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R acquet The University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

IN THIS ISSUE: T h u r s d ay, O c t o b e r 8 , 2015

DORM ROOM NIGHTMARE...page 2 Party drug Raves out depression...PAGE 3 FIX YOUR FALL UP RIGHT...PAGE 3 w w w.t h e ra c q u e t . n e t

4 Pa g e s

S i n g l e Co p i e s Fr e e

Open forum presents UW System challenges, strategies By Alex Johnson News Editor

At an open forum for the entire campus community, faculty, staff and students had a chance to take part in a Q and A session with Chancellor Joe Gow. The session, composed mostly of academic staff and department personnel, raised questions regarding possible higher pay, the UW System as a whole, admissions and upcoming and current building projects taking place on campus. During the discussion involving higher pay for academic staff and faculty, Gow noted, “We think compensation is our biggest challenge, and we want to pay people more. [The University] wants to be more competitive with pay, but in the political environment, how can we get that done?” To help alleviate stress on university employees’ concern for higher pay, including

professors and employees in offices such as Financial Aid, “a pool of money has been identified, a total 2% of our budget that we can allocate. We are looking at every person at the University on an individual base, and we will have a merit component for faculty,

“We think compensation is our biggest challenge, and we want to pay people more. [The University] wants to be more competitive with pay, but in the political environment, how can we get that done?” UW-L Chancellor Joe Gow which the System added in. Of course, this is highly political, and we discussed this all with the president of the UW system, Ray Cross.”

In addition to Gow addressing higher pay, Bob Hetzel, UW-L’s Vice President of Administration and Finance, spoke about the original plan for raising wages. “All of our plans, the Budget Council and Joint Planning and Budget, took a budget overcut to the tune of 1.5 million plus dollars so that every employee could get at least 1%. That was our goal. That would have been across the board, because all of our employees are all underpaid. [University staff] all work extremely hard, and we don’t compensate enough,” said Hetzel. In addition to the original 1% pay increase, the university wanted to use the $750,000 restored funds for an additional 1% to be used for university staff. “At this point, we were called into a meeting with President Cross and he said ‘We understand the problems with compensation but the system cannot enact something that

Hixon trails cleanup

Campus gets connected By Elena Montanye Copy Editor

In past years, the UW-La Crosse staff have updated the community agency guide once per school year to introduce students to non-profit organizations seeking volunteers. Although the project had all the right intentions, it quickly became outdated as needs changed, making it more difficult for interested students to find opportunities to lend their services to the community. This year, there is a new and improved way for students to find volunteer opportunities: Ugetconnected. The project officially launched last week, providing opportunities to students at UW-L, Viterbo and Western Technical College. By searching ugetconnected.org, interested students may search for local non-profits in need of extra help. The opportunities listed may be ongoing volunteer projects or simply one-day events, so students can choose how

“To be able to get out to a broader spectrum of people, to have all the non-profit agencies together, truly is a huge benefit to the community.” President Eve Zellmer Capable Canines much time they are willing to commit. One of the many organizations connected through the partnership is Capable Canines, a non-profit that trains service dogs to work with disabled individuals. President Eve Zellmer is excited about the potential of Ugetconnected. “To be able to get out to a broader spectrum of people, to have all the non-profit agencies together, truly is a huge benefit to the community,” she said. Capable Canines is just one of many nonprofits that often utilize the time and talents of college students. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the 7 Rivers Region, Boys and Girls Club of La Crosse, Children’s Miracle Network Hospital, 231 & 232 Cartwright Center 1725 State Street La Crosse, WI 54601

The Coulee Region Humane Society and dozens more agencies have created profiles on Ugetconnected to reach out to the volunteers that keep their organizations afloat. Zemmler noted that organizations are thrilled to have any and all help they can get, saying “We love finding fresh faces to help out.”

By searching ugetconnected.org, interested students may search for local non-profits in need of extra help. The opportunities listed may be ongoing volunteer projects or simply one-day events, so students can choose how much time they are willing to commit. By logging onto the website, users can sort through the dozens of postings to find opportunities that best fit their interests. They can search by date posted, agency or interests, and all the information stays updated and relevant. Each organization that posts has created a profile page describing a bit about their organization’s mission statement and the help they are most in need of, in addition to contact information and how to get involved. The website also provides students the opportunity to log their personal volunteer hours online. This feature is ideal for those keeping track of hours for a class or a club, saving time and avoiding missed hours. Volunteer résumés can be created to keep tabs on every community service activity the student has done throughout their college career. To get involved with the La Crosse community, go to ugetconnected.com or contact involvement@uwlax.edu to answer any questions.

To get involved with the La Crosse community, go to ugetconnected. com.

reflects a pay plan,’ meaning everybody gets something,” he stated. Further questions were brought up concerning the admissions rate for UW-L. The most recent incoming class had a total of 2,054 students, an increase from the previous year. The international student rate, however, dropped significantly, but the Admissions Office said they are trying to “get those numbers back to where they were.” In the closing minutes of the Q and A session, Hetzel also discussed the numerous amount of building projects taking place on campus currently or in the very near future. The new Student Center, being built directly beside Wimberly Hall, has an estimated holiday opening in Dec. 2016, officially opening for the campus in Jan. 2017. In the upcoming years, a remodel for the Annette Theatre is planned in the Center for the Arts, giving a more modern, updated feel.

By Stephanie Koss Staff Reporter

Members of the UW-La Crosse Men’s and Women’s Cross Country team are participating in a cleanup effort on the Hixon Forest trails. The 7 Rivers Region Outdoor Recreation Alliance of La Crosse are constantly working to maintain and upkeep the trails. One of our own professors, Dr. Scott Cooper, is heavily involved in the Hixon cleanup efforts through the 7 Rivers Alliance. Derek Stanley, the head coach of the Men’s and Women’s Cross Country Team, found out about the trail cleanup efforts through Dr. Cooper’s involvement. “Hixon is used by many people, and it experiences frequent use by our team. There is a responsibility to take care of the trails. The trails in Hixon vary in surface terrain and need regular work, especially after heavy rain or rapid spring melt,” said Stanley. So what exactly the cross-country team is doing in order to help clean up these trails? Stanley explained that in their most recent work session, the team was split into multiple groups in order to prep the trails for a bike race taking place that weekend. “Two groups were filling ruts on the newly constructed road, another one was clearing overgrown areas of the trails, and another group was clearing rock from a steep hill on

“Hixon is used by many people, and it experiences frequent use by our team. There is a responsibility to take care of the trails. ” Derek Stanley Cross Country Team Coach the bike route,” explained Stanley. The cross-country team participates in this community service project annually. Because the team utilizes the Hixon trails so frequently for their practices, the team,

Word of the Week Bailiwick

a special domain The kitchen was Paul’s bailiwick; he perfected a Baked Alaska at age seven.

especially head coach Derek Stanley, feels that they owe something back to the beautiful trails of Hixon Forest. “We are committed to community service

“Two groups were filling ruts on the newly constructed road, another one was clearing overgrown areas of the trails, and another group was clearing rock from a steep hill on the bike route.” Derek Stanley Cross Country Team Coach

but in particular to this project because our program owes it to Hixon. The trails do a great job of comforting us, caring for us, and nurturing our development as runners, and our athletes want to pay Hixon back,” he said. The 7 Rivers Region Outdoor Recreation Alliance is committed to providing “worldclass” recreational activities and opportunities for everyone in the coulee region, whether that may be cycling, kayaking, mountain biking, cross-country skiing, hiking, birdwatching, sailing, and much more. ORA wants as many people as possible to be able to take advantage of these wonderful opportunities provided to us by the area’s glorious water bodies, expansive bluffs, and marvelous terrain. Together, these elements place a charming natural world upon us in La Crosse, one that is quite hard to come by anywhere else. Since 1999, the ORA has provided the framework for the creation of new multiuse trails in the coulee region. These trails are found in a variety of areas, including municipalities, counties, townships, river authorities, state parks, and many more. If you would like to get involved with helping to clean up and restore the trails of Hixon Forest, contact the 7 Rivers Region Outdoor Recreation Alliance at www.naturesplacetoplay.com for more information.

Index

News. . . . . . . . . . .. 1 Viewpoint . . . . . . .2 Features . . . . . . . . .3 Sports. . . . . . . . . ....3

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Viewpoint

The

RacqueT Editorial Board

Heidi Gempeler | Editor-in-Chief gempeler.heid@uwlax.edu Danielle Cook| News Editor news@theracquet.net Alexander Johnson| News Editor news@theracquet.net Ellie Brown | Viewpoint Editor viewpoint@theracquet.net Ashley Voxland | Features Editor features@theracquet.net Justin Nichols | Sports/Health Editor sports@theracquet.net Henry Halling | Online Editor online@theracquet.net Mary Purdy | Copy Editor purdy.mary@uwlax.edu Elena Montanye | Copy Editor montanye.elen@uwlax.edu Alesha Cody | Graphic Designer cody.ales@uwlax.edus

Staff Reporters

Dustin Skolaski, Stephanie Koss, Alexis Zuel, Nicole Witt, Tyler Frickson, Emily Hilby

Art and photo staff

Photographer | Madeline Alden, Shelby Hanewold, Carly Juzwik, Dang Ton, Quinn Burzynski

Business staff

Blaire Thielen | Advertising Director thielen.blaire@uwlax.edu Michaela Burton | Publicity Director burton.mich@uwlax.edu Bailey Krueger | Business Director sales@theracquet.net

The voice of the campus community is printed here

Thursday, october 8, 2015

Ellie Brown Viewpoint Editor viewpoint@theracquet.net

Dorm room nightmare

By Ellie Brown Viewpoint Editor

Put yourself back into the state of mind you had the summer before you came to college. You were excited, nervous and more than anything else, ready to be out of your parents’ house. Then you get the email that tells you where you’ll be living this semester; it’s a study packed with five other people. That doesn’t sound like any stereotypical college movie you’ve ever seen. How did this happen?

“Apparently, the solution to over-enlisting studentsis to jame too many people in studies and double rooms.” Each year at UW-La Crosse, it seems like enrollment grows and the student population increases with it. To accommodate the higher number of students, dorms become stuffed to the max, especially with freshmen. Students are required to spend one full year in the dorms, excepting for special circumstances, and are typically encouraged to stay for their sophomore years as well. The housing market is competitive, especially since most students feel urged to sign a

lease by the end of September. I know I panicked last year when I didn’t sign mine until mid-October. Apparently, the solution to over-enlisting students is to jam too many people in studies and double rooms. The double rooms, which are supposedly built to accommodate two people, are expected to squish in three. I remember my movein day, knowing I was living in a triple double. We arrived, sweaty because of the sweltering heat and lack of air conditioning, and nervous. When I walked in, most of my roommates stuff was already unpacked. I was incredulous. There was barely any room to move! A desk was shoved under one loft, our tv balanced precariously on the refrigerator and one of my roommates sacrificed almost all of her dresser space in favor of a microwave. Not to mention that we rarely ever had privacy or room for clutter. Now the studies are larger, but the name implies what they’re actually supposed to be used for; studying. By using studies as bedrooms, it effectively takes away a much needed study space as well as discourages floors to get to know each other. Instead, five girls or boys are crammed into there, lofts and desks littering a room set up with tall windows. They allow for almost no privacy and there are constantly other people around you. To

South Park set to stun By Henry Halling Online Editor

The infamous duo, Matt Stone and Trey Parker, have started their 19th season of South Park! Without giving away too many spoilers, the first two episodes include the likes of Caitlyn Jenner, political correctness, references to Bill Cosby, Subway Jared, Tom Brady and Deflate Gate, intolerance of immigrants, Donald Trump and Canadians. Episodes are available to view for free on southpark.cc.com, and are released every two weeks on Wednesday nights at 9 p.m. If anything can be said from their first several episodes of the season, it looks to be a good one!

awards, it has made quite a name for itself. If you haven’t already seen it, it is definitely something to check out. Their songs are enormously catchy and can be found on iTunes. Tickets for the Broadway hit start (online) for $99. If you aren’t ready to shell out money to see it on Broadway, a big-screen version of the musical is in the works by Important Studios; the production company founded by Stone and Parker. The two are infamous for their secrecy about their activities, so the release date is still in the air at this point, but after seeing the travelling show in Chicago, I can speak for myself- the movie will not disappoint!

“Along with the release of the newest season of South Park, their musical, The Book of Mormon, continues its enormous success on Broadway.” Along with the release of the newest season of South Park, their musical, The Book of Mormon, continues its enormous success on Broadway, having grossed in already at three hundred and seventy million dollars since its release in 2011. The winner of nine Tony

bookofmormonbroadway.com

Subscriptions To reserve your issue of The Racquet, call us at (608) 785-8378. Single issues are free on campus or available by mail for a subscription fee. SPRING 2015: 15 issues for $30 FULL YEAR: 30 issues for $50

The Racquet 231 & 232 Cartwright Center 1725 State Street La Crosse, WI 54601 The Racquet is an Award-Winning Newspaper, achieving the Third Award for Best Editorial in 2010 and Second Award for Best Advertisement in 2009 through the Wisconsin Newspaper Association Foundation. The Racquet is a student-produced weekly newspaper distributed for the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. The editorial staff assumes full responsibility for content and policies. The Racquet values accuracy and will publish corrections if necessary; please send them to editor@ theracquet.net. Deadline for article submission is Friday by noon. The staff editorials contain the oppinions of the editorial staff only and do not represent the views of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. To advertise with The Racquet, please contact sales@theracquet.net. For general inquiries, contact editor@theracquet.net. Single copies are free to members of the UW-La Crosse, WTC, and Viterbo campus communities. Multiple copies can be acquired from The Racquet at a price to be determined by the publisher by contacting the Racquet business office. Newspaper theft is a crime and is subject to civil and criminal prosecution and/or university discipline.

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some, this is preferred. You might meet your best friends there and love the constant interaction. To others, it’s a nightmare. Other roommates constantly leaving their things all over the room, waking up for 7:45 a.m. classes when you don’t have to wake up until 9 a.m. Maybe you like to go out on the weekends and you know one of your roommates

“Quality housing should be a right for our tuition, not a privelege. ” hates it when you come in late. There are enough horror stories on the Internet about traditional dorm living; I can’t imagine how many there are detailing problems with multiple roommates. Most of the dorm rooms on campus are pretty small. It takes everyone a while to get used to them. But by forcing too many people into that small space, where the heater sounds like rocks are being poured down it, air conditioning is (mostly) nonexistent and the hallways are always loud, it creates a stressful environment for living. Quality housing should be a right for our tuition, not a privilege.

On this day in history...

• 1871: The Great Chicago Fire happened on this day over 200 years ago. It burned for three days before burning out on October 10th. • 1919: The first transcontinental air race in the United States begins, with 63 planes competing between California and New York. • 1929: A Man is Charged of Speaking Offensively in Front of a Lady and found guilty for using obscene language in front of a woman in Ohio. • 1952: Three trains crashed at Harrow in North London with over 80 dead and many more injured. • 1970: In Sweden, the Russian writer, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, won the Nobel Prize for literature. • 1998: The U.S. House of Representatives voted to proceed toward impeaching President Bill Clinton on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice in cases concerning Arkansas real estate deals. • 2004: Martha Stewart is sentenced to five months in prison and five months of home confinement in addition to a $30,000 fine and was sent to the minimum-security facility in West Virginia—known as “Camp Cupcake.” • 2005: A massive 7.6-magnitude earthquake strikes Azad Kashmir leaving an estimated 70,000 dead and 70,000 more injured. More than 3 million were left homeless and without food and basic supplies.

Do you have any article ideas for The Racquet? Let us know by emailing editor@theracquet.net! Classified Would you like to advertise any Classified Adveritsements with The Racquet? Email editor@theracquet.net for more information.


Features

Ashley Voxland Features Editor features@theracquet.net

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Thursday, OCTOBER 8, 2015

Happy fall, y’all

Five ways to make the most out of your autumn season By Emily Hilby Staff Reporter

2.) Host a Movie Marathon

Fall is in the air. The leaves are falling, the aroma of pumpkin spice is everywhere, sweaters are being pulled from the back of closets and football is on TV. What is not to love about autumn? Being located in Wisconsin, we know this weather won’t last long, so before you get nestled in for a long winter, make sure to take some time to enjoy all the wonderful things that come with this crisp fall season. Here are some things you can do to make this fall one for the books.

1.) Bluff Hike when the Leaves are Changing

When things turn chilly at night, snuggle into your coziest sweater and turn to the tube for some of the best shows of the year. Hocus Pocus is always a classic, or you could relive your childhood by watching all four of Disney Channels “Halloweentown” movies. It’s also the best time of the year for horror films, so grab some Halloween Oreos and get ready because scary movies are always just a little bit scarier this time of the year.

5.) Carve a Pumpkin

Cliché, but how can you make it through the entire month of October without digging your hands into a pumpkin? It’s the

3.) Go to a Haunted house

Nothing feels more like fall than going to a haunted house. Looking for one in the area? Fearwater farm is having their annual “Freak Haven” hosted by the Onalaska Jaycee’s. Go on a Thursday and bring your student ID and admission is only $5. Opening Oct. 16, Freak Haven should be your one stop fright-fix for this fall.

4.) Knit Something

uwex.edu

The bluffs are scenic no matter what time of the year it is, but there’s something a little more magical about a bluff hike just as the leaves are changing colors. You get to crunch through the leaves on your way up, the air is brisk and cool, which eliminates all the sweat related thoughts one normally associates with hiking and the view when you get to the top is unparalleled. Grab your camera and your friends because the scenery will be something you’ll definitely want to share.

of knitting. It’s relaxing, it’s a good skill to learn and it makes for dexterous hands. There’s really no downside. If you pick it up quick, then you have the perfect Christmas presents for your loved ones. If you don’t? Well, then at least you can say you gave it the good old college try.

interurbanarthouse.com

It might be the weather or knowledge that winter is coming, but for some reason, fall is the best time to knit. Knit a sweater or a blanket, or if your skills are lack-luster, just knit for the sake

PUZZLE

CAN YOU KEN-KEN?

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perfect study break or excuse to avoid studying all together. Grab a knife and a stencil and get artsy! Whether you live in a residence hall, a house or an apartment, every stoop looks a little bit better with a pumpkin on it. Get creative and make your living environment more festive with your wonderful creations! Whether you stick to these five, or have your own fall bucket list, make sure to take the time to enjoy it. Fall only sticks around for so long, so grab your sweater and your pumpkin spice latte and breathe in that crisp air before it’s gone. Happy fall y’all.

GrinBin

SUDOKU

Performing ‘Proof’

UW-L theatre explores the mind of a genius By Kelsey Norton Guest Reporter

The UW-La Crosse Department of Theatre Arts presents David Auburn’s Proof, a play focused on the chemistry of relationships in a family of brilliant mathematicians, but no worries, you don’t need to have an A in calculus to enjoy it. Winner of the 2001 Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award for Best Play, Proof explores the past and present world of Catherine, a brilliant young woman haunted by both the mathematical genius of her recently deceased father and the mental illness she fears that she may have inherited from him. However, when a mathematical proof of historic proportions is discovered within her father’s work, Catherine’s relationships with her controlling sister and a new romance fall apart. Through fear and distrust, Catherine struggles to mend the relationship she has with herself. Senior Olivia Dubiel, a double major in Theatre Performance and English Education, welcomes the intensity of playing Catherine in UWL’s production. “It’s been a challenge to incorporate the role that mental illness plays in the piece. In every scene we are either unstable or dealing with a person who is.” She says. Dubiel is one of four total members in the all-senior cast who has put countless hours in and out of rehearsal towards researching mental illness, grief, and what it means to be a family. Proof challenges the audience to think compassionately, while also forcing them to laugh from the sarcastic nature of the characters. Although this show is fitting for any audience member, Dubiel finds it particularly important for the students at UW-L.

“We constantly have to prove that we are smart, that we are useful to society, that we have a plan for our lives that is considered ‘successful’,” she says. “[Proof] is a story that every college student needs to witness as

“We constantly have to prove that we are smart, that we are useful to society, that we have a plan for our lives that is considered ‘successful’. [Proof] is a story that every college student needs to witness as they are discovering who they are at their core.” Olivia Dubiel UW-L Senior

they are discovering who they are at their core.” Proof will play at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16-17 and Oct. 22-24 with matinee performances at 2:00 p.m. on Oct. 18 and 25 in Toland Theatre in the Center for the Arts at 16th and Vine streets. Tickets go on sale at 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. 12. Box office hours are 1 to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays, and one hour before show times. Tickets are $16 for adults, $14 for senior/non UWL students and $5 for UW-L students; call (608) 785-8522.

If you go... What: Proof by David Auburn Where: Toland Theatre When: October 16-17 & 22-24 at 7:30 p.m. and October 18 & 25 at 2:00 p.m. Admission: $16 for adults, $14 for senior citizens and non-UWL students, $5 UW-L students. Tickets go on sale at 1:00 p.m. Monday, October 12.


Sports & Wellness

Justin Nichols Sports Editor sports@theracquet.net

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Thursday, October 8, 2015

Volleyball team scores another victory By Dustin Skolaski Staff Reporter

The UW-La Crosse women’s volleyball team continued it’s WIAC conference play on Wednesday night in Mitchell Hall with another thrilling five set victory over a quality opponent. This time against the Blue Devils of UW-Stout. The return to Mitchell Hall was greeted by UW-L as they had previously finished up a dual in Illinois that saw UW-L not drop a game as they won six straight sets against out of conference competition. The opening set was tied midway through when UW-L began to pull away and would use smart defense and great serving to take the first set, something UW-L had trouble with when they began conference play as the dropped the first two sets. The early success would not continue as UW-Stout would come from behind and win despite a 21-20 lead by UW-L. UW-L and UW-Stout would battle once again in the third set with the score evened at 20 when UW-L volleyball player Ashley Entinger recorded three straight kills to take a 23-20 and put away the set for good measure with another kill. UW-L darted out to a 4-0 lead in the 4th set and hoped to put the game away and avoid the 15 point tie breaker set but UW-Stout would not have any of it as they responded in lightning fashion to wrestle away the lead

“We have potential to win the conference tournament and we have the potential to reach the NCAA Tournament. We need to come out strong at the start of the match and play steady throughout” Lily Hallock UW-L Head Women’s Volleyball Coach from UW-L and would eventually take the 4th set to split the match at two sets apiece and force the tiebreaker. UW-L would jump ahead in the final set and hit well enough to win while UW-Stout

definitely were not on top of their game as UW-L took the final set and improved their overall record to 12-4 overall and 2-0 in conference play.

This UW-L team knows how to win. They’ve won the back and forth matches and they’ve wom in dominating fashion. This UW-L team knows how to win. They’ve won while being from behind, they’ve won the back and forth matches and they’ve won in dominating fashion. The team which has already surpassed its win total from last season looks poised to do things the program hasn’t done in a while.

uwlax.edu

Lily Hallock, UW-L Head Volleyball Coach

Coach Lillian Hallock said, “We have potential to win the conference tournament and we have the potential to reach the NCAA Tournament. We need to come out strong at the start of the match and play steady throughout.” Only time will truly tell what UW-L can accomplish but with great play and contributions from key and role players the sky truly is the limit for the Eagles.

Nothing to play with By Nicole Witt Staff Reporter

Three of the most common injuries are bruises, sprains and strains. For athletes, the risk is insurmountably increased. But these can happen to anyone and do happen to everyone. One of the most common sprains occurs in the ankle. A sprain happens when there is a stretching or tearing in one or more ligaments. It could happen by just a simple misstep. Though these injuries typically would not require serious medical treatment. But, there seems to be a longer term affect from these injuries. Most people wipe it off and forget about it once it is healed, but try to think twice. For walking, people need the use of their ankles. They allow fluid movement. But it can be a quite vulnerable spot. Ankles are not typically as strong as people assume. The most common after effects are having really stretched out ligaments. This allows the ankle to move farther than normal. And once stretched, they do not bounce back to their normal shape and more unstable. Also, because there is a looser connection in the ligament, there is a slower connection to the brain. The brain needs connection to the entire body for coordination and movement. The slower connection to the ankle causes a loss of coordination, therefore, increasing the risk of seeing the injury again.

The injury can aso cause a domino effect. After the injury, the ankle can become stiffer. Then the ankle loses more of a range of motion, and the body acts to compensate...

The injury can also cause a domino effect. After the injury, the ankle can become stiffer. Then the ankle loses more of a range of motion, and the body acts to compensate and potentially cause damage or injury to other parts of the body like legs or hips. The compensating could also cause back problems. Dr. Tricia Hubbard-Turner of University of North Carolina at Charlotte did a study

in which she monitored students who have chronic ankle instability-which results from ankle sprains- and students without injuries. In the results, she found the students with the instability walked a lot less than students without injury. Though the study was a

Special K: Not just for breakfast anymore By Tyler Frickson Staff Reporter

There is a new mind-altering drug that is making its way into the anti-depressant field that could potentially change the way that some doctors treat depression: ketamine. With research continuing to be done on this supposed wonder drug, ketamine has been shown to be able to relieve severe levels of depression in a few short hours, thus encouraging doctors to give this to some of their more unstable patients. The trick, however, is that this is all being done without ketamine being approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating depression. David Feifel, a professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego said, “It became clear to me that the future of psychiatry was going to include ketamine or derivatives of ketamine” after he had begun administering the drug to his patients in 2010. Originally, ketamine was developed to be used as an anesthetic and was able to eventually receive FDA approval in 1970. However, several decades later the drug developed into a popular psychedelic club drug, otherwise known as “Special K.” Later, in 2006, a team from the National Institute of Mental Health then published a significant study which showcased that even a single intravenous does of ketamine produced significant as well as rapid antidepressant effects within a few hours.

media.npr.org

David Feifel, Professor of Psychiatry

depression would disappear like magic after a dose of ketamine…we could never get it to sustain beyond maybe a day.” Beth Hellenbrand, a senior at UW-L, said, “I think that ketamine needs to be regulated and investigated more thoroughly. The side effects sound risky and the public should have more information available.” This is the risk that many doctors are taking with prescribing this drug. With the FDA

Later, in 2006, a team from the National Institute of Mental Health then published a significant as well as rapid antidepressant effects within a few hours Since this time, there are now thousands of depressed patients who currently receive “off-label” treatment for depression. Currently, the drug is difficult to receive officially because it is still in the experimental stage, and many of those who desire to be a part of the research study suffer depression and can occasionally have suicidal thoughts, thus removing them from the possible pool of people. This is because doctors refuse to prescribe a mind-altering drug to a person with a mental illness. However, there are some risks to this new potential drug. Since this medication has a history of being used as a party drug, it is classified as having addictive tendencies. This can be attributed to its use as an anesthetic for children who arrive in the emergency room with broken bones. Another risk to consider is how its effects vary from person to person. Feifel remarked, “One patient whose

tradexshop.com

Intraveneous injections of Ketamine can have lasting effects on depression

holding off on approval until after extensive testing, it will be difficult to determine how successful this drug can actually be. The trick will not be how it makes someone feel in the short term with mild forms of hallucinations; rather, it will be how it can benefit a person in the long run and stave off those dark feelings of depression in the long term.

Do you know of any outstanding student athletes? kinesiology.uncc.edu/

Dr. Tricia Hubbard-Turner, Department of Kinesiology UNC Charlotte

shorter term one, it still showed the effects of the injury. If these can be seen very early after the healing, one could only begin to imagine the affects later in life or just in a longer term. Even at a considerably young age, sophomore Tara Scott sees the effects of ankle sprains on herself and keeps it in mind for future potential activity. Scott said, “I feel that after my first sprain, which occurred in about fourth grade, my ankles have never been as strong as they were before the sprain. This weakness has forced me to be careful in the activities that I choose to do because my ankles sprain so easily now.” There are ways to help prevent longer term damage. For those who have not had an ankle injury, the best way to prevent is to build up strength and balance. One can try this by just standing on one foot on flat ground. Some athletes train with a flat foam mat to add difficulty. Otherwise, even if there has been an injury, all hope is not lost. If there is any concern about the state of the injury,

Email editor@theracquet.net with the student’s name, year at UWL, and a description of why you think this student athlete should be recognized in our newspaper!

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