Page 1


‘[W]hether  the  leaves  of  our  MISCELLANY  fall  prematurely  or  in  due  course,  there  is   the  consoling  thought  that  deciduous  trees  are  not  the  least  fruitful’,  ends  the   foreword  to  the  1920  edition  of  A  Queen’s  College  Miscellany.     We  don’t  have  any  flowery  metaphors  in  this  edition,  but  we  do  have  frogs,  God,   revolvers  and  marshmallows.  Enjoy.                 From  your  editors,     Emma,  Poppy  and  Laurie                                                                

1.


Contents     from  Museum  (1920)-­‐  Alan  Porter                                                                                                                                        3   Has  anybody  seen  Florence?  –  Poppy  Middleton                                                                4   IKONA  –  Joshua  Claxton                  5   a  frog.  –  Elaine  Joseph                  6   This  is  where  you  jump-­‐  Evie  Kitt                  7   Riddles  (from  the  Old  English  Exeter  Book)-­‐  Laurie  Churchman   8   7  (Amiens)-­‐  Merryn  Davies-­‐Deacon   9   Perpetually  sad…-­‐  Anonymous   10   B.C.-­‐  Jack  Straker   11   To  the  Man  on  the  Street-­‐  Mary  Maschio   12   À  gens  nus…-­‐  Jack  Straker   13   Drawing  -­‐  Emily  Motto   14   Croquet  is  a-­‐playing…Anonymous   15   Yet  in  this  modern  day  and  age…Kitty  Ho   17   Marry  sounds-­‐  Emma  Papworth   18   The  Dissolution  of  the  Wall  -­‐  Emma  Papworth   19   Marshmallow  Drift-­‐  Evangeline  Atkinson   20   Closing  note                                                                                                                                                                                                                            21                                                    

 

 

2.


from  Museum       ‘That,’  said  a  girl  in  a  flat  voice,  ‘is  God.’   She  turned  and  slid  the  table-­‐cover  straight.   Her  mother  could  not  answer,  but  she  thought   ‘It  must  be  Beggar  Joe,  gone  lately  mad.’   He  lumbered  along  the  read  and  turned  a  corner.   His  tapping  faded  and  the  day  was  death;   till  a  few,  leaden-­‐heavy  globes  of  rain   fell  swift  and  meteor-­‐straight,  pocking  the  road.         Alan  Porter  (1920)  A  Queen’s  College  Miscellany                                                              

   

3.


Has  anybody  seen  Florence?       Robbing     hours  in  broad  midnight,   Champagne  Charlie’s  black  and  blue,   Who  Knows  Driver,   turn  out  the  light   just  a  few  questions  for  me  and  you.       We  see  purple     Can  you  find  us  Sir?   We  rocked  your  boats   and  shamed  your  camera,     We’re  the  two  you  thought  you  knew.   We’re  always  running     past     the  space  in  your  curtains   Chasing  through  tunnels     And  doughnut  holes,   We’ve  got  your  squirrels.       Take  the  name  we  left  you  with,   Has  anybody  seen       Florence.         Poppy  Middleton  

 

4.


I  K  O  N  A  

    He’s  been  sitting  in  the  living  room  for  a  few  hours  now,  occupying  the  majority  of   the   coffee   table.   He   must   have   appeared   overnight,   this   would   be   the   only   explanation,   but   I   don’t   know   where   from,   and   I   don’t   know   what   for.   He   just   stares   back  at  me  and  I  feel  guilt.  His  eyes  don’t  follow  you  around  the  room,  though,  not   like  the  masterpieces  of  Rome  and  London,  or  even  Jan  Matejko.  His  chains  are  gilt-­‐ edged,   or   more   likely   just   painted   gold,   for   in   some   of   the   crevices   the   gold   has   begun  to  crack,  revealing  something  black  underneath.  I’d  heard  He  spent  the  night   next  door,  and  the  night  before  that,  the  door  before  that,  but  I  never  thought  He’d   come  to  ours,  but  it  all  makes  sense.  We  must  all  host  Him  at  some  point.  I  wonder   what  the  appropriate  greeting  would  be.  How  does  one  address  God?  Or  is  he  God?   On  the  specifics  I’d  always  been  unsure,  especially  in  their  version.  He  shows  me  His   palms   and,   as   expected,   the   scars   are   there.   Light   erupts   from   a   distant   source   behind  His  head,  blurring  his  edges.  I’m  not  sure  what  to  make  of  that.  I  realise  I’ve   still  not  said  a  word,  or  can  He  hear  my  thoughts?  In  which  case,  I’ve  said  plenty  of   words.   But   He’s   still   said   none.   But   if   you   are   the   word,   perhaps   you   need   never   say   any.   It’s   all   too   awkward,   this   confrontation   with   the   Almighty,   so   I   walk   to   bathroom   and   grab   the   nearest   towel,   re-­‐enter   the   living   room,   and   gingerly   place   it   over  His  head,  out  of  sight.  Nonetheless,  the  living  room  is  now  a  no-­‐go  zone,  at  least   until  He  decides  to  leave  again  and  go  next  door.       Joshua  Claxton                                      

5.


a  frog.   you  are  so  tiny  in  his  hands.  as  he  scoops  you  up  and  pops  you  over  the  threshold.   from   playground   to   grass.   it   doesnt   help   that   the   rain   has   made   me   giddy   and   while   we  peer  down  with  childish  anticipation,  you  fail  to  move,  you  gaze  into  the  green,  a   defeated   gaze,   then   wordlessly,   without   even   a   nod   of   gratitude,   hop   into   the   darkness.   we   think   weve   rescued   you.   that   some   kid   wouldve   found   you   belly   up   on   the   tarmac   the   next   morning,   feet   bubbling   from   the   heat   of   the   sun.   or   maybe   a   pram  wheel  wouldve  squished  your  head  into  your  neck,  like  sleeping  swans.     can  you  forgive  us?  or  dont  you  know  that  you,  between  us,  beneath  us,  lit  up  one   soggy   June,   dragging   yourself   onwards   nowhere   specific,   will   always   be   remembered?  you  wouldve  gone  unseen,  untouched  that  night.  and  doesnt  everyone   need  to  be  seen  sometimes  and  touched,  moved  even,  lifted  up,  albeit  momentarily,   into   the   void.   rescued   from   the   tarmac   and   the   gravel   and   the   metallic.   held   in   his   hands  on  the  brink  of  falling  and  loving  it.         Elaine  Joseph                                                      

6.


Evie  Kitt   ‘This  is  where  you  jump’   Acrylic  and  coloured  pigment  on  paper  

7.


Riddles   from  the  Old  English  Exeter  Book       Birds     The  air  suspends  bright  little  beasts   Obscure  over  the  hills,  bold  choristers   In  dark  robes.  They  rove  in  flocks   Calling  at  headlands,  sometimes  houses,   Charing  Cross,  Embankment,  Waterloo  –   At  your  door,  they  name  themselves  for  you.         Oyster     The  sea  fed  me  –  the  helmet  of  the  water   Cradled  me  in  waves  as  I  rested  on  the  ground.   I  often  opened  my  mouth  to  the  tide.   Now  people  will  glut  on  my  footless  flesh  –   They  don’t  care  for  my  skin,  my  shell  –   They  rip  it  with  a  knife’s  point   And  eat  me  uncooked.     Laurie  Churchman          

 

8.


7  (Amiens)       I  have  been  apart  from  you  so  long  that  I  have  almost  forgotten  your  likeness— enough,  at  least,  to  mistake  countless  strangers  for  you:  this  man,  in  the  park,  or   that,  in  the  metro,  of  a  city  I  shall  leave  on  the  first  train  tomorrow.  Enough  for  my   travels  to  come  to  a  momentary  standstill,  while  I  let  myself  believe  that  the   distance  between  us  is  effaced,  and  imagine  that  one,  just  one,  of  these  unknown   men  will  turn  to  me  and  recognise  me,  and  I  him.  I  am  transfixed  by  the  promise  of   joy,  the  sureness  of  our  next  meeting,  which  will  be  all  the  sweeter  for  its  delay:  I   anticipate  in  the  sight  of  each  near-­‐doppelgänger  the  half-­‐walk  half-­‐run  that  will   lead  to  our  next  embrace.     In  art  galleries,  I  see  you  in  this  or  that  painting,  and  feel  ashamed  of  my   shallowness,  my  overwhelming  distraction.  Ars  gratia  artis,  no  more:  there  is  always   this  lingering  undercurrent,  the  search  for  you  that  lies  behind  my  cultural   aspirations.  How  long  until  I  can  again  view  a  painting  for  what  it  is,  and  not  search   it  for  connections  it  can  never  have  known?  When  will  I  retrieve  the  rational  eye  of   the  critic,  unhindered  by  the  lover’s  distorting  lens?       -­‐Merryn  Davies-­‐Deacon      

9.


Perpetually  sad  and  ill  at  ease   Delicate  one   Do  you  not  see  beauty  when  you  look   Down  from  above?   Perched  with  a  song  trapped  in  your  throat   Delightful  one   Did  some  heartless  creature  steal  your  joy   During  a  carefree  flight?   Perfectly  shaken  and  ruffled  eternally   Deep-­‐thinking  one   Does  silence  keep  calling  to   Deaden  the  pain?   Pulling  at  wisps  that  float  through  the  wind   Determined  one   Does  hope  hold  you  back  from   Drowning  completely?   Profoundly  loved,  little  streamtail-­‐oh   Disillusioned  one   Do  you  dare  to  see  how  love   Divine  can  set  you  free?       Anonymous                                            

10.


B.C.     Our   castle’s   not   smoke                                                                                     It’s     our     only     hope   It’s   culture   we’ve   borne                                                                         To     even       it       out   We’re   such   different   folk                                                                                     Equality’s               scope   We’ll   always     be   torn                                                                                         Is   fair     shake     without   But    since      it      ain’t      broke                                                                                                                                                                    All  mankind’s   false  

trope.  

Why   so   full     of     scorn;                                                                                   And   Darwin     in   doubt.     But  

so  

says  

Inherited   Will  

fortune  

exile  

And  

so  

Up  

to  

Both  

I  

my   a  

a  

his   them  

do  

whose  

virile  

of  

undermine  

And  

And  

one  

every  

to  

kingdom,  

pathetic   cowardly  

gender’s  

shrug  

pledge  

patriarchy’s   that   castle  

lack  

game,  

dreamt-­‐up  

to   run  

privilege,  

passive   in  

of   of  

frame.  

the   human   a  

wraith?   sky   faith   goodbye.  

  Jack  Straker            

11.


To  the  Man  on  the  Street       In  all  the  noise,  you  had  nothing  to  do.   But  sit  and  watch,  a  splendid  bloated  farce,   As  I  went  by,  your  eyes  fixed  on  my  arse.   A  bit  of  skirt  swaying  as  it  passed  through     And  crossed  your  marbled  legs,  ready  to  rise.   I  saw  myself  shrink  and  wanted  to  hide,   My  core  clenched  and  my  limbs  liquified,    Looking  back  into  your  slavering  eyes.     An  eclipse  of  fear…  gone.  I  ran  away   Before  your  staring  dismembered  me.   Must  I  go  through  this  every  single  day?     Is  there  nowhere  safe?  Nowhere  I  can  flee?   They’ll  say  I’m  overreacting,  although   What  you  might’ve  done,  I  just  couldn’t  know.       Mary  Maschio                                              

12.


À                                                                                                                          gens                                                                                                                            nus                                                                                  Enjoy    all    this    whilst    you    still  can,                                                              It’s          spoiled          and          shifting          sand.                                                      A  nibble  condemned  us  to  wander  the  earth                                                Enlightened  souls  could  make  some  sense  of  our  birth                                                      Now  only  on  screens  do  we  find  our  lives’  worth                                                                    The      sands      will      rub      off      our      veneer                                                                                      Joy  and  love                    are  still  here.       Jack  Straker                                                        

13.


Emily  Motto   Pastel  on  paper  

 

14.


Croquet  is  a-­‐playing   As  you  punt  away  your  June   And  the  silver  summer  mornings  warm   To  golden  afternoon     And  your  love  is  always  carefree,   And  your  love  is  always  young,   And  you  feed  ducks  on  the  Isis   While  Christchurch  bells  are  run     And  you  wear  your  gown  to  dinner   In  your  stained-­‐glass-­‐windowed  hall   And  you  kiss  her  in  the  cloister,   Up  against  the  chapel  wall     And  you  kiss  her  on  your  staircase,     And  on  the  library  floor   And  you  murmur  in  her  ear  that  you’ll   Be  hers  for  evermore     And  you  have  your  little  spats   And  pretend  that  they  are  real   For  only  an  imperfect  union   Can  ever  be  ideal  –     And  she  gives  you  space  for  finals   Because  you  must  go  far   For  your  two-­‐and-­‐a-­‐half  children   And  your  shiny  Rover  car     You’ll  drink  away  the  summer   And  visit  through  the  vac   And  both  be  oh,  ever-­‐so-­‐glad   You  won’t  be  coming  back  –       And  you’ll  get  your  First  in  Classics   And  then  convert  to  Law,   And  suddenly  you’ll  feel  the  world   Is  not  yours  anymore,     And  your  love  will  shrink  and  wither   As  the  grey  comes  to  your  hair   And  then  you’ll  find  remembering   Is  more  than  you  can  bear     And  you’ll  find  that  bitterness  

15.


Tears  you  quite  in  two  or  three   And  you’ll  wish  with  all  your  aging  heart   We  were  how  we  used  to  be       Anonymous                                                                                  

16.


Yet  in  this  modern  day  and  age     When  streetlamps  make  the  starlight  fade,     How  can  we  trust  ourselves  to  know     That  the  stars  above  us  continue  to  glow?   Blind  faith  belongs  in  a  different  century,     A  time  far  off,  which  exists  outside  of  me.     When  people  had  the  confidence  to  say     That  an  empty  sky  should  be  okay.   Perhaps  I  lack  the  kindness  to  be  sure     That  should  you  neglect  me,     I  could  still  love  you  more.     But  when  uncertainty  and  doubt  holds  true,     Please  let  the  more  loving  one  be  you.       Kitty  Ho                                                              

17.


marry  sounds   in  a  deep  web  gauze  of   stolen  sounds,   fluidity  talks  in  tumbling  dispositions,   she  always  said     they  swallow  god  without  thinking   and  allow  time  to  pass   unspent       Emma  Papworth                  

18.


Emma  Papworth              ‘The  Dissolution  of  the  Wall’                Canvas,  acrylic,  plaster    

 

19.


Marshmallow  Drift     Standing  in  the  middle  of  a  marshmallow  drift   Trying  to  keep  everything  dead  cold   So  I  can  stay  fixed  in  the  middle   Just  me   And  the  mallows  just  bump  off  and  round  and  over  me     But  then  the  storm  hots  up   And  the  marshmallows  start  sticking  and  stretching     And  pummelling  me  thick  and  fast     Till  I’m  bound  in  a  goozing  cast   Soft  but  so  constricting       So  I  tightly  squeeze  my  eyes  shut     (Till  the  lights  pop  in  the  dark)   And  waddle  on   Pretending  I’m  free  from  this  bloody  show  business.         Evangeline  Atkinson                        

20.


Thank   you   to   all   of   this   edition’s   contributors;   please   feel   free   to   email   your   submissions  for  the  Michaelmas  2014  edition  to  our  new  editors:   stephanie.carey@queens.ox.ac.uk  and  laurie.churchman@queens.ox.ac.uk      

21.


Trinity 2014  

'Whether the leaves of our MISCELLANY fall prematurely or in due course, there is the consoling thought that deciduous trees are not the lea...

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you