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FINAL CUT

INTO

STEEL CITY REGIONAL LLQ

HIGH POINT NATIONAL

A FULL HOUSE WITH ONLY A FEW TICKETS TO THE FINAL SHOW

PA PROS USE HOME TRACK ADVANTAGE TO PIECE TOGETHER THE PUZZLE

A LESSER UNKNOWN

JONATHON SAUERS

250/OPEN B CONTENDER

VOLUME 9 ISSUE 3 // 2012

PLEASURE VALLEY RACEWAY HOSTS THE LAST N.E. AREA QUALIFIER

SATURDAY-NIGHT SPECIAL

PYRAMID VALLEY’S OUTLAW TRACK

PAMX POINTS •

L.L. QUALIFIERS •

STEVE ROMAN •

ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE

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THE RACING PAPER


REGULARS CONTRIBUTOR

FEATURES THE FINAL CUT

Lowery

Riders came from near and far to race the Steel City Loretta Lynn Regional Qualifier. This is the last step between staying home and going to Loretta’s. Flip to page 33 to catch a preview as to who might shine at the amateur national.

SIGN UP PAMX SCHEDULE NEXT EXIT FLASHPOINT FRONT & CENTER BAR-TO-BAR VIRTUAL TRAINER Cudby

PUBLIC ADDRESS

INTO A LESSER UNKNOWN We threw the new intern right into the deep end at the High Point National and told her to go interview some PA pros. She swam back to let us know what they were thinking before they lined up against the world’s best in a familiar setting.

PREMIX TAKE 5 INVENTORY TAPPED OUT ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE

Greiner

PVR PHOTO REPORT Did you go to the Loretta Lynn Area Qualifier at Pleasure Valley Raceway? Maybe Arlene Lantzer or Mimi Greiner shot some photos of you. Maybe they didn’t. Check out the photo report to find out.

EDITOR / ART DIRECTOR: JORDAN ROBERTS STAFF LENS: CUDBY, FRED STAFF PENS: JEN KEN, CHASE STALLO HEAD HONCHO: DAVEY COOMBS BOSS GUY: BRYAN STEALEY BOSS GIRL: JULIE KRAMER ADVERTISING: TIM CRYTSER ACCOUNTS: JERRI HEADLEE INTERN: TAYLOR DRESSLER VOICE OF REASON: RITA COOMBS CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: MIMI GREINER, LAUREN HALL, ARLENE LANTZER #98, ZAK LOWERY CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: TIMMY COOMBS, TIM CRYTSER, ARLENE LANTZER, TYLER NEWCOMER COVER PHOTO BY MIMI GREINER THE RACING PAPER 122 VISTA DEL RIO DRIVE, MORGANTOWN, WV 26508 TEL 304.284.0080 | FAX 304.284.0081 | THERACINGPAPER.COM The riders appearing in this newspaper are, for the most part, skilled amateurs or highly trained individuals with experience racing and operating motorcycles. Please don’t try to imitate them. When you ride a motorcycle or all-terrain vehicle, always wear a helmet, eye protection and the appropriate safety gear. Never ride beyond your capabilities. Use your head, be safe and enjoy the ride. The Racing Paper publishes six issues annually by World Sports Holdings, LLC. Our editorial office is located at 122 Vista Del Rio Drive, Morgantown, WV 26508. Copyright ©2012 Filter Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing in this newspaper may be reprinted in whole or in part without the express written permission of the publisher. Editorial contributions are welcomed, but must be guaranteed exclusive to The Racing Paper. We are not responsible for the return of unsolicited material. Letters cannot all be answered, nor can all service inquiries be answered. We appreciate correspondence sent to our editorial office and will use the most interesting and appropriate letters in the newspaper. Email letters to: jordan@racerxonline.com

Advertising: Please call Tim Crytser at 407-748-4663

Roberts

SATURDAY-NIGHT SPECIAL Do you wish you were a supercross superstar and got to race under the lights every Saturday? Who doesn’t? Too bad they only take 20 riders from around the world to the main. Pyramid Valley gives everyone else the chance to race under the lights.


Zak Lowery has been supplying The Racing Paper with quality photos ever since it was resurrected back in 2004. He has been present for every High Point National since 1992, which now recently marked his 21st consecutive attended High Point National to date. Some of you who suck at math are probably counting your fingers right now, but Zak probably isn’t because he studied at Penn State and now works at Fenner Dunlop America as a Senior Mechanical Engineer. Zak’s big-boy job has allowed him to acquire a CRF 450, YZ 250, and a slew of Canon cameras over the years. Although Zak attends many amateur races, and some even claim to have seen him enter one, although he prefers the comfort of labeling himself as a crafty practice rider. It’s much easier to claim you’re faster than another rider if you jump in behind them after they have already completed eight laps. Zak is also a huge James Stewart fan. Add Zak on Facebook if you’d like to witness this man-crush firsthand. Actually, you’d probably get more enjoyment by just checking out the race photos on his website. Fire up AOL and visit pbase.com/ zlowery to check out the rest of Zak’s work.. TRP

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THE RACING PAPER


USA

Sign Up Letters to the Editor

This is a picture of my son, Ben. This was his first race back from a shattered collarbone. After one very long screw and five months of therapy, he finally raced his first race. I was so proud of him, and he won! Deana Smith Deana, It’s great to hear Ben is making a quick and successful return to racing, although his competition probably isn’t quite as excited as you are after his first-place finish. He must be pretty fast coming off of the couch, which isn’t always easy to do. In fact, it looks like he’s so fast he did the ‘ole ‘pull the tablecloth out from under the dinner set’ trick by going fast enough for the wind to catch and remove his number background without even slightly disturbing the number. Or maybe I’m just venting from the last time I was ragged on for not sporting backgrounds on my plates, but hey, if you can smoke the competition off the couch, I say do what you do and keep on rockin’ in the background-free world. Either way, welcome back to the track, Ben! JR Want to write a letter to The Racing Paper? Send it to: jordan@racerxill.com or

TRP Sign Up 122 Vista Del Rio Dr. Morgantown, WV 26508 5


JUNE - SEPTEMBER 2012

6/17 TBA 6/22-6/24 Doublin Gap 6/24 MapleShade MX

Round 10 of the Thor/Yamaha Spring Series presented by Dunlop Tires Loretta Lynn Youth Regional

7/8 7/15

MapleShade MX Pleasure Valley

7/29

MapleShade MX

Round 11 of the Thor/Yamaha Spring Series presented by Dunlop Tires Round 12 (Final) of the Thor/Yamaha Spring Series presented by Dunlop Tires

8/11-8/12 MapleShade MX 8/19 Pittsburgh Raceway 8/26 MapleShade MX

Round 1 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood Round 2 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood

9/1-9/2 9/9 9/9 9/16

Lucas Oil AMA Pro Motocross Championship (amateur racing on Sunday) Round 3 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood

Steel City Pleasure Valley MapleShade MX TBA

Round 4 of Fly Racing PA State Championship presented by In The Blood

PERFORMANCE FIRST

PHONE: (724) 342-5378 FAX: (724) 342-5530

Sharon Cycle Sales & Service “HONDA MOTORCYCLES-PARTS & SERVICE” Over 45 Years of Service in the Shenango Valley

ROBERT BORNICK OWNER

MON. & THURS. 10 to 8 T W F 10 to 6 SAT. 10 to 4

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THE RACING PAPER

265 E. CONNELLY BLVD. SHARON, PA 16146


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THE RACING PAPER


NEXT EXIT BY JORDAN ROBERTS never asked in the first place. We only made it a half hour into the trip before we made our first skate session stop. It wasn’t much of a skate spot, and now that I think of it, none of our skate sessions took place in a legit spot. Despite the inadequacy of our skate spot choice, we still made it fun. It had a killer view of a lake nested in the mountainside and we had some foreign crowd checking out our moves. I hope we did Americans justice. Nick doesn’t skate, but we hope he had fun watching us. We got back on the road and drove a little while before we hit DC traffic. If you’ve

C

never experienced it before, DC traffic is like being stuck in

haos has been the theme ever since outdoors started.

a crowded elevator for two hours with people sweating all over

I’ll blink once and I’m suddenly on the West coast. I

you. For some reason, this was the unfortunate leg of the trip

blink twice and I’m already back home, briefly. With

that Andrew and Chase had to desperately use the bathroom. With

time being the hot commodity I’m currently lacking, I knew help

no exits in site and gridlock keeping us at a standstill, they

for this next issue was desperately needed. Luckily, High Point

realized the grim reality of the situation and made bathrooms

brought in some of our out-of-town staffers that might normally

out of bottles. Chase never overcame stage fright, but Andrew

make an appearance once a year. A man they call Fish and a guy

somehow managed to fill up the 12-ounce bottle to the brim with

that looks like Conan O’Brien’s brother walked in the door the

no overflow… he claims. Gross I know, but it was truly amazing.

week prior to the third issue’s deadline, and I scooped them up to help design before they could even say hi. Fast-forward a week and a couple all-nighters, and I’m now sit-

We finally got out of that dreadful traffic and hit up a Ruby Tuesdays for some grub and brew. With our stomachs full, we then set out for a gas station and skate sesh numeral dos. I step on

ting at a Starbucks in Maryland surrounded by snobs. This time I

my board and take off as soon as I see some good curb action.

didn’t get here by blinking. This is the first road trip of the

I get halfway there and look back to catch some chaos. Andrew

year and it is everything airports and jet lag are not. Let’s

was limping away from the scene of an accident. Apparently he

take this back to the beginning before I get ahead of myself.

was blindsided by an oncoming Chase. Better him than me. Nick

We should’ve left a half hour before we did but I was sliding into home at the last second with this issue. Nothing is worse

doesn’t skate, but we hope he had fun watching us. We get back on the road and turn up the jams. Creedence

than being the person to hold up the rest of the group, not be-

Clearwater Revival and The Black Keys accompanied us to the

cause I felt bad, but because the rest of the group had no prob-

wrong turns we were about to make. Fred was riding shotgun,

lem letting me know how bad I suck. I briefly dipped out of that

so we all agreed that is was his fault as we drove through the

situation to go pack, and by pack I mean haphazardly throw six

ghetto. Skate spot number three? Don’t think so; I like my wal-

pairs of socks in my suitcase and forget the underwear. I hur-

let where it’s at. After heavy criticism circulated the car like

ried for no reason. By the time I got back to the office I catch

greyhounds at the racetrack, we made our way back to an ac-

wind that we have to wait for the trophies that will go to the

tual highway and eventually make it to the hotel in Waldorf,

fastest men on the planet. I guess you can’t argue that matter.

Maryland. A slew of cop cars greeted us out front. We sweat, and

Another half hour goes by before we load up the trophies and

then realize they’re not there for us. We stay low-key and don’t

our skateboards, and Chase, Andrew, Nick the new guy, and I hit

ask any questions. At this point, we have no idea what kind

the road.

of place we’re staying at. If you don’t see issue number four,

We nominated Nick the new guy for the first shift of driving.

please send a search party to Waldorf. TRP

We didn’t tell him there was only going to be one shift, but he 9


10

Karver, Massachusetts’ Keith Johnson was able to edge out Hudson, New York’s Scott Sheak in every 35+ moto at the Steel City Regional, but second place was the end of the road for Johnson. Jimmy Evans was untouchable with 1-1-1 finishes at his home track. PHOTO BY: ZAK LOWERY

THE RACING PAPER


Here’s a shot of Nick Fratz-Orr skying it out at the Steel City Regional, probably against doctor’s orders. Nick busted his leg up pretty bad earlier this year, but still managed to come back for a 7th-place finish in 250 B Modified.

PHOTO BY: MIMI GREINER

11


Brock Papi took a break from his rigorous amateur national racing schedule and got back to his PA roots for the seventh round of the Spring Series at PRP. He rode strong in his motos, and expects to do the same at the Doublin Gap Youth Regional coming up on June 23 and 24. PHOTO BY: JORDAN ROBERTS

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THE RACING PAPER


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Zach Bell returned to the Keystone State to lay waste to the competition and further himself with a ticket to the Amateur National Motocross Championship at Loretta Lynn Ranch. He swept all three motos in both 250 A and Open Pro Sport classes. PHOTO BY: ZAK LOWERY

THE RACING PAPER


FRIDAY, AUGUST 31 Organized practice (10a-3p). Open to all riders. No membership required for practice.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 LUCAS OIL AMA PRO MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 THOR UNITED STATES MX MEGA SERIES presented by DUNLOP TIRES Mega Series Points SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14

PAMX TEAM SUZUKI PA STATE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES presented by FLY RACING & IN THE BLOOD TATTOOS PAMX State Champ Points

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THE RACING PAPER


TRP: Let’s just start off with some basics. Where are you from? How old are you? What kind of bikes do you ride? Sauers: I’m from Bethel Park, Pennsylvania. I’m 15 years old. I ride a KTM 250 two-stroke. You’re only fifteen and you already race a 250 two-stroke in 250 and Open B? Yes. Both classes. When did you make that step up from minibike and how did you decide to move up? Did you move up from minibike to a 250 or did you have anything in between? I moved up to a 250 when I was thirteen and a half. I went right to the 250 twostroke. What did you ride before that? I rode a Suzuki 85. Didn’t that seem like a big step to go from an 85 to a 250, or were you just cool with that? I was a little freaked out at first but after a few weeks on the bike you just kind of get comfortable with it. How would you say your minibike days went for you? Were you killing it back then or did you start finding more speed when you got on the big bike? I think I sort of found more speed on the big bike, but I always had fun on the little bikes. I thought they were a little bit more fun. It was more challenging. I think it made the tracks a little more fun. So did you do well when you were on minibikes, too? I did pretty good. I never really tried for the Nationals or anything. I did pretty decent. I see you’ve been racing quite a few PAMX races this year. What classes are you racing and what’s the competition like in them? I race the 250 B and Open B. The competition is good. Every weekend there’s always five or six guys that are right there. Nothing’s easy.

The Steel City Regional Qualifier just wrapped up. What were you expecting going into that? I was expecting top ten, just solid finishes and expecting good starts but it didn’t really work out as planned. Was that for all your classes or just a couple? I wrecked in the first 250 Mod class, but I did pretty solid and pretty decent in the other three.

Were you nervous when you saw how many people were signed up for your classes? Not really. I thought it’d be a little bit more on the start with all of the riders there, but I was pretty comfortable. Did you qualify for the classes you were hoping for? Yeah. I didn’t really mind which class I made it in. I made it in the 250 B, and as an alternate in the 250 Mod and Open. You definitely plan on going to Loretta’s, then? Yeah. How do you think it will go for you? Have you been there before on a big bike? No, I’ve never been there before. I’m just hoping for good starts and to keep it on two wheels.

So switching gears a little bit, what’s you’re favorite place to ride? My favorite practice track is by my house. It’s really nice. I really like that layout. It’s a fun track. What kind of soil is it? Is it more like windy turns, jumps…? It just has a really good flow and there’s big jumps. It’s real wide open. Are there any friends or family members you normally ride or race with? Or is it just whoever that weekend? Just whoever shows up. I always like some competition. So you don’t have any regular guys that you normally practice with or anything? Well, there’s a lot of PAMX riders that go out there that you see a lot. So are you into any other things besides moto? No, not much. Well, we’re in Pennsylvania. It gets cold during the winter. What do you do then? I go skiing here and there but for the most part I just kind of stay at home and stay warm. I hate the winter so much. You said you’re 15… Are you getting good at picking up chicks yet? No. Well, I’m 25 and I’m not good either, so when you figure it out let me know, give me some pointers. So the only other thing is, who helps you out and who are your sponsors? I know you don’t quite have a drivers license yet, so I’m sure your parents and maybe some other people are helping you get out to the races. Yeah. Just my family and my mother’s business Colonial Modern Furniture, and Cernic’s and FCR Suspension. TRP

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BAR-TO-BAR

A

funny thing happened the other day. My wife, Jessica, got home with the kids after work and as soon as they walked through the door, my son Cade ran into the living room and jumped on top of me while I was lying on the couch recovering from my broken neck and three broken backs.

idea from him. I told him that it was way too long and that if he gave it to me, I would shorten it and give it back first thing in the morning. Well, of course I forgot about the while ordeal as soon as I put the necklace in my pocket. The next morning arrived and the first thing Cade did was

BY TIMMY COOMBS

away from a large pond the track went around. I told him boys don’t wear jewelry and that he was going to make a choice—either the necklace or his new KTM 50 race bike. He thought for a few seconds and then he calmly said, “I’ll take the necklace.” When he said this, I nearly

HOW DID I END UP GETTING HIM A KTM 50 IN THE FIRST PLACE? Suddenly, something sharp poked my chest and it really hurt. I asked him what it was and he showed me a cross on a long silver chain that hung all the way down to his belly button. I asked him where he got it and he said he just bought it at Wal-Mart for $21.50, with his own money. Later, I found out through Frankie Ali that he probably got it because his best friend and mini-racing idol Gavin Towers had one just like it and Cade probably got the 18

THE RACING PAPER

ask for the necklace back. Well, maybe the second thing—first he had to hold my sacred jar full of two-stroke exhaust under my nose to wake me up and send me scurrying to get dressed as if I was late to staging after winning the first moto at a big race and I can’t find anything to race with—goggles, boots, leathers, etc. It’s one of my reccurring nightmares since my the days of “Harbor Woods.” I remember racing in the snow, just a few feet

fainted. I was so upset I told him he should be ashamed of himself and needed to go back to bed and pull the covers over his head to save himself and me the embarrassment of his ridiculous decision. He did exactly as I said and went to his bedroom and jumped back in bed and piled the covers up over his head. I think the only reason he did this was because he thought that if he stayed in bed long enough, he could get out of going to school

that morning. When he did this, it hit me that it didn’t matter what choices I gave him. He didn’t want anything to do with his new KTM 50. It wasn’t the fact that he didn’t want the bike, but that it was too much for him and he needed a bike that was much easier to ride. I turned around and went back into his bedroom and asked him to come out from under the covers and continue getting ready for school. Later that day I called Jeff Cernic and asked if I could trade the KTM for something easier to ride, like the old XR75 of yesteryear. We ended up getting a new CRF70 that’s a three-speed automatic—perfect. Now I think we’re on the right track to help him get away from his outdated PW50—unlike the route taken by a handful of 65cc riders at last month’s High Point Loretta’s Area Qualifier. So if you see some kid out there racing a trail bike this season, don’t feel bad for him. It’s what’s best for him. Ask his father, the one who paid for the bike (soon, anyway). How did I end up getting him a KTM 50 in the first place? It turns out that his best friend at the races, Gavin Towers, races one and therefore he wanted one too. But he wasn’t ready for a bike that peaky and fast. He almost looped it out the very first time he rode it and was terrified of it from that day on—so much that he was prepared to subsequently hang himself in the process. That reminds me, remember rubber-band starts? I once went to a track where the promoter tied a brick to the end of one to make the start unjumpable. It was mind-boggling. TRP


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VIRTUAL TRAINER

S

chool’s out, the days are longer, the outdoor nationals are in full swing, and Loretta Lynn’s is right around the corner! Just like the pros at the outdoor nationals, you’re probably experiencing the effects of increasing temperatures locally with only worsening conditions to look forward to as summer marches on. If you plan to race in the South or especially at a race like Loretta’s, you need to pay close attention to how you prepare or acclimate to the heat. Your body is equipped with mechanisms that allow you to adapt to these harsh conditions in a process called heat acclimatization. The most important of these mechanisms revolves around the process of sweating, which helps keep your core temperature in check through evaporative cooling. Proper acclimatization causes the following sweat related physiological changes: • Lower core temperature required to start sweat response (start sweating earlier) • Higher volume of sweat (more potential for greater evaporative heat loss) • Increased plasma volume (decreases heart rate and allows for more sweat loss before large decrements in performance— temporary but is replaced by other changes that have the same end effect) • Decreased skin temperature (helps keep core cooler and decreases perceived exertion) • Conservation of sodium chloride (helps maintain proper electrolyte and ionic balance) Complete heat acclimatization takes up to two weeks, but the more fit you are, the less 20

THE RACING PAPER

time it takes. There is no magic formula; a decrease in exercise intensity and duration with the onset of heat that is gradually increased over the course of the acclimatization period is a general guideline. You must also increase fluid intake during this time, and it has been shown that increasing electrolyte (think Gatorade) intake during this period helps as well. It is important to remember that trying to maintain

and throughout the day. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, you should consume 2 cups of fluid for every pound lost during exercise (remember, 8 oz. = 1 cup). To get an idea of just how much you need to drink, you should weigh yourself before and after you train or ride. Any weight decrease is probably due to water loss. If you lose 2 or more pounds during your workout, you should drink

COMPLETE HEAT ACCLIMATIZATION TAKES UP TO TWO WEEKS. the same level of exercise intensity if you’re not acclimatized is a surefire way to overtrain. Willpower cannot overcome the rules of physiology, so always respect what your body is telling you when acclimatizing to the heat. How to Acclimate To become acclimated to the heat, fluid intake has to be increased to make up for the increase in sweat and plasma volume. This means you have to drink more, both during exercise

3 cups (24 oz.) of fluid for each pound lost. If you track what you did drink and add what you’re required to drink to maintain your body weight, you can formulate a drinking rate that will keep you as close as possible to a zero net loss of fluid weight. Relying solely on your thirst mechanism to drink will always leave you behind in the fluid-balance race. Drink on a schedule and before you’re thirsty to ensure adequate hydration. Using drinks with electrolytes can help with both

BY TIM CRYTSER

acclimatization and performance in the heat due to the body’s quest to retain sodium chloride and plasma volume. Another important consideration is that heat acclimatization is specific to humidity. The adaptations are different for hot/dry environments vs. hot/humid environments, so it is best to plan your acclimatization strategy to match your specific race environment. Even though it can get hot and humid in the PAMX racing area, it’s nothing like Loretta Lynn’s. If you do not prepare properly, you will soon discover how humidity can significantly degrade your performance. Heat acclimatization reverses itself rather quickly once the heat stress is removed. Heat acclimatization will be retained for one week but 75 percent of the adaptations are lost within three weeks. More frequent exposures to heat/more exercise sessions in heat will slow this rate of loss. Similarly, leaving the hot environment during the acclimatization process will extend the total period of time it takes to become fully acclimatized. The most efficient acclimatization process takes place when you can stay in the hot environment for the entire time period required to acclimatize. Motocross is a physically demanding sport; heat only adds to the demands placed on your hardworking body. Proper heat acclimatization will help you perform to your potential and help you avoid heat-related injuries ranging from heat cramps all the way to heat stroke. Make sure all your hard work and dedication are not hampered by the hot environment at the races—acclimatize properly and make sure you can handle the heat. TRP


21


Lantzer #98

Dueling water trucks—an occurrence rarely seen in their natural environment. Roberts

If you keep staring at that thing you’ll go blind. Cudby

It drives a van with “Free Candy” spray-painted on the side. 22

THE RACING PAPER

Lowery

Arlene gets official. Lantzer #98

Cudby

Who will be first to go faster than Dad? Greiner

The Levic crew at the High Point National.

Canfield pretends he’s back in the glory days. Wait, Canfield had glory days?


Cudby

Melaina and Miss West Vir-who?

Quads and JNCO. Like two peas in a pod.

Lantzer #98

Lamont and his sign versus...

Cudby

Roberts

Swarr

They’re cute now, but wait until they hit 13.

Someone must’ve told Courtney they were running a 3rd set of motos.

Lantzer #98

...the entire bridge army. It appears Lamont is going to need a bigger sign.

Roberts

Will work 4 moto. 23


Lowery

Cernic

Lantzer #98

The girls who make it happen at PVR.

This hog gets 80 miles to the gallon.

Lantzer #98

BFG holds up the moto order on standard-size paper.

We’re not janitors. We’re masters of the custodial arts. Lowery

Lowery

Come on, just get your own already. Cudby

Would you like your photo in Public Address? Email jordan@ racerxonline.com Snail Mail

TRP Public Address 122 Vista Del Rio Dr. Morgantown, WV 26508

She was DQ’d before they even brought out the 30-second card. 24

THE RACING PAPER

Free swag hyenas, commonly known for their aggressive behavior. Keep a safe distance.


25


Thor Yamaha Spring Series Presented by Dunlop 27

Top Five Sugar Buzz

Check 28 Style From PRP

Courtesy of Outlaw

Talk 29 Shop Outlaw Motorsports

Winners 30 FB Nothing but no-shows and disappointment

26

THE RACING PAPER

The PAMX Spring Series has broke past the halfway mark, with seven out of twelve rounds already in the books. There’s still time to rake in some points, but some riders are looking to run away with the series in their respective class(es), while others have faced injury and are unable to defend their points lead. Other classes are completely up for grabs, but you’ll have to visit www.GoPAMX.com to see what your chances are. As for now, you can check the table out below and see who has the points lead in each class.

Class 50cc 1 50cc 2 50cc 3 50cc Open 65cc 7-11 B 65cc 7-11 C 85cc 9-11 B 85cc 9-11 C Jr Mini Thru 13 85/150 12-15 Supermini 12-15 Schoolboy 12-16 250 A 250 B 250 C Open A Open B Open C Open D Collegeboy 14-24 +25 B/C +25 A Vet B/C +35 A +40 B/C +45 2 Stroke 4 Stroke Women Bomber

Number 122 50 122 50 81 14 81 81 4 79 79 187 721 22 02 717 247x 97 5 717 42 448 890 58 890 13 22 717 17 171

Rider Breyden Campbell Jaydon McCurdy Breyden Campbell Jaydon McCurdy Hunter Carper Jacob Posey Robert Semelsberger Hunter Carper Vincent Luhovey Jr. Timmy Crosby Timmy Crosby Alex Saylor Jason McConnell Joey Deneen Tanner Flemm Broc Streit Trey Gildea Jarrett Thompson Cody Guzzo Broc Streit Brett White Billy Kibler Michael Warchol James Evans Michael Warchol Mimi Greiner Joey Deneen Broc Streit Tiffany Palacki Scott Karluk

Hometown Altoona, PA Blairsville, PA Altoona, PA Blairsville, PA White Oak, PA Belle Vernon, PA Windber, PA White Oak, PA Greensburg, PA Confluence, PA Confluence, PA Altoona, PA McDonald, PA Bedford, PA Freeport, PA Ellwood City, PA Hollidaysburg, PA Hyndman, PA Export, PA Ellwood City, PA McKees Rocks, PA Hastings, PA Brackenridge, PA Elizabeth, PA Brackenridge, PA McKeesport, PA Bedford, PA Ellwood, PA Latrobe, PA Pittsburgh, PA

Points 176 149 177 157 132 174 73 131 136 150 150 80 144 122 163 135 93 142 116 181 162 148 188 100 200 90 150 157 100 47


EVENT: HIGH POINT NATIONAL // BY FRED

Q: What’s your drink of choice on race day?

EnErgy Drinks WatEr Marvin Musquin

Jason Anderson

48%

33%

gatoraDE 19%

ChoColatE Milk 0%

i’M so out of shapE i norMally rEquirE an

iV.

0% Race day drinks? Jessy Nelson

Alex Martin

Visit facebook.com/theracingpaper to tilt the scales!

HOMECOMING WEEKEND: SEPTEMBER 22 & 23 SATURDAY & SUNDAY:

22ND ANNUAL DC VET NATIONAL MOTOCROSS MOTOCROSS & HARE SCRAMBLE

SEPTERMBER 30 SUNDAY

PAMX TEAM SUZUKI PA STATE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES PRESENTED BY FLY RACING & IN THE BLOOD TATTOOS PAMX State Champ Points

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EVENT: PRP // BY JORDAN ROBERTS

Taylor Levic

Lowery

Billy Kibler

g the arted ridin ed. st I e r o c d at I’m so har eck amput n y m t o g I day after

Corey Passieu

Luke Himler

Showcase your finest skills by sending your photo to jordan@racerxonline.com

Who’s listening to what before the gate drops...

Name

Artist

Album

Taylor Dressler’s Playlist 1 Invincible (feat. Ester Dean) 2 Half Naked & Almost Famous 3 Mercy 4 Vengeance 5 Better Off This Way

Machine Gun Kelly Machine Gun Kelly Kanye West Woe, Is Me A Day To Remember

Invincible EP Mercy Single What Separates Me From You

Zak Lowery’s Playlist 1 Forgot About Dre 2 Mercy 3 Welcome to Jamrock 4 Natural Born Killer 5 Drop the World

Dr. Dre Kanye West Damian Marley Avenged Sevenfold Lil Wayne

2001 Mercy Welcome to Jamrock Nightmare Rebirth

Joey Daroza’s Playlist 1 Switchblade 2 A Boy Named Sue 3 Yer So Bad 4 Hateful 5 Can I Kick it

Lars Fredricksen Johnny Cash Tom Petty The Clash A Tribe Called Quest

Viking At San Quentin Full Moon Fever London Calling People’s Instictive Travels

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THE RACING PAPER


Courtesy of Outlaw

E

By Julie Sankbeil

stablished in 2003 by Bill Dailey, Outlaw Motorsports is located on Route 7 in scenic Morgantown, WV. Outlaw Motorsports specializes in parts, accessories, and apparel for various major manufacturers of ATVs, dirt bikes, and street

bikes, including Yamaha, Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki, KTM, and more. Interested in something on a smaller scale? Check out the Outlaw Motorsports R/C Corner for all your radio-control plane, car and truck needs. The selection features Team Losi, Traxxas and Team Associated as well as various fuels and parts. At Outlaw, the staff is enthusiastic about off-road racing and, as former crosscountry racers themselves, has the knowledge to provide the best customer service.

With this understanding of the sport combined with years of experience in the motorcycle retail industry, you are guaranteed to keep coming back. Whether you are looking to replace a part or make your

machine even better, let those who love the sport as much as you do help today. TRP Outlaw Motorsports (304)284-0480 www.outlawmotorsports.4t.com

Vinny Luhovey navigates a long, wellgrooved sweeper during one of his Supermini motos at PRP. We’re assuming it’s the first moto since he’s not underwater. He piloted his Honda to two second-place motos. PHOTO BY: JORDAN ROBERTS

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Troy never returned our emails after we shipped out his new goggles, so we can only assume this is what he looked like before we were able to intervene. We’re glad we could help you out, Troy.

Rider: Troy Herrington Bike: Unknown Prize: Smith Fuel v.2 Goggles


Steve Roman

By Jordan Roberts

TRP: What was the step before you reached the pro level? What were you doing before you turned pro? Roman: Just like a lot of local pro/am money races. I did a lot of Arenacross at a pro level but I felt like that was more of a stepping stone for me. I feel like I suit the tighter style tracks a lot better. That’s pretty much where I got my stepping into that. Then I went with the outdoor stuff more pretty much in the last two years where I’ve felt like I’ve been a little more prominent on that than what I have been in years prior that I tried. What really made you decide to step up and go pro? Were you just feeling like you finally found the speed where you wanted to be and just made the move? I’ve always wanted to do it my whole life. Definitely I’ve always wanted to be a professional motocross rider. I just look at it like now I’m getting a little older with age and I just want to take it to the fullest I can in these next two years, instead of seeing when I’m 35 looking back saying this is what I could have done. The next two or three years I’ve just got to put down as much as I can and give it everything I have so I know that I can’t look back and say this is what I could have done. I want to know I gave it everything I did. So, you’ve definitely put in a pretty good year this far. Probably one of the best, you’d say? I feel like this year definitely went the best… I don’t know if you could say it was a very good year. My finishes aren’t where I want them to be, but just going and making it was solid. But I’m not looking to go and make the main event; I want to go and be top twenty at every round. I just had minor struggles at every round that I went to this year. Then again, leaving states and knowing you made the main event was good, but

it’s just not where I wanted to be. I hope that the rest of the rounds I go to I can correct them to where I want to be. You said you’ve had some mechanical failures the past few rounds that really haven’t done you very good and haven’t really helped you prove anything in your results, right? Yeah. At the first round I had a cam break, so I had to ride my brand new stock practice bike. Then I had that fixed. And then I went to Texas and I only made it through one practice and I threw the bottom end out of it. So, it was basically those first two rounds right there were just going to the line with a completely bone stock motor in my race chassis. Which is a good setup but it was just a total struggle. You know you’re not going to get a good start in the Lites class with a stock motor. So I felt like right off the bat that was just kind of a killer for me. Then after Freestone I came home and decided to get both my bikes ready and we just realized there wasn’t enough time to get them 100 percent prepared to be where they needed to be. So Chad Sanner at Elev-

en 10 Mods had offered me to ride one of his bikes. I took the offer up and it went really well. I qualified real good. I qualified 25th practice. I was running 15th or 16th the first four laps and I had a mechanical issue. That pretty much ended my day because I didn’t have a backup bike at High Point. Now I’m just looking forward to Budds Creek back on my home bike and trying to get some finishes here on one good motor. That’s probably one thing a lot of people don’t realize how difficult the privateer life is. Do you feel like once you get the bike solid underneath you and get everything completely prepared are you feeling good for a full 30 minutes plus 2 laps? Yeah. I feel like more or less with riding the first few Nationals on the stock bike, my confidence had already been through lows. I felt like it was senseless for me to ride because I knew there was no chance of doing what I wanted to do. I’m in good enough shape for sure to finish it. I’ve done it before; I’ve got a top twenty before. I just want to go out there and do what I’ve prepared this year to do. I know I can do it. I’ve just got to get to the line on the bike that I initially wanted to ride and get a good start and a finish. If you get that good start and you can run that pace the first half of the moto, you can shadow into a pretty calm for the rest. And you’ve rode a lot of these tracks before. Which track do you think is the one to really push for that 20 spot? I look forward to being top 20 at Budds Creek, Red Bud… Every one that I go to. I don’t want to go to one and not… I don’t think that there’s one that I do that I don’t think I can run the top 20. But I do look forward to Steel City as being more of a tenth or maybe even better. That’s my hometown track. I look forward to finishing real high there. TRP 31


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We were going to fill this spot, but we went riding instead.

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The classes got faster once the Regional Qualifier arrived at Steel City. Many showed up, but only some will make it to the next stop. BY TAYLOR DRESSLER PHOTOS BY ZAK LOWERY

W

ith the AMA Amateur National Motocross Championships at Loretta Lynn’s only seven weeks away, Area Qualifiers were over and everyone’s attention turned to the Regionals, which began in early June with the Loretta Lynn’s Northeast Regional at Pennsylvania’s Steel City Raceway. Riders knew what they had to accomplish to continue on the path to the world’s largest amateur motocross race, held each August in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee. All the work that they’d put into getting there would have to be duplicated and then intensified if they hoped to reach Tennessee to compete against the most talented riders from across the country. The track conditions at Steel City varied through the weekend. Practice had some slick spots because the ground was fairly dry, but that was taken care of by the steady rain that rolled in about midday Friday and continued through the night. It left just enough moisture for track conditions to be prime come Saturday morning. The

track crew made sure there was enough traction and moisture throughout the weekend for racers to perform to the best of their ability. Threatening clouds rolled in and out throughout both days, but the rain held off and didn’t cause any problems. The track offered something for everyone. Favorite spots included the two uphill doubles on the backside of the tracks, as well as some technical rollers that only a few riders were brave enough to triple through. Top riders know their training clocks are ticking as they move forward to the next round. Dakota Alix and Cooper Webb are perfect examples of this. It’s refreshing to see young talent come head-to-head this year as both boys move up from the Schoolboy class and into the 250 B Stock and Modified classes. Their sure-to-unfold rivalry will definitely be one to watch. Last year, 16-year-old Cooper Webb finished third overall in the Super Mini 1 (12-15) class and thirty-second in Schoolboy 2 (13-16) B/C at the national. This year it looks like he will be battling with another young threat, Dakota Alix, aboard his Red 33


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THE RACING PAPER


Riders came out in droves to Steel City Raceway in Delmont, Pennsylvania, to try and punch their ticket to Hurrican Mills, Tennessee for the Red Bull AMA Amateur National Championship at Loretta Lynn Ranch. The track was full all day, even with multiple divisions for split classes.

Bull KTM. Alix looked strong in the area qualifiers last year but suffered a few big crashes at the Muddy Creek Regional, hindering his ability to move forward to the finals. This year we will finally get to see these two go head-to-head. Both seem to be confident and rode very smoothly in Pennsylvania, though Webb was able to prevail, sweeping his 250B Stock and Mod motos. Alix finished a close second overall in both classes. “My results were good,” Alix said. “I didn’t go there to win—I just went there to qualify—so I just rode nice and easy and came away with two seconds. So I accomplished what I went there to do.” Local rider Jared Lesher from Shelocta, Pennsylvania, rounded out the top three in the 250B Modified class, finishing 2-5-4 in his motos. Another kid to watch is #100 from Cairo, Georgia, Zachary Bell. He was able to win all three motos in both the Open Pro Sport and 250A classes, following a second-place 250B Stock finish last year. Bell will face Joey Savatgy and Mitchell Oldenburg, who also finished first overall in the Open Pro Sport class at Steel City, for the Mid-East and South Central Regionals at Red Bud and Freestone.

Luke Renzland took first in 450A and third in 250A for the weekend. Cody Gragg, known for being a consistent and well-versed rider, also put in a solid performance in the 250A and Two-Stroke classes, finishing second overall in both. Local favorite Casey Clark from Pine Grove, Pennsylvania, finished first overall in the Junior 25+ class with a 2-2-2 moto finishes; he qualified fourth in Open Pro Sport with 6-2-3 scores. Clark battled with Elizabeth, Pennsylvania’s James Evans in the Junior 25+ class. Evans finished second overall there while sweeping all three Vet 35+ motos. Fombell, Pennsylvania’s Daniel Lippman qualified fifth in 250 A and sixth in 450 A. At the Pleasure Valley Area Qualifier, he won the Open Pro Sport and 250 A classes and finished second in 450 A. The weekend at Steel City fell into the “smart and safe racing” category, as top riders had to balance speed with the need to stay healthy. We are definitely in for some exciting racing when they drop the gates for the first motos of the 31st running of the Red Bull AMA Amateur National Motocross Championship on July 29. TRP 35


INTO A LESSER

UNKNOWN Our region’s top riders take solace when the outdoor nationals arrive at High Point, their backyard track.

Mike McDade: During the first practice I felt good. I felt like I had the fastest time, I’m pretty sure. During the second practice I tried to get out front again but got stuck behind a lot of people and it seemed like no one was trying to ride hard. I didn’t get to get a good time in during that practice, but I got to see the track as it got rougher, and so it was good. Alex Martin: I felt pretty good. I was just trying to feel things out in the first practice. I’m trying a different setup for my bike, and I was actually really happy with it. So going into the second practice, I just wanted to try and get comfortable and use to the track and bike. I was really happy with how I felt on the bike. The track is good and they did a really good job prepping it, so it should be a fun day. Steve Roman: I felt good, just had a little bit of a struggle with the suspension, but the bike felt very fast. It’s kind of a bummer with the last-minute decision to switch to the Honda, and I didn’t have much time to ride it. I actually only got to run one tank of gas through it before I got to come here, and for not really getting to ride it, it seems to be working pretty good so far. Hopefully I can work the suspension a little bit. I’m on a Honda this weekend because I had a few minor problems with my Yamahas at the beginning of the year. I went out and did the first two nationals and had little blow-ups. I didn’t really switch onto this completely; this is just for this weekend. It could possibly lead into more if I do well this weekend, though. Taylor Levic: It didn’t go too good. I couldn’t get around that well and didn’t go as fast as I wanted to. I just checked out the track. THE RACING PAPER

alex Martin

Steve roMan

taylor levic

BY TAYLOR DRESSLER PHOTOS BY ANDREW FREDRICKSON

How did you feel about practice today?

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Mike McDaDe

Did you race here last year? McDade: I wasn’t here last year. I broke my leg in the end of 2010 and then broke it four more times throughout 2011 and didn’t start riding till about June last year. I think my first race back last year was Unadilla. I had surgery and was out the whole beginning of last year. Martin: Last year I think I went 13-6 for tenth in the 250 Class. The second moto was a breakout ride for me; it was my best finish at that time, so it gave me confidence and motivation for the rest of the season. It helped to raise me into another level. I’ve always liked High Point and looked forward to coming here. I really enjoy it. Roman: I think I went 26-28 last year here. This year I feel like I have a more prepared bike. I think my physical fitness and mental game of it is also more prepared this year too. Levic: I didn’t race here last year; I was doing a regional for Loretta’s last year at this time. I was going to come here and watch the pro race but I had a regional to go to.

What’s the best thing about your day so far? McDade: Going out in the first practice, and as nervous as I was because it’s been a while, I ended up having the fastest lap time in my practice. Also my son is here today, and I always do better when he’s here, so those two things have been the “keys to the day so far.” Martin: Well, in the second practice I really felt comfortable and I was able to be more aggressive and throw some big whips, which is fun. Roman: Being able to get through practice and having a good time. And being safe and having all my friends and family here is pretty cool.


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Featuring Craig Morgan live on Satruday

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INTO A LESSER

UNKNOWN Clockwise from left: McDade airs out the uphill triple by the starting line; Levic suited up and ready to go; Roman suffered from mechanical issues; Martin enjoyed excellent starts in his motos. Levic: Just being able to be here and watch all the pro guys. Also being up in the mechanics’ area and standing there and getting to feel like a pro and just have that attitude is awesome.

What’s your favorite part of the track? McDade: I like the downhill rollers and the big sky jumper. Martin: I really like the dirt here and the corners always rut up nice. The hip double down at bottom is cool. I really like that jump. Roman: Probably the stair steps after the first turn. Levic: I really like the new pro section; you go up the big step-up in the area I don’t usually get to race on.

What’s your favorite local track? McDade: I like Steel City on the good days, when it’s all groomed up. I like the private tracks that I’ve built or my friends have built around here too. Martin: I like the private tracks around here—Chris Durham and Chad Sanner have some good tracks at their place. I also like Pittsburgh Raceway. Roman: Steel City. Levic: I really like Steel City.

What did you have for breakfast this morning? McDade: I had a crunchy peanut-butter bar and two bananas and then some grapes. Martin: I had some breakfast potatoes, eggs, and sausage. Roman: Peanut butter and some toast. Levic: I had fruit and some granola bars. It wasn’t that big.

What’s your motivation for the day? McDade: I want to get points and be top-fifteen this weekend, but being the first one of the year for 38

THE RACING PAPER

me, I’d be happy with a top twenty. Martin: I want to put on a good show for all the people that came out. A lot of PA people are here, and a lot of people for the Eleven10 Mods shop are here, so I want to put on a good show for them and have some good results and just have fun. Roman: I want to be in the top twenty this weekend. Levic: Have fun and stay loose, because last year I raced Steel City and I was really tensed up and nervous.

What are you most nervous about? McDade: I’m nervous about the start, because the gates here are favored for the inside. So if I don’t get a great gate pick, it’s going to be a longer run from the right of the box. If I can get inside the box that would be awesome, but if I get outside the box I’ll just have to go for it. Martin: I really want to get a good start so I can run up front and get a good finish. I don’t really want to get a bad start and be in the back and get roosted all day, ’cause that’s never any fun. Roman: I want to finish the motos strong and not blow all the turns like I was in practice, and be able to catch all the lines I want to catch. Levic: The ruts get pretty deep. I don’t want go down and crash out or anything.

What are your plans for the rest of the day? McDade: Take what didn’t go great here and fix it for next weekend. Martin: Get some food and relax. I’ll probably be pretty worn out. I don’t really do anything crazy. Roman: Probably go get a good dinner with my girlfriend and family. Levic: Hang out here, walk around, and hang out with some friends. TRP


39


PHOTO PVR LLAQ REPORT

Alex Rick

Slusser by Arlene

Lantzer

Jarrett Thompson

Greiner

Greiner

450 A holeshot goes to Slusser.

Corey Passieu Lantzer

Greiner

Trey Gildea

Great day to get a holeshot. xx 40

Lantzer Lantzer

Cooper Webb’s Nac-Nac

Lantzer

Lantzer

Loretta Lynn Qualifiers have been busy all around the Northeast over the past months as riders have traveled around matching their skills to get that spot for a Loretta Lynn’s Regional. High Point’s qualifier was back in April and enjoyed great attendance; Pleasure Valley presented riders with another opportunity to narrow down the class or just get that solid qualifying spot. Saturday’s track was moist and chunky but didn’t slow the talent down, while Sunday’s track was drier and very fast. Cooper Webb was in the mix with our class of B riders, Joey Deneen, Jonathan Sauers, and Jared Lesher. The C Class had Johnny Owens from Georgia mixing it up with our Aaron Fenchak. Bryan Turpin of Georgia and Colin Thomas from Ohio made it tough for the riders in their classes—Cameron Davis, Corey Passieu, and Cameron Scheller took first in their 65 and 85 divisions. Congratulation to all of the riders, and may they all do well at their particular LL Regionals!

Lantzer

WORDS BY ARLENE LANTZER PHOTOS BY ARLENE LANTZER AND MIMI GREINER

THE RACING PAPER

Dale Hanlon

Liston & Turner


Lantzer

Lantzer

Greiner

450 B holeshot went to D. Eliis

Slusser by Mimi

Joey Deneen

Greiner

Lesher and Deneen side by side in 250 B Mod.

Lantzer

Lantzer

Luke Himler with one leg out.

Lantzer

Greiner

Mauro Cautela

Cameron Scheller

Lantzer

Greiner

Jonathon Sauers

250 C holeshot

450 B on the starting gate.

Jonathan Wells

41 xx


Pyramid Valley Round 2 of the Western Powersports Tri-State Championship STORY AND PHOTOS BY JORDAN ROBERTS

I

It would be false to claim there is an abundance of motocross tracks in this region that allow a rider to race well past the sunset and through the night—especially if you eliminate any of the one-off fair races that might populate the brief list. It would also be false to claim the writer of this article as being a worthy nighttime flash photographer, but hey, sometimes you have to play the cards you were (or weren’t) dealt. Doug Keller is the operations manager of Pyramid Valley, a track that’s had plenty of ups and downs in its multi-owner history. Fortunately, things are currently on the up with Keller and his selfdescribed “outlaw” track.

Pyramid Valley does not belong to any multi-promoter series or conglomerate racing organization. They run their own series, the Western Power Sports Tri State Championship. This year’s series hosts a string of Saturdaynight races and kicks off the first weekend in May. The race schedule takes a brief break for most of June, 42

THE RACING PAPER

making way for Wednesday-night practices, and starts back up in July and continues through August until it reaches the season-ending championship race, scheduled for second weekend in September. We stopped in for the second round of Pyramid Valley’s series to see what it was all about. There was no vacancy in the lower parking area well before practice started, and the hillside continued to fill up until there was little space left. It was quite a turnout for the standalone track. The motos began early in the evening and provided every class with daylight for their first moto. After the first motos wound down, the track crew went out to

do a little grooming and bypass the section on the hillside that lacks adequate lighting. Second motos started back up as the sun slowly disappeared behind the Lost Creek, West Virginia, treeline. At this moment on that night in particular, at least one sap realized he was screwed because he had only brought goggles with tinted lenses. The odds of at least one rider showing up ill-equipped seemed plausible with such a generous


turnout; at least that’s how I … I mean he ... reasoned it away. As for everyone else, they seemed to have come prepared. They weren’t just prepared to ride, either. They were prepared to race, and that was evident in the 250 A class. Frostburg, Maryland’s Brandon Minnich shot out to an early lead in the first moto and even had a little bit of breathing room by the end of the first lap, while Fairmont, West Virginia’s Ryan Echols and Weston, West Virginia’s Joe McCarty duked it out for second place. Echols was able to separate himself from McCarty on the last lap and began to hone in on Minnich. He must have found a second power band in his YZ250, because he was all over Minnich’s rear fender with just a few turns to go. Echols dove in under Minnich in a tight, flat 180-degree corner to take the lead, but Minnich set himself up for the inside technical line in the following turn. He kept impressive momentum through the inside line, but he was unable to

squeeze out Echols as he shot back from the outside line. The two were side-by-side going into the last turn, but unfortunately for Minnich, the outside line was the slower of the two. Ryan Echols jumped across the finish line first with only a wheel length between himself and Brandon Minnich. The inspiring first-moto battle wasn’t decisive for the overall, though. Echols needed to prove he could repeat his impressive first-moto ride and Minnich had a chance at redemption. Joe McCarty still had a chance at the overall with a previous third-place finish, but a second-moto win wouldn’t necessarily guarantee him the top spot. Unfortunately for Echols and McCarty, Minnich took the lead in the second moto and never looked back, nabbing the 250 A overall win, with Echols going 1-2 for second overall and McCarty taking third with 3-3 moto finishes. There were other notable motos from the night, and certainly more to come in the series, but you’ll have to make your way out to Pyramid Valley’s Saturday-night special to check it out for yourself. TRP You can find their schedule on page 8 of this issue. JR

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WATCH ON FEATURING EPISODE DATE

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

6/17/12 6/24/12 7/1/12 7/1/12 7/8/12 7/15/12 8/19/12 9/2/12 9/9/12 9/16/12 9/23/12 9/30/12 10/7/12 10/14/12 10/21/12 10/28/12 11/4/12 11/11/12 11/18/12 11/25/12 12/2/12 12/9/12 12/9/12 12/16/12 12/16/12 12/23/12 12/23/12 12/30/12 1/6/13 1/6/13 1/13/13 1/13/13 1/20/13 1/20/13 2/3/13 2/3/13 2/10/13 2/10/13

TIME (ET)

RACE LOCATION

RACE

3:30 PM 5:30 PM 4:30 PM 5:00 PM 4:30 PM 4:30 PM 4:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 6:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 4:00 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 5:30 PM TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

Morganton, NC Blountville, TN Union, SC Union, SC Budds Creek, MD Park City, KY Park City, KY Walnut, IL Springville, IN Springville, IN Hurricane Mills, TN Hurricane Mills, TN Oakland, KY Masontown, WV Masontown, WV Mt. Morris, PA Millfield, OH Snowshoe, WV Snowshoe, WV New Berlin, NY Millfield, OH Buchanan, MI Hurricane Mills, TN Millfield, OH New Berlin, NY New Berlin, NY St. Clairsville, OH St. Clairsville, OH Crawfordsville, IN Crawfordsville, IN Hurricane Mills, TN Hurricane Mills, TN

GNCC Bike ATVMX GNCC ATV GNCC Bike ATVMX GNCC ATV GNCC Bike ATVMX GNCC ATV GNCC Bike MX MX ATVMX GNCC ATV GNCC Bike ATVMX ATVMX GNCC ATV GNCC Bike ATVMX GNCC ATV ATVMX ATVMX GNCC Bike GNCC ATV GNCC Bike GNCC ATV GNCC Bike GNCC ATV GNCC Bike GNCC Bike GNCC ATV GNCC UTV/Utility GNCC UTV/Utility GNCC UTV/Utility GNCC UTV/Utility GNCC UTV/Utility GNCC UTV/Utility

CATCH UP ON EPISODES AT WWW.RACERTVONLINE.COM Schedule subject to change.

THE RACING PAPER


By Jordan Roberts // Photos by Fred

TCX Pro 2.1 // $439.99

Have you taken a close look at James Stewart’s and Ryan Dungey’s custom Nike boots? Pretty sick, right? Well TCX is the Italian company that manufactures the custom kicks, and even though they aren’t available to the public, you can get the next best thing with the TCX Pro 2.1 model. Make your feet happy.

www.TCXboots.com Motul MC Care // Varies

Motul just came out with an entire line of motorcycle-specific products that will keep your bike and hard apparel top notch. From lubricants to cleaning agents, Motul’s new product line will ensure proper upkeep on all the items you broke the bank for. Throw out that mystery can you’ve been spraying on everything.

www.Motul.com One Gamma Helmet // $270

We’re glad One Industries decided to start making more than graphics. Not only do they make safe and stylish quality helmets, among other apparel, but they’re moderately priced to where you can afford to buy more than once every ten years. Follow the link to check out their full line of melon protectors.

www.OneIndustries.com Rescue Pegs // $49.95

Rescue Pegs mount over your stock pegs and allow room for another rider’s feet. Tandem backflips? Maybe. Hauling out an injured rider from deep in the woods? Yeah, that’s what they were actually made for. Snag some of these to increase your bargaining power at your friend’s worst moment.

www.RescuePegs.com

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It’s easy to get down on yourself after giving it your all and still falling short of your expectations, and teamwork is most difficult during times of tribulation, but where you go from there depends on your ability to mend and move on. Patience and determination seldom go unrewarded. Photo by Jordan Roberts

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47


TRP Volume 9 // Issue 3  

Cover: Jonathon Sauers by Mimi Greiner. Features: The Final Cut, Into A Lesser Unknown, PVR LLAQ Photo Report, Saturday Night Special

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