blayney’s growth on and off the soccer field. “Mick is a great coach. He boosts seven NEC title wins and has enabled me to understand the importance of becoming more of a multidimensional player,” Blayney expressed. “He genuinely cares about the welfare of his players on and off the field and that is something that you have to value in a coach.” As Blayney embarks on her final games here in a Blue Devils jersey, she is grateful for the memories that CCSU soccer has given her. “We have really good supportive fans. I will miss playing in games with them and cheering me on at the sidelines.” And as for the team?

“The last 20 or so minutes of any game we play when we are all working really hard for each other to win,” Blayney said. “And of course winning the NEC title and playing in the NCAA tournament.” Even though Blayney has done almost everything a soccer player can do at CCSU, she is still looking for improvement. “My biggest goal is to give 100 percent every game and practice, walking off the field knowing I gave everything for the team I am a part of,“ Blayney said. “As a team I think we are capable of winning the NEC championship once again, but ultimately I would like for us to advance past the first round of the NCAA tournament.” After graduation, Blayney would be finishing a career that an incoming freshman for the women’s soccer team would want to mirror. However, spring does not mean the end for Blayney on the soccer field. “I would like to be involved in women’s soccer as a college coach,” Blayney said. “I also endeavor to play in the women’s professional league and for Australia.” For now, CCSU fans should be thrilled with what Blayney (who already has 10 points in six games) has given on and off the field for a couple of more weeks. Her legacy at CCSU may be coming to a close, but won’t be overlooked.

Photo courtesy of Conrad Akier

Another Opportunity For Success: Taylor Morgan Christopher Boulay THE RECORDER

He’s only 18, but at 6’5 and 180 pounds, freshman striker Taylor Morgan might be exactly what the CCSU men’s soccer team needs. He has only played a few games, but has already made an impact. He has proven he can score, he is a daunting presence in the attacking third, and the only way from here is up. It didn’t take long for Morgan to put his first goal in the books, as he scored against Holy Cross late in the first half. “It was a relief to score the first goal,” Morgan said. “That’s the hardest one, really. After that, it gets a bit easier, but I was really glad to score.”

In a soccer player comparison, he looks like a Peter Crouch (currently of Tottenham Hotspur F.C.) type player, only if Crouchie could actually run. Morgan is a lanky, deadly threat inside the box. Teams are also realizing that he’s no pushover. Every match he’s played, he has had more and more pressure on him. There is a target on his back the size of the British Isles. “I think that’s good because that’s a challenge,” he said. “I just have to keep working on my game to make it better.” There is definitely some reason for this too, beyond his intimidating size and skill. Let’s rewind a bit and check his resumé. Morgan played youth football for Southampton F.C. in his hometown of Southampton, England as well as Queens Park

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Rangers F.C. in London. He also was a member of the English Schoolboy National Team, where he scored a goal in a 2-0 win against Scotland at Wembley Stadium, one of soccer’s most storied and glorified stadiums. Now he starts for the Blue Devils up front, and is hoping for big things from a team that is only two years removed from their best finish ever, a trip to the NCAA Soccer Tournament’s Sweet 16.

“[The main goal] is to win as many games as we can; to win the conference,” Morgan said. “I have four years to do it, but I want [CCSU] to get as far in the NEC as we can.” Being a new college student, in a new country also adds pressure to a kid who is expected to be a part of an annually successful soccer program, but Taylor stated that his teammates, many who are from England, have helped him adjust.

“It helps a lot. They know where I am from, and they know what I am going through,” he said. “They have helped me settle in.” Morgan has a long way to go to be considered one of CCSU’s greats, but he has started off well, and certainly has the potential. His legacy will be one of great importance for the Blue Devils’ NEC hopes, not only this season, but for the next four years.


10

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, September 23, 2009 / SPORTS

Pick Your Poison

NFL Predictions for Week 3

Another full weekend of football is behind us and another one awaits once classes rap up for the week. Week 3 has another full slate of games that could be ripe of upsets. The field is starting to even itself out now that more people are joining in on the fun. The best way to stay near the top is to remember your picks. If you want to join in on the fun, go to our web site: www.centralrecorder.com/nflpicks

christopher boulay

CARMINE VETRANO

Edward Gaug

Mike walsh

Sports Editor

Assistant Sports Editor

Managing / Photo Editor

Entertainment Editor

Baltimore

Baltimore

Baltimore

Baltimore

Cleveland at Baltimore Atlanta at New England

Atlanta

Atlanta

New England

Atlanta

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota

Jacksonville at Houston

Houston

Jacksonville

Houston

Houston

Tennessee at NY Jets

NY Jets

NY Jets

NY Jets

NY Jets

San Francisco at Minnesota

Kansas City at Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

Green Bay at St. Louis

Green Bay

Green Bay

Green Bay

Green Bay

NY Giants at Tampa Bay

NY Giants

NY Giants

NY Giants

NY Giants

Washington at Detroit

Washington

Detroit

Washington

Detroit

New Orleans at Buffalo

New Orleans

New Orleans

New Orleans

New Orleans

Chicago at Seattle

Chicago

Chicago

Seattle

Chicago

Pittsburgh at Cincinnati

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh

Miami at San Diego

San Diego

Miami

San Diego

San Diego

Denver Indianapolis

Denver Arizona

Denver Indianapolis

Oakland Indianapolis

Dallas

Dallas

Dallas

Dallas

Denver at Oakland Indianapolis at Arizona Carolina at Dallas

This Week’s NFL Pick’Em Leaderboard Rank

Name

Total Points

Current Week

1

Marc Chouinard

24

11

2

Joshua Davenport

22

10

3

Tonya Malinowski*

21

9

3

Nicholas Menapace

21

10

3

Andre Ciccarelli

21

11

3

Chris Boulay*

21

11

3

Brittany Burke

21

11

8

Edward Gaug*

20

9

8

Matthew Kitson

20

11

10

Michael Walsh*

19

8

10

Ian Cole

19

8

10

Ryan Kennedy

19

10

10

Kim Gaity

19

10

14

Michelle Traynor

18

8

14

Carmine Vetrano*

18

8

14

Brian Coscina

18

10

14

Gary Berman

18

10

18

Kevin Dennis

14

12

19

Sean Chacho

12

0

19

Stockton Farmer

12

0

21

Melissa Traynor*

11

0

21

Chris Wendt

11

11

21

Nick Caiafa

11

11

24

Jeff Rodriguez

9

9

24

Anthony Gonsalves

9

9

26

Tyler Boling

8

8

27

Chris Culmone

7

7

27

Timothy Farrell

7

7

6

6

* Denotes Recorder Richard Staff Swett 29


11

THE RECORDER / Wednesday, September 23, 2009 / SPORTS

Prepping Mentally and Physically for the Swimming Season Kim Gaity THE RECORDER

The women’s swimming and diving team is looking to capture their third straight NEC championship this season, which officially kicks off Saturday, Oct. 17 at Northeastern University, but it’s not their only goal. It’s been a year since the team was named the ECAC Champs in 2008 so the team hopes to return the crown to CCSU in addition to qualifying some girls for the NCAA Invitational, which hasn’t been done for three years. It may seem like a tall order, but according to head coach Bill Ball, “This team has definitely got the potential to do it.” Coach Ball is entering his 8th season as head coach and has already built an impressive resume for Central’s swimming program. The team’s success may not have the student body flooding the Suydam Natatorium for meets, but it has certainly made a big impact for the school in terms of recognition and recruiting. Eight athletes were added this year in an attempt to fill the void left by the graduation of former captain, Erin Crowley. Lauren O’Kelly, Christine Smith, Lauren Shortell, Jennifer O’Leary, Hannah Packer, Taylor Friedmann, Katie Lang and Allison Rasile make up the freshman class that will help the Blue Devils achieve their goals, and Coach Ball is more than optimistic about their chances. “They provide us with such talent and depth that we have the potential to be one of

Photo courtesy of CCSUBlueDevils.com

Women’s swimming coach Bill Ball is optimistic when looking forward to the team’s upcoming season. The Blue Devils were able to win the conference for the past two years.

the strongest classes we’ve ever had,” he said, “so long as we work hard and stay healthy.” Adding to that potential is two-time NEC Diver of the Year Kristen Rossi, who has been out the past two years with a back injury. She will rejoin her teammates this year in their quest for a three-peat, behind newly named captains senior Kandra Kane and junior

Alyssa Carlucci. Staying healthy is vital in a sport that spends the entire season preparing for one final competition. Although winning competitions along the way is important, Coach Ball explained why it isn’t the most important. “Winning is great, but in each meet

we focus primarily on the time trials and implementing the little things we work on each practice, to try and get better and faster for the championships in February, which matter most.” Ball said. “These girls spend 20 hours a week in the water preparing for them, and with practically no rest, they can get pretty beat up throughout the season.” “Practically no rest” seems to be an understatement. The BU Invitational just before winter break is the most important measuring stick for the team to see where they stand among the other competition, and the team doesn’t get to rest before it or after it. When the rest of the school enjoys a month break, the team spends winter break putting in their 20 hours, in addition to meets, from Dec. 28 to January 23. They get a brief 10-12 day break at the start of school, but it’s far from relaxing as they anticipate the biggest competition of the year and the defining moments of the season. “That’s why both physical and mental toughness are so important in staying healthy throughout such a rigorous season because the smallest injury or illness could waste a whole year of work,” Coach Ball said. “It’s tough because this is an endurancebased sport and you can only get out of it what you put into it.” The team will hold their annual Alumni Pentathlon on Saturday, Oct. 3 at 11 a.m. in the Suydam Natatorium. Here, they can enjoy some friendly competition before starting down the familiar road of hard work, hoping to end up in the same spot as last year: the top.

Saints Give Blue Devils Baptism By Fire

Eduardo Ortiz is left looking as he takes an unsuccessful shot on goal. Christopher Boulay THE RECORDER

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

CCSU Defeats Holy Cross Continued from page 16 While the Devils lost the momentum in the third game, the sudden loss seemed to wake them up. They regained some of their momentum and power and were able to take an early lead at 14-7. No matter what type of point gain Central managed to gain, Holy Cross was right there fighting for the top spot. If Central won the game, the match would be over, but if Holy Cross managed to win then the teams would be forced to play a fifth game. Holy Cross did manage to catch up to Central and suddenly the game was tied 2020. Central was the team to pull away from the tie making the game 21-20. The game proceeded to go back and forth, and after many heart racing minutes the score was newly tied at 24-24. With this scenario a team has to win by two, instead of ending the game at 25.

With the first point going to Central, the crowd was ecstatic. There was an overwhelming amount of clapping and CCSU chanting, but as the next ball was served the noise seemed to immediately disappear. Everyone was eagerly waiting to see which team the next point would be awarded. Holy Cross kept fighting, but the match point went to the Blue Devils ending the game at 26-24. Holy Cross played hard throughout all four of the games, but they made some back-to-back errors that hurt them and helped the Devils. “We need to play our style of volleyball no matter who is across the net,” Coach Sagnelli said. On Sept. 18 and 19 the Devils played in the Dartmouth Invitational, where they lost to Northeastern, Dartmouth and Sacred Heart. On Sept. 23 Central hosts the Quinnipiac Bobcats in their first NEC game of the season at 7 p.m.

LOUDONVILLE, N.Y. - CCSU dropped their second match of the week, after a 4-0 drubbing by Siena. Three goals by Siena (4-2) in the second half in just over eight minutes sealed the Blue Devils’ fate, showing a very different level of play from the first three games. Saints’ junior midfielder Joe Tavernese sent the Blue Devils’ morale through the floor when he scored in the 66th minute touching the ball in from a Sebastian Anzevui corner. Captain Robert Cavener was visibly frustrated with the effort of the defense, as well as the lackluster play overall. “I told the defense, ‘Have some pride. We need to show we can defend,’” Cavener said. “‘Let’s take something away [from the match] in the last 15 minutes, let’s not concede a goal. We don’t want to go [behind] six or seven...’ It’s embarrassing. I felt the lads rallied after that. We need to do that from the start.” Senior goalkeeper Paul Armstrong was pulled in the second half after Daniel Alderstad scored in the 73rd minute on a loose ball breakaway. Regarding some in-fighting in the squad while the game was slipping away, Cavener spoke regarding fixing the overall attitude that plagued the team throughout the match. “We need to get [arguing] out of our game,” Cavener said. “People make mistakes, I made mistakes today. You don’t go through a game without making mistakes. But, it’s how you react to the mistakes.”

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

The rout finished in the 74th minute, when Tavernese scored his second of the match, by Blue Devils backup keeper, Anthony Occhialini. “When all is said and done, they outworked us this afternoon,” Coach Shaun Green said. Scoring opened in the 28th minute of the first half on an incredible free kick from the left side by Anzevui. The ball sailed over everyone and found its way into the top right corner for a goal that was not savable. Coach Green was not thrilled with the opening goal, or the referee’s call on the free kick that led to the strike. “I felt it was unfortunate how they scored,” Green said. “I don’t think it was a free kick, the referee gave a poor decision on that.” Regarding the problematic efforts by the defense, Coach Green was contemplative. “We’ve got problems defensively and we’ve got to work on them,” Green said. “I think offensively, we created opportunities. Our lack of pace shows against fast players. That is going to be an ongoing issue until we can improve the defense.” CCSU (3-2) looked the better side in the first half, even when they were behind, but in the second half, just about every aspect of play was dominated by the Saints. “The first half was end-to-end,” Green said. “They had chances, we had some great chances. We could have gone into the locker room with the score 3-0.” The Blue Devils are in action Saturday at Fordham at 4 p.m. The next home game for CCSU is Tuesday, September 29th at 3 p.m. against Hartford.


12 THE RECORDER Wednesday, September 23 , 2009

Sports 9.23

Blue Devils Shut Out by Saints

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

The Blue Devils might have had more shots on goal, but the Saints’ defense proved to be too much as they pitched a 4-0 shutout in Loudonville, NY. The full story is on Page 11 with additional soccer coverage on Page 9. For photo slideshows and video interview with Coach Green, check us out at www.CentralRecorder.com

Central Finish Second at QU Invitational Christopher Machnich The Recorder

The CCSU men’s cross country team finished second over all with 88 points, trailing only Sacred Heart, while the women’s team finished fifth at last weekend’s preNortheast Conference Invitational held at Quinnipiac University. In the men’s race Sacred Heart finished first, with Monmouth University, behind CCSU, finished third, Yale tied up the fourth place spot followed by Wagner. The women’s race was won by Quinnipiac, who placed five runners in the top ten, followed by Sacred Heart in second, Monmouth in third, and Yale fourth, just ahead of CCSU with 136 points. Monmouth senior, Pete Forgach, placed first in the men’s race with a time of 25:52. Quinnipiac freshman, Rebecca White, placed first in the woman’s race at 17:58. The CCSU men were lead by outstanding performances by sophomore Sam Alexander, who placed third and freshman Craig Hunt, who placed sixth. Alexander was able to hold off a runner closing in at the last push of the race.

Inside This Issue:

“Sacred Heart had a man behind me, and I just maintained my spot,” Alexander said The CCSU women followed teammate Katherine Bossardet, who placed eighth and had an inspiring finish, closing in nearly thirty yards to knock a Monmouth runner back to ninth place. At around the ten-minute mark in the men’s race, the top three runners ran off the course and the CCSU men were able to pick their pace for the next couple of minutes. “We actually slowed our pace down. It’s a big decision to take the lead at that point,” said Alexander. He placed third at 26:05, Craig Hunt finished sixth at 26:21, Dan Watson finished 21st at 27:10, and Kevin Tiernan finished 36th at 27:22. Bossardet placed eight at 18:50, Alyssa Cole finished 19 at 19:27, Amanda Asaro finished 29 th at 19:45, Nicole Coiteux finished 38th at 20:05, and Kim Savino finished 43rd at 20:34. Women’s Coach Brenda Webb was optimistic about the team’s performance. “We’re happy with where we’re at. We’re going to continue to get in better and better shape, and move up in the conference,” Webb said.

Edward Gaug | The Recorder

Sara DeLacey and Jamie Baumer attempt to block a Holy Cross spike in their 3-1 win last Tuesday.

Volleyball Victorious Over Crusaders Brittany Burke The Recorder

In the first game back on their home court since the opening invitational, the CCSU women’s volleyball team was set to take on the Holy Cross Crusaders (1-7) on Tuesday Sept. 15. The Blue Devils (3-7) were coming off of a two-game loss in the Fordham Rose Hill Classic entering the match Tuesday night. Central ended the match with a (3-1) win, but it did not come easy. The first two games went to the Blue Devils with scores of 25-18 and then 25-23 without substantial point gaps between the two teams.

Blayney Looking Forward to Last Season as Blue Devil

See Blayney Looks Forward Page 9

While Central was able to move ahead and take the leads in the game they were very close. Whenever either team had begun to gain the lead the other team would come back to tie. The team came out and was showing good power and great team skills. There was a lot of good passing amongst the players and great blocking up at the net. What luck the team had during the first two games seemed to fade with the start of the third. They began to fell behind early in the match, which eventually led to a 22-15 deficit. The Devils fought hard and were able to close the gap to just four points, but it was too

Taylor Morgan: Another Chance at Success

See Another Chance Page 9

late. Holy Cross took the inevitable win with a score of 24-21. Regarding what her team learned from losing the third game, Head Coach Linda Sagnelli said they realized that the game is “never over until it is over. After the first and second games there is still a lot of volleyball left.” Coach Sagnelli noticed the fact that her team seemed to sit back in the third game when they got comfortable, which in part lost them the game and is something that will have to be worked on before they meet their rivals in the Northeast Conference. See Heart-Racing Finish Page 4

Swim Coach Optimistic for Upcoming Season

See Prepping Mentally Page 11


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