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VolUME 9 Issue 4 // 2012 Roberts

randall everett’s masters track walk for vet class riders

pamx spring series finale Wrapping up points at pvr

final pamx points •

pro-action •

vinnie luhovey •

industry goods

Lantzer #98

1

the racing paper


2

the racing paper


regulars contributor

features the road more traveled

Hall

You do not need to be at least 48” tall to enjoy this ride. Doublin Gap was home to all the little bikes when they hosted the Northeast Youth Regional Qualifier in late June. Fast things can come in small packages.

sign up pamx schedule next exit flashpoint front & center bar-to-bar Virtual Trainer Hill

public address

the new blackwater Only the brave line up to take on America’s new toughest offroad race: Snowshoe GNCC. The race, which is nestled in the Cheat Mountain range, is considered to be the closest challenge to what the legendary Blackwater 100 used to be.

premix take 5 inventory tapped out sandbagger hall of fame

Roberts

editor / art director: Jordan Roberts

randall everett’s masters track walk Randall Everett teaches the +30 guys the do’s and don’ts through every section of the track at Tomahawk. The only thing he forgot is the segment about proper goon riding.

Staff Lens: Cudby, aFred Staff Pens: Jen Ken, Chase Stallo Head Honcho: davey coombs Boss Guy: bryan stealey Boss Girl: julie kramer advertising: Tim Crytser accounts: jerri headlee Intern: Taylor Dressler voice of reason: rita coombs Contributing Photographers: Mimi Greiner, Lauren Hall, ken hill, Arlene Lantzer #98, Zak Lowery Contributing writers: Timmy Coombs, Tim Crytser, Arlene Lantzer, Tyler Newcomer Cover Photo by Lauren hall the racing paper 122 vista del rio drive, morgantown, wv 26508 tel 304.284.0080 | fax 304.284.0081 | theracingpaper.com The riders appearing in this newspaper are, for the most part, skilled amateurs or highly trained individuals with experience racing and operating motorcycles. Please don’t try to imitate them. When you ride a motorcycle or all-terrain vehicle, always wear a helmet, eye protection and the appropriate safety gear. Never ride beyond your capabilities. Use your head, be safe and enjoy the ride. The Racing Paper publishes six issues annually by World Sports Holdings, LLC. Our editorial office is located at 122 Vista Del Rio Drive, Morgantown, WV 26508. Copyright ©2012 Filter Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing in this newspaper may be reprinted in whole or in part without the express written permission of the publisher. Editorial contributions are welcomed, but must be guaranteed exclusive to The Racing Paper. We are not responsible for the return of unsolicited material. Letters cannot all be answered, nor can all service inquiries be answered. We appreciate correspondence sent to our editorial office and will use the most interesting and appropriate letters in the newspaper. Email letters to: jordan@racerxonline.com

Advertising: Please call Tim Crytser at 407-748-4663

Lantzer #98

spring series finale The PAMX Spring Series ended with a two-day romp through the turns of Pleasure Valley Raceway. Arlene and Mimi tag teamed this event WWF style with a barrage of photos from the event.


WATCH ON FEATURING EPISODE DATE

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

6/17/12 6/24/12 7/1/12 7/1/12 7/8/12 7/15/12 8/19/12 9/2/12 9/9/12 9/16/12 9/23/12 9/30/12 10/7/12 10/14/12 10/21/12 10/28/12 11/4/12 11/11/12 11/18/12 11/25/12 12/2/12 12/9/12 12/9/12 12/16/12 12/16/12 12/23/12 12/23/12 12/30/12 1/6/13 1/6/13 1/13/13 1/13/13 1/20/13 1/20/13 2/3/13 2/3/13 2/10/13 2/10/13

TIME (ET)

RACE LOCATION

RACE

3:30 PM 5:30 PM 4:30 PM 5:00 PM 4:30 PM 4:30 PM 4:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 6:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 4:00 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

Morganton, NC Blountville, TN Union, SC Union, SC Budds Creek, MD Park City, KY Park City, KY Walnut, IL Springville, IN Springville, IN Hurricane Mills, TN Hurricane Mills, TN Oakland, KY Masontown, WV Masontown, WV Mt. Morris, PA Millfield, OH Snowshoe, WV Snowshoe, WV New Berlin, NY Millfield, OH Buchanan, MI Hurricane Mills, TN Millfield, OH New Berlin, NY New Berlin, NY St. Clairsville, OH St. Clairsville, OH Crawfordsville, IN Crawfordsville, IN Hurricane Mills, TN Hurricane Mills, TN

GNCC Bike ATVMX GNCC ATV GNCC Bike ATVMX GNCC ATV GNCC Bike ATVMX GNCC ATV GNCC Bike MX MX ATVMX GNCC ATV GNCC Bike ATVMX ATVMX GNCC ATV GNCC Bike ATVMX GNCC ATV ATVMX ATVMX GNCC Bike GNCC ATV GNCC Bike GNCC ATV GNCC Bike GNCC ATV GNCC Bike GNCC Bike GNCC ATV GNCC UTV/Utility GNCC UTV/Utility GNCC UTV/Utility GNCC UTV/Utility GNCC UTV/Utility GNCC UTV/Utility

CATCH UP ON EPISODES AT WWW.RACERTVONLINE.COM Schedule subject to change.

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the racing paper


USA

Sign Up Letters to the Editor

I just received a copy of Issue 3 of The Racing Paper. I am pleased by the write-up you gave us for Round 2. I am honored by your mention of me as operations manager for Pyramid Valley, however I am not in this alone. My business partner Danny Welch is the heart and sole of Pyramid Valley. Danny started working with Tom Stout (original track owner) in the early 80’s by running his harescramble races. Danny later became track manager and ran the motocross track when harescramble racing went by the wayside (early 90’s). Danny has seen some of the best riders in our region come and make laps only to race on the national level later in there careers. Everybody knows Danny, he is the face of Pyramid Valley. When Tom Stout passed away, the family, who had been part of the workings of Pyramid Valley for many years, decided they did not want the burden of carrying on Tom’s dream. They saw only one person who could do Tom proud, Danny. I came into the picture to help Danny realize his dream of track ownership. It is true that I embody the role of operations manager, in the fact that I organize the business end of the track, Danny’s specialty is track set-up and maintenance, however, he is involved with the day-to-day workings as well.

Tyler Newcomer is a brand new addition to The Racing Paper team this season. The Greencastle, Pennsylvania resident was brought aboard to cover the Loretta Lynn Area Qualifier at Tomahawk MX and has proven to be a perfect fit ever since. Tyler’s love for motocross didn’t come to fruition until age 30, when he hung up his shoes after pursuing goals as a runner, only to walk away to give motocross a try for the first time. Everyone that knew Tyler thought he was crazy for doing so, but he never looked back and now shares his newfound love for the sport with his family. Tyler is an elementary school teacher and works right down the hall from his wife, Kim, in Hagerstown, Maryland. Alongside his wife, Tyler enjoys taking his son, Caleb, and stepson, Kaden, (who are both seven years-old) riding as often as possible. Riding is a huge part of their family, but keeping it fun comes first. They also have an adopted son, Molson. Molson is a blonde golden retriever and, through their eyes, is the greatest dog of all-time. Somehow, every time we talk to Tyler he ends up being on an island—first Ocracoke, and now Jamaica as this is being typed. Next time, save us a seat! TRP

Thanks! Doug Keller Managing member Pyramid Valley, LLC Doug, I apologize for missing such a key element behind the innerworkings of Pyramid Valley. I have a feeling I didn’t get the chance to meet Danny during the night of Round 2 because he was busy keeping the racers happy and the gears of Pyramid Valley turning. Not only do I look forward to racing at Pyramid Valley again, but meeting Danny for the first time as well. Thanks for taking the time to ensure proper credit is given where it’s due. If anyone missed the article, you can find it on page 42 of the third issue. Their race schedule for the remainder of the year can be found on page 8 of this issue. JR

Want to write a letter to The Racing Paper? Send it to: jordan@racerxonline.com or

TRP Sign Up 122 Vista Del Rio Dr. Morgantown, WV 26508 5


August - end of season 2012

6

8/11-8/12 MapleShade MX 8/19 Pittsburgh Raceway 8/26 MapleShade MX

Round 1 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood Round 2 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood

9/1-9/2 9/9 9/9 9/16 9/22-9/23 9/23 9/30

Steel City Pleasure Valley MapleShade MX TBA High Point Mapleshade MX High Point

Lucas Oil AMA Pro Motocross Championship (amateur racing on Sunday) Round 3 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood

10/7 10/7 10/14 10/21 10/28

Sleepy Hollow Mapleshade Steel City Doubling Gap Pittsburgh Raceway

Round 6 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood

the racing paper

Round 4 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood 22nd Annual DC Vet National Championship Round 5 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood

Round 7 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood Round 8 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood Round 9 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood


50cc 1

85cc 9-11 C

250 C

+25 B/C

Women

BRAYDEN MILLER

SETH ANDRES

AARON FENCHAK

SHAWN RENO

RAESLEE WEIMER

TRAYSTIN TOMALSON

HUNTER CARPER

JARRETT THOMPSON

DAN DERRICO

TAYLOR LEVIC

CARTER KNOX

JACOB POSEY

TRAVIS WEST

ERIC HAMILTON

GRACE MAJKOWSKI

JAY COVERT

JACOB INGRAM

CODY ARLET

RANDY WHITE

ATALIE YINGLING

50cc 2

Jr Mini Thru 13

Open A

Vet B/C

Bomber

JAYDON MCCURDY

MARK PETERMAN

JASON MCCONNELL JR

MICHAEL WARCHOL

SCOTT KARLUK

BRANDON SLAUGHTER

TIMMY CROSBY

BILLY KIBLER

LOUIS ALI

COREY NALEPA

DONOVAN SANTE

AUSTIN LEGG

DYLAN SLUSSER

JASON KLINE

*LANCE BAILEY

TYLER CAPANE

SETH ANDRES

MICHAEL MCDADE

DAN DERRICO

*COREY RABER

BREYDEN CAMPBELL

COREY PASSIEU

CHRISTIAN MCCAULEY

VINCENT LUHOVEY JR

TANNER FLEMM

BROC STREIT

BRETT WHITE

BRETT WHITE

50cc 3

85 / 150 12-15

Open B

+35 A

BRAYDEN MILLER

MARK PETERMAN

ZACH OESTERLING

JAMES EVANS

PHILLIP WILLIAMS

AUSTIN LEGG

KALEB CHRONISTER

JASON HALLER

KYLE SCHLEMMER

CAMERON MCKINNEY

TREY GILDEA

MIKE WEIMER

CARSON CAHILL

MAURO CAUTELA

JOSHUA LISTON

ROBERT ELLENBERGER

50cc Open

Supermini 12-15

Open C

+40 B/C

COREY PASSIEU

VINCENT LUHOVEY JR

AARON FENCHAK

MICHAEL WARCHOL

DONOVAN SANTE

CAMERON MCKINNEY

BRODI SNYDER

SCOTT KARLUK

TYLER CAPANE

ALEX SAYLOR

TRAVIS WEST

KEN FISHER JR

DANIEL LEWIS

CHRISTIAN MIKITA

MICHAEL PETERS

EARL ROTHEY

65cc 7-11 B

Schoolboy (12-16)

Open D

+45

COREY PASSIEU

ALEX SAYLOR

CODY GUZZO

KIRK ROGERS

CHRISTIAN MCCAULEY

SETH STANGROOM

AARON BERTOVICH

JOHN MCCONNELL JR

CAMERON DAVIS

VINCENT PALESE

KOLTON KERN

JACK MILLS

BRETT DOLFI

JOSHUA WETZEL

NOAH BRENNAN

KEN FISHER JR

65cc 7-11 C

250 A

Collegeboy 14-24

2 Stroke

JACOB INGRAM

DYLAN SLUSSER

NICHOLAS PATTERSON

RYAN LECHIEN

COLTON GORBY

ALEXANDER ODELL

JOEY DENEEN

MATTHEW BRADY

COLE JONES

TY NEWCOME

TIFFANY PALACKI

GAVIN MURPHY

DANIEL LEWIS

ZACHARY KANTNER

CHARLES BRIGHT

TIMOTHY DAUGHERTY

85cc 9-11 B

250 B

+25 A

4 Stroke

KORIE STEEDE

JONATHON SAUERS

JAMES EVANS

NICHOLAS PATTERSON

ROBERT SEMELSBERGER

ZACH OESTERLING

JAMES SINGER

CHAD HAFER

HANK HAYS

MICHAEL FISHER

TAYLOR BARNHART

JOSHUA LISTON

BLAKE FISHER

NOAH VISLOSKY

JEREMY COOK

ALEXANDER ODELL

BREYDEN CAMPBELL

JAYDON MCCURDY

HUNTER CARPER

JACOB POSEY

CAMERON DAVIS

TIMMY CROSBY

TIMMY CROSBY

GARRETT SMITH

JASON MCCONNELL JR

JOEY DENEEN

JONATHON SAUERS

JARRETT THOMPSON

THOMAS ROGERS

BROC STREIT

BILLY KIBLER

TAYLOR BARNHART

TIFFANY PALACKI

LAMONT HUNTER

*DAVID KLINE *Tie

LOUIS ALI

MIMI GREINER

JOEY DENEEN

BROC STREIT

7


  All Races Are Weather Permitting

Cancellations or postponements: please refer to the website or call (304) 672-6028

WWW.PYRAMIDVALLEY.COM

All series races count for series-end awards.

2012 Race Series

Must race 8 events to qualify for series end awards. Western Power Sports Tri-State Championship Series Round 7 28-Jul Gate Opens 1:30PM Round 8 4-Aug Sign-up 2PM Round 9 11-Aug Practice 4PM Round 10 18-Aug Racing 6PM Series Pro-Payout 100%

 A Class Rider Fee= $35 per class Rider Fee= $25 per class Gate Fee= $10 6 and under Free



 

         

  Visit www.pyramidvalley.com for more details!

 

(122cc-Open) Open Pro Bike Purse Minimum Payback:     Gate Opens 1:30PM     Sign-up 2PM     Practice 4PM     Racing 6PM        

World Outlaw Motocross Championship

Gate Opens 7:30AM / Sign-up 8AM / Practice 10AM / Racing 12PM 8-Sep

Third Annual World Outlaw Motocross Championship Race (Tri-State Championship Series Awards Day)

Follow us on Facebook: Pyramid Valley motocross

Gates Open 8AM Tri-State Championship Series Awards 9:30-11AM Sign-up and BBQ 11AM Practice 1PM World Outlaw Motocross Championship Race 3PM Longer single-moto format Long practice sessions Plenty of track time! Free Food (BBQ) Adult Pit Bike Race 16 and older* *Free entry for Adult pit bike race September 15 will be the rain date for the Tri-State Championship Awards Day

PYRAMIDVALLEY.COM

8

the racing paper

Required Riding Gear Helmet Goggles Long-sleeve shirt Long pants Gloves

Boots


Next Exit

T

By Jordan Roberts

he idea was proposed on Friday to go race in

The drive did have a couple interesting moments, though.

Ohio at Fast Traxx on Saturday—as in less-than-

Apparently, deer along the West Virginia-Ohio border are

18-hours-away Saturday. There’s nothing like

suicidal. Deer + speeding semis = meat bombs, and they had

last-minute plans. I can’t remember who actually

exploded everywhere along the highway. Auto insurance must

came up with this idea, but Fred, Jen Ken, Jen’s

be expensive in that area. Shortly after crossing the bor-

brother Jake, and I were all committed to racing the next

der there was a huge traffic jam … on the side of the highway

day within five minutes of the initial proposal. The decision

leading up to a gas station. You’d think they were selling

wouldn’t have been so dreadful if we were in normal circum-

gas for a penny a gallon or something....

stances, but how often can normal circumstances occur for a

Fred and I arrived at Fast Traxx right on time and I wasn’t

crew that goes to sleep in three different cities across the

even tired anymore. It was good to be there, but there was

country in a given week?

no sign of Jake and Quad Girl. We kept trying to call them as

Jen, aka Quad Girl, didn’t even have her bike at the time.

the race neared, but phone service was basically nonexistent.

Some quad guys had it and were fixing it up for her, put-

After the guy on the PA made a few jokes about said service,

ting a quad exhaust on it or something. Jake doesn’t have a

complete with apocalypse and carrier-pigeons references, we decided to give up and go race.

bike altogether. His plan was

The track was super muddy,

to borrow Jen’s, which obviously posed a problem. The suspen-

but it was still fun. If noth-

sion on my bike was jacked—the

ing else, it gave us an excuse

forks were all out of balance

for crashing. The staff said

and the linkage was seized up

the track wasn’t really that bad

because the bearings were quick-

considering the storm that had

ly turning into dust crumbles.

rolled through the night before.

And there was Fred. Fred doesn’t

I came to the conclusion that

race. Fred tried to race once—at

they were either on bath salts

Ironman GNCC, of all races—and

or Noah had just dropped ev-

broke his wrist to smithereens.

eryone off as soon as the storm

At least he looked cool in his

cleared. Fred and I packed up and head-

pastel pink (not even hot pink)

ed out in opposite directions—

gear.

him east back to Morgantown, me

Of course, we didn’t immediately see the big picture de-

northwest toward Michigan. Not

scribed above—we were going

ten minutes into the drive, I

racing! The chance of get-

noticed every single gas sta-

ting us all together without any conflicting schedules is

tion was as packed as the one we’d seen earlier. As soon as

about as likely as, well, Fred racing. Everyone went back to

I had a signal, I phoned a friend who was near a computer to

their desks and thought about their personal predicaments,

get the skinny. It turned out nobody was on bath salts. The

and within a half hour were back to talking about the race

southern half of Ohio’s power had been knocked out the night

again. This time around, though, the big picture was actually

before. Most of the stations I’d driven past were closed be-

realized. After some discussion, we decided the big picture

cause they’d run out of gas—something I was about to experi-

really didn’t matter. We were determined to go racing.

ence myself.

Everyone headed back to the drawing board to work out

I started freaking out immediately after my gas light came

their problems. In hindsight, I had a problem on top of a

on. The stations were closed and I didn’t know anyone within

problem. I always underestimate the time it takes to tackle

four hours in any direction. That guy on the PA was right:

any given project. I figured I’d just knock out this suspen-

it was the apocalypse. I was out of options—all but one. I

sion job in an hour after work and get things ready so I’d be

slowed down and began to pull onto the shoulder. It was time

ready to leave by 5 a.m.

to dump the remaining gas from my bike into my truck. But

It was 1 a.m. before I turned and tightened the last bolt

wait! Just as all four tires had cleared the rumble strip, I

on my bike. I headed back to my apartment to go to bed for

saw a gas station sign. After passing roughly thirty gasless

an entire three hours—which quickly turned into two when I

gas stations, I had found the one that still had fuel in the

laid there for an hour worrying about how much sleep I wasn’t

tanks. I filled up and hightailed it out of that wasteland.

going to get. After my nap I left to meet Fred. Words can’t

No more last-minute planning for me—at least not until an-

describe how excited I was for the upcoming three-hour drive.

other good idea is proposed. TRP 9


10

the racing paper


Local boys Mike McDade (left) and Steve Roman (right) chat it up while they wait for their gate pick at Spring Creek MX in Millville, Minnesota. What were they talking about before battling with 38 of the other fastest riders in the world? Stickers! Just another day in the office... photo by: Jordan Roberts

11


No roost can slow down Ranson, West Virginia’s Zachary Lahman and his neon color schemes. Zachary raced the Youth Regional at Doublin Gap and captured a couple of 11th-place moto finishes in both 85 9-11 Stock & Mod. He was the highest finishing rider with pink grips. photo by: Lauren Hall

12

the racing paper


13


Charles Bright didn’t seem to lose his form, or speed for that matter, after suffering a broken collarbone in May. He swapped moto wins with Broc Streit in Collegeboy over two days of racing at PVR, and it’s common knowledge that Broc could smoke most of us even if he was on a Cobra. Welcome back Charles! photo by: Mimi Greiner

14

the racing paper


FRIDAY, AUGUST 31 Organized practice (10a-3p). Open to all riders. No membership required for practice.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 LUCAS OIL AMA PRO MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 THOR UNITED STATES MX MEGA SERIES presented by DUNLOP TIRES Mega Series Points SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14

PAMX TEAM SUZUKI PA STATE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES presented by FLY RACING & IN THE BLOOD TATTOOS PAMX State Champ Points

15


16

the racing paper


TRP: How old are you, and where are you from? Esper: I’m 14 years old and I’m from Butler, Pennsylvania. Is that where you’re originally from? No, I’m originally from Howell, Michigan, where my dad lives. What bike are you riding right now, and in what classes? I ride a Honda 150 and I’m racing 85 12-14, and I’m not really doing stock class anymore. I’m also doing Supermini 1 & 2.

long ago. Do you still ride with Shane a lot? Yeah, I ride with Shane. He works at PR2, at our house, and he wrenches for me at all of the big races. It’s pretty cool to have him around. Who else is in your regular crew at the races? My mom and my stepdad—that owns PR2—come to most of them. My dad comes to a lot of the big races and helps me out.

Regional Championships, right? Yeah, I got two, so that’s pretty good. I got first in 85 Mod and Supermini 2. Where has the toughest competition been before Loretta’s? Supermini 1 & 2 at the other nationals for sure, like Adam [Cianciarulo]. So you have a pretty good idea who you’re lining up against by the time you get to Loretta’s then? Yeah, I’ll usually see all of the same fast guys at all of the big races. Has there been anything else going on for you this year? Actually, once I get on big bikes, I think I’ll be riding for the Farren PR2 team on a Suzuki 125 and 250. I’ll start riding them as soon as possible, and the first big race with them will be at Mini O’s.

What got you out of the 85 12-14 Stock class? I’m getting pretty big on the bike, so I’m starting to do the Mod class because there’s more power on the 150. So what’s the next class and bike you want to ride? I’m going to ride Schoolboy 1 & 2, and probably on Suzukis. What has riding and racing been like for you growing up? Have you been riding with Darryn and Shane [Durham] much? Oh yeah, I’ve been riding and learning a lot with them and it’s helped me a lot.

What are some of the big races you have done this year? I did Oak Hill and Mill Creek—the two nationals. I did a couple qualifiers, and then I broke my foot. The only race I got in after that was the Doublin Gap Youth Regional.

I know that Darryn moved not too

You walked away with a couple

So who’s helping you out with sponsorship right now? Morgantown Powersports, for sure; they help me get a few bikes. PR2 Suspension has been awesome. Chris, my stepdad, has helped me out with that. I’ve also had help from Answer, Smith Optics, Gaerne, Pant Saggin, Shoei, Pro Taper, FMF, Pro Circuit hooked me up with some parts, and for sure my mom and dad. TRP

17


Bar-to-Bar

I

t’s really difficult to continually belt out tremendous stories every issue, but I seem to be able to nail it each time—kind of like my count-

There aren’t too many ways to step over the gate and accomplish this rare feat without getting turned around backwards, or being asked to

By Timmy Coombs

had one at the track while growing up; my dad was always busy running the races. If I would have, maybe I’d still have the end of my right in-

it was the first moto of the third day, and the start was really soft for the other 38 riders who would soon be eating my roost. less precision holeshots. I’m going to tap this one out on my iPhone, using only my right thumb, just for the sake of doing it. It’s kind of like getting the holeshot at Loretta’s from the outside gate even though I won the previous moto. I b*tched and moaned so much that nobody noticed the path I made when I stomped toward the moto-order board where the referee, Captain Russ, was holding the 30-second board for the start. I secretly packed my line halfway to the first turn. It was the first moto of the third day, and the start was really soft for the other 38 riders who would soon be eating mouthfuls of my roost. 18

the racing paper

move to another gate position, but keep reading and you might find out about another. Once again, don’t ever let your mechanic choose your position on the gate unless you know that you’re going to get a bad start, and then you can blame him. But always let him, or especially her, hold an umbrella over you for shade or wetness protection. I hate mechanics because I never

dex finger instead of getting it chewed off in between the chain and the front countershaft sprocket. You see, if you have to oil your chain by yourself, you can skip spinning the rear wheel with your free hand

by running the engine with the bike in gear—enabling you to use both hands to improve your lube-spraying accuracy. Even though I did this, I still got a little bit of overspray on the swingarm near the axle. When I tried to wipe it off with my finger, the front sprocket decided to run its course of revenge on me for removing its cover several weeks earlier. I took away all of its personal space and teased it with the side of a Hi-Point boot that it couldn’t eat as easily as the tip of my finger. Good times… Good times… If you’re still thinking about trying this method to help with spray-can accuracy, just remember that it doesn’t matter which gear you put it in because they all hurt. Did I forget to mention that you need to have your own medical insurance if you’re going to race? If you don’t, just remember to pay on your huge medical bills each and every month. Give them about $20 and they can’t come after you or screw with your credit. Now that right there is valuable racing information. That can make you faster just knowing about, but you didn’t hear it from me. TRP


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19


Virtual Trainer Effective Practice Planning

T

raining for you, the recreational rider, is actually much more complicated than training for an elite rider. School, career and family take most of your time and energy, leaving little that’s leftover for training and recovery. Planning and efficiently executed training is a must for 99% of riders striving to remain competitive. A smart rider focuses his time, energy, and effort into areas that will create the most positive changes to his or her overall motocross racing ability; for most riders this area is usually bike skills and fitness that can only be achieved with actual motocross riding. Since recreational riders will gain the most by actually riding motocross, plans to allow as much actual riding is a must. This class of rider tends to only ride on weekends, but many of them spend a large amount of time during the week going to the gym to train. The time spent at the gym could actually be better spent riding. Executing an actual ride session is much more complicated than just going to the gym or going cycling, but the payoff for getting another practice into the week is realistically much greater than doing any other training activity. It may be nearly impossible for a rider with a career and family to figure out how to add a riding session into the week, but every effort should be made to ride as much as possible. Something as simple and quick as doing drills after work pay bigger dividends to most normal riders rather than

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another session in the gym. The best way to systematically address riding weak-

muscle—shoulders to hands— lap riding in traffic. 3.) Mental Goals: Focus on maintaining gives out at the 15-minute mark of a race moto. 2.) Riding loose and relaxed while riding under pressure. When Joe Vet gets to the track, he creates his specific practice plan to attack the goals he created while at work in the order of decreasing energy demands. 1.) Warm-up, then ride two 17-minute motos at race pace. When fatigue creeps in, focus on maintaining a loose and relaxed riding style and breathing normally. 2.) Do 8 practice starts and ride one sprint lap as hard as he can go, but using lines that are not part of the main race line to simulate having to pass or defend positions during the first lap of a vet race. 3.) Again, work on breathing normally and remaining mentally calm. If done systematically and with purpose, Joe Vet can execute his riding plan and load up within his available two hours! Trading cross-training time Specific Skills: Starts! Joe Vet gets lackluster starts and con- for riding time, or figuring out tinues to lose positions during the logistics to add more ridthe first lap. 3.) Mental Issues: ing time, will help every rider immensely. Using a system of When followed, Joe Vet rides defensively which causes ner- categorizing components of riding performance, identifying vousness, which leads to falimiters, and creating practice tigue in his arms within a lap. For most amateurs, effective goals will eliminate “just riduse of practice time is a must. ing around” and “wasting” precious riding time. You will Joe can make it to the local Wednesday night practice, but be specifically working on the he only has about two hours to things that will make the most ride. He wants to train smarter difference in your overall riding ability. You aren’t getting so he creates these goals at the office while he is supposed any younger, so get faster by training smarter! Do some to be working on a presentathinking and planning to make tion: 1.) Riding Specific Fitness Goal: Ride two 17-minute the most out of every minute motos at race pace. 2.) Riding you get to ride and train. Be smarter, be efficient, and GET Specific Skills Goal: Practice FASTER! TRP starts and work on the first

The time spent at the gym could actually be better spent riding. nesses is to divide your overall riding ability into specific categories and address the weakness in each. An average rider’s categories might look something like: 1.) Riding Specific Fitness. 2.) Riding Specific Skills. 3.) Mental Issues. This will make it easier to identify specific limiters that are holding you back within each category. The most effective way to use your practice time is to have a training objective that addresses each of your known limiters and create practice goals. An example of a structured track day with self-proclaimed limiters for Joe Vet in the above categories look like: 1.) Riding Specific Fitness: Every

By TIM CRYTSER


21


Lantzer #98

You can’t rock a cowboy hat without a proper mustache.

Clown. Damien. Just happy to be there. Roberts

Hall

Greiner

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Roberts

Who needs a holeshot when you can cut the track?

Stop looking at me Swan!

Vinny and Mauro get their GQ on.

Lantzer #98

Lantzer #98

Clint says, “Heyyy!”

Jorts? Check. Fox tattoo? Check. Foot gloves? $@*# I knew I forgot something.


Roberts

Mat Simmons knows how to make a marker feel magic.

Lantzer #98

Taylor and Tanya cruise the pits. Lantzer #98

Zack driving the Mack.

Lantzer #98

Greiner

Brett White won some goggles, but no luck with a shirt.

Eating roost is for worms, and Taylor Barnhartt approves this message. Lantzer #98

We couldn’t find anything clever to say about this photo. Please feel free to send in hate mail.

Lantzer #98

Justun must have some interesting tees. 23


Lantzer #98

Roberts

Lantzer #98

DJ and Eric bro-out at the Pro-Action rig.

Mike McDade gets in the zone at Millville. Cernic

Roberts

Dylan, doing some sort of front flip variation on the PVR sign.

All that generator and just one iPhone. Lantzer #98

Hopefully that’s chocolate... or mud. Mud wouldn’t even be that bad. Lantzer #98

Would you like your photo in Public Address? Email jordan@ racerxonline.com Snail Mail

TRP Public Address 122 Vista Del Rio Dr. Morgantown, WV 26508

Someone’s gettin’ down on a 2-smoke at PVR. 24

the racing paper

Things that happen when you still use things from middle school...


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25


Thor Yamaha Spring Series Presented by Dunlop 27

Top Five Barcia! Barcia! Barcia!

The PAMX Spring Series has come to an end, with all twelve rounds now in the books. Aside from the top-five points standings on page 7, here are some stats to sink your teeth into. Visit www.GoPAMX.com to view full points standings and results from each round.

corey passieu - 50cc 2, 50 OPEN TIMMY CROSBY - 85/150 12-15, SUPERMINI MICHAEL WARHOL - +40 B/C

28 GOON Quad Girl

JOEY DENEEN - 2 STROKE BROC STREIT - 4 STROKE

Courtesy of Pro-Action

BREYDEN CAMPBELL - 50cc 3 JACOB POSEY - 65cc 7-11 C CHRISTIAN MCCAULEY - 85cc 9-11 C TIMMY CROSBY - JR MINI THRU 13 BROC STREIT - COLLEGEBOY

Talk 29 Shop Pro-Action

total points possible Broc Streit Collegeboy 14-24 Jacob Posey 65cc 7-11 c broc streit 4 stroke

winner, 30 Winner, chicken dinner. Moto Pillows

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the racing paper

brett white vet b/c breyden campbell 50cc 3

Louis Ali Hunter Carper Dan Derrico Jason McConnell Jr. Jacob Posey Broc Streit Brett White

Breyden Campbell Tanner Flemm Cole Jones Billy Kibler Jason Kline Jaydon McCurdy Mark Peterman Michael Peters Shawn Reno Donovan Sante Jeremy Shaffer Brodi Snyder Jarrett Thompson Travis West


event: Doublin Gap youth regional By lauren hall

Q: Who’s going to be holding the #1 plate in the 250 class at the end of the outdoor season? blake baggett

21% justin barcia

36% Clint Schaffer

Evan Richard

marvin musquin

8% ken roczen

14% eli tomac

21% Mr. Mustache

Robert Piazza

Michael Pettit

Visit facebook.com/theracingpaper to tilt the scales!

HOMECOMING WEEKEND: SEPTEMBER 22 & 23 SATURDAY & SUNDAY:

22ND ANNUAL DC VET NATIONAL MOTOCROSS MOTOCROSS & HARE SCRAMBLE

SEPTERMBER 30 SUNDAY

PAMX TEAM SUZUKI PA STATE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES PRESENTED BY FLY RACING & IN THE BLOOD TATTOOS PAMX State Champ Points

27


event: Doublin Gap youth regional By lauren hall

Brandon Garlock

Timmy Crosby

ithout to leave w s ie r t s y a of it. My quad alw I fall off r ve e n e h w me l! - Jen ttle rasca li a h c su It’s Brad Esper

Vinnie LuHovey

Showcase your finest skills by sending your photo to jordan@racerxonline.com

Who’s listening to what before the gate drops...

Name

Artist

Album

Courtney Zollinger’s Playlist 1 Folsom Prison Blues (Live) 2 Shiloh 3 Faith Works 4 Here’s to the Meantime 5 This Must Be the Place

Johnny Cash Magnolia Electric Co. SOJA Grace Potter & the Nocturnals Talking Heads

At Folsom Prison Josephine Syr Mahber This Is Somewhere Speaking in Tongues

Zack Kantner’s Playlist 1 Little Talks 2 I Got Some Money on Me 3 Houdini 4 Snapbacks and Tattoos 5 Dark Shades (feat. Lil Wayne and...)

Of Monsters and Men Lil Wayne Foster the People Driicky Graham Birdman

My Head Is an Animal Tha Carter IV Torches Flash the Cash Bigga Than Life

Charles Bright’s Playlist 1 Exploder 2 Buried Alive 3 Narcissistic Cannibal 4 Break Stuff 5 Said I Loved You... But I Lied

Audioslave Avenged Sevenfold Korn Limp Bizkit Michael Bolton

Audioslave (self titled) Nightmare The Path of Totality Significant Other The One Thing

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the racing paper


Hundreds of attendees gather on a grassy knoll to soak in the music provided by the Snowshoe GNCC. There are many ways you can end up on the ground that weekend, but this way is considered to be the more desirable. photo by: Ken Hill

Courtesy of Pro-Action

I

n 1977, George Quay III began a small suspension company in the basement of his house in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. It wasn’t long before he sought out a partnership with D.J. Korzen—a local mechanic with a reputation for building top-notch motors for local pro riders. Considering the duo’s extensive knowledge and experience in the motorcycle industry, they were bound to become an influence to be reckoned with. After building a proper business model, they turned to The Racing Paper—which was still in its early stages as the stepping-stone publication to Racer X—for a way to spread the word about their newly formed business. They hold bragging rights for being one of the first-

By Taylor Dressler

ever advertisers in the magazine, and have since expanded to become a worldwide franchise with locations in the US, Canada, France, and New Zealand. Pro-Action has now become one of the most trusted names in motocross, ATV, and UTV suspension services and modifications. They are proud to offer an exclusive three-stage valve system that is pressuresensitive and self-adjusting. It’s a product they have refined and perfected over the years, but suspension isn’t the only product or service they offer at their numerous franchise locations. Pro-Action also offers four-stroke engine packages and installation of cams, valves, and valve springs; custom fork and shock pistons; KTM bladder kits;

swingarm linkage and many other suspension enhancing products. The company understands how important it is for riders to feel safe and comfortable on their equipment. “The level of trackside support and dedication offered by Pro-Action is unmatched by any other suspension company. Not only do we have the world’s leading suspension technology, but more importantly, we care,” reasons Korzen. Riders can find an onsite Pro-Action suspension specialist at a majority of the PAMX events, as well as other racing events

across the country, for trackside assistance and customer service. “No matter what you ride, or how you ride, Pro-Action has the right suspension set up for you,” says Korzen. Customers can rest assure that they are receiving top-quality products and premier service when two of the industry’s best collaborate and build a company like ProAction. TRP Pro-Action Suspension & Motors (724) 846-9055 Pro-Action.com 29


Brought to you by:

Like The Racing Paper on Facebook to learn how you can win cool prizes while sitting on your butt.

30

the racing paper

Courtesy of Francis

Rider: Ben Francis Bike: Suzuki Super Mini Prize: McGrath & Reed Pillows


vinnie luhovey

By Jordan Roberts

TRP: How old are you? LuHovey: I just turned 13 years old May 26th.

12-14 Mod], I got a fifth the first moto, I won the second moto, and I got a fifth again for the third moto.

I know you’re a small guy; how much do you weigh? 70 pounds.

In that second moto, you and Brad Esper were neck-andneck right off the holeshot, and you ended up nailing it. Did you feel any pressure, or were you pretty comfortable being out front? I like the pressure. It makes me go faster.

Do you ever feel like that puts you at a disadvantage, or is it not even a factor? Well, it’s kind of an advantage because my bike is stock. Since I’m really light, the bike can go faster. A lot of the other kids are around 120, or 130 pounds, so my bike can go a little bit faster being stock. Gotcha, so you’re racing a stock bike in the [Mini Sr. 1214] Mod class right now? Yeah. Have you been racing a stock bike in the Mod class all year, or is that because you got a new bike recently? No, I’ve been doing that all year. We got this bike [CRF 150] and blew the other one up, and it’s a lot of money to mod a 150. It’s usually $1,000 to mod a 2 stroke, but it’s like, $4,000 to mod a 4 stroke, so my bike is stock.

Do many kids ride or race at your school? Um, no. I have one friend that rides around in his backyard, but that’s it.

Besides that Loretta’s qualifiers, have you raced anywhere else besides PAMX events this year? No, I pretty much stuck with the qualifiers for Loretta’s and the PAMX races. That’s about it. How’d the Regional Qualifier go for you?

How long do you think it’ll be until you’re ready to move up to a bigger bike? Probably about four years.

Yeah.

So you pretty much just ride with the kids you race with?

Who would you say is your closest competition at your home races? Everyone is pretty fast, but my main competition back home is Timmy Crosby. Who helps you get to the races each weekend? My dad, Aunt Sonya, and Uncle Scott. Does your dad ever make you do a bunch of chores before you can go racing? Not really. I train and stuff; that’s kind of my chore.

Would you go with a 125 or 250? Probably a 250F.

Ok, so last question… If you didn’t have a dirt bike, what would you do? Probably be a gym teacher.

If someone started a 450 for you right now, could you ride it? Yeah. No problem? No problem.

[Laughs] Right now? Nooo, I’d probably get a dirt bike. TRP

I’d like to see that. Ok. Good. The class that I qualified in [Mini Sr.

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Youth riders converge at Doublin Gap for the Northeast Youth Regional Qualifier. Several roads lead to it, but everyone has their eye on a coveted road that heads out.

T

he “Road to Loretta’s” has become a much-publicized showcase for tomorrow’s American motocross stars. While MX Sports, the governing body of the Amateur National Motocross Championship at Loretta Lynn Ranch, attempts to pave the road equally with their area and regional qualifying formats, the documented road is oftentimes the one less traveled. With factory sponsorship, top-notch training facilities, and personal trainers, tomorrow’s stars often have opportunities comparable to today’s professionals. But while the playing field may seem lopsided, never underestimate the size of a rider’s heart and his or her family’s dedication to carry them to the hallowed grounds of Loretta Lynn Ranch every August. The Northeast Youth Regional Qualifier arrived at Doublin Gap Motocross Park in Newburg, Pennsylvania, on June 22. Although Doublin Gap is predominantly the host of amateur racing sanctioned by the Mason Dixon Rider’s Association, it appeared to be the home of the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship on this weekend. With factory pits,

vendor row, and fan-friendly conveniences, the Yentzer Family showed that their facility was prepared to host a national-caliber event. Doublin Gap may be the home to the MDRA, but the vast majority of every riding association in the four-state region was represented at the Northeast Youth Regional Qualifier. Even though fall shootouts between riding associations typically pop up all over the end of the season calendar, Loretta Lynn Regional Qualifiers still give ultimate bragging rights. PAMX had its top guns representing at Doublin Gap in the two-day, three-moto format that aims to seed out only the top riders from each region. PAMX hotshot mini star Corey Passieu of McDonald, Pennsylvania, was at Doublin Gap, but not to qualify his speedy King Cobra 50 for the Amateur National—he had already done so two weeks earlier at Kentucky’s Ballance MX for the Mid-East Youth Regional. Passieu was at Doublin Gap to make a third attempt at qualifying in the 65 (7-9) Stock class that eluded him in Kentucky and the North-Central Youth Regional at Spring Creek MX in Minnesota the week prior. 33


After traveling some 3,500 miles, the young Passieu piloted his 65 into Loretta’s with 11-5-8 moto finishes for fifth overall. To put a price tag on the Passieu Family’s Journey: 3,500 miles of gas at a modest 10 mpg at $3.50 per gallon would be $1,200. That elusive second class at Loretta’s, of course, is priceless. While Corey Passieu will return to Loretta’s for the second time in his blossoming racing career, Brad Esper of Butler, Pennsylvania, was attempting to qualify for the eighth time. The younger stepbrother of pro racers Shane and Darryn Durham, Esper would seem to live the “road to Loretta’s” most portrayed by the media. With support from his stepfather, Chris, a part-owner of PR2 Racing, Esper rides equipment close to the factory level. He has the opportunity to ride on a daily basis, has been homeschooled, and trained with a personal trainer. However, his 2012 road to Loretta’s would have a few detours. In a TRP interview, Esper explained, “I can ride every day, but I broke my foot recently and haven’t been riding as much as I usually do. I’ve been riding for a week or so.” The cool and calm Esper also recently returned to public school and is back with his family for training and riding advice. But even with the recent changes and the anticipation of moving to big bikes after Loretta’s, Esper’s focus at Doublin Gap would remain the same: “I expect to come through here and hopefully win, but definitely qualify for Loretta’s.” Attempting to race Esper down the road to Loretta’s, recent TRP cover boy Timmy Crosby was hoping to return to Hurricane Mills for the third time after heartbreak on the very first day last August. Explains his mother, Laurie: “Last year at Loretta’s, he got run over on the first lap of practice and took all the skin off his back. It was so painful. The perfect Dunlop tire mark, it was all ugly and red. He couldn’t race. He put his jersey on for the first moto and tried to do it, but he couldn’t do it. We ended up leaving on Wednesday, because the heat started prickling his back.” This year has not been without its speed bumps for the Confluence, Pennsylvania, native. “Here three weeks ago, we were just practicing on a Saturday for a Sunday race,” Laurie adds. “His foot slipped off the foot peg and hit the back brake. He cased a jump and hurt his shoulder. So, he’s been off for three weeks. We weren’t even sure he was going to race this weekend because he hasn’t been on a bike.” But with the true grit of a champion, the 13-year-old Crosby put that pain aside and focused on the goal ahead. Searching for the pits of our PAMX stars to interview at Doublin Gap, two roads really did diverge in the woods. However, in this case the woods led to a stream and the family of Greensburg, Pennsylvania’s Vinnie Luhovey. With no industry support, Luhovey’s race team is solely 34

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powered by family efforts. “My main support is my family, Uncle Scott and Aunt Sonya,” he explained. “If I didn’t have them, I wouldn’t be here right now.” The Luhovey family has never searched for sponsorship for Vinnie. “We are it—just family, explains Vinnie’s mother. “We put everything together. We have to all come together. This is for fun—we do this for the fun of it.” But don’t think Luhovey isn’t out there to win. Weighing in at 70 pounds, he consistently pulls holeshot after holeshot on his Uncle Scottand Aunt Sonya-backed Honda CRF150R. A fan favorite while running the famous #4, he was anointed “Ricky Carmichael, Jr.” by the trackside announcer for his customary quick starts. While each was attempting to qualify in multiple classes, these three teenage stars of PAMX would have their roads to Loretta Lynn’s merge in the Mini Sr. (12-14) Modified class. The super smooth, almost effortless Esper; the high-flying, go-for-broke Crosby; and the pint-sized giant slayer Luhovey were determined to make a statement at Doublin Gap and give PAMX bragging rights at this Loretta Lynn’s Northeast Youth

Regional. Esper would lead the way, leaving Doublin Gap as champion with 1-2-1 moto finishes. But it would be Luhovey’s second-moto upset victory that would assure him his third place overall in the class with moto scores of 5-1-5. Crosby would follow one place behind in fourth with 2-3-6 moto finishes. Only South Carolina’s Logan Stokes could break up the clean sweep with his second overall. All three are now set to pack their bags for Loretta Lynn Ranch in August for the Mini Sr. (12-14) Modified class. Esper would also qualify with another championship in the Super Mini 2 (13-16) class and a runner-up finish in the Super Mini 1 (12-15) class. Crosby would join Esper qualifying in three classes with a third-place in Super Mini 2 (13-16) and a sixth overall in Mini Sr. (12-14) Stock. While the media’s interpretations of “The Road to Loretta’s” are filled with stories of hard work and determination, it’s a nice to find grassroots efforts from our local stars as they pave their own path. It doesn’t always take factory support and a top-level training facility to deliver at Loretta’s; sometimes, it just takes a family. TRP 35


Upon the absence of the legendary Blackwater 100, Snowshoe GNCC was left to pick up its insurmountable reputation as the toughest race in America.

H

eld atop the alluring Snowshoe Mountain in West Virginia, the Motosport.com Snowshoe GNCC is one of the toughest races in America, drawing racers from all over the country. The race is unique for many reasons, ranging from its centralized location in the ski resort to the distinctive starting procedures. Riders and spectators alike enjoy to the event’s locale, where beautiful scenery, varied nightlife, and exciting racing intensify the energy of the weekend. Thursday prior to race weekend, riders are given the opportunity to participate in the GNCC University program, a two-day riding school where they can learn from some of the best riders in the world. Due to the technical and demanding conditions at Snowshoe, the knowledge of Yamaha riders Paul Whibley, Jason Raines, and Randy Hawkins does not go unappreciated. They were able to help the students gain a better understanding of the terrain they would be racing on. Bike control, hill climbs, and navigating roots and rocks are popular topics around the notorious Snowshoe course. As the weekend approached, people made their way up the mountain to the village, where the hotels, restaurants, pools, shops, and nightlife can be found—as well as the starting

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line! This is one of the few races where participants look forward to being with their family (and “racing family”) since everyone is able to gather in the village rather than being spread out at hotels in neighboring cities around the track. This year, motorcycle enthusiast and well-known country singer Craig Morgan played a live show on Saturday night for all the fans. The motorcycle racing kicked off Sunday morning with a start that is unparalleled in Can-Am GNCC Racing. Arranged by points standings in their class, riders lined up in rows of five


along the main road. Most GNCCs require a dead-engine start with larger rows for each class, but this race features a start with multiple rows of the same class. Once the race begins, adjusted time is taken into account as the riders come through the scoring tent. The Snowshoe course is also unique, featuring steep hill climbs, a spectrum of soil from dust to mud, an abundance of large rocks, plenty of unruly roots, and slick log crossings. Riders who enjoy more technical terrain tend to shine here, but endurance, perseverance, and sheer talent are essential for all. New Zealand’s Rory Mead astonishingly led all seven laps of the premier XC1 race, thanks in large part to his trials riding experience and his ability to maintain composure through some of the toughest and most technical sections. After his spectacular performance at The Mammoth GNCC, it wasn’t unreasonable to predict that he’d be a threat at the more technical tracks. With that said, Mead was able to pull away from the rest of the pack and at one point

would hold almost a two-minute lead over second place. “I’ve been planning this race for a while now, and I knew it was a strong one for me and it played out,” Mead explained. “It was one of the toughest races I have done in America.” Although Mead put in a solid ride for first, Kailub Russell was able to reel him in by the end of the race and finished just six seconds behind him. Russell is having one of the best seasons of his career with four overall wins. “I put in the work during the week to prepare for this race, and it really paid off today,” Russell said. “But Rory rode really well. We have five tracks coming up that I really like, and hopefully I can get a few more wins.” Points leader Paul Whibley finished third in XC1. Even after a rough start, his consistency and endurance helped him make his way through the pack and get on the box. Due to the unique start and adjusted time, Jason Thomas, who started on the second row and technically came through right after Whibley, was able to get on top of the box with an XC2 win and third-place overall finish for the weekend. Grant Baylor was able to finish first in 250 A and twelfth overall, making him the top amateur of the day. Other races have much to offer riders and their families, but in many ways, Snowshoe tops the list. It’s clear why more and more riders and spectators are making their way to top of the mountain each year. TRP

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A

t the ripe old age of 30, I walked away from a career as professional distance runner. The demands of training day in and day out and the stresses to perform were beginning to take their toll. While those that surrounded me were skeptical about my decision and how long it would last, I knew something they did not. I had fallen in love—in love with motocross. Like any great love story, it started with innocent flirting. With two stepsons riding, I was beginning to spend more and more time at the track and the races with them. Like distance running, the physical demands and mental toughness of the sport were the first things that drew me in. I immediately began to admire the riders and wanted 38

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to be like them. However, there was a small problem. I had never ridden a dirt bike. While it was fun to start from the beginning and develop a passion for a new sport, it didn’t take long until being the slow guy on the track started to get old. I listened attentively to anyone that was around, hoping to take in any kind of advice that may help me improve. However, the old advice of “twist it a little further” just wasn’t helping. Taking a riding school was always an option in the back of my mind. But like Trix, I thought they were just for kids. The idea of heading back to school with a bunch of young racers and being the slowest in the class conjured up memories of being afraid of being picked last for the kickball game at recess. However, I


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recently saw that Randall Everett and his 454Factory were headed to my local track for a Master’s Prep Riding School. Even though I can say the anxiety was still there, I felt a lot more comfortable signing up knowing I was going to join riders my own age in the search for speed. Randall Everett, a native of Nokesville, VA, made a career out of being the hard working local professional that was going to outwork, out-train, and outperform riders of equal ability. His “blue collar” approach to training and racing would carry him to the AMA Pro Nationals and to Europe as a factory rider on KTM Sarholz and Suzuki Reineke Race Teams. Having trained with professionals like Mike Alessi and Mike Brown, his experiences in the industry helped launch his 454Factory Racer Development Program. I was completely awestruck when I arrived at Tomahawk Motocross Park for the camp. Unless you have already seen the 454Factory set-up at your local track, you can’t help but feel like you have stepped into a factory ride for a day. A personal bike stand, classroom complete with a flat screen TV, and a perfectly watered and prepared track awaited us from the moment we arrived. We were basically getting the red carpet treatment in rural West Virginia. School bells weren’t needed to keep us from being tardy. Everett introduced himself and his assistant Devin O’Neal as soon as every-

one was present. He explained that the Master’s Prep School was designed as a track walk, which encompasses one entire lap over the course of a 6-hour day, and we’d be looking at the skills and techniques needed to master different parts of the track. Each session was launched in the classroom with an informative PowerPoint and instruction from Everett. The instruction then lead to a track demonstration by Everett, which was followed by time for the riders to practice their new skills and techniques. During this practice time, Everett was on the track giving one-on-one instruction to each rider while O’Neal would record video for on-screen analysis back in the classroom. Everett instantly challenged us to step out of our comfort zone with the first lesson on body position, but he encouraged the class with the words we were all probably looking to hear, “Sometimes you need to slow down to go faster. This day isn’t about going fast as much as developing the skills needed to go fast.” Our first session on the track couldn’t come soon enough, and it only seemed fitting that we began at the starting gate. Tomahawk is unique in that it starts on concrete. Everett gave us valuable pointers for both starting on concrete and dirt that, if performed correctly, should result in some holeshots in the coming years. The first track session was followed by the first opportunity for the group to be stars on the flat-screen. My first impression was that the video classroom was there to primarily give us that factory feel for the day, but Everett put it to practical use with valuable instruction and feedback throughout the school. Any time you try something new, it’s rewarding to be able to watch yourself on video and analyze the skills you are using for the first time. From the first session, the class moved past the first turn to a difficult whoop section. This gave the class an opportunity to learn body position and throttle control through the whoops, as well as proper braking technique in the following turn. Everett had concrete suggestions and critiques, but trying to break old habits proved to be quite the challenge. We continued our trek around the Tomahawk circuit, further focusing on braking, cornering, line choice, and jumping throughout the remainder of the day. Although we weren’t riding lap after lap throughout the day, the energy level of the class as a whole was depleted by the time we made it to the last section. Even with the classroom lectures and critiques, the day was filled to the max with actual time on the bike. Everett left us full of new knowledge to apply and practice at our local tracks. And fitting to any graduating class, a class reunion will be needed to show off our acquired speed next year at another 454Factory Master’s School. TRP Randall Everett and his 454Factory Racer Development Program offers one-day riding schools, three-day overnight camps, and an amateur race team that provides coaching and a mechanic on race day. The 454Factory has a valuable program to offer riders of every age and ability. You can find them on the web at www.454Factory.com.

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Here’s a shot of TRP contributor Tyler Newcomer scootin’ around Tomahawk MX, his home track. He should suck a lot more for someone who didn’t start riding until last year, but in all reality, he’s no slouch. The next time you’ll see Tyler in Flashpoint is when he conquers that elusive 100 ft. tabletop. photo by: Jordan Roberts

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By Jordan Roberts // Photos by afred

J27 Shooter Tube // $65.95

Really, there’s not much more you can say about this throttle tube besides it’s awesome. The roller bearings in the threaded end cap allow you to effortlessly twist the throttle, in turn reducing arm pump. There is just one drawback though... Use wisely if you have a reoccurring case of whiskey throttle.

www.J27moto.com Novik T.E.C. Gloves // $20.98

What purpose do they serve? Well, they help prevent your hands from getting blisters and they’re made to look cool, too. However, Novik does it a little differently than the rest. They make slip-on gloves that are thinner than the rest, which results in supreme comfort without sacrificing durability.

www.NovikGloves.com Matrix M4 Floor Mat // $49.95

When do you think every motocross track will start paving their pits over? It will probably be later than sooner. You can either A.) Keep losing bolts in the grass while you work on your stallion in between motos, or B.) Pick up one these floor mats instead of looking like a beachcomber carrying a metal detector.

www.MatrixRacingProducts.com Etnies Freeport Shoes // $65.00

This might have been five years ago, but I’ve once overheard someone ask, “Why do you wear skateboard shoes if you don’t skateboard?” That’s like saying you’re not allowed to lace up some Nike’s unless you’re on a basketball court. Besides that, a traditional skate shoe has so much padding it feels like you’re walking on clouds. Who doesn’t want to walk on clouds?

www.Etnies.com

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You don’t want to be behind this roost! Trey Gildea hammers on the throttle during the final round of the PAMX Spring Series. He raced 250 B and Collegeboy throughout the series, but Open B was his best class, where he finished fourth in the series. If you ever find yourself riding behind Trey, make sure you have a worthy chest protector. Photo by Mimi Greiner

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TRP Volume 9 // Issue 4  

Cover: Brad Esper by Lauren Hall. Features: The Roads More Taken, The New Blackwater, Master's Track Walk, Pleasure Valley Photo Report.

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