Page 1

Y o u r

s c h o o l .

Y o u r

h o m e .

Y o u r

v o i c e .

R acquet The University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

IN THIS ISSUE: T h u r s d ay, M a r c h 31, 2016

COLONIZING MARS...page 2 MENS TENNIS DOMINATES...PAGE 4 COLLEGE PENNY PINCHING...PAGE 3 w w w.t h e ra c q u e t . n e t

4 Pa g e s

S i n g l e Co p i e s Fr e e

“Jazz Radio of the Mississippi” dazzles UWL By Peter Lenz Staff Reporter

On the evening of Tuesday, March 22, Annett Recital Hall rumbled with the jingles and tunes of a 1930’s radio show entitled, KVJE 160 “Jazz Radio of the Mississippi.” UW-La Crosse’s very own vocal jazz ensembles Collegiates and La Capella performed the songs and commercials of the show, while UWL music professor Gary Walth played the host and voiced most of the radio themed transitions. To start the show off, the members of La Capella came barreling out of their dressing room in bathrobes, primping and pruning themselves starting the show off with a song titled “Bless Our Show” from the musical, Sister Act. This song ended with Walth uncharacteristically barking orders at the

After the members of “La Capella” finished their intro to the show, members of “Collegiates” took the stage and started their show off with a proper 1930’s radio station ID jingle, telling the audience that they are listening to KVJE 160 “Jazz Radio of the Mississippi. members of La Capella, as a radio host that is attempting to keep the show on schedule would do. This performance was unique with their

incorporation of the 1930’s radio theme. After the members of La Capella finished their intro to the show, members of Collegiates took the stage and started their show off with a proper 1930’s radio station ID jingle, telling the audience that they are listening to KVJE 160 “Jazz Radio of the Mississippi”. UWL student and audience member Claire Howard said that her favorite part of the show was the various ways that they got the audience involved. With Walth

“I’d say the most fun for me is working with 7 other fabulous performers. We all support each other every step of the way. Singing with them in front of an appreciative audience is thrilling.” Megan McCarthy UWL Collegiates Ensemble Member peppering in words like “On-Air”, referring to the audience as “Radio Listeners” and the Collegiates throwing in the traditional station identification jingles and old timey toothpaste ads, the audience was involved throughout the entire show. This concert, filled with musical hits of the 1930’s, was an amusing time for the performers as well as the audience. I talked to Collegiates member Megan McCarthy about her favorite parts of this 30’s radio themed show, “I’d say the most fun for me is working with seven other fabulous performers. We all support each other every step of the way. Singing with them in front of an appreciative

Courtesy of Greg Hill

audience is thrilling.” Members of La Capella performed most of their pieces in the first half of the concert. Performing multiple pieces originally made for musicals the concert had aspects of a theatrical event as well as a concert. After La Capella finished their set, Collegiates started their half of the production with UWL student Maxwell Ward reading an ad for a product called “Brill Cream.” Other members of Collegiates accompanied Maxwell on stage and acted out the advertisement he was reading. The concert continued with a bevy of

hits from the 30s. Throughout the rest of the concert multiple songs and solo’s granted rounds of applause from the audience. The shows final song, “Bye Bye Blackbird” motivated the audience to stand up and clap with the ensemble as they sang. At the end of “Bye Bye Blackbird” both of the ensembles sent the audience on their way with a literal last wave goodbye and like that, the concert was over. Be on the lookout for additional concerts in April and for more information contact Gary Walth at gwalth@uwlax.edu.

“MIXED” performance reflects multicultural identity By Whitney Storvick Staff Reporter

On Wednesday, March 23, UW-La Crosse’s Intercultural Organization Promoting Awareness (IOPA) hosted MIXED: A One Woman Show. The event featured Juilliardtrained actor, producer, writer and activist Maya Lilly as she portrayed the experiences of eight different multiracial people of both sexes in order to shed light on the specific struggles they often face. Lilly first began to

Her inspiration came from the lack of representation of multicultural identities, which she learned from personal experience. As a multiracial actor, she was often told she didn’t look “black enough” or “Indian enough” during her auditions. show the piece in 2005, with premieres in both New York and Los Angeles.

Lilly conducted over 200 interviews with multiracial individuals in order to write MIXED. Every story she told on the stage was true and came from one of those interviews. Her inspiration came from the lack of

“Mixed race people have a different understanding of what the race concept is.” Maya Lilly MIXED Actor and Activist representation of multicultural identities, which she learned from personal experience. As a multiracial actor, she was often told she didn’t look “black enough” or “Indian enough” during her auditions. “There has to be someone talking about this,” she said. Her goal for MIXED was to write about what was missing. Jamie Capetillo, IOPA member, said the group decided to bring Lilly’s show to campus due to its popularity among other

multicultural events in the area. MIXED has been featured throughout the UW system, including the UW-Green Bay campus, as well as across the nation. As a group, IOPA focuses on transracial and multiracial student identities. Together, they decided Lilly’s one woman show would capture the message they hoped to bring to UWL about students with these identities. As Lilly told the stories of these different people, there were commonalities among them all. Many of the characters struggled not within themselves, but from the perceptions of those around them. “Mixed race people have a different understanding of what the race concept is,” said Lilly. The characters in MIXED could not understand how they would be able to check a box on their identity when they didn’t truly see themselves fitting within any of the given options. The show portrayed that tension, along with expressing the pressure these individuals received from those on the outside. During the play, characters were often described as half-this and half-that. Lilly would argue, “My

parents didn’t give me half of anything, they gave me more.” The actor also stressed that everyone identifies in different ways, whether that be by their sexuality, their passion, or their ethnicity. “This is a teaching moment,” Lilly says of her show. She stresses the importance of listening to people’s stories rather than asking the dreaded, “So, what are you?” Lilly believes

She stresses the importance of listening to people’s stories rather than asking the dreaded, “So, what are you?” Lilly believes the best way to diminish hatred is to foster an open and honest dialogue about these issues. the best way to diminish hatred is to foster an open and honest dialogue about these issues. Although the conversation may be difficult at times, she believes the best way to treat it is with love, compassion, lots of listening and respect.

Follow Humans of UWL on Instagram! @uwltheracquet

231 & 232 Cartwright Center 1725 State Street La Crosse, WI 54601

Word of the Week Balter

to dance gracelessly, without particular art or skill but with enjoyment The baby lambs joyfully baltered in the field among their mothers.

Index

News. . . . . . . . . . .. 1 Viewpoint . . . . . . .2 Features . . . . . . . . .3 Sports. . . . . . . . . . .4

Please recycle


The

RacqueT Editorial Board

Heidi Gempeler | Editor-in-Chief gempeler.heid@uwlax.edu Danielle Cook | News Editor news@theracquet.net Alexander Johnson | News Editor news@theracquet.net Ellie Brown | Viewpoint Editor viewpoint@theracquet.net Ashley Voxland | Features Editor features@theracquet.net Justin Nichols | Sports/Health Editor sports@theracquet.net Mary Purdy | Copy Editor purdy.mary@uwlax.edu Alesha Cody | Graphic Designer cody.ales@uwlax.edus

SENIOR STAFF Reporter Stephanie Koss

Staff Reporters

Dustin Skolaski, Alexandra Ronnestrand, Sarah Busse, Miranda Martin, Alex VandenHouten, Megan Poczos, Eagan Norman, Destiny Baitinger

Associate Reporters

Peter Lenz, Whitney Storvick

Art and photo staff

Photographers | Madeline Alden, Shelby Hanewold

Business staff

Bailey Krueger | Business Director sales@theracquet.net Michaela Burton | Publicity Director burton.mich@uwlax.edu

ADVERTISING Staff

Blaire Thielen | Advertising Director thielen.blaire@uwlax.edu

Viewpoint Thursday, March 31, 2016

By Destiny Baitinger Staff Reporter

FOMO is real. For those of you who haven’t heard that term before, it’s Fear of Missing Out. It’s a disorder where someone feels anxious because something exciting is happening without them. Most of the time this is triggered by pictures on Instagram, Facebook or other social media sites.

FOMO happens when anyone first becomes aware of an opportunity that sounds appealing, and then at some point they find out that they weren’t invited to attend this opportunity. It can even be triggered by word of mouth: when someone hears about something and they weren’t invited, they might feel left out. FOMO happens when anyone first becomes aware of an opportunity that sounds

SPRING 2016: 15 issues for $30 FULL YEAR: 30 issues for $50

The Racquet 231 & 232 Cartwright Center 1725 State Street La Crosse, WI 54601 The Racquet is an Award-Winning Newspaper, achieving the Third Award for Best Editorial in 2010 and Second Award for Best Advertisement in 2009 through the Wisconsin Newspaper Association Foundation. The Racquet is a student-produced weekly newspaper distributed for the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. The editorial staff assumes full responsibility for content and policies. The Racquet values accuracy and will publish corrections if necessary; please send them to editor@ theracquet.net. Deadline for article submission is Friday by noon. The staff editorials contain the oppinions of the editorial staff only and do not represent the views of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. To advertise with The Racquet, please contact sales@theracquet.net. For general inquiries, contact editor@theracquet.net. Single copies are free to members of the UW-La Crosse, WTC, and Viterbo campus communities. Multiple copies can be acquired from The Racquet at a price to be determined by the publisher by contacting the Racquet business office. Newspaper theft is a crime and is subject to civil and criminal prosecution and/or university discipline.

Page 2

FOMO is real

appealing, and then at some point they find out that they weren’t invited to attend this opportunity. Here’s what FOMO might look like for a college student: It’s a Friday night and there’s a ten-page essay due tomorrow, but your roommate asks if you want to go to a party. You know you shouldn’t go, because you haven’t started your essay, so you stay home. The entire night you think about what is happening at the party, what you missed out on and then pictures pop up on your feed. You fear that you’re missing out on one of the best opportunities, and instead of working on your essay, you get nothing done while you anxiously flip through your newsfeeds. These sort of events happen every day. Their ex-best friend is hanging out with a new one, your family is back home having family dinner, and your roommate is out at a party. It’s the worst feeling. And it’s a real disorder. The reason why FOMO exists is essentially because of loss aversion according to Mira Zaslove on Quora.com. Loss aversion is

Should we colonize Mars?

Since the discovery of other planets, people have talked about the possibility of being able to colonize and live on them. Most of this talk has been dubbed science-fiction, and impossible, but in recent years, there have been leaps and bounds scientifically that may make this possible. Terraforming, the hypothetical process of transforming a planet’s atmosphere to resemble Earth’s, has been mentioned in science-fiction a lot since it was first hypothesized, but now is becoming a lot less fictional and more realistic. With issues like overpopulation and climate change potentially threatening the future of the human race, people are beginning to look to Mars, which may have been hospitable at one point according to credible speculation. If it could be terraformed and become hospitable to the human race, should we as a species jump on the opportunity? Would it be a waste of resources? And do we have any issues we need to correct on Earth before colonizing another planet?

Subscriptions

The voice of the campus community is printed here

Fear of missing out:

By Eagan Norman Staff Reporter

To reserve your issue of The Racquet, call us at (608) 785-8378. Single issues are free on campus or available by mail for a subscription fee.

Ellie Brown Viewpoint Editor viewpoint@theracquet.net

As someone who has always been fascinated with the concept of travel in outer-space, I believe that if we have this opportunity that we should take it. As someone who has always been fascinated with the concept of travel in outer-space, I believe that if we have this opportunity that we should take it. As a species that has taken every opportunity possible to further ourselves and have a part in our own evolution, I don’t see why we wouldn’t take this opportunity to at least attempt to terraform Mars. As far as colonization goes however, I feel like there are a few things that we need to take care of here on Earth before we can start relocating to another planet. One issue, not only with colonization, but also with terraforming is that it would cost so much money to be able to complete this scale of a project. In order for our species to complete such a task would also require a large amount of cooperation between most

essentially the “tendency to want to avoid any losses”. We don’t want to lose out on anything. Equally, it’s important to remember that more often than not, things that are posted online are misleading. They are images posted in the best possible moment of the opportunity or event. Likely, that selfie of a roommate was at the beginning of the night before something went wrong. It’s likely that the images on the screen represent what people genuinely want out of the event, not what actually happened.

Likely, that selfie of a roommate was at the beginning of the night before something went wrong. It’s likely that the images on the screen represent what ppeople genuinely want out of the event, not what actually happneed. The best way to combat FOMO is to do something that makes you feel

good. Something that you can always do when you feel down. You don’t have to post about it, but you certainly can. This will be something that anyone can get involved with when FOMO strikes. Join a new club, meet someone new, paint, write: anything that you find pleasure in will suffice. The other thing that will help is to shut off your phone or social media sites for awhile. I know it seems crazy. However, since so much of our anxiety about missing out on things comes from what others post, it only makes sense to distance ourselves from sites and technology sometimes. For some, it may seem silly, but FOMO actually causes anxiety. It lingers in the back of someone’s mind when they say yes or no to an opportunity. Thoughts come streaming in like, what if I don’t go and what will I miss? There are ways to combat it, and managing social media time is the best way. Once you’re able to recognize FOMO and manage it, you’ll find yourself much happier living the way you want to.

No ID, no vote By Megan Poczos Staff Reporter

first world nations, something that isn’t seen very often nowadays. There would be years of planning and collaboration as well as approving budgets to even begin on the path to accomplish such a feat.

In order for our species to complete such a task would also require a large amount of cooperation between most first world nations, something that isn’t seen very often nowadays. In this time though, we would have time to pay attention to other major issues that would need to be addressed before colonizing a whole new planet. With climate change being such a controversial topic in present day politics, we would need to come to a general consensus on whether it is real or not. We need to analyze whether the way we live on Earth is killing the planet, and if so, find a way to change the way we inhabit a planet, rather than migrating from one dying planet to a planet that we will eventually do the same thing to. Otherwise we have the opportunity of making both Earth and Mars inhospitable, and leaving very few options for the survival of humans.

With elections coming up just around the corner, many people— both young and old—are in a hot debate over whether or not it should be required by law to show photo identification while registering to vote and when entering polls. Both sides of the debate show compelling arguments, with both liberals and conservatives very passionate about the issue. But my understanding of the situation is this: I do not believe that the law should require a photo ID to vote. It is my belief that this rule is redundant was put in place to discourage citizens from voting. This law blocks close to 11 percent of validated, qualified American citizens from voting. While it may seem like most Americans have some form of official identification or another, the fact is that many citizens—for one reason or another—simply do not have official photo identification. Obtaining photo identification is much more costly than lawmakers profess. One ID can cost up to $50, while passports and other forms can cost up to $180. This makes it difficult for some citizens to access a photo ID, particularly seniors, minorities, people with disabilities, students and low-income voters.

It is every American citizen’s constitutional right to vote. If they have registered and proven their citizenship previously, they should not be required to go out of their way to provide a seconf proof of identification. Not only is it morally wrong (which should be enough to convince you of the atrocity of this law,) it is also unconstitutional. It is every American citizen’s constitutional right to vote. If they have registered and proven their citizenship previously, they should not be required to go out of their way to provide a second proof of identification. Many Americans do not have the means to provide this secondary identification, and denying them their right to vote goes against what our forefathers fought and died for. As Americans we should be standing up for those who wish to vote as much as our ancestors stood up for themselves when they wanted to vote.

It boils down to this: Do we still want to live in that world where minorities and people with lesser incomes are not able to express their opinons and act on their basic American rights?

assets4.bigthink.com

In conclusion, I believe that we as a species with a higher level of operation have an obligation to make an attempt at outer-space colonization. In order to accomplish this feat, we’ll need to spend years planning and approving funds and plans, as well as analyzing and finding the healthiest way to inhabit a planet. If we can, as a species we need to go boldly where no man has gone before.

vote. These kinds of tests were nearly impossible to accomplish, and were clearly put in place to suppress minorities from voting. It is the sad truth that voter suppression still goes on today. While it may seem less drastic than it was 150 years ago, it is still wrong.

blog.constitutioncenter.org

At this point, this is not only an issue of wealth, but it becomes an issue of suppression and oppression. When African Americans first became able to vote, processes were put in place to discourage them from voting. These processes included ridiculous measures such as needing to guess how many marbles were in a jar and, if guessed incorrectly, African Americans weren’t allowed to

It boils down to this: Do we still want to live in that world where minorities and people with lesser incomes are not able to express their opinions and act on their basic American rights? Or do we want to move forward from those years of suppression and create a world that thrives on equality and inclusion? I know what side of history I want to stand on. What side will you be on?

Classified Holmen Park & Recreation Dept. is accepting applications for: spring soccer (referees, volunteer coaches), spring & summer track (supervisors, instructors), men’s softball (umpires), aquatics (lifeguards, WSI instructors, admissions/concessions, swim team coaches), basketball (supervisor, instructors), fitness (instructors), girls softball (coaches, umpires), t-ball (supervisor, volunteer coaches), tennis (supervisor, instructors), volleyball (referees, supervisors, coaches), tot sports and youth activity (instructors), Sunday Concerts (supervisor), and summer park maintenance. Applications agailable at the Holmen Village Hall (421 S. Main St., Holmen, WI 54636) or from www.holmenwi.com. Hiring March-April, call (608) 526-2152 for more information.


Features

Ashley Voxland Features Editor features@theracquet.net

Page 3

Thursday, March 31, 2016

Simple money saving solutions: How to penny pinch in college By Alexandra Ronnestrand Staff Reporter

College can be a big budget buster for most students. There are loans to take out, food to buy and those extras that every college student needs. Going from limited financial responsibilities to almost fully or on your way to is an adjustment for anyone. If there is any advice to give, it is simple ways to save a dollar here and there. Listed below are money saving techniques everyone should have in their bank. One of the easiest ways to save money is to create a money plan. Budget in rent and electricity, create a stipends for food and have money for unplanned expenses. Besides

setting aside amounts to spend, account for money to save. Each month, set a goal of how much you want to save. By having a set plan, it will be easier to limit excessive spending. After creating a plan, there are ways upon ways of earning an extra buck. Many sites such as Zaarly and TaskRabbit are available for people reaching out to others for a helping hand. A range of jobs from manual work to simple errands are simple and efficient ways to earn fast cash. Other jobs though like sitting (i.e. house-sitting, babysitting and pet-sitting), mowing lawns or even selling your unused items are great for establishing money making jobs on the side. Of course, jobs are the best ways of earning money, but once had, it can be even easier to

spend. Learning to safely spend is a skill that needs to be practiced like any other. When shopping, check out the sales first whether shopping for clothes or food. Grocery stores are always have discounts on food but you have to keep your eye on them. Remember when your grandma or even your parents were clipping coupons and told you to always use them! Well, they were right. Coupons can save you a load over time. Don’t be afraid to ask for them at the counters of the stores. There are plenty of other ways to save on food. Many college students get trapped in the state of fast food runs because their money is fleeing fast. But with watching for sales and coupons, it is easier to grab more filling foods. Stack up on staple items that

are easy to make into multiple dishes. Look for versatile foods like peanut butter, bread, and fruits that can be made into breakfast or dinner foods. It is more fiscal to make a week’s dinner of rice and chicken than grab a burger at McDonalds and a lot tastier! The most important thing to remember when saving money is just that; save money! By invoking these easy methods, saving money will become much easier. In the near future, make a financial plan, look the sales and deals and spend smart. Save a penny, one day it could become a fortune. More financial tips can be found at moneytalksnews.com

Down to Earth: Bluffland properties By Shelby Roberts Guest Reporter

On a snowy Sunday in early February, I stood with three friends in the middle of an expansive field with rolling hills stretched as far as we could see. In front of us rose a massive wall, a sandy red-orange that contrasted starkly with the pristine white snow that blanketed everything. Everything except that is the shear cliff that is Medary Quarry. Few people have heard of Medary Quarry and even fewer realize how close it is. The quarry is just a ten-minute drive up the bluff

from campus, or under an hour bike ride when the roads and trail conditions are good. Once at the old quarry, you can hike the 1.5 mile loop that brings you past the quarry and out into a clearing. For a second, you feel like you’re in another country. Medary Quarry is part of a widely unknown trail system in La Crosse called the Bluffland Trails. These trails are part of an area of nearly one thousand acres protected by the Mississippi Valley Conservancy (MVC) and the city of La Crosse. Starting in 2002, La Crosse set aside money each year for the MVC to preserve a natural bluff land along an eight mile stretch of the Mississippi River Bluffs that surround La Crosse. This

began what is now known as the La Crosse Bluffland Protection Program. Since 2002, the Bluffland Properties have expanded to include the striking rock faces of Medary Quarry, Miller Bluff and Cliffwood Bluff, as well as some smaller hiking areas within a mile of West Avenue which include Hass Trail, Welch Trail and Juniper Trail. These trails are much less traveled than the popular Hixon Forest Trails, yet just as scenic and even more rustic. As the weather starts to warm and the last traces of snow disappear, explore new trails and discover a new corner of your backyard!

Green tip of the week: Carpool. Especially when making a trip home or to another city, check the UW-L Rideshare group on Facebook for who is going where and when they are going. Save gas, money and maybe even make a friend!

Hey UW-L! What did you do for spring break? By Miranda Martin Staff Reporter

“My best friend and I drove down to Chicago for the second year to visit some family. However, my favorite part of spring break consisted of a British movie marathon weekend with a total of nine movies and a Harry Potter marathon (and of course a bottomless bowl of popcorn).” Emily Abramowicz

Secure your freedom from college debt Serve part-time in the Guard, and you’ll be eligible for at least four financial benefits to help pay for school. (We’re talking thousands of dollars.)

“I hit a squirrel, got to ride horses, and flew an airplane with my dad”

Plus, join the ROTC program, and you’re eligible for even more benefits, and you’ll graduate as an officer with officer-level pay ($$$).

Abby Scaffidi

Full-time school. Part-time service. And a future without loads of debt. “I flew in a plane for the first time and went to Washington D.C!” Nicole Reske

Contact SFC Stan Grandt at 608-807-6628

OPTIONS CLINIC IS NOW Offered in La Crosse at Essential Health Clinic: Birth control • STD & HIV testing • Breast & cervical cancer screenings Annual health exams • Pregnancy testing & counseling Emergency contraceptives • Education & resources Call (800) 657-5177 to make an appointment. Visit essentialclinic.org. 1201 Caledonia Street, La Crosse, Wis Hours: Monday & Tuesday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday & Thursday 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Friday 9 a.m. to noon (closed every 3rd Friday of the month)

NATIONALGUARD.com/Wisconsin Programs and Benefits Subject to Change

73173-5_WI_ARNG_College_Ad_5x8.indd 1

3/21/16 2:48 PM


Sports & Wellness

Justin Nichols Sports Editor editor@theracquet.net

Page 4

Thursday, March 31, 2016

UWL men’s tennis dominates Lawrence to improve record By Alex VandenHouten Staff Reporter

Due to the inclement weather the UW-La Crosse men’s tennis team opened up it’s home season in the Mitchell Fieldhouse this past Friday where UW-L dominated defeated the overmatched Lawrence University Vikings 9-0. With the victory the Eagles are now 8-7 on the year, the loss dropped the Vikings record to 500 at 6-6. The Eagles started the year ranked 13th in the country by the Intercollegiate Tennis Association, but lost six of their first seven matches to start with a disappointing 1-6 record due in large part to a tough schedule that saw the Eagles face

The Eagles found themselves during their spring trip in Orlando, Florida winning their first four matches.

many ranked teams. However the Eagles found themselves during their spring trip in Orlando, Florida winning their first four matches, before falling in their fifth and final match of the trip to Bethel with a score of four to five. And with the drubbing of Lawrence University, UW-L is now winners of seven of their last eight matches. For the Eagles every singles player, with

the exception of Senior Tony Mirasola, won in straight sets. Playing at one singles, Mirasola, after dropping the first set 4-6 to the Vikings David Jumes, the senior then came back and won the next set 6-1 before completing the comeback in the third set tiebreaker 10-7.

Every doubles team for UW-L won easily as well led by the number one doubles team of Mirasola and Woghan who took care of business with an 8-1 victory over the Vikings doubles team. Other single winners include Junior Austin Stefanich at two singles (6-1,6-2), Freshman Kyle Wogahn at three singles (6-0,6-0), four singles Sophomore Matt Lindsay (6-4,6-1), five singles sophomore Joey Schneider (60,6-0), and six singles Junior Simon Brandt rounded out the singles with a (6-1,6-0) victory. Every doubles team for UW-L won easily as well led by the number one doubles team of Mirasola and Woghan who took care of business with an 8-1 victory over the Vikings doubles team of David Jumes and Brian DeCorte. The number two doubles team of

Photo by: Ken Schneider, uwlax.edu

The men’s tennis team started the season slow, but has gotten hot as of late

Lindsay and Schneider won (8-4) and the three doubles duo of Sophomore Joey Shubert and Freshman Sam Gowan won (8-5). The Eagles will return to action on Sunday, April 3 to versus Luther College (Iowa) at the Winona (Minn.) Tennis Center. The Eagles will return home and

host both Edgewood College (Wisc.) and University of Northwestern (Minn.) on April 9 before closing out their regular season at the University of Oshkosh on April 23. The Eagles will close out the season facing rivals UW-Eau Claire and UW-Whitewater.

Advertise with The Racquet! Email our Advertising Director, Blaire Thielen, at thielen.blaire@uwlax.edu for more information! FLEXIBLE OPTIONS & EASY TRANSFER

Online

On-Campus

Hybrid

Travel Study

Internships

TAKE YOUR SUMMER IN A NEW DIRECTION www.winona.edu/summersession MAY SESSION | MAY 7 – 27 FIRST SUMMER SESSION | MAY 31 – JULY 1 SECOND SUMMER SESSION | JULY 5 – AUGUST 5

For More Information 1.800.DIAL.WSU ext. 2800 www.winona.edu/summersession

2016

REGISTER NOW

3.31.2016  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you