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R acquet The University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

IN THIS ISSUE: T h u r s d ay, D e ce m b e r 10, 2015

RACE ISSUES AT UW-L...page 2 Eagles wrestling dominates...PAGE 4 TRADITIONAL HOLIDAY MEALS...PAGE 3 w w w.t h e ra c q u e t . n e t

4 Pa g e s

S i n g l e Co p i e s Fr e e

Battle of the Books presents literary challenge By Stephanie Koss Senior Reporter

On Tuesday, Dec. 1, the second annual campus-wide Battle of the Books competition, sponsored by the School of Education, the English Department and Murphy Library, took place from 6:30 to 8:30 P.M. at Murphy Library. The competition at UW-La Crosse is modeled after the Battle of the Books competition that is seen in grades K-12. People form teams of three to four, read a list of selected books and then come together to test their knowledge by answering trivia questions at the competition. The team who answers the most questions correctly wins the competition. The books on the list include everything from historical fiction, supernatural mysteries, science fiction, graphic novels and much more, so there’s a little something for everyone. Some of the books from this year’s list included Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqeline Woodson, Mira in the Present Tense by Sita Brahmachari, Ungifted by Gordon Korman and The Thing About a Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin. The full book list can be viewed here: http://www.uwlax.edu/events-calendar/

?eventId=11527&date=20151201. This event first started last fall at UW-L when Ann Yehle, Assistant Professor of Education Studies, approached the library with the hopes of holding an event to celebrate young adult and teen literature. Linda Jerome, a Teen Librarian at the La Crosse Public Library, came up with the idea of having a Battle of the Books competition for college students, and thus, UW-L’s Battle

“The planning group also works to pick some really stellar books that people might not have heard of and cover a wide range of subjects, cultures, styles, and formats. We show the breadth and depth of material in the YA lit realm and the its potential to help students connect with nearly any subject.” Marc Manke Library Services Assistant of the Books competition was born. Marc Manke, Library Services Assistant at Murphy Library believes that there are many benefits to hosting and participating in this

competition. “First we wanted to generate interest in young adult lit. The planning group also

“I am a very competitive person so I love the trivia part of it, but the whole thing is just fun! You get to read some great books, meet other people who also enjoy reading, and learn as you are doing it.” Marc Manke Library Services Assistant works to pick some really stellar books that people might not have heard of and cover a wide range of subjects, cultures, styles and formats. We show the breadth and depth of material in the young adult lit realm and the its potential to help students connect with nearly any subject,” said Manke. The competition is also targeted at students in the School of Education to reinforce the value of young adult literature and to encourage them to share the benefits of young adult lit with their students in the classroom. The month of October each year is

celebrated as the “Month of the Adolescent,” and the collaborators figured that there’s no better way to celebrate young adolescents than by a book trivia competition. This year’s winners, answering the most questions correctly out of all the other participating teams, were Rebecca Lee, Aiyana Dettmann and Michelle Sturm. “I am a very competitive person, so I love the trivia part of it, but the whole thing is just fun! You get to read some great books, meet other people who also enjoy reading, and learn as you are doing it,” said Manke.

This year’s winners, answering the most questions correctly out of all the other participating teams, were Rebecca Lee, Aiyana Dettmann, and Michelle Sturm. Various sugary snacks and beverages were provided throughout the competition, as well as prizes awarded to the first, second and third place winners. Have questions regarding the competition or want to know more? Contact Marc Manke at mmanke@uwlax.edu or Ann Yehle at ayehle@uwlax.edu.

La Crosse Collegiate Recovery group screening: “The Anonymous People” By Clayton Kemp Associate Reporter

“We take the recovery step to another level of not so much just giving another avenue to the AA meetings, but creating a support system that some people need because they need that too,” said Isaac Michalski, one of the UW-La Crosse seniors in charge of the La Crosse Collegiate Recovery Group on

“We take the recovery step to another level of not so much just giving another avenue to the AA meetings, but creating a support system that some people need because they need that too.” Isaac Michalski UW-L Senior La Crosse Collegiate Recovery Group campus. This past Wednesday, Michalski, Jackie Chilsen and Dr. Marin hosted a showing

of “The Anonymous People,” a powerful documentary film dedicated to raising awareness of addiction. The showing was open to anyone willing to attend. It exposed addiction for what it really is: a disease. In the film, the facts were spewed out about the 23 million Americans living in recovery from addictions of some kind. It took it a step further by giving some of the American history of the long road that this large community has been on, and continues to be on, in order to lift the stigma from people suffering from addiction. The film tackles the idea of anonymity as it relates to addiction. It challenges the origins of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), which it hails as a great stepping-stone towards destigmatizing addiction, but it also brings into question whether or not people with addiction should feel that being anonymous about their condition is necessary. Lifting this stigma could begin with lifting the anonymity from the condition, and there were many testimonies by recovering celebrities, such as, Chris Herren and Kristen Johnston in the film. Both high profile names

set out to lift the mask on the disease either by way of writing or speaking to any audience

“There are people throughout the community that would want to be a part of this effort, so it’ s just a matter of trying to advocate for that.” Dr. Marin UW-L Professor willing to listen. Various collegiate recovery groups exist throughout the country as shown in the film,

“We just have to make it sustainable, and finding the stakeholders in the community that are proponents for it.” Isaac Michalski UW-L Senior La Crose Collegiate Recovery Group

and some were even featured in order to show their effectiveness in helping the student population escape the holds of addiction. UW-L has its own collegiate recovery group, and they are looking to grow and get the word out. Certain programs are featured in the film, such as Rutgers University, which highlights some of its individual student success stories of using such a support group to beat addiction. The support group here on campus is aiming to accomplish the same goals and to grow to the same level as programs like those at Rutgers. As Michalski and Marin said, “We just have to make it sustainable, and finding the stakeholders in the community that are proponents for it,” said Isaac. “There are people all throughout the community that would want to be a part of this effort, so it’s just a matter of trying to advocate for that.” The group functions as a social group and outlet those in need of an escape from the addictive influences of everyday life on campus. The program also does fun outtings and meets weekly at Common Ground.

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Word of the Week Gambol

to dance and skip about in play; to frolic The shepherdess watched her new lambs learn to gambol in the field.

Index

News. . . . . . . . . . .. 1 Viewpoint . . . . . . .2 Features . . . . . . . . .3 Sports. . . . . . . . . ....3

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Staff Reporters

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The Racquet 231 & 232 Cartwright Center 1725 State Street La Crosse, WI 54601 The Racquet is an Award-Winning Newspaper, achieving the Third Award for Best Editorial in 2010 and Second Award for Best Advertisement in 2009 through the Wisconsin Newspaper Association Foundation. The Racquet is a student-produced weekly newspaper distributed for the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. The editorial staff assumes full responsibility for content and policies. The Racquet values accuracy and will publish corrections if necessary; please send them to editor@ theracquet.net. Deadline for article submission is Friday by noon. The staff editorials contain the oppinions of the editorial staff only and do not represent the views of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. To advertise with The Racquet, please contact sales@theracquet.net. For general inquiries, contact editor@theracquet.net. Single copies are free to members of the UW-La Crosse, WTC, and Viterbo campus communities. Multiple copies can be acquired from The Racquet at a price to be determined by the publisher by contacting the Racquet business office. Newspaper theft is a crime and is subject to civil and criminal prosecution and/or university discipline.

Viewpoint

Ellie Brown Viewpoint Editor viewpoint@theracquet.net

The voice of the campus community is printed here

Thursday, december 10, 2015

How far is too far: Freedom of speech opinions at UW-L

By Megan Poczos Staff Reporter

Recently, there was somewhat of a scandal on campus with the incident regarding use of the Confederate flag. There has been a lot of controversy over whether or not faculty (including Chancellor Joe Gow) responded properly to the race issues on campus.

“To err is human and I think those of us who are expecting a non-offensive reaction from any of the faculty extremely quickly that is absurd.” The way I see it, yes, the Chancellor may have been able to address the issue earlier than he did, but we have to remember that he most likely wanted to make sure not to offend anyone with

his response as well as make sure he had all of the details of the situation. To err is human and I think those of us who are expecting a completely nonoffensive reaction from any of the faculty extremely quickly that is absurd. We should appreciate that the Chancellor took the time he needed in order to address the situation in its entirety rather than quickly and sloppily in order to appease everyone’s sense of timeliness. We also should remember that to deny the worker his Confederate flag is to deny his freedom of speech. This is a violation of the First Amendment. It may be that the flag makes some uncomfortable, but we have to come from a place of understanding in that the Confederate flag is a considerable artifact in some people’s culture and heritage. Yes, it is true that the South has a reputation and history of racial violence, but the Confederate flag does not represent hate to many people. To the majority, the flag represents a long tradition of family and heritage, and those who wave it only wish to address

Got organs? By Destiny Baitinger Staff Reporter

Do you remember years ago walking into the DMV to take your final drive in hopes of getting your license? There were many papers to fill out and numerous forms of identification; it was a mess for you at 16, 17, maybe even 18 years old. Now when you are required to go in and renew them, it seems like a breeze, right? Well, maybe that isn’t the case when you stop at the question that asks, “Do you wish to register to be an organ, tissue and eye donor?” It seems as though it would be easy enough. Well, by marking a big “X” into the no box, you, like others, are letting approximately 22 people end up on the waiting list to die without a transplant. This suddenly doesn’t seem so easy. The question seems to be buried in with all of the others asking you to identify yourself, but it gets me every single time. For many years, I was opposed. It was a strange idea to think that someone could walk around with my body parts, but then something changed.

“‘By marking the yes box, you could save someone’s greatest love, when you can no longer love.’” I went in to get my license and I was so wrapped up in how to answer the questions that I forgot to fill them in. I was of course sent back to my seat to wait in the ungodly long line, where I continued to think. The gentleman next to me saw my hesitation and said, “My wife is waiting for

a heart, you know. By marking the yes box, you could save someone’s greatest love, when you no longer can love.” I stopped in my tracks, and it seemed easy then to mark yes. There are many different spectrums to transplants. There are situations that happen when both people are alive, the recipient may need an organ in the near future, and any donor may agree. There are also organ donations and transplants that occur after death, which is what many agree to on their driver’s license. The bottom line is, we can’t begin to understand the extent of need, or even the magnitude of gratefulness that families feel after being cho-

“‘The reality is that the number of candidates waiting to continues to dwarf the number of donor organs available.’” sen. Organdonor.gov states it best: “The reality is that the number of candidates waiting continues to dwarf the number of donor organs available, and only you can change thisby registering as an organ, eye, and tissue donor.” Some may be very against donating. I was too. I encourage you to look into the facts, and even if they don’t convince you, find out what you can do to donate otherwise. The DMV has a great follow up question asking for a $2 donation. These organizations greatly need monetary donations to function and to be facilitated properly. The DMV isn’t the only way to become a donor either. There are ways to

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“To the majority, the flag represents a long tradition of family and heritage, and those who wave it only wish to address their Southern roots. ” their Southern roots. That is not to say that there are not racial issues on campus or that the faculty on campus do not care about said issues. The faculty on this campus is obviously very involved in this particular issue, and they would not be if they did not care. This issue would not have blown up as much as it did if the faculty were indifferent to the racial issues we are faced with. The bottom line is, we all come from different backgrounds and histories, and we should try our best to be as respectful as we can towards those cultures we do not come from or necessarily understand.

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December Holidays (besides Christmas) December 6: Saint Nicholas Day December 6-14: Hanukkah December 23: Festivus December 21: Yalda December 21: Soyal December 25L Quaid-e-Azam’s Day: December 21-25: Pancha Ganapati December 25: Newtonmas

December 26: Boxing Day December 28: Holy Innocents’ Day December 26-January 1: Kwanzaa New Year’s Eve: December 31 December 31: Hogmanay Saturnalia Yule Dongzhi Festival


Features

Ashley Voxland Features Editor features@theracquet.net

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Thursday, DECEMBER 10, 2015

Holiday cuisine: a delicious tour around the US By Alexandra Ronnestrand Staff Reporter

Turkey. Mashed potatoes. Stuffing. Pumpkin Pie. These traditional holiday meals are familiar to the Midwest but how familiar are they to other areas around the United States? Each region celebrates with holidays with some classic and unique meals. The Deep South is known for seafood and creole inspired food. Turkey and mashed potatoes can be found served around the holidays but often times, there is much more to be seen. Classic dishes like chicken, andouille, and oyster filé gumbo; it is a spicy soup filled with chicken, andouille sausage and fresh seafood. Each house may make their gumbo a little different from one another, but one thing they all have in common is that the meal is holiday favorite in many Southern homes.

Unlike the various pies found on Midwestern tables around the holidays, the south is quite familiar to the Mississippi Mud Cake. Believed to be originally originating the south, the cake is a dense sweet and fudge like dessert including marshmallows, cocoa, and pecans along with butter and various sugars. The savory and sweet after meal dessert leaves its southern families full and licking their lips of velvety chocolate. “Mele Kalikimaka is the thing to say on a bright Hawaiian Christmas day” but merry Christmas is accompanied by bright Hawaiian meals. Very much like the rest of the United States, Hawaii celebrates its holidays with a classic turkey, stuffing, and sweet potatoes. However, special twists make these all around dishes unique to the area Kalua Turkey is a staple piece to the dinner table. The dish basks for hours in seasoning then later sliced and dished with pineapple and other juices.

Hey UW-L! What do you want from Santa this year? By Miranda Martin Staff Reporter

Colin Malliet

“Tickets to the logic tour.” Maxwell Helo

Kalua Turkey is a staple piece to the [Hawaiian] dinner table. The dish basks for hours in seasoning then later sliced and dished with pineapple and other juice. year round including the holidays. Add a bit of these elements to make your next meal a little more Hawaiian. West coast states such as California, Washington, and Oregon incorporate fruits and seafood into their holiday traditional

“For everyone in my family to be happy and healthy.” Madison Johnson

By Sarah Busse Staff Reporter

“A big dog.” Sara Alarie

“Felt IA4 – a $5,499 triathalon bike.” Daniel Traverzo

meals. Dungeness crab is a must in California. Either butter or another sauce will served with the main dish making it an enjoyed dish by many Californians. Washington and Oregon include blueberries, cherries, apples, and other fruits into their feasts. It is no wonder since these states are the United States main source of fruits. Similar to all parts of America, Florida is highly influenced by its Cuban population. Cuban style pork and chicken have been adapted by the public including Cuban style bread, beans, and rice. Authentic holiday desserts are sweet just how most like their treats to be. Key Lime Pie and Orange Grove Pie are go-to recipes. Florida residents love their key lime pie and is a sure thing in spreading holiday cheer.

Do you want to build a perfect snowman?

Do you remember the joy of first snow fall as a child? The mad rush to put layer upon layer of clothing just to get outside? The taste of snowflakes on your tongue as you strain “More clothes and your neck back exposing your face to the cold in order to catch as many fluffy flakes as gas money.” Jessica Sisul possible? It can be hard to remember when snow is seen as an obstacle or chore. The struggle to try to make it to work or school on time becomes all the more really with the chilly substance piling higher and higher. The obligation to shovel the walkways and driveways slowly diminishes the appeal of ice crystals drifting down. Sometimes as we grow order we need to work a bit harder to see the magic in the “Free tuition.” Meledim Dejone world. One way is to try is to let your inner child shine through. Go play in the snow. Build that perfect snowman. The only things needed to build the perfect snow are sticky snow (which occurs close to 32C), a bit of space and a little creativity.

“My two front teeth.”

The island is full of fresh pineapple unlike any found on the mainland making the food extra tasty. Many of the state’s delicacies are filled other natural sweets such as coconut. Coconut pudding, coconut pie, and pineapple coconut cake are common desserts made all

There are many different options when it comes to [decorating]... Just keep in mind whatever you put on the snowman may go missing.

First start by making sure there is a decent amount of snow on the ground a few inches is not going to cut it. Also make sure the snow you have to work with is clean snow white snow rather than a dingy gray color “Clothes and a car.” which happens to snow as it has been around Hayley Williams a while. Next start by making a snowball by gathering a handful and patting it together

until it forms a ball. Then being to roll the ball on the ground making sure to switch of sides that you push from to insure as the ball of snow gets bigger it does become lopsided. Once you are satisfied it is large enough to

retrogrou.ch

be the base of the snowman, repeat the some process with progressively smaller balls of snow that with be become the middle and the head. Then place the middle on top of the base using snow where they meet to glue the pieces together; repeat this process again (Note: This is for building a traditional snowman. There are other was of arranging the body, such as upside down, just remember to consider gravity as factor when pursuing these other options). Finally comes the decorating. There are many different options when it comes to this. You can look around outside for sticks and rocks to add arms and facial features or you can raid closest for extra mittens, scarfs, and hats. You can also raid the fridge for a carrots nose. Just keep in mind whatever you put on the snowman may go missing. Lastly admire your creation with an optional, but highly encouraged, cup of hot cocoa. You now have a friendly face greeting you every time you come home reminding you of your inner child, well at least until the snow melts.

On a budget this season: making your own holiday gifts By Emily Hilby Staff Reporter

Ready or not, here it comes. The holidays are just around the corner. Time to start thinking about gift ideas for all the special

season. Here are a couple ideas to get your gifting adventure started. Like most cute do-it-yourself projects, I like to start with the cardinal item: a mason jar. With this one simple element you can create a number of heart-felt, cheap, and awesome gifts. What gets someone in the

With mason jars, the DIY gift possibilities are endless. Take some mod-podge and mix it with red or green glitter (or both) and smear on the outside of your mason jar and let dry. Once it’s done you’ll have a festive candleholder for someone special. celebratingsweets.com

people in your life. Save yourself from the dreaded holiday shopping and crowded malls this year, by DIYing the perfect gifts for every family member and friend! Save your cash, and spend some time crafting this holiday

holiday spirit better than some Christmas cookies? Take a mason jar with a twist off lid and fill layer by layer with all the dry ingredients needed to make a batch of your favorite cookies. Add to the merriment by using red and green m&ms to make it extra festive! Wrap with some Christmas ribbon,

and add a tag that explains the rest of the baking instructions. Ta-da! You have a cute gift that everyone is bound to love. Plus, it is super easy to make in large quantities, if you have the ingredients anyways you can knock out presents for plenty of people on your list at once!

popsugar.com

With mason jars, the DIY gift possibilities are endless. Take some mod-podge and mix it with red or green glitter (or both) and smear on the outside of your mason jar and let dry. Once it’s done you’ll have a festive candleholder for someone special. If nothing else you can use it as a cute container for small gifts, like a mini pedicure set: fill with a

nail clipper, file, and must-have polishes! Another great DIY gift project is to make personalized coasters. The first step is to pick up small white tiles (4x4 makes a great size) at your local home goods store, which typically cost less than a dollar each. Next, pick your personalization. You can do anything from funny photos to colorful scrapbooking paper; personalize it to your gift recipient for a gift that is sure to shock. Next use your leftover mod-podge from all of your mason jar DIY projects and coat the front of the tile with a thin layer using a foam brush. Then center and press a picture/paper to the tile and let dry for 20 minutes, then coat the top of the picture with a light coating of Mod Podge, brushing in just one direction. Let dry for another 20 minutes and then lightly coat again, sealing the top of the coaster and ensuring the photo is completely adhered to the tile. Gift giving doesn’t have to be so scary. Grab a jar, some glitter, some paint, and go to town. Remember the best gifts are the ones that come from the heart, and if for some reason your crafting abilities fail you, there’s always amazon.


Sports & Wellness Thursday, December 10, 2015

Eagles fall short against Dubuque By Alex VandenHouten Staff Reporter

The Eagles fell 77-68 to the Dubuque (Iowa) Spartans at Mitchell Fieldhouse on Wednesday. Both teams struggled shooting the ball in the first half with La Crosse shooting just 25% (11-44) from the field and Dubuque was just 31.4% (11-35). The Eagles were able to get off to a fast start and led 11-2 in the opening minutes paced by 6 points from Maggi Bishop. The fast start would not last long as the Spartans fought back behind Braana Steen and Abbey Meyer’s 5 points, and were able to cut La Crosse’s lead by the end of the first quarter to 3, with a score of 15-12. The Spartans tied it up at 17 to begin the second quarter, but Cameron Chapin’s 3-point play broke the tie to regain the lead. However, that lead was short lived as a Kara Enos jumper gave Dubuque their first lead of the game at 25-24. A 3-pointer from Steen gave the Spartans a 28-26 lead at halftime. Bishop led the Eagles with 8 while Steen led the Spartans with 10. Both teams came out of the half shooting the ball much better, as the Spartans led 35-33 with 8:33 left in the third quarter. But behind a couple of Allison Biermeier 3’s the Spartans went on a 19-6 run that was capped off by another 3 pointer by Braana Steen to push the lead to 54-39. The Eagles responded with forcing a turnover en route to a 9-0 run that ended with a Sierra Watrud layup to cut into the Spartan lead 54-48. An Emily Brinker free throw made it a 55-48 Spartan lead heading into the 4th quarter. To open up the final frame Rachel Atchison nailed a 3-pointer to breathe life into the Eagles and brought the Spartans lead down to 4. But once again Dubuque answered with a Steen layup and a Brinker 3 which pushed the lead back up to 10 and made it 63-53. La Crosse refused to give up as Kara Selk’s only bucket of the game brought it to 67-62 and Jenna Anderson’s steal and layup pulled the

game to within 2 with 2:14 remaining. This would be as close as the Eagles would get, as the Spartans were able to ice it by making their free throws and scoring 9 of the last 11 points in the game.

uwlax.edu

The Eagles were led by Rachel Atchison who scored a team-high 15 points, Maggi Bishop finished with her 5th career doubledouble with 12 points and 10 rebounds. The Eagles outrebounded the Spartans 6538, including 36 offensive rebounds and attempted 93 shots. But the Eagles couldn’t capitalize on the extra shots and only shot 31.2% (29-93) from the field. Braana Steen’s 22 points and Emily Brinker’s 18 points and 7 rebounds led the Spartans. The loss gives the Eagles a 3-4 record while the Spartans improved to 2-3 on the year. The Eagles play their next game Saturday, December 12th at Mitchell Hall against Carthage College.

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Eagles wrestling gives impressive performance By Dustin Skolaski Staff Reporter

The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse Wrestling team put together another stellar showing this Saturday with a dominant performance at the Candle Suite Duals. This was the first home match for UW-L who entered the day 2-1, with their only loss coming to the U.S. Air Force Academy, and posting an impressive #5 ranking in the NCAA Division 3 coaches poll.

This was the first home match for UW-L who entered the day 2-1. with... an impressive #5 ranking in the NCAA Division 3 coaches poll.

Rachel Atchison, UW-L Junior had a team leading 15 points for the Eagles

Justin Nichols Sports Editor sports@theracquet.net

The home crowd was very excited to see UW-L who already seems poised for an amazing season as they return a ton of contributors from last year’s squad with a lot of experience under their belt. Up first in the Candle Suite Duals, was Southwest Minnesota State University. The Weinmann’s were up first and they got the evening started on an exciting note as both Ryan (125) and Dustin (133) were able to win their matches by falls. Cody See and Mason Geary would both blank their opponents as See would win by decision and Mason would win by major decision to bank in the points for UW-L. The next two bowuts were much closer as Austin Schoen won by a single point and Clark Doyle won by 2. In the end, it didn’t matter if it was by an inch or a mile, those two wins gave 6 straight individual victories for UW-L and officially clinched the match against Southwest Minnesota State University. Taylor Schneider would come back and win in a major decision before UW-L would suffer their first defeat of the match as Alex Freidman would narrowly fall to a decision. Zach Tooley would come back and win a major decision before Clay Broze would fall for UW-L’s second and final loss of

the dual. The final point score was UW-L: 32, Southwest Minnesota State University: 6 The second opponent was a familiar foe for UW-L, Loras College. The Weinmann’s continued their opening match success with both winning by falls once again. The drama in this match came early as See was able to win a decision which came down to the wire by one point. Geary would blank his opponent before Schoen would fall by a major decision to give Loras their first and only victory of the dual. Doyle and Schneider would continue their winning ways as well before Freidman would avenge his loss earlier with an 8-0 major decision win. Tooley and Broze would continue the impressive showing for UW-L as they ended with a 39-4 victory over Loras. The final opponent, Saint John’s University, saw UW-L firing on all cylinders, as all wrestlers were victorious. Ryan Weinmann won by his third fall of the night, his brother Dustin, would not get a chance, as he would win by forfeit. Schneider would also win by fall, as he would take down his opponent in less than a minute with the official time coming in at 49 seconds.

UW-L has been dominating their unranked competition so far, so their next match... against #8 Luther College will be a very good benchmark for both teams as to where they stand. Right now, it’s a good bet UW-L will be standing pretty tall at the end of the season. UW-L has been dominating their unranked competition so far, so their next match which will be this Thursday against Luther College (currently ranked #8th in the NCAA D3 poll), will be a very good benchmark for both teams as to where they stand. Right now, it’s a good bet UW-L will be standing pretty tall at the end of this season.

Happy Holidays from The Racquet

12.10.2015  
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