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R acquet The University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

IN THIS ISSUE: T h u r s d ay, M a r c h 3r d , 2016

HATE CRIMES AREN’T PRACTICAL JOKES...page 2 warm weather, hot Activities...page 3 Conference upset by uw-l...PAGE 4 w w w.t h e ra c q u e t . o r g

4 Pa g e s

S i n g l e Co p i e s Fr e e

Hate incident prompts racism discussion and debate By Stephanie Koss Senior Reporter

On Friday, Feb. 19, a drawing was found on a whiteboard in one of the residence halls that was extremely racially suggestive, and a hate/bias incident was filed through the UW-La Crosse’s Campus Climate Office. In response to this incident, Chancellor Joe Gow sent out an email to all UW-L students regarding not only this incident, but drawing attention to a larger issue at hand: the issue of racism and oppression.

“The number one thing I’ve learned about the issue of racism and white supremacy is that people know that it’s happening, but they don’t think it’s a big deal. People think that it has gotten better since the 1950’s, but the reality is, it hasn’t.” Jude Legiste Drake Hall Director Racism tends to be one of those topics that is difficult to discuss, especially when, on a predominantly white/Caucasian campus, many haven’t felt the oppression

of being racially segregated. When asking many different students and faculty around campus, the responses regarding the existence and severity of racism on campus were surprising, yet also extremely eye-opening and informative. A majority of the people asked were in agreement on one aspect, however: racism is real, and it is happening on this campus, whether we want to believe it or not. What differed between the responses though was the extent to which racism occurs. While many agreed that racism is a severe issue that needs to be seriously addressed, some others thought that racism on the UW-L wasn’t something to make a big deal about. “I think people need to realize that although there is racism happening, it’s definitely something that has gotten better since the Civil Rights Movement. I think sometimes people just try to over exaggerate it,” said one student. “I don’t really think racism is that big of an issue. I know it happens, but I think the times that it does happen are really blown out of proportion,” responded another student. Drake Hall Director Jude Legiste provided some interesting perspectives in response to

what some of the students were saying. “The number one thing I’ve learned about the issue of racism and white supremacy is that people know that it’s happening, but they don’t think it’s a big deal. People think that

“Having grown up in the south, I can honestly say that racism is the same there as it is here. It’s no different. This is not a ‘regional’ issue. This is happening throughout the country. White supremacy is ingrained into the American culture, and it’s only when people start realizing this and admitting that they’re contributors that racism will begin to disappear.” Jude Legiste Drake Hall Director it has gotten better since the 1950’s, but the reality is, it hasn’t. Some white people only think that it’s gotten better because they aren’t the ones faced with this struggle everyday of their lives,” said Legiste. He also commented on the prevalence of racism throughout the whole nation. “Having grown up in the south, I can

honestly say that racism is the same there as it is here. It’s no different. This is not a ‘regional’ issue. This is happening throughout the country,” Legiste said. “White supremacy is ingrained into the American culture, and it’s only when people start realizing this and admitting that they’re contributors that racism will begin to disappear.” What can be learned from these responses, even though there is a large disparity between the opinions of students? As Legiste alluded to, everyone plays an important role in helping to end racism. It’s only when people begin to recognize their own racial tendencies and the fact that there truly is a problem that productive racial discussions and solutions can commence. If you would like to play a larger role in ending racism, especially on the UW-L campus, you might be interested in a couple of events happening in the upcoming weeks: • Part One of a Hate/Bias Open Forum: Monday, March 7, 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM, Centennial Hall of Nations • Part Two of a Hate/Bias Open Forum: Tuesday, March 8, 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM, Centennial Hall of Nations Any questions or comments regarding this topic? Contact jlegiste@uwlax.edu.

Alpha Phi makes hearts throb at annual pageant By Destiny Baitinger Staff Reporter

Alpha Phi is more than just a sisterhood of girls having fun together and learning more about themselves along the way. Alpha Phi has been involved in numerous events over the past few years to benefit multiple organizations. Their spring philanthropy

“One of my favorite things about this event is how truly amazing the men in this competition are. All of them are just regular, everyday guys that want to put their best foot forward to raise money for a fantastic cause. To me, they all deserve to be winners!” Jade Nolden Alpha Phi Member event this year is Mr. Heartthrob. Last year, this event raised almost $900 for the Alpha Phi Foundation and Women’s Heart Health. This year, the group is hoping to raise even

more for Women’s Cardiac Care and the Alpha Phi Foundation. “The Alpha Phi Foundation divides donations into several categories including women’s heart health, scholarships and leadership programs,” Through their service and philanthropy, Alpha Phi makes every effort to “support those in need and give back to [the] community through service.” Mr. Heartthrob is a male pageant filled with humor and surprise. Male contestants from all organizations, majors, and interests come together to compete in different categories. The categories are talent, formal wear, and a question and answer session. The talent category, as in any pageant, is an opportunity for the judges to better understand the contestants. Formal wear shows much of the men’s brawn. Finally, the question and answer sessions are an opportunity for the judges to fully understand each contestant, and to have further insight into each individual’s eloquence. This year’s contestants came from numerous different backgrounds. Mr. ΔΣΦ, Mr. Chemistry, Mr. ΣΑΕ, Mr. Chi Phi, Mr.

Whitney Dining Center, Mr. Cycling, and Mr. Sustainability were all contestants featured on the event’s Facebook page. The judges have been composed of UW-L administration and students in the past. This year’s judges consisted of last year’s Mr. Heartthrob, also known as Mr. Hockey, Miss Onalaska, a trauma nurse from Gunderson Health System, and a UW-L calculus professor.

“The Alpha Phi Foundation divides donations into several categories including women’s heart health, scholarships and leadership programs.” Alpha Phi Philanthrophy Statement deltakappa.alphaphi.org One Alpha Phi member, Jade Nolden, spoke about the event, “’One of my favorite things about this event is how truly amazing the men in this competition are. All of them are just regular, everyday guys that want to put their best foot forward to raise money for

a fantastic cause. To me, they all deserve to be winners!’” As Jade mentioned, the men that compete in this competition help raise awareness, and also help raise money to benefit a great cause. It’s also a great way to laugh, and support the Alpha Phi Foundation. This year, the event raised over $1400, which surpasses last year’s amount of $900 for the event. The results for the foundation weren’t the only thing that the audience and participants were excited about: the crowning is one of the highlights for the night. After deliberation, the crowd named Zachary Pasano, or Mr. ΔΣΦ, Mr. Heartthrob for 2016. He was excited, and so was the crowd. He wowed the judges in all categories, especially formal wear to bring home this year’s Mr. Heartthrob crown. Alpha Phi hopes to continue this funloving event in the future in order to grow awareness of Women’s Heart Health and Women’s Cardiac Care. They hope that the event grows in numbers and participants as well.

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Word of the Week Mellifluous

sweet or musical; pleasant to hear No sound appears more mellifluous to a dog-lover than a puppy’s happy whine.

Index

News. . . . . . . . . . .. 1 Viewpoint . . . . . . .2 Features . . . . . . . . .3 Sports. . . . . . . . . ....3

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The

RacqueT Editorial Board

Heidi Gempeler | Editor-in-Chief gempeler.heid@uwlax.edu Danielle Cook | News Editor news@theracquet.net Alexander Johnson | News Editor news@theracquet.net Ellie Brown | Viewpoint Editor viewpoint@theracquet.net Ashley Voxland | Features Editor features@theracquet.net Justin Nichols | Sports/Health Editor sports@theracquet.net Mary Purdy | Copy Editor purdy.mary@uwlax.edu Alesha Cody | Graphic Designer cody.ales@uwlax.edus

SENIOR STAFF Reporter Stephanie Koss

Staff Reporters

Dustin Skolaski, Nicole Witt, Alexandra Ronnestrand, Sarah Busse, Miranda Martin, Alex VandenHouten, Megan Poczos, Eagan Norman, Destiny Baitinger

Art and photo staff

Photographers | Madeline Alden, Shelby Hanewold

Business staff

Bailey Krueger | Business Director sales@theracquet.net Michaela Burton | Publicity Director burton.mich@uwlax.edu

ADVERTISING Staff

Blaire Thielen | Advertising Director thielen.blaire@uwlax.edu

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The Racquet 231 & 232 Cartwright Center 1725 State Street La Crosse, WI 54601 The Racquet is an Award-Winning Newspaper, achieving the Third Award for Best Editorial in 2010 and Second Award for Best Advertisement in 2009 through the Wisconsin Newspaper Association Foundation. The Racquet is a student-produced weekly newspaper distributed for the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. The editorial staff assumes full responsibility for content and policies. The Racquet values accuracy and will publish corrections if necessary; please send them to editor@ theracquet.net. Deadline for article submission is Friday by noon. The staff editorials contain the oppinions of the editorial staff only and do not represent the views of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. To advertise with The Racquet, please contact sales@theracquet.net. For general inquiries, contact editor@theracquet.net. Single copies are free to members of the UW-La Crosse, WTC, and Viterbo campus communities. Multiple copies can be acquired from The Racquet at a price to be determined by the publisher by contacting the Racquet business office. Newspaper theft is a crime and is subject to civil and criminal prosecution and/or university discipline.

Viewpoint

Ellie Brown Viewpoint Editor viewpoint@theracquet.net

The voice of the campus community is printed here

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Page 2

The line between practical jokes and hate crimes By Destiny Baitinger Staff Reporter

Within the last couple of weeks an issue has surfaced in the UW system. This issue primarily began with a specific hate incident in Sellery Hall at UW-Madison. Two individuals thought it was a non-harmful joke and taped pictures of swastikas and Adolf Hitler on a Jewish student’s dorm door. Though the two guys involved thought nothing more of the situation as a joke, the student was very hurt and asked that anti-Semitic practices be explained to show awareness throughout the incident. Now, it’s important to realize hate crimes, violent or not in nature, happen more than we think. It’s instances like this one, that are brought to light, often, because of social media. An outside, angry, student wanted to explain that her goal in posting the photo of the incident on Facebook

was to reflect on the fact that “if there had been an equivalent anti-black incident, ‘the campus would mobilize” and ‘professors would bring it up in lectures’” (althouse.blogspot.com). And, honestly, I would say she’s right. These incidents are brushed over no matter how big or small, quite a lot. Regardless of the race, the type of prejudice, etc., it happens daily. I think the UW system does a very great job at addressing these matters, but I think they lack in where they address the situation. In this particular situation University Housing and the Division of Student Life said that, “When a bias incident occurs, our first priority is to respond immediately to the community most directly affected” (althouse.blogspot.com). Here’s where the problem lies: University officials don’t know the exact individual students being affected. In this instance, they reached out to the Jewish community. That

Ghost stories of UW-L

By Eagan Norman Staff Reporter

It’s a cool dark February evening, and you’re walking across campus all alone-or so you think. As you continue to walk through campus, you start to have an eerie feeling that someone else is around. You look around as you begin to pick up your pace, but there’s nobody there. You can’t seem to shake the feeling off though, and rush to your destination to escape whatever may be outside. Once you get where you’re going, you feel safe, but are you really? Many places on this campus are rumored to be haunted, and you might walk through them daily. I interviewed a few UWLa Crosse students about this, and I was able to come away with some new opinions on places I should avoid in the late hours of the evening. I first met my friend Keely at Murphy Library in order to discuss this topic in a public place where we could avoid the eyes of any ghosts that could be potentially watching. As soon as I was selected to write on this piece, I knew Keely would be the perfect person to talk to. She has always tried to prove to me that ghosts were real, and this was her opportunity to give me some solid evidence. She started out by telling me the tale of Anna Wentz. Anna Wentz was born in 1920 and died in 1948 as a professor at UW-L. Since her death, she has been rumored to roam the halls of the second and fourth floor Wentz Hall protecting the girls that live there from a young man who died in the hall some time ago. In years past, students studying in the Wentz basement have

witnessed scuffles between the two ghosts where papers flew around and lights flickered. While I was talking over this with Keely, a few of our other friends walked up, and I figured it wouldn’t hurt to ask them what their opinions on the subject were. Before I could even finish my sentence, our friend Sierra spat out “Morris!” and Josh and Harry (the other friends that had come by) quickly agreed. I asked them what evidence they had behind those statements, but I didn’t really get a straight answer. Josh said that he felt creeped out whenever he went into the theater, but that was about as in depth as they got. They then proceeded to leave, and as they just got past earshot, Sierra yelled back “Oh yeah, Wittich is also haunted!” I don’t have any evidence to back either of those statements up, but those buildings certainly are old enough for ghosts to frequent or reside. I continued to talk with Keely as the time we had before the library closed dwindled. As she prepared to leave, I asked her one last time for good measure if she thought that anymore places on campus were haunted. She then cackled and said “I think that all places on campus are haunted!” The library was then illuminated by a lightning striking the clock tower and in the flash of brightness, Keely vanished. The only thing left was a note saying “’Watch out for ghosts. They’re fo real’ – Keely” So heed this warning the next time you walk home in the cover of night. You may not know what things lurk in the dark.

If you were being abused at your job, would you put up with it and continue working there, or would you take a stand against your abuser? This is what pop-singer Kesha is going through right now. Her producer, Dr Luke, has been accused of physically, mentally and sexually abusing her. Kesha says that Dr Luke has even raped her. On Friday, Feb. 19, there was a court hearing to decide whether or not Kesha should

be allowed out of her contract with her abusive producer. The verdict was that Kesha is not able to leave her contract. Fans across the globe were infuriated by the ruling and started a worldwide support system for the pop singer. Hashtags such as #FreeKesha and #IStandWithKesha started appearing on social media sites, as well as many other celebrities publically announcing their support for Kesha. Here’s the bottom line: No one, man or woman, should have to deal with abuse in the workplace. Whether it is a job

“Many of these problems are swept under the rug and disregarded as small jokes. . ” walks of life in order to promote awareness on these situations. Unfortunately, many of these problems are swept under the rug and disregarded as small jokes. Even worse, students and staff members often feel obligated to take these ‘jokes’ lightly and not report them. Hate crimes are often committed by friends and people we know,

so it’s hard to admit they hurt. UW-La Crosse states, “For a hate or bias incident to qualify as a hate or bias crime, two variables must be present:1) A crime must take place; 2) That crime must be motivated by bias against characteristics included in federal, state and/or local statutes” (http:// news.uwlax.edu/). Just two variables make a joke into a real hate crime. Though the Sellery Hall incident was over a hundred miles or so away from UW-L, these incidents unfortunately, still happen every day in La Crosse. While posting pictures on Facebook wasn’t necessarily the right thing to do, one student was bringing awareness to a very serious problem. I’ve witnessed jokes like these in my dorm, in my classroom, and even at my job. Where it’s easy to let them pass as jokes: it’s not easy to stand up and say something. Hate is not a UW-L value.

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#IStandWithKesha

By Megan Poczos Staff Reporter

doesn’t necessarily target those who have minimal ideas that anti-Semitic practices are harmful, or those that don’t realize jokes like these are considered hate crimes. The list of those affected is endless, and though it’s rational to respond to obvious victims, it’s important to target all

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as common as receptionist or as rare as pop star, no one deserves to be mistreated. In many corporate work environments, there is a clause within employees’ contracts that lets them out of a job if sexually harassed. As we can see, it seems that Kesha’s contract with Dr Luke had no such clause. Kesha should be able to make music and do her job without fear of abuse. Period. There is no if, ands or buts about this kind of situation. There is never an excuse or reason to abuse someone, and Kesha is no exeption.

Classified

Holmen Park & Recreaton Dept. is accepting applications for: spring soccer (referees, supervisors, coaches and volunteer coaches), spring & summer track (supervisor, instructors), men’s softball (umpires), aquatics (lifeguards, WSI instructors, admissions/concessions, swim team coaches and water aerobics instructors), basketball (supervisor, instructors), fitness (instructors), girls softball (coaches, supervisors, and umpires), t-ball (supervisor, volunteer coaches), tennis (supervisor, instructors), volleyball (referees, supervisors, coaches), tot sports, youth activity and arts and crafts (instructors), Sunday Concerts (supervisor), and spring & summer park maintenance. Applications available at the Holmen Village Hall (421 S. Main St., Holmen, WI 54636) or from www.holmenwi.com. Hiring March-April, call (608) 526-2152 for more information.


Features

Ashley Voxland Features Editor features@theracquet.net

Page 3

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Sewing: how does that work?

By Alexandra Ronnestrand Staff Reporter

Once sewing was mandatory in schools. It was taught in a home economics class along with any other basic skills that would prove

leafytreespot.blogspot.com

useful in life and around the home. Because of budget cuts, children’s attention wavering, societal norms and technology changing,

sewing has become more of a hobby or pastime than a basic skill used. A small poll conducted on the UW-La Crosse campus showed that only five out of fifteen people have basic knowledge of sewing. Even then, these people were not confident in their skills enough to sew a button or mend a hole. When technology was limited to a black and white TV or packman, time was consumed by more than just computers, social media and texting. People used to have to be much more independent when it came to everyday tasks. Not even just sewing clothes for the family, but also fixing cars, painting houses or unclogging the sink were all basic knowledge, all in the hopes of saving some money. However, today it is so easy to contact someone else to do those jobs. The car won’t start, send it in. There is a leak in the facet, call the plumber. The coat is missing a button, ooo better get it to that

UW-L Creative Imperatives unite disciplines with curiosity and wonder By Sarah Busse Staff Reporter

Do you ever wonder what it would be like for different majors to come together and create something awe-inspiring? Then Creative Imperatives is a festival that is an event created for you and other like-minded people. The festival Creative Imperatives again took place this year, for the 3rd consecutive year, with over 30 events happening on campus and out in the surrounding La Crosse community, at place such as Myrick March, The Pump House and The Root Note, between Sunday, February 28 and Tuesday, March 1. The goal of the festival is “to showcase innovative and thought-provoking work” created by faculty, students, and staff alike showcased through an assortment of performances, presentations, lectures and exhibitions. This year’s theme happened to be Curiosity and Wonder: the Intersection of Art and Science, with the free and open to the public events. This year’s events really exemplified what is to go to a college that offers a wide array of major, with productions in Biology, English, History, Mathematics, Psychology and Geography & Earth Science all collaborating with Art for some truly spectacular results. While creativity might finds its most obvious match in art, it truly can be found in any major or subject it just takes a willingness to look beyond the typical perspective. This is just what the festival set out to do by reminding us why it is so important take those general education credits to truly understand how different disciplines can come together for amazing results. An example of one of the events that truly exemplified this year’s theme was Between River and Sky: A UW-L Ecocritical Literary Anthology for the La Crosse Marsh and Hixon Forest which was put together by Associate Art Lecturer

Misha Bolstad and Assistant English Professor Kelly Sultzbach which brought together poetry, graphic design and nature. The event took place on Sunday at noon which invited students to bring their phones to pull up the event webpage of photographic pieces to participate in as Bolstad described as “sort of like a

While creativity might finds its most obvious match in art, it truly can be found in any major or subject it just takes a willingness to look beyond the typical perspective. reverse of a museum audio tour” which literature being read while admiring the pieces. Then participants were invited to make their own work out in nature while consider its partnership with literature. If you would like to learn more about this particular event’s artworks and interpretations go to betweenriverandsky. org. This year there was also nationally and internationally recognized guest within roles as artists, educators and innovators, including people such as Ted Louis Levy, Ben Toth, Margaret Wertheim, Holly Walter Kerby, Shumpei Yamaki and Jill Sisson Quinn. With particular events such as nature walks, open studio experiences, readings of works and thought-provoking lectures. The events are made possible through the combined efforts of the UWLa Crosse Provost’s Office, the Visiting Scholars and Artists Fund, the College of Liberal Studies, the School of Arts and Communication, the UW-L Foundation/ Community Engagement Committee, State Bank Financial and Dick Record.

place on the corner that fixes those things. Believe it or not, all of those phrases have been used by someone in the family. It is sad to think that such a simple skill could save so much money, but it can. Sewing simple things can help save cash.

Fix that hole in that shirt that has been sitting in the closet for a year. Sew a pillow or blanket for an upcoming birthday present. The favorite pair of jeans or that gorgeous top that snagged a hook could easily be repaired. But it doesn’t have to be sent in. When there are many more worries to be had about student loans, groceries to get, or bills that need to be paid, paying someone to mend your clothing seems to hit right in the gut

or perhaps right in the wallet. With a basic knowledge of sewing, it would be easy to fix those pieces yourself. To master the basics, the internet is filled with video after video, instruction after instruction for beginner sewers. There are also free classes offered as well. Unfortunately, there are no classes offered at the UW-L that teach this, but there are plenty of other ways in learning. Take time and learn from a parent, grandparent or maybe someone else that is familiar with this art. Once you learn, there are numerous things that can be accomplished. Fix that hole in that shirt that has been sitting in the closet for a year. Sew a pillow or blanket for an upcoming birthday present. Perhaps even offer your talents to other people for friendly costs to turn a profit. Sewing may seem like a waste of time but the money that can be saved or the fun that can be had makes it all so worth it. Pick up the needles and you’ll see.

Hey UW-L! What’s your favorite outdoor activity? By Miranda Martin Staff Reporter

“My favorite outdoor activity is skiing because I enjoy the winter time and seeing the trees fly past me as I go down the mountain.”

“Rugby”

Zachary Maize

James North

“Riding my motorcycle”

“Floating down the river with some beers”

Nate Vick

Kelsey Cattanach

“Running and Volleyball”

Dylan Reuck (right)

“Long walks on the beach in the winter” Jacob Mathiebe (left)

Check out theracquet.org for the latest news, polls, and UW-L updates!

Down to Earth: The food industry and sustaiable eating By Nicholas Theis Guest Reporter

Did you know that animal agriculture accounts for 14 percent of greenhouse gas emissions across the globe? Did you know that only four global grain corporations direct three-fourths of all grain trade worldwide? One year ago, these statistics, available at greenpeace.org, were presented to me. I never knew that only a few large, powerful businesses essentially controlled the agriculture industry, and that this industry is one of the leading causes of global climate change. This led to a further question, which literally stares us in the face every day at mealtime, but we rarely consider: Where

does our food come from? Everything we eat, from chicken to beef to eggs to corn, is, for the most part, mass produced. Genetically modified crops, drenched with huge amounts of pesticides and other chemicals, and are fed to livestock in large-scale, industrial farms. In these factory farms, or Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs), animals are contained in small areas relative to their size, for most of their lives. Furthermore, such farms have significant negative effects on the planet: rainforests are torn down to make way for agricultural fields, resulting in habitat loss, waterways are polluted from farm runoff, and the overfed animal produce large amounts of excrement, which contributes to climate

change. In other words, there is a process behind the neatly packaged supermarket products, which causes environmental harm. However, there are little things that we can all do to reduce our environmental footprint in regards to eating. Composting, Meatless Mondays, and shopping for organic, locally grown products can all help facilitate greener living. If you’re looking to get involved in promoting sustainable food in the La Crosse area, check out the Hillview Urban Agriculture Center, Hunger Task Force of La Crosse, Grow La Crosse, and the Coulee Partners for Sustainability to volunteer.

Green tip of the week: BYOB. That’s right, Bring Your Own Bag! Many stores will knock a few cents of your total bill if you bring your own bag while others don’t even offer bags! If you do forget your canvass bag, use paper or as few plastic bags as possible.


Sports & Wellness

Justin Nichols Sports Editor sports@theracquet.net

Thursday, March 3, 2016

UWL upset at home by hot shooting River Falls in WIAC tournament

By Alex VandenHouten Staff Reporter

The La Crosse boys basketball team fell at home 72-61 in a WIAC tournament semifinal game last Friday Night at Mitchell Hall. After securing their first conference championship since 1965, the Eagles secured the number one seed for the tournament. The number one seed received home court advantage throughout the tournament meaning La Crosse would get the opportunity to win the tournament in front of their home crowd. In the opening minutes they gave that home crowd lots to cheer about as UWL jumped out to a 21-6 lead on Junior Kenny Finco’s banked in 3 with 11:31 left in the half. La Crosse Junior Austin Fritz’s 9 points early on helped UWL build that lead. But then River Falls woke up and responded with shut down defense and lights out shooting. Jon Christensen hit three straight 3 pointers on 3 possessions to cut the lead to 21-17 helping River Falls reel off a 25-4 run. While River Falls caught fire, La Crosse went ice cold from the field. UWL was only able to muster 4 points in the final 11 minutes and 31 seconds of the half going 2-17 in that span. For the half La Crosse shot just 32% (10-31) from the field including 1-9 from 3. River Falls only shot 31.7% (11-29) from the field but the Falcons made 6 3 pointers on 14 attempts to help them build a 31-25 lead at the half. Three point shooting was the key to the half

Shebly Hanewold The Racquet

Efforts from Jared Staege and Devin Yurk were not enough to help the Eagles overcome a poor shooting performance last Friday night

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along with UWL’s leading scorer Senior Jared Staege being forced to sit most of the half after picking up his second foul early on in the half. With Staege forced to sit the pine La Crosse struggled to find offense which combined with River Falls making shots made it tough for UWL to keep up. River Falls continued their hot shooting into the second half as they quickly pushed their lead up to 10 by a count of 38-28 on a Jack Herum 3-pointer. The Eagles cut the lead to 5, 43-38 on Junior Devin Yurk’s jumper. But River Falls always had the answer and went on a 15-2 run to give them their largest lead of the game at 58-40. The Eagles gave it one last push going on a 14-3 run capped off by Freshmen Brendon Manning’s layup to cut it to a 7 point game, 61-54, with just over four minutes left. But that was as close as the Eagles would get as River Falls hit their free throws down the stretch to ice the game. This was the third meeting between the teams, La Crosse swept the regular season series. 3 point shooting was the key to the game as the Falcons drilled 12-25 while UWL was 3-22. Jon Christensen had a game high 21 points on 7 3’s for the Falcons while Junior Devin Yurk who had 20 points paced the Eagles, Austin Fritz chipped in 13 points for UWL as well. Because of the loss, UWL ended up being left out of the NCAA tournament as they did not receive an “at-large” bid.

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