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R acquet The University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

IN THIS ISSUE: T h u r s d ay, Ap ri l 14 , 2016

Campus oppression...page 2

PARENTING PLANTS...PAGE 3 w w w.t h e ra c q u e t . n e t

4 Pa g e s

S i n g l e Co p i e s Fr e e

Chopping locks and helping tots: St. Baldrick’s raises awareness for childhood cancer

By Whitney Storvick Staff Reporter

UW-La Crosse students gathered in the Recreational Eagle Center on the afternoon of April 9 in order to fundraise for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. The proceeds help children with cancer and go toward childhood cancer research. Students could also volunteer to shave or cut their locks to either donate or show their support. By shaving their heads, volunteers can inspire others to donate money to the cause and help

“Not only do you get to witness the UW-L community coming together to support each other, but also the La Crosse community.” Andie Coxey St. Baldrick’s Event Organizer raise awareness of childhood cancer. Students attending could also enter raffles to win various prices throughout the event, watch and support students who chose to donate their hair, and buy St. Baldrick’s merchandise. The annual event hoped to raise $15,000 dollars this year, adding to the $130,000 that has been raised by UWL students in the past decade through this event. Love Your Melon and Caretaker Support also joined the St. Baldrick’s team for this year’s fundraiser. St. Baldrick’s is one of UWL’s most

beloved traditions among students. One of the event organizers, Andie Coxey, loves the community connection that the event brings to campus. “Not only do you get to witness the UWL community coming together to support each other,” said Coxey, “but also the La Crosse community.” Another student organizer Julie Fuerbringer said, “everyone leaves with empowerment and inspiration from the selflessness of everyone willing to help children overcome cancer.” The event is traditionally done by Coate Hall, which is how they first became involved with the program three years ago. Both students agree that seeing everyone work together in order to make a change for those affected by the disease is a beautiful thing. Student Ketura Luginbuhl first heard of UWL’s St. Baldrick’s event when she was still in high school. After looking into it, she immediately knew she wanted to be involved

“There have been so many people in my life affected by cancer, so raising money for research and shaving my head is my way of showing support and love to all those people.” Ketura Luginbuhl UWL Student and Event Participant when she attended UWL. Last year, she donated ten inches of her hair to Pantene Beautiful Lengths. After that experience, she

knew she wanted to do more and decided to shave her head at this year’s St. Baldrick’s event. “There have been so many people in my life affected by cancer,” said Luginbuhl, “so raising money for research and shaving my head is my way of showing support and love to all those people.” Her dad agreed to join her for the event, and she was excited to “brave the shave” with him. Together, Luginbuhl and her supporters have raised about $600 for St. Baldrick’s. She’s also looking forward to seeing other student participants around campus in order to make connections and continue the support for this event. Last year, there were more than 50 people who made the decision to donate their hair and raised around $14,200. This year, the goal

Whitney Storvick The Racquet

is around $15,000. The event was run by about 40 student volunteers, who helped to set up and manage the event, and was organized by both Coate and White Hall. “Together, all of us are working towards making a difference,” said Luginbuhl, “it’s amazing to be a part of.”

“Social Justice Week” challenges perceptions and breaks stereotypes By Stephanie Koss Senior Reporter

Social Justice Week: Pursuing Social Justice in Changing Contexts was held on campus from Monday, April 4 to Friday, April 8. The week provided many different types of events, all with the goal of promoting awareness for various social justice issues, especially ones that are predominant on the

“The purpose of Social Justice Week is to bring together faculty, staff, students, and community members to learn about social justice issues and ways to address them.” Dr. Laurie Cooper Stoll Asst. Professor of Sociology UW-La Crosse campus. There were several different categories of events that were held throughout the week. Among some of them were brown bag lunches, research sessions, roundtable

sessions, panels and plenary speakers. Some of the social justice issues and topics that were explored during these events include racism, white privilege, rape on college campuses, age discrimination, marginalization, diversity and underprivileged children. Dr. Laurie Cooper Stoll, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Founding Director for the Institute of Social Justice, was the major coordinator for Social Justice Week. “The purpose of Social Justice Week is to bring together faculty, staff, students, and community members to learn about social justice issues and ways to address them. The most important ways that students will benefit is by raising their awareness of social justice issues and learning specific ways they can bring their own unique talents and abilities to bear on addressing these issues,” said Dr. Cooper Stoll. She also notes that of the social justice issues that are occurring on campus, racism, sexism, homophobia and ableism are among some of the most prevalent.

UWL Junior Michelle Chester also had some interesting things to say regarding the social justice issues that are the most commonly seen on the UWL campus. “I would have to say that racism and sexism are some of the more prevalent issues that I’ve seen. However, there are many other social justice issues that are occurring that many may not think about, such as the stigma and alienation surrounding mental illness and students with disabilities,” said Chester. Chester also went further with this idea and provided some interesting insight into some of the feelings that students have surrounding social justice topics. “I think a lot of the times when people hear about social justice issues, many are turned away from it or think that it doesn’t apply to them. I think having a social justice week on campus can bring many types of people together and all of these different issues can be brought to light by the contribution of these different people. These topics are uncomfortable to talk about at times, but these events are largely geared at those who don’t think they’re happening. Awareness

needs to be raised,” continued Chester. Dr. Stoll said that she hopes Social Justice Week becomes an annual event at UWL and that all people can benefit from attending just one event during the week. The event drew upwards of 600 people by just the middle of

“I think having a social justice week on campus can bring many types of people together and all of these different issues can be brought to light by the contribution of these different people. ” Michelle Chester UWL Junior the week from all around the La Crosse area. She also urged anyone who is interested in getting more involved with these topics or wants to help promote awareness to contact her. She can be reached at lcstoll@uwlax.edu. UWL’s Social Justice Institute’s homepage can be viewed at http://www.uwlax.edu/socialjustice/.

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Word of the Week Taradiddle

a fib or pretentious nonsense The professor complained the students caused too many taradiddles in class.

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