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A St. Mary’s Student Publication since 1925

Vol. 100 Issue 2

Feburary 22, 2012 •

stmurattlernews.com

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10 FEATURES

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13 ENTERTAINMENT

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*HRSNQXBNKNQR NTQB@LOTR Learn how an organization on campus is celebrating our history. PG. 10 .YHWOPJ0SS\Z[YH[PVUI`*OY`Z[HSSH.LYNOPV\c7OV[VZV\YJLZSPZ[LKVU^^^Z[T\YH[[SLYUL^ZJVT


News

2 The Rattler

February 22, 2012

www.stmurattlernews.com

CONTACT US The Rattler St. Mary’s University One Camino Santa Maria Box 83 San Antonio, TX 78228 OFFICE: 210.436.3401 FAX: 210.431.3407 EMAIL: rattlernews@gmail.com WEBSITE: www.stmurattlernews.com

FOLLOW US ON ... for the latest news and updates.

STAFF Editor-in-Chief

Sports Editor

Managing Editor

Entertainment Editor

Copy Editor

Photo Editor

Layout/Design Editor

Assistant Photo Editor

Web Editor

Advertising Manager

News Editor

Staff Cartoonist

Commentary Editor

Faculty Adviser

Azhmir Acosta Amanda Cano Nick Canedo

Chrystalla Georghiou Emily Scruggs

Katherine Benavides Briana Perez

Features Editor

Joe Rodriguez Jessica Valles Felix Arroyo

Brissa Renteria Greg Valdez

Jasmain Aquino

STAFF WRITERS Alexander Eakins Austin W. Newton Angelica Radacinski Chris Childree Denice Hernandez Mercedes Kelso Frances Mell

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS Nicolas Campaña Alejandra Diaz Analissa Cantu Brittany Horack Sarah Jardine Cheyenne Palmer Sarah Dwyer

NEWS IN BRIEF >> >> >>

Brother Dennis Bautista, S.M., Ph.D.

Arturo Osteguin Jr.

Alex Meyer Dania Pulido Lena Scalercio Julie Losoya Lane Swenson Emily Artalejo Julia Pullin

Members of Laugh, Love, CoMeTrY perform for students in the Albert B. Alkek Business building atrium on Wednesday, Feb. 15. The University Programming Council hosted the event which focused on inspiring people to laugh at life. / Photo by Brissa Renteria.

Chanti Lee Vong Rubi Doria Melina Cavazos Miriam Dorantes Maria Correa

STANDARDS The Rattler upholds the Mission Statements of St. Mary’s University. The Publication follows the Canons of Responsible Journalism, the Associated Press Stylebook and the Student Publication Policy. The Rattler is a member of the Associate Collegiate Press, the Columbia Scholastic Press Association, the Society of Professional Journalists and the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR POLICY

The Rattler welcomes letters that do not exceed 500 words and include the writer’s name, classification, major and telephone number. Editors reserve the right to edit submissions for length, grammar, spelling and content.

INDEX news 1-5 commentary 6-7 features 8-11 entertainment 12-13 sports 14-16

Speaker focuses presentation on human trafficking The University Programming Council is hosting a presentation on the shocking realities of human trafficking on Tuesday, Feb. 28 at 4:30 p.m. in UC B. An activist in this issue, Dottie Laster will speak and bring her experience to inform and make the university community aware of this topic. For more information, contact Karen Vega at (210) 436-3994.

>>

Get your game on!

>>

A Night in Little Italy

Rattler Weekends presents a chance to cheer on the San Antonio Spurs against the Charlotte Bobcats at the price of $10 on Friday, March 2 at 8 p.m. at the AT&T Center. There are 30 slots and sign-ups can be done at the UC Information Desk. Contact Jerome Budumo at (210) 436-3714 with any questions.

The university Opera Workshop will host “A Night in Little Italy” on Saturday, March 3 at 5:30 p.m. in UC A. There will be an Italian dinner, a performance and various serenades. Some favorites include Don Giovanni, La Traviate and Le Nozze de Figaro. Contact Isabel De La Cerda at (210) 204-6425 to purchase tickets.

POLICE BLOTTER Feb. 4 >> Saturday, Student reported vehicle stolen in Lot B. Reviewed video showed tow truck towed vehicle from lot. Student admitted to still owing payment and vehicle was repossessed.

Feb. 7 >> Tuesday, Employee vehicle in Lot S stolen by unknown suspect. SAPD & DPS notified. Stripped vehicle was later recovered. Feb. 8 >> Wednesday, Student fell while attempting to jump campus perimeter fence near Dougherty Hall; broken arm, bump on head and scraped knee. EMS contacted for treatment and transport. Student received further medical treatment.

Feb. 14 >> Tuesday, Unattended vehicle in CSLJ found parked in middle of entrance driveway, obstructing traffic. Owner was unable to be found and vehicle was towed off property to impound.


News

February 22, 2012

The Rattler 3

www.stmurattlernews.com

Scheduled updates for St. Louis Hall stay on course By Alexander Eakins Staff Writer

Renovations to St. Louis Hall are on track and the university community can expect to see the completion of the building on the original expected date of April 2012, according to Vice President of Administration and Finance Rebeckah Day. The project is scheduled to finish in April 2012 with completion of mechanical, electrical and plumbing work, including paint, flooring and other finishes, said Day. Day affirmed that, as part of the renovations, archways will be added, ceilings will be raised, spaces will be reconfigured, air conditioning units will be centralized, electric work will be refurbished, benches will be added, false doors will be removed, fire sprinklers and alarms will be set up, bathrooms will have facelifts and a conference room for meetings will now be available. Prompted by a major donation of $1 million in 2005 by alumnus Bill Greehey, serious planning for the renovations began then. Day said that “there has always been interests in making the building more attractive,” with particular interest in better air conditioning. “That was Mr. Greehey’s original desire—to see the building become more attractive.” Although there have been renovations to the Hall before, they have been sparse and have never seen this magnitude.

Bill Tam, facilities administrator and overseer of the project alongside architect Kenneth Zuschlag and contractor SpawGlass, said that the last time major changes to St. Louis Hall took place was in the 1960s, accompanied by the addition of the Blume Library. A supportive campus community met the renovations, but not without hardship. “The move from St. Louis Hall has been difficult for the University Advancement office because our department has been divided,” Assistant Director of University Advancement Allison Ludwig said. Likewise, the office of the registrar has been “split,” with part of the office relocated to Treadaway Hall and the other part relocated to the University Center. Space and the division of their office are reasons that make Jo Anne Rivas, administrative assistant for the registrar’s office, eager to move back to their original location. “I’m eager to move back because we’re a good team,” Rivas said. Rivas also said that it has been particularly difficult working in the Treadaway office because there is no direct contact with the UC office. Thanks to a campus team effort though, the transition has gone smoothly. Day, Ludwig and Rivas are all grateful to the sacrifices the community has made to house their respective departments. Day commented that the money the Marianists provided helped the university save in spatial expenses and said, “I would say that—behind Mr. Greehey—the

Marianists were the largest contributors.” Built in 1893, the historic building has some impractical and inconvenient problems, such as incorrect signage, low ceilings cutting into windows and darkening the rooms and veiling the view of downtown San Antonio. In the past, scheduled meetings were arranged outside of St. Louis Hall because there was no space for meetings to take place, according to Director of Media Relations Gina Farrell. Also, there were only separate air conditioning units and no centralized cooling or heating system—making it “hot in the summer” and “cold in the winter,” according to Farrell. The relocated members of the university faculty have good reason for their eagerness to return to St. Louis Hall. Their natural workspace will be more comfortable, attractive and modern. Ludwig expressed enthusiastic excitement for the renovation project. “It was very exciting to see the progress on St. Louis Hall,” Ludwig said. “We’re pretty amazed at how quickly the renovations have gone. The most interesting part was comparing our old offices to the new layout...We are going from a small dark space with a lot of walls separating each individual office to a big open space with a lot of light.” Day mentioned that the dedication of the hall is scheduled for May.

Contractors work on renovations on the second floor of St. Louis Hall. / Reproduced with permission of University Communications.

For exclusive footage of St. Louis Hall, visit the Media section on: www.stmurattlernews.com

University instructor starts new organization for professors By Arturo Osteguin Jr. Features Editor

The American Association of University Professors—a new chapter on campus focused on academic quality and professionalism—is having their first meeting next month, according to associate professor of theology and president of the chapter Robert O’Connor S.M. The organization consists of various chapters across the nation. The university chapter has nine members, focusing on recent concerns that affect the university. According to O’Connor, the chapter serves closely to an information board that creates awareness among professors in how to conduct the best methods and etiquette in the classroom. Any university professor is welcome to join this organization. O’Connor grew interest in the organization last year. “I have for years thought about joining it, until last June, I decided to join,” O’Connor said. “So far, I think it is appropriate for me. Issues discussed at the conference were intriguing as a professor.” After learning more information on what the chapter provides, O’Connor believed that this is what the university needs and took it upon himself to create a

local chapter here. “It is like having a chapter of a fraternity or sorority. Though the organization may be national, having one on campus keeps things local,” O’Connor said. O’Connor said that it will be very beneficial for professors and students alike on campus. “It allows professors to know how accreditation works, how admission processes work to respective universities,” O’Connor said. The organization gives professors an idea of how a respective university works and what type of students and staff runs the organization. “I don’t see how joining AAUP will not be beneficial for professors and the university,” O’Connor said. “It only adds to professionalism and academic concerns.” Junior philosophy major Gabriel Torre believes that AAUP will better professionalism on behalf of university professors. “I definitely support O’Connor on opening a chapter on campus. It will help some professors on an approach to students and how to engage effectively with them,” Torre said. “I feel that some professors on campus— though good intentioned—are losing sight of why there are university professors.” Torre said that some professors’ teaching methods

makes it very difficult for some students to embrace them with problems or concerns. Torre said, “Overall, the professor rules the classroom. Having faculty join the AAUP, I hope will change all this.” However, senior mathematics and information system management major Eshraf Choudhury believes that although AAUP is not a bad thing, it should be only an option for professors. “Though the AAUP sounds good for professors in being well informed on concerns and issues that affect them, I still believe a professor should do as they please in the classroom to a certain extent,” Choudhury said. “Professors work hard to achieve their status as a Ph.D., and to tell them to act or teach a certain way isn’t right in my book. I just believe it should be informative, not prescriptive.” AAUP has a subscribed periodical named “Academe” for professors. It includes examples of professors’ experiences and provides beneficial tips on classroom etiquette and professionalism. O’Connor is the contact person for joining AAUP. Professors can reach him at theobob@stmarytx.edu.


4 The Rattler

News

February 22, 2012

www.stmurattlernews.com

Media center increases number of workshop attendees By Katherine M. Benavides News Editor

The Academic Media Center has doubled the number of people that have come in to use their services in the last year and a half, according to Kathe Lehman-Meyer, the center’s director. “In this semester alone, we have already had nine different classes come into the lab for different types of workshops. That’s just in the first three weeks or four weeks of classes,” Lehman-Meyer said. The AMC offers standard workshops per semester that are generally geared toward students. The workshops include learning how to operate a projector, public address system trainings and digital video camera workshops. Although these workshops are offered in group sessions, the AMC can provide customized trainings for individuals on a one-to-one basis. “We’ve discovered that it makes more sense for students to tell us what they want to learn and for us to develop a smaller workshop for that particular need,” Lehman-Meyer said. “Basically the way it works is now a student comes in and says ‘I’d like to learn Photoshop or I’d like to learn Flash,’ and then we’ll ask a few more questions. Then, we will make

sure we’ll get them either assigned to a student that has got instructions and can actually administer the workshops or one of the staff members.” According to Lehman-Meyer, 80 percent of students are going to have something to do with media in their career. About 20 percent of students are probably going to have to create some type of media as a part of their job daily. “As a result of that, the more we can equip our students to work with technology in a way that can lead them to do things that other students with their same degree from another university can’t, [and it] gives them a competitive advantage,” Lehman-Meyer said. Associate professor of languages Eva Bueno has taken her students to the AMC several times over the years to utilize their services and attend different workshops. “This semester, I went to the introductory presentation that Professor Lehman-Meyer gave to my poetry class,” Bueno said. “She demonstrated what could be used and how simple it is to master the programs. Whenever possible, I incorporate the workshops in my classes.” Although faculty are always welcome to the AMC, the Faculty Instructional

Why have the potholes on Rattler Drive not been fixed?

We started the asphalt repair on Feb. 7 but ran out of material. The material came in on Feb. 16 and the work resumed on the 17th. We have 14 cans remaining and will continue the repairs using this material. The purchase order request for an additional pallet of patch material will go in tomorrow. We expect that all work will be completed by Feb 29. Bill Tam FACILITIES ADMINISTRATOR

Technology department—which specializes in workshops, designing, developing and consulting—focuses their workshops toward faculty, but students can still attend. According to the Faculty Instructional Technology Director Jeff Schomburg, their numbers in attendance are definitely growing. “We want students and faculty to take advantage of these opportunities at their convenience,” Schomburg said. “Our academic purpose is to make sure technology is at its best and highest quality for both teaching and learning.” Bueno has seen how the students benefit from the workshops. “The benefits are immediate when the students become more familiar and more comfortable handling cameras to make films, and software to make professional-grade presentations,” Bueno said. “Each new program or camera the students master in the AMC can be immediately used for different classes and may make the difference later when the students are applying for a job and can add that skill to their résumé.” Junior biology major Willie Montoya realized the impact of the services offered in the AMC after working there from Fall 2009 to Spring 2010. Montoya assisted

a staff member at times by teaching workshops. “I learned how to utilize different technology, how to communicate and teach others effectively and how to multitask when having to do five different things coming in at one time,” Montoya said. “I believe that the AMC is a key component in the life of students at St. Mary’s, especially the ones that are involved in organizations on campus.” With the trainings, the AMC is able to decrease operator errors with their equipment by requiring that a student earns certification by attending the workshop to receive the proper training needed to handle the gear. Before the certification process, over the course of a year they had 700 calls of problems and had 1400 checkouts, meaning that there was a problem for every other checkout. After the certification was put into place, the AMC only received three calls. Lehman-Meyer and Schomburg encourage all students of all disciplines and majors, faculty and staff to take advantage of their services.


What

color

?

can you add to The Rattler Newspaper Always looking for fresh writers and photographers Now hiring for Fall 2012:

• • • •

Copy Editor Assistant Photo Editor Web Editor Layout/Design Editor

Be bold, be bright The Rattler Newspaper • UC 258 • rattlernews@gmail.com • (210) 436-3401


Commentary

6 The Rattler

February 22, 2012

www.stmurattlernews.com

GOP weakness shown so far in primary season

What was once seen as a two-man race between Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney changed course after the Florida Republican primary. Since then, the “underdog”—Rick Alex Eakins Santorum—has captured three victories in a row. The fact that Santorum won the last three states would pose little threat to Romney—if Romney were not Romney. That is to say, if Romney were not a flip flopping elitist utterly detached from reality. According to Romney himself, the Republican frontrunner describes himself as "moderate," and yet "severely conservative" at the same time. A blatant lack of concern for the poor is a key element to Romney’s presidential platform. The only reason Romney should be sweating is that his inexhaustible access to cash has become a stain on his campaign. People are starting to realize that Romney is significantly outspending every other candidate. In other words, what Romney lacks in substance, he makes up for in cash. He puts his money where his mouth is, with a total of $57 million in spending as of midFebruary, according to the Huffington Post. However, there are two other candidates the media and voters seem to have forgotten. Ron Paul remains the least popular, least publicized, and the least viable of candidates. The biggest problem with Paul is that he doesn’t have the backbone to pander like the other candidates do. Most of what he says seems genuine, which is a frightening reality. Newt Gingrich, the favorite in politically strategic South Carolina, also seems to have dipped off the political map. He has only gone downhill in public opinion since then. His extreme conservatism may have turned off voters, as well as his attitude that seems even more disconnected with reality than any of the other candidates. The most appalling aspect of this race so far, though, is what candidates have done to get votes. Robocalls, major ad campaigns and an excessive amount of debates have surrounded these primaries. Yet, all of these are lacking real substance. These candidates have spent millions, and yet most could wager that most people still have no idea where the candidates stand. Although Santorum, like Romney, has won four states, it’s difficult to predict who will be the Republican nominee. Romney remains the front-runner, but his opponents have yet to be squashed under his piles of cash. The next round of primaries takes place Feb. 28.

Cartoon by Katherine Benavides

Contraception crucifies religious freedom PRO

The Catholic heirarchy proteced our first ammendment rights.

The Obama Administration recently proposed a law in which health care plans for employees were to include access to and cover the cost of contraception for all women. This mandate includes all Catholic institutions, such as universities and hospitals, but with the exception of Dana Traugott Catholic parishes. Luckily, the backlash of Catholic protests—mainly from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops—caused this mandate to be rescinded and insurance companies will now be responsible for the cost of contraception, not the institutions themselves. According to the Washington Times, William Lori of Bridgeport stated that Catholic institutions “shouldn't be at a disadvantage because we bring moral convictions to the table." He compared this mandate to forcing a Jewish deli to sell ham sandwiches. According to a CNN report, during the Second Vatican Council, Pope Paul VI formed a committee to assess the Church’s position on contraceptives. The pope chose to incorporate the Humanae Vitae (Of Human Life) into church doctrine in 1968. In this document, the pope discarded the committee’s ruling for the allowance of contraceptives and maintained his stand against them. As Catholics, we place heavy emphasis on the right to life, and the allowance of any type of contraceptive or sterilization is an “affront to the rights of Catholics and a dangerous precedent against religious freedom,” according to Archbishop Garcia. With this mandate, our God-given rights—from which this country was founded upon—are stripped from us. We are faced with a challenge—to face the violation of our consciences or to protest this comprehensive health care coverage. As a Catholic church, we should choose to side with our morality over our health. We should choose to remain loyal to our faith. In the past, the faithful have been able to protect their rights and protest situations that challenge their beliefs, with the First Amendment of the Constitution on their side. It is reassuring to see the faithful of this generation continue to do the same.

CON

Access to contraception is a health issue, not a religious one.

Galileo claimed the Sun was the center of the universe in 1616 – a claim that would eventually have him convicted of heresy by the Catholic Church. It took the Church over 200 years to concretely agree with Galileo. Let’s face it: the Catholic Church is Alex Meyer slow to science, slow to change and often slow to common sense. T h a t ’ s where we are today. This time, the problem is the Church’s sluggishness to embrace modern health practices. With global population figures escalating out of control, smart sexual health is more important than ever. As our president adopts a universal health plan for all Americans, he has been met with opposition all along the way. The bishops argued that the mandate to provide contraception infringes on the religious freedom of Catholic institutions. Providing such health care would be morally damaging to the Church. But it’s not morally corruptive, just smart living. A recent study found that nearly 98 percent of sexually active Catholic women have used some form of contraception. Clearly the Church’s teachings on contraception are wisely being ignored. However, Obama sensibly submitted to the will of the bishops, as the stakes are particularly high in this election year. In early February, he amended the bill to provide exemptions for those religious institutions not originally allowed to opt out of the mandate and instead now requires the birth control to be paid for by the insurer – not the employer. The compromise seems pragmatic and should please a majority on both sides of the debate. But the bigger problem here is that the Church’s backwards teachings on contraception and smart sexual behavior have larger consequences on society than just who pays for what. The Church—like many other religious institutions—is only adding to the assault on women’s reproductive rights. Smart sexual and reproductive health information should be promoted, not shamed, regardless of religious conviction. Religious institutions should never dictate scientific advancement or dissuade from smart health practices.


February 22, 2012

Commentary

The Rattler 7

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STAFF EDITORIAL

University adapts to change

The university president represents the public face of the academic institution. They are charged with the difficult task of maintaining the image of the university, setting goals for the institution and forming a new vision for the university to strive towards. Charles Cotrell has served as our president since 2000, and when he steps down to return to teaching this May, the university will face major changes. Earlier this month, Thomas M. Mengler was chosen to succeed Cotrell. With an enormous amount of experience in academic administration, including 18 years as a law school dean—the last nine spent at the University of St. Thomas School of Law—he seems to be an excellent choice. In his résumé, Mengler stated he is particularly focused on creating a welcoming community for both Catholics and non-Catholics. This is especially important as the university becomes increasingly multi-cultural and focuses on creating international ties. He also stated he would like to bring a larger focus on pre-professional undergraduate programs to campus, giving students a leg up in understanding the professional world they enter. Serving as a professor, department chair, dean and vice president of Academic Affairs before becoming president, Cotrell completed his 45th year at the university in 2011. Filling Cotrell’s shoes will be a monumental task for any man. The university students, faculty and staff must put their faith in Mengler. Moving from a law school environment to the world of undergraduate and graduate education will be Mengler’s biggest hurdle. But with the support of the community, we are sure he will rise to the challenge.

Interns subject to exploitation Praise is due to college students who obtain a coveted internship. Though an unpaid internship can be a source of experience, more often than not, unpaid internships are simply a source of free labor. Companies have shifted away from apprentice-style internships and now delegate menial tasks to those willing to work without pay. Emily Interns are often thrilled at the fact that they have already Artalejo put one foot in the door in their career field, but the fact remains that companies have tens of thousands of graduates at their disposal. Instead of offering an entry-level position to the intern who has clocked in 300 hours a week while attending school, a company would save a tremendous amount of money by hiring a fresh-faced college student who does not expect to be paid. Our nation has lost the opportunity to achieve entry-level jobs and has created the trend of “serial interns” who must sacrifice wages at multiple internships before landing a paid position. Serial interns must rely on mom and dad for expenses for years after graduation. The harms of unpaid internships are not solely economic. Laws prohibiting discrimination and the right to workers’ compensation rarely apply to interns, even if they work the same amount of hours as full-time employees. In 2010, the U.S. Department of Labor published six criteria that legalize work without pay. Though the criteria exist, the Department of Labor puts the responsibility of enforcement on the intern. Many interns are unaware of unpaid labor laws and those who realize that they are being exploited are often unwilling to report the company for fear of not being hired in their field later on. On Feb. 1, Xuedan Wang used the legal criteria against the Hearst Company—publisher of “Seventeen,” “Cosmopolitan” and “Harper’s Bazaar”—because the company did not pay her while she was performing the work of a paid employee. Several interns on the set of “Black Swan” are attempting to file a class action lawsuit against Fox Searchlight Picture for the company’s violation of labor laws. The criteria have not diminished exploitative internships, but have given power to brave interns who decide that enough is enough. Until the government decides to enforce its own laws, exploitative internships will still remain the highly sought-after goal of college students. Those who receive the chance to intern and gain hands-on experience in their field should consider themselves fortunate. But those padding their résumé with a year or two of free labor should take comfort in the fact that they’ll learn to brew a mean pot of coffee.

Cartoon by Ana Cano

Super Bowl frenzy veils trafficking Every TV and radio station blasted news about the New York Giants winning this year’s Super Bowl immediately following the last play of the game. Facebook status updates glorified their win, and their winning score trended on Twitter. Attention around the country was shining on this major event, with fans from all-around throwing huge celebrations for America's sport of choice. However, the brighter the light shines, the bigger shadow Colin it creates. According to the Huffington post, Texas Attorney General Greg O'Donnell Abbot called the Super Bowl, “the single largest human trafficking incident in the United States.” Ask any criminal, and they can tell you working in the shadow of diversion is their best choice. The Super Bowl—and other major sporting events—attracts an increase in sex trafficking to the host city, with partygoers diverting police attention to drunken, loud parties and away from the mafioso in a cheap Italian suit smuggling prostitutes into the hotel room of a desperate sports fan. This sort of natural distraction is perfect for organized crime, because most activity done by syndicates is covert, and sex traffickers can operate freely while intoxicated Giants fans sing the praises of their favorite team. The question we must ask ourselves is why attention is not being diverted to a major human rights issue and away from a football game, which in comparison seems insignificant. Because of the nature of the crime itself, human trafficking is a significantly unreported crime. Girls are kidnapped from their country of origin and forced into prostitution by criminal syndicates or cartels. These young women are then controlled by the syndicate, either through coercion or by leashing them to an addictive substance, like cocaine and heroin. It’s difficult to escape this imprisonment, and often, aggressive pimps or syndicate kidnappers are quick to use any means necessary to get their girls back into the game. Unless caught by an undercover sting operation, the crime goes unreported. Criminal organizations are smart, and they know that with police attention being diverted by events like the Super Bowl, they can easily traffick. This serious situation has to be given more focus. These illicit activities are being conducted right under our noses. The Super Bowl unites a vast majority of Americans, but we should be striving to place a stop on the market for sex trafficking. Media attention on Super Bowl Sunday could be used to bring light to this pressing issue. With that said, don't stop enjoying football. Simply be aware of the sinister activities in the shadowy sidelines.

What rattles your cage? Do you think Super Bowl media should put a greater focus on sex trafficking? Share your opinion and see those of your classmates on our website: www.stmurattlernews.com in the Community section. Join the debate!


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10 The Rattler

BSU honors Black History Month with ongoing event series By Arturo Osteguin Jr. Features Editor

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Feburary 22, 2012

www.stmurattlernews.com

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Faculty member wins Artist of the Year Award by Art League By Angelica Radacinski Staff Writer

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Feburary 22, 2012

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The Rattler 11

www.stmurattlernews.com

Twins discuss common misconceptions and experiences By Alexander Eakins Staff Writer

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Organizations provide exclusive benefits to its members By Victoria Edwards Contributing Writer

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12 The Rattler

Entertainment

February 22, 2012

www.stmurattlernews.com

A review of the Andy Warhol exhibit at the McNay Art Museum By Dania Pulido Staff Writer

Were Andy Warhol alive today, he would be throwing dinner parties with Perez Hilton and declare himself a proud member of the Kardashian posse. He is the creator of the admiration for reality stars, after all. This complicated opposition of actions and thoughts is only the beginning of the story of Andrew Warhol—a man who took the traditional to mainstream and the significant to superficial. His art, like his life, juxtaposed reality and fantasy, and the McNay Art Museum’s “Andy Warhol: Fame and Misfortune” exhibition gives visitors and Warhol fans a groovy inside look at that life. The collection is drawn from the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and is exclusive to the McNay. It is set up akin to the Warhol exhibitions of his time, and one cannot help walking through it without the awareness that these were the works presented in the same manner that the celebrities and icons of the 1960s and 70s were admiring with brand new curiosity. The walls are painted with a few of Warhol’s famous quotes in the signature yellow font that have made their way onto every piece of commercial merchandise. The entrance of the exhibit showcases Warhol’s early self-portraits, as well as a large screen print of the infamous Campbell’s soup can. Sitting in the middle of the gallery floor are the equally notorious partners of the Campbell’s cans—the Brillo Boxes made with home paint. While comical in appearance, these simple pieces were another one of Warhol’s tools in his attempt to bring the commercially mundane to the attention of high culture. A true rags to riches story himself, Warhol constantly used this archetype to bring the conventional to the prestige and fame of museums. The iconic Marilyn Monroe and Jackie Kennedy portraits are revealed in the first part of the gallery, and every replica that has ever been produced of these famous images does no justice to the vivid, electrifying colors of the real works. While the portraits are made to look whimsical because of the color choices, Warhol’s contradictory motives are apparent. His fascination with stars like Marilyn, Jackie, Elvis Presley and Elizabeth Taylor, among others, revealed his obsession with tragic American success stories. Under the superficial facade, each of these celebrities suffered with their own private issues—abuse, health problems and drugs—that

were brought to light by the media. Consecutive portraits of Jackie on one wall show her expressions disintegrating from happy to mournful and another part of the gallery displays numerous bright portraits of Mao Tse-Tung, the sinister and feared Communist leader made to look mischievous and harmless. The magic of Warhol’s creations is seen in his ability to transform the macabre into something playful. The other half of the works demonstrates his passion for the tragic, with neon and pastecolored screen prints of skulls, car accidents, violence, death and the electric chair. “FLASH” displays screen prints and a manuscript following John F. Kennedy’s assassination, a tribute to the four days that the world lived in fear. A devout Catholic who frequently volunteered at soup kitchens, Warhol spent his last years creating collages, screen prints and acrylic paintings of biblical images, such as “The Last Supper,” and recreating Renaissance masterpieces to his liking. “Raphael Madonna-$6.99” is a towering sketch with childish colors, and another work displays a modern sketch of Jesus glowing under black lights. His “Factory” manufactured pieces opposed the solitary genius of the Renaissance and Baroque periods, and his unique reproductions symbolized the lost significance of these important works through repetition. Throughout the gallery, his black-and-white films play, some silently, while the background noise of others adds to the eerie feel of the exhibit. His unsigned works are left to linger in the minds of viewers, creepily posing as cheerful emblems of hope or providing nostalgia for good days gone by. In reality, they stand as a challenge to the high culture position of art and a shield that hides distress. Warhol lived fascinated by the unreal apparitions that movie stars and art represented, and exposed that superficiality for the world to see in the Pop Art Movement. “I always thought I’d like my own tombstone to be blank. No epitaph, and no name. Well, actually, I’d like it to say ‘figment,’” revealed the artist. Viewers and fans cannot ignore his art or existence, but most have managed to remain ignorant to the significance behind it, transforming the iconic images into cartoonish figments of their imagination, molded to their own beliefs. It seems that once again, Andy Warhol has gotten his way.

Andy Warhol, Liza Minnelli, 1979. Acrylic and screen-printing ink on linen, 40 × 40 in. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution Dia Center for the Arts, 1997.1.10a. © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait, 1964. Acrylic, metallic paint, and screen-printing ink on linen, 201⁄8 × 161⁄8 in. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution Dia Center for the Arts, 2002.4.20. © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Andy Warhol, Skull, 1976. Acrylic and screen-printing ink on linen, 721⁄8 × 801⁄2 in. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution Dia Center for the Arts, 2002.4.31. © 2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


Entertainment

February 22, 2012

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Passionate student-musician composes relatable songs By Pablo Cruz Contributing Writer

Sophomore philosophy major Rick Springer is a captivating, creative, upand-coming acoustic artist with lyrics bound to relate to anyone. Born and raised in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., Springer decided to attend the university in 2010, packed up all his belongings and took a leap of faith to an unknown state across the nation. He made sure to not forget his guitar— the one thing that best describes him. Ironically, his love for the guitar did not come quick, “I had a guitar just sitting around for quite a while, focusing on the bass first. But then I picked it up, taught myself and it was history after that.” Springer’s music is originally influenced by multiple genres. He laughs at his random taste in music and said, “I listen to so much music, from Louis Armstrong to some industrial metal, and then some dark down tempo electronica to The Killers. I listen to everything and I like to think I draw pieces from all that.” His radical music taste came from his mother and father, “My dad had a deep love for music, collecting tapes and compact discs in a drawer next to his toolbox and my mother always listened to the jazz radio station, all the time jazz was on in the house.” With this influence behind him, it’s clear why

his sound is different, but what is truly special about Springer is the lyrics to his songs. Springer’s lyrics carry messages that anyone—no matter what age—can have a connection to. His songs speak of mistakes we all make, and his songs talk about the struggles of life. The songs motivate young adults by helping them realize that every day someone may be feeling the same way they are. Springer said, “To record in a professional studio would cost a lot of money but luckily I have been recording at the recording studio in Treadway with the help of Dr. John Rankin and have uploaded my songs online where anyone can listen and enjoy.” Music for him is more special than the fame it can bring and his intentions for music making are for people to “relate to his songs, help them think about themselves, enjoy the music and challenge them to have a good time.” Springer said, “Fame brings deadlines on selling a product and my talent would in a sense become artificial and I don’t want to become lost in something unreal because music to me is real.” Springer’s talent goes deeper than just a hobby. For him, it’s a way of escaping and expressing himself while venting out his emotions when certain situations in life inspire him to do so. “I’m just a guy—a guy with passion for music. I’m no better than anyone else; I’m just a guy with a

Sophomore campus musician, Rick Springer, and his guitar. Photo by Felix Arroyo

guitar that knows how to use it.” Check out Springer’s music at www. reverbnation.com/rickspringer and watch him perform original songs on Feb. 29 at

Java City for the BSU Open Mic Night.

New Resident evil game proves to be a revalation By Colin O’Donnell Staff Writer

Leave it to a game about zombies to breathe life into a game system. “Resident Evil: Revelations” is not just a quality game, but it gives a valid reason to own the 3DS Nintendo system. Introducing new hardware, game play depth that rivals console games, as well as fun core game play, “Revelations” is set to redefine the standard of what makes a solid portable game. Taking place between the events of Resident Evil 4 and 5, “Revelations” sets the player as the main characters Jill Valentine and Parker Luciani, elite government operatives sent to investigate the bio-weapon based terrorist activity by the enigmatic organization Veltro. Jill has another motive for taking on this perilous mission— to save her one time partner and series mainstay Chris Redfield, the protagonist of the first Resident Evil. Resident Evil has returned to its core successfully in “Revelations,” while still adding more recent features. There is plenty of action, but the scares that defined the series are back and stronger than ever. Now gamers will feel frightened by the unpredictability of enemy placement. Weapon customization is back from Resident Evil 4 and allows you to mix and match your inventory to handle the variety of situation that Resident

Evil games present. However, Jill isn’t the only character whose role the player takes. Throughout the story, focus shifts to secondary characters in stand-alone scenarios, often filling in the holes in the story, providing unique experiences aside from Jill’s investigation and providing new locations in which to battle the undead. These side stories offer a bit more straightforward action than the core story, and provide a nice change of pace from the harrowing survival-based core story. The biggest criticism there is to give is its lack of novelty. For those who have played the other Resident

Evil games, it is essentially known what to expect here. Though it does things right, it does not take anything further. It is solid, but not transcendental. However, it does try to do a few things differently. For example, a scanning element that allows players to scavenge for supplies and analyze enemies for health bonuses really only feels tacked on. Co-op is integrated wonderfully, but the game is not dependent on it. The game can be played with Co-op or solo, but the difference in gameplay is hardly noticeable. The story itself is pretty inconsequential as well. It serves as a rather plain mortar for the architecture of good game play. However, the one thing “Revelations” does differently is in the hardware. The first 3DS Nintendo game to use the new circle pad peripheral ($20), it introduces an ease of control never seen before in a hand held system. The game can be played without it, but it is recommended to invest in the peripheral as well. The game is $50, so buyers are looking at a $70 investment if they want to play this game optimally. However, a game as solid and focused as this is a rare thing, and no doubt “Revelations” is a game that players will want to play through more than once. Get ready to experience fear in three dimensions video game fans. The king of survival horror is back. Source: thetancoki.com


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Sports

The Rattler

February 22, 2012

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Superstitions help athletes Softball looking to 3-peat By Mercedes Kelso Staff Writer

Many athletes on campus believe superstitions and rituals for their sports help them to maintain a good mindset during their games. Freshman art education major and volleyball player Kelsey Huber said that many girls on her team have certain necessary rituals for games. “Some girls wear a certain hairstyle or eye shadow and we always warm up with the same partner in the same spot on the court,” Huber explained. Similarly, the athletes on the women’s basketball team are superstitious about their sport. Sophomore exercise and sport science major Amber Polvago said that her whole team has the same superstitions. “Before we run out, two teammates yell, ‘It’s game time and I’m so excited. Yeah baby,’ three times.” Polvago, too, has her own personal routine she does at halftime. “There are two walls that meet at a corner and I have to touch each wall with my right hand, my left hand twice and then with both hands,” Polvago said. Although most athletes have some form of ritual, Huber thinks that of all the sports she has played, volleyball is the most superstitious. “They had so many rituals, it was crazy,” said Huber. Freshman engineering science major

s t r po

S

JUNKIES

By Joe Rodriguez and Felix Arroyo Sports Editor and Photo Editor

Louis Perez Criminology, Freshman

Code Blue Coach Cassandra Vara English Communications, Senior

Andrew Gould Chemistry, Freshman

Brian Buchmeyer Industrial Engineering, Senior

By Danielle Torres Contributing Writer

Zach Stater who plays for the men’s soccer team does not have superstitions, but he, himself, has certain routines he sticks to. “Most players have some routine that they get into to prepare for games. I always get dressed in a certain order and listen to music to help me focus,” said Strater. Most athletes that perform routines before a game do so in order to focus. Freshman cross country runner and exercise and sport science major Olivia Lara gets ready for her races by first preparing her mind. “I don’t listen to music before a race because it distracts me. Instead, I take deep breaths to get in the zone and prepare my mind to have fun,” Lara said. Huber and Polvago agree that not doing their rituals would affect their mindset. “I do my ritual and my mindset is in lockdown,” Huber said. “If we did not each make one half-court shot during warm-up, it would affect my mindset during the game,” said Polvago. Whether or not athletes believe in performing a routine out of superstition, most athletes have to do a certain procedure to prepare their minds for the competition. “I don’t believe in superstitions but I believe all athletes just have a certain way of preparing for a game and if they get thrown out of their normal way of preparing, they can lose focus,” Strater said.

As the San Antonio weather keeps changing, the Rattler softball team expectations do not. The Rattlers headed into the season as the number one ranked team in the Heartland conference. The team didn’t disappoint, as they came out in their season opener with a game winning blast by junior outfielder biology major Alex Garcia. Sophomore English communication arts major and catcher and third baseman Ashley Behabetz said, “I don’t think we saw the ranking as any sort of pressure because Coach Fields expects us to be the best every year. It was just a confidence boost.” The Rattlers are at the top of the Heartland Conference, mainly due to an outstanding returning roster and a record-breaking coach—Donna Fields. Fields is the all-time leader in wins as a head coach with 570 games. The Rattlers come into the season with hopes of three-peating. They have won the conference tournament the past two years and with four seniors on the team, it is important they show the younger members on the team how to play through tough losses and not get too excited over big wins. The seniors are sure to bring poise and leadership.

After back-to-back championships the Rattlers are ready to make a run at their third straight title. / Photo by Robin Johnson.

Simply put, the Rattlers have players on their team that know how to win big ballgames. “We are a team that gets along on and off the field,” said Behabetz. Since the season got under way, the team has had a few hiccups, including losing three in a row and four all together in this short season. But all is not negative, as they have won three games, including a win against the University of the Incarnate Word. Many games have been moved to later times or cancelled due to the weather. “The weather has definitely been a factor in our schedule, not in our play,” Behabetz said. “We’ve had to battle the elements trying to keep the field dry, avoid lightning, hail and the cold, but we know we have to take it one game at a time.”

Local experts “on the clock” The average attendance at basketball is probably...

His VP should be...

The best Lin nickname..

Tim Duncan

Kevin Kotzur

Linderella

600 or 700

Tom Brady

One of the Code Blue dancers

One of the cheerleaders

All he does is Lin Lin Lin

a little under 100

Michael Jordan

500

Calvin Johnson

The athlete that I would want to be President is...

Moses Sundufu

Darryl “DT” Taylor

Amazian

Brian Urlacher

Jeremy Fonteneaux

Linsanity

85 ACTUALLY 335

If I could be any athlete, I would be...

Dustin Pedroia


Sports

February 22, 2012

The Rattler 15

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Surprise phenom takes over sports world with Linsanity By Brian Magloyoan Staff Writer

Over the past two weeks, New York Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin has dominated the attention of the entire sporting world. However, before all the “Linsanity,” Lin’s rise to fame was not steadfast or easy. The Taiwanese-American economics major—who graduated from Harvard in 2010—was an undrafted rookie. Following the 2010 draft, Lin was asked to play for the Dallas Mavericks Summer League team. There, he left an impression on the Golden State Warriors and was offered a contract. However, with the Warriors already possessing a deep backcourt featuring Monte Ellis and Stephon Curry, Lin only played in 29 games. Prior to the start of the 2011-2012 season, Lin was released by the Warriors and picked up by the Houston Rockets on waivers. Shortly after, Lin was cut by the Rockets. The Rocket’s general manager would later admit in a tweet that it was a mistake when he said, “We should have kept [Jeremy Lin]. Did not know he was this good. Anyone who says they knew misleading U.” On Dec. 27, the Knicks signed Lin to be a backup point guard

due to several injuries on the team. On Feb. 4, Lin was given his shot, and took advantage with 25 points, 5 rebounds and 7 assists off the bench against the New Jersey Nets en-route to a Knicks victory. The following game against the Utah Jazz, Lin started for the first time in his NBA career. Lin scored 28 points along with 8 assists. Six days after his breakout performance, Lin faced Kobe Bryant and the Los Angeles Lakers in front of a sellout crowd in the World’s Most Famous Arena—Madison Square Garden. The home crowd got their money’s worth as Lin stole the show, scoring a career high 38 points and leading the Knicks to another victory. Facing the Toronto Raptors on Valentine’s Day, Lin made a three pointer with 0.5 seconds remaining to seal yet another Knicks victory. In his first five career starts, Lin scored a total of 136 points, the most by any player since the ABA-NBA merger, which means Lin outscored the likes of Shaquille O’Neal and Michael Jordan. On Thursday, it was announced that Lin will be playing in the NBA Rising Stars Challenge on All-Star weekend in Orlando. With his Asian-American heritage, Lin has become the most influential figure in basketball across Asia since former NBA Center Yao Ming, who retired this past

Upcoming Games Baseball Fri, Feb. 24 vs. Oklahoma Panhandle State University (Game 1), Wolff Stadium 2:00 p.m. Fri, Feb. 24 vs. Oklahoma Panhandle State University (Game 2), Wolff Stadium 4:00 p.m. Tue, Feb. 28 at University of Houston-Victoria, Victoria, Texas 5 p.m. Fri, Mar. 02 at St Edward’s University (Game 1), Austin, noon Fri, Mar. 02 at St. Edward’s University (Game 2), Austin, 2 p.m. Sat, Mar. 03 at St. Edward’s University, Austin, 1 p.m. Tue, Mar. 06 vs. University of the Incarnate Word, Wolff Stadium, 6 p.m. Men’s Basketball Sat, Feb. 25 at Texas A&M International University, Laredo, Texas, 2 p.m. Heartland Conference Tournament, TBD Women’s Basketball Sat, Feb. 25 at Texas A&M International University, Laredo, Texas, noon Heartland Conference Tournament, TBD Softball Fri, Fed. 24 at Fort Hayes State University, Denton, Texas, 4:30 p.m. Sat, Feb. 25 at Emporia State University, Denton, Texas, 9 a.m. Sat, Feb. 25 at Washburn University, Denton, Texas, 2 p.m. Sun, Feb. 26 at Fort Hayes State University, Denton, Texas, 9 a.m. Wed, Feb. 29 at University of the Incarnate Word, Northside ISD Softball Field, 7:00 p.m. Sat, Mar. 3 at Missouri Southern State University, Joplin, Missouri, noon Sat, Mar. 3 at University of Central Missouri, Joplin, Missouri, 6 p.m. Sun, Mar. 4 at Fort Hayes State University, Joplin, Missouri, 11 a.m. Sun, Mar. 4 at Washburn University, Joplin, Missouri, 1 p.m. *Home games in bold

Jeremy Lin has scored more points in his first five starts than any other player. In that time he has also led the Knicks to a record above .500 without Amare Stoudemire and Carmelo Anthony. / Courtesey of lin-sanity.com.

summer. Not only has Lin become an ambassador to the game of basketball, he has resurrected the Knicks and created a buzz around New York that hasn’t been felt since the Patrick Ewing teams that competed for the NBA championship. Since his emergence, Lin’s number 17 jersey has been the highest selling jersey in the league.

Many have called it “Linsanity,” while others have called it a “Linderella Story.” However, one question remains—is Jeremy Lin a one hit wonder or is he here to stay for years to come? Whether that is true or not, thanks to Jeremy Lin, these past two weeks have been “Linsane.”


Sports

February 22, 2012

The Rattler 16

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THE

HOT

SEAT

/ Photo by Robin Johnson.

Richelle Morales, SS Biology, Senior

QUICK FACTS: Has been playing softball for over 17 years, and has been playing for the Rattlers for the past four seasons. Last season she started all 57 games and had a team high 66 RBIs. HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT YOUR TEAM AFTER BEING RANKED FIRST IN THE PRESEASON POLLS? “It was exciting to be ranked first, but no matter the ranking, I feel our team will do really well this year. We have a lot of team chemistry on and off the field and a lot of returning talent as well as newcomers who have stepped up at establishing themselves.”

Heartland Conference Tournament preview By Joe Rodriguez Sports Editor

After a slow 1-10 start, the women’s basketball team stormed back to win 11 of their last 16 games. The spurt could not have come at a better time for the Rattlers as the Heartland Conference tournament is about to take place. After the Rattlers finish up their season on Feb. 25 against Texas A&M-International, they will be one of the top four teams in the conference to head to the Heartland Conference tournament. All season, the Heartland Conference has been a four team race between Newman University, TexasPermian Basin, University Arkansas Fort Smith and St. Mary’s University. Amazingly, all four of these teams have conference records ranging within 1.5 games of each other. The Rattlers have been averaging against these teams with a record of 2-4. The total margin of difference in these six games is incredibly only a combined 9 points for the women’s basketball team. Recently, the women have been riding a wave of momentum, including a 74-66 overtime victory over Newman University and an amazing game against Oklahoma Panhandle where the Rattlers managed to score 100 points. The Rattlers hope to continue this hot streak as they push through the conference tournament. The men’s basketball team will be finishing up the season on Feb. 25

Moses Sundufu, guard and the Rattlers are preparing for a deep run in the Heartland Conference tournament. / Photo by Brittany Horack.

as well when they play Texas A&MInternational in a game that could decide the first seed in the Heartland Conference. Texas A&M-International is currently 10-2 in conference play, while the Rattlers are currently 9-3. Rounding out the top four teams in the conference will be Newman University and either Texas-Permian Basin, University of Arkansas-Fort Smith or Dallas Baptist. This season, the Rattlers have an edge of 5-3 against these four teams. The Rattlers could possibly host the Heartland Conference tournament if they win their last game against Texas A&M-International.

The main key for the Rattlers will be the play of junior center Kevin Kotzur who has led the Rattlers in both scoring and rebounding this season. Kotzur was recently renamed the Heartland Conference player of the week. It was his fourth time this season to recieve the honor. Over the most recent four game surge, Kotzur has scored an average of 19.8 points. Both the men’s and women’s basketball teams are ready to make deep runs into the Heartland Conference Tournament and both are heating up at the right time, having competed well against the teams that will be in the tournament.

WHAT IS ONE THING THAT YOUR TEAM WILL HAVE TO DO WELL IN ORDER TO BE SUCCESSFUL THIS SEASON? “Execute! Being able to do the little things like ‘80s bunting and working together as a team through all 21 outs!” WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT YOUR TEAM? “Team camaraderie. All the laughs, road trips and fun we have together. Also, the impact Coach Fields has had on not only myself, but our team as an entirety. She has definitely made my experience at St. Mary’s a memorable one.” WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT SOFTBALL? “When thousands of hours of hard work come together for one moment of success.” WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE ATHLETE? “Tim Tebow, I admire his determination and leadership as well as his boldness of faith on and off the field.”

Compiled by Joe Rodriguez

Seniors DeAnna Patterson, guard (left) and Lamb Autley, guard (right) both will have to play big for their respective teams in the upcoming Heartland Conference tournament. / Photos by Brittany Horack.


Vol. 100, No. 2 - 02/22/2012