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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF BROKEN ARROW HIGH SCHOOL

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BROKEN ARROW, OKLAHOMA

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BAHSPULSE.COM

Highlights from Friday nights Broken Arrow finishes football season and is crowned “Fans in the Stands” champs By Drew Watzke and Dylan Rivera Pulse Staff Writers Broken Arrow is usually one of the tougher football teams to beat in 6A division 1 and this year’s team wasn’t much different. The Tigers stumbled a bit out of the gates, losing their first two, but followed up by going 6-2, including a 5-0 record at home. When the final regular season whistle blew, BA finished 6-4 and secured the number three seed in the 2016 playoffs. Junior running back Tucker Dunlap said the team seemed calm when the

PARTY IN THE USA The student section throws red, white and blue colored corn starch at kickoff at the Owasso game for the USA theme. (Photo by Audrie Chastain)

Tigers playoff game kicked off, and they remained that way throughout the duration of the game. “The team responded wonderfully,”

Dunlap said. “We didn’t let it phase us and we just put everything we had into it.” Broken Arrow’s first round matchup

was none other than the rival Union Redskins. The Tigers love to hate

See “Fans” Page Two


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Fans (Continued from Page One)

Union and always show out in big numbers at Union’s Tuttle Stadium in hopes that the Tigers walk away with the win. The first round of the playoffs was much of the same, and the visitor section was pumped as BA scored the first touchdown and took a quick 7-0 lead over the Redskins. However, the Tigers fell short of their ultimate goal of getting to the state championship game, as Union knocked Broken Arrow out of contention with a 42-20 victory over BA. The players fed off the energy of the crowd and the student section every game. When the Jungle is rocking, the players get pumped up for every down. Dunlap says while they may not be out on the field in the play, they have an affect on something else that the team requires to win on Fridays. “They make a huge impact,” Dunlap said. “If they are all hyped up, that helps us be hyped. They play a crucial role in how the spirits are on the field.” Broken Arrow was announced the 2016 Fox23 “Fans in the Stands” champions, recognized for bringing a dedicated student section to every game, whether on the road or at Memorial Stadium. That section, positioned behind the south endzone at home games, propelled BA to a 5-0 record at home this season. Leading the students every Friday was the high-

energy Jungle Squad. The elite group of 13 boys bring the heart to every BA game, and senior Cade Ferguson knows that their role is vital in encouraging the team on. “When it’s a close game, the noise from the student section completely pumps up our team, sometimes giving us the W,” Ferguson said. All in all, a hard-working team and extremely supportive student-base tells the story for the 2016 season. The confidence BA instilled in its players translated into a perfect 5-0 home record, an accomplishment that was felt by the entire student body. The strong relationship between the athletes and student supporters resulted in a football season filled with excitement and Friday night fun. Returning students and fans alike can only hope next year brings the same atmosphere as this season did. Junior Bri Regnier is looking forward to her senior year and another exciting season. “Next year, being my senior year, I will have a lot of fun with my friends again,” said Regnier. Now, it’s time for Broken Arrow to get out and support Tiger basketball, swimming, wrestling, and hockey as the winter sport season gets underway. The Jungle Squad will be there the whole way, encouraging the Tigers all year.

MARCH TO WAR Broken Arrow Varsity Football runs out to the field at the Owasso game. (Photo by Allison Black)

LETS GO TIGERS Student section (top) and junior Tucker Darnell (bottom) cheer on football team. (Photos by Andra Fauvell and Ashley Spencer)

EYE ON THE BALL Junior Tucker Dunlap jumps and braces for the catch. (Photo by Lorance Washington)


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SOUND WITH PRIDE Senior

Preston Myer (top) and senior Chase Gaddis (bottom) play/yell for the Tigers. (Photos by Ashley Spencer and Gracie Basinger)

THROW YOUR HANDS IN THE AIR Broken Arrow student section cheers on football team by throwing cornstarch in the air at kickoff. (Photo by Gracie Basinger)

SPIRIT OF THE SQUAD Varsity Jungle Squad decks out for neon theme (top) and the student section cheers for the Tigers at the gold out game (bottom). (Photos by Amy Stecker and Andra Fauvell)

ROAR FOR THE TIGERS Senior Sarah Leger cheers for the tigers alongside fellow tigettes. (Photo by Gracie Basinger)

FACE OFF Broken Arrow football player holds his ground against Sapulpa (top) and the football team huddles before a game (bottom). (Photos by Andra Fauvell and Ally Coldwell)


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Respect the kicker By Dylan Rivera Pulse Staff Writer

Most people don’t look at the kicker or the punter as a prime example of what football is all about. They aren’t out there dodging tackles or delivering big hits, but they’re an intricate part of the game in a different way. Broken Arrow High School senior Chandler Saied is both the punter and kicker for the Tigers, and he’s hoping that in his last year he can help get BA to the state championship game for a second consecutive year. T h e r e ’ s a common perception that the kicker gets treated differently by other players and coaches. Saied clears the air and says it’s just a myth, and that in his case, it’s the exact opposite. “It’s thought to be that we get treated worse, but honestly everyone likes me so I kind of get spoiled a little bit,” Saied said. Saied first started kicking in third grade, but has just recently started punting. He’s worked with both coaches, Seth Ramsay and Billy Gates, to try and perfect his game. Ramsay has been helping with Saied’s punting a lot both in the offseason and in practice. He’s impressed with how

Saied is constantly working on his game. “Chandler has focused more on hangtime,” Ramsay said. “Basically, if you put it in Chandler’s head, he will find a way to be great at it.” Gates has also noticed Saied’s work ethic and has been impressed by his drive to get better even throughout the season. “He has done very well this year,” Gates said. “He works on his technique daily to be the best he can be.” Saied knows that one of the keys to being a good kicker is being mentally focused and prepared for those gamechanging kicks. Gates said that it’s one of the areas that Saied excels. That preparation helps him in becoming one of the top scorers at Broken Arrow. “The best part about being a kicker is you get to score the most points,” Saied said. “People don’t really notice it, but when you look at the stats, I’m up there. I’m either number one or two, I’m not real sure.” Saied would like to continue kicking in college and is still waiting to see if he gets more offers before he makes his decision where.

He works on his technique daily to be the best he can be. -Coach Billy Gates

HEAD HELD HIGH Chandler Saied walks to his postition on the field. (Photo by Allison Black)


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BA hockey excited for new season By Drew Watzke Pulse Staff Writer There might be days that it’s still 80 degrees outside, but that isn’t stopping the BA hockey team from getting on the ice. The guys from Broken Arrow are not funded by the school, but they strive every year to represent BA in the best way possible. Their season started Monday night, and Broken Arrow took the game by a huge margin: an impressive 9-1 victory over rival Union. Senior Ben Groover was pleased with the team’s opener. “The lines that were being put together were working and everything was just clicking for everyone,” Groover said. Broken Arrow relies on a strong coaching staff to keep them focused throughout the season. Head coach Hamilton is accompanied by goalie coach Skylar and defense coach Schultz. Each player appreciates the coaches and how they prepare them both in practice and in the games. Sophomore and starting goalie Cain Robison knows the coaching staff is vital to the team’s success. “They’re all really good guys and they help us out no matter what,” Robison said. Despite Broken Arrow hockey’s success in recent years, the sport still doesn’t receive the recognition

HIT THE ICE Last year’s Broken Arrow hockey team poses for a picture. (Photo submitted)

and support from the school they’re school,” Reynolds said. All the guys on the team value representing. Senior Jacob Reynolds fan and student thinks that the The freedom we have while support. Robison hockey team along recalled that a with other nonskating and the friendships couple of years ago funded school there were over a teams should that are formed are awesome. hundred spectators receive more at Broken Arrow recognition from hockey games, -Ben Groover, senior Broken Arrow. and now the team “We have a struggles to find world-class rugby someone in the team, hockey team, crowd that isn’t a players’ parent. and bowling team which all receive little attention and support from the Groover is ready for another solid

season and hopes BA will come out and support. “The freedom we have while skating and the friendships that are formed are awesome,” Groover said. “It’s really intense and we love having a big crowd.” The Tigers practice and play their games at the Tulsa Oilers ice center, aside from one game at the BOK Center a year, which will take place in December.


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A run in Annalise Crockett’s shoes Senior cross country runner reflects on season By Hunter Grim Pulse Staff Writer

After being one of the four runners to qualify for the State Championship, Annalise Crockett reminisced on her past four years in cross country. Her hard work has finally paid off during her senior year. The Broken Arrow Cross Country team was 18 points away from qualifying for state, which led them to only have four runners chosen for the state run - two boys and two girls. The names of those who ran along side Crockett, were seniors Kelsey Bottomley, Collin Carpenter and Blake McConkay. “Annalise is extremely hard working both on and off the field,” junior Peyton Jones said. “She has set the bar extremely high and continued to be a great influence.” Annalise is one of the leaders on the girls cross country team, and her confident but humble attitude is one of the reasons why she is a great runner. Her silent confidence is something that has been influenced by the people in her life. Being the youngest of five siblings shows that

one must have perseverance. “Annalise is a great friend of mine and she is a wonderful person,” senior Jessa Murray said. “We’re good runners and I hope we stay in touch after graduation as we go our separate ways.” Annalise has moved around a lot while she was growing up, living in Utah, Arkansas, Missouri and finally settling in Oklahoma. She plans to either attend the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs or Northeastern State University on both an athletic and academic scholarship. “My brother scored a 32 on the Act and my goal is to get a higher score than him,” Crockett said. “The first time I took the ACT I scored a 31 and I plan on taking it again later in the semester.” Along with being a dedicated student and runner, Crockett is a devoted Mormon. Along with going to practice and studying, Crockett also attends seminary which starts at 6:00 in the morning every day. After graduating from college, she plans to serve a mission for the church.

RACE TO THE FINISH LINE Senior Annalise Crockett runs in a meet. (Photos submitted)


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Wrestling season starts with a slam

the state championship, the Tigers have reloaded and are ready to burst onto the scene this season and reclaim the As the seasons continue to change, coveted state championship. Finishing the colder weather brings on the with a state championship this year start of wrestling season. The 16- will bring the Tigers total count to time State champion Broken Arrow 17 and make Coach Shawn Jones the Tiger Wrestling team looks to bring winning-est coach in the history of the back yet another championship to program. Coach Jones is currently tied the already prestigious program. The with former Coach Steve Dunlap at 4 Tigers are going into the 2017 season state championships. The Tigers also looking to make a return to the top of look to return to the top by winning the the Oklahoma wrestling world. Coach dual state championship. “I’ve been taught that a good work Shawn Jones and his varsity squad have ethic influences been prepping Wrestling taught me that others,” sophomore for the season Zach Macheselli said. with grueling I always have a band of “Wrestling taught me practices and that I always have hitting the brothers and always try to a band of brothers weights hard. to always try to Coach Jones’ do better the next match and do better the next formula for march.” success is -Zach Macheselli, The Tigers are proven by loaded with talent the amount sophomore this year. Some of individual key wrestlers to the and team championships that Broken Arrow Tigers quest for yet another state has won, making them one of the best championship are Tajuan Daniels, Tyler Lawley, Brady Mattioda, Caleb programs in Oklahoma. “Everyone’s goal this year is to win Wise, Zach Macheselli, and Trenton state both individually and as a team,” Lieurance. “We are really coming together as a junior Brady Mattioda said. “Coach Jones pushes us in practice and it really team, and I really feel like we have a chance to win big in most categories pays off when it counts.” After finishing with a 12 and 2 record this year,” senior Tajuan Daniels said. last year, and finishing runner-ups for By Hunter Grim Pulse Staff Writer

PIN IT TO WIN IT Senior Tyler Lawley gets ready for a match (top) and wrestlers cheer on their teammates (bottom). (Photos by Spencer Tuia)


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Miller Godwin is louder than a bomb By Cloey Patton Pulse Staff Writer

SMILE FOR THE CAMERA Senior Miller Godwin poses for a photo shoot done by his friend, Kelsey Hausam. (Photo submitted)

Senior Miller Godwin first performed a spoken word piece at Mr. BA in his junior year. He has continued his poetic growth throughout creative writing courses and performing at events. “I knew I wanted to participate in Mr. BA last year, but I didn’t know what to do for a talent so I just spoke,” Godwin said. “I got a great response, so I participated in the poetry slam in December. After that, Mr. Wann told me to take his advanced creative writing course and that’s when I started writing regularly.” His main inspirations for his writing and performances are his creative writing teacher Joshua Wann and the poet SNCKPCK. “He’s a very talented poet, as all of our students are,” Wann said. “ But on top of that, he’s taken a lot of initiative as far as helping organize things, getting the word out for events, putting in the extra time to make events happen and taking it very seriously.” During a performance, Godwin mostly has the feeling of excitement. “I don’t really have the fear anymore like I used to,” Godwin said. “Honestly, just practice and belief that my work will be appreciated were what helped me overcome my fear. I learned that if you believe in your writing, than you’ll believe in your performance.”

Godwin regularly fills his poems with humor and motivation. “I love hearing people’s laughter,” Godwin said. “Most of my pieces are just funny things my mind thinks of or motivational messages that I’m called to spread.” Outside of his comedic poetry, he does sometimes take a serious note. “My more emotional pieces that I don’t usually perform are usually about the people closest to me at the time in my life,” Godwin said. Godwin also helps inspire people that perform alongside him. Seniors Rebecca Wheeler and Chyna Mayer are two of his close friends that take part and speak at the events. “He’s incredibly encouraging,” Wheeler said. “I’ve dealt with social anxiety all my life and he’s truly helped me find my courage. I wouldn’t have even joined the poetry team if he hadn’t been there.” Along with encouraging friends, Godwin also brings them joy. “Miller taught me how to write happy and uplifting poems,” Mayer said. “He’s my best friend. I love him dearly.” Godwin continues to encourage his peers both with his writing and his personality.


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Exchange students visit Broken Arrow By Cheyenne Pauls Pulse Staff Writer

Every year Broken Arrow High School receives a small number of exchange students from across the globe. This years exchange students are from several different countries: Junior Einar Lunde from Norway, junior Leon Knichel from Germany, junior Sungsu Park from South Korea, junior Peilun He from China and senior Maria Franceschina from Italy. “School here is very different from in South Korea. There we begin school in March and go to November,” Park said. “There, each grade learns separate things and the grades don’t merge. Also, each day the first hour is a different class.” Lunde and Knichel both got involved with the exchange program through relatives or friends suggesting the EF program to them. “My brother was an exchange student in California and said I

should sign up for the program,” Knichel said. “Though I didn’t get to choose where, I still thought it’d be a fun idea.” Being a foreign exhange student opens up many opportunities for students. It gives them the chance to immerse themselves into another country’s culture and living habits along with their values and ways of life. “Here I get to learn and live in another country and learn their different values and cultures,” Lunde said. “It’s very different from my home town in Norway. It’s much bigger.” If students are interested in becoming a foreign exchange student for a year, EF has an academic year abroad program that students can sign up for. Visit http://www.ef.edu/ aya/ for the beginning application and first step to becomming a foreign exhange student.

It’s very different from my home town in Norway. It’s much bigger. -Einar Lunday, junior

Dru Denny is on the rise By Bailey Hill Pulse Staff Writer

Junior Dru Denny is an aspiring actress at Broken Arrow High School. Denny has been involved in drama programs at church since the second grade, however, she has been involved with the school’s program since seventh grade. Denny is very involved in high school drama competitions. Denny travels with the drama department around the state for competitions and has been given numerous all-star cast awards, as well as a state recognized award. “My high school drama experience has been great so far,” Denny said. “I’ve been involved in a lot of good shows. My favorite thing to do during the school year is the One Act Competition. Going to competition with your favorite people is such a great experience. It’s cool to travel around and meet new friends from around the state and see the shows they bring to the table.” To prepare herself before plays, Denny normally warms up her voice, does relaxing exercises to calm her nerves and prays over her cast mates. Denny is known for her dramatic facial features and her acting skills, which are admired by several of her classmates in her drama classes. “Dru is an amazing and dedicated actor,” junior Deisy Bustamante

said. “She gets very into her role and steps into her character’s shoes, and it is amazing to watch her bring her character to life. She is very talented.” The drama student’s audition for each play and the drama teacher, Mrs. Ellis, will decide who will be placed where. Denny normally receives the roll of the comedic relief or the gossip, as those are the roles she excels in. “She thrives in comedy. She is extremely funny and it shows in her everyday life,” senior Torri Jordan said. At the senior high, Denny has played Beline, a gold-digging trophy wife in “Imaginary Invalid,” Mary Windrod, a battered old woman in an old mining town in “Rimers of Eldritch,” and Maggie, a sarcastic gossip who owns the town tavern in “Anatomy of Gray.”

DRAMATIC MOMENT Junior Dru Denny performs her part in “The Rimer’s of Eldritch” last year. (Photo by Ashley Spencer)


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FCCLA leads the way By Bailey Hill Pulse Staff Writer

Not only is Broken Arrow High School’s FCCLA, or Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America club the largest club at the high school, it is also the largest FCCLA club in the nation. The club has 320 active members, and centers its focus on family leadership skills. “My favorite part about being in FCCLA is being able to meet a ton of amazing leaders and make new friends. It is also a great learning experience,” senior Courtney Center said. The club goes to competitions where they compete in things such as public speaking, cake decorating and children’s literature. There are competitions all around the state of Oklahoma, and if the Broken Arrow club does well they will move on to national competitions. “Last year Cory Lane and I competed in Applied Math for Culinary Management,” senior Tony Hall said. “We won state for our competition. Sadly, we did not get to go to nationals. We had to take two different types of tests, then created a taco truck to explain Applied Math for Culinary Management to the three judges we had.” Students gain multiple skills such as leadership and career skills, and they are provided with the social

opportunity to meet new students from around the United States. FCCLA is filled with numerous opportunities for the active members. “I joined FCCLA because I always heard people talk about it and how fun it was, so I wanted to be a part of this awesome leadership experience,” senior Taylor Wooldridge said. “My favorite part of FCCLA would probably be all the wonderful people that you get to meet not only in our school but people from all around the United States.” FCCLA does multiple fundraiser events at the school such as selling chocolate bars around the school and hosting movies nights throughout the school year. They are showing the film Hocus Pocus at the Tiger Stadium on Oct. 11. Applications are available in the Family and Consumer Science classrooms located in building C.

FCCLA MAKES A DIFFERENCE FCCLA has a meeting (top). FCCLA members work their car wash (bottom left). FCCLA poses for a group photo. (bottom right) (Photos by Lorance Washington and submitted by Olivia Hernandez)


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Pride takes state at home

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Makes history by breaking records By Shaelyn Disotell Pulse Staff Writer On Oct. 29, the Pride competed at their annual state competition and won for the fifteenth consecutive year. The Pride also, for the second time this season, made history by setting a new OBA record of a score of a 95.95. The Pride’s other record-breaking score was when they went to St. Louis and received a 94.5. The Pride had never scored higher than an 88 at this Super Regional. “It feels good to be a part of the band that made history twice in one season,” senior snare player Blake Jumper said. The competition lasted all day, and members got the opportunity to go watch other bands performances. Although there were many parts to the competition, some members have selected favorite parts. “My favorite part of State was performing finals for the last time,” senior colorguard member Abby Cha said. “It’s just so awesome to be in front of a crowd that large, and to be

able to perform you heart out.” A tradition that happens at every state competition is that all the alumni from past pride years come to see the members and watch the band’s performance. It’s a great opportunity for the alumni to see what the Pride is like from the outside and is also a time where past members can converse and mingle with the new members. “My favorite part of state was seeing how proud all of our alumni were,” junior Euphonium player Jaide Wiles said. Although this competition completed the Pride’s competitive season, their season is still in session. “In December, the Pride is heading to the Tournament of Roses Parade,” senior clarinet player and oboe soloist Megan Kesterson said. “It’s a great reward for all the hard work we’ve done this season.” For more information on the Pride and their upcoming events, visit their website at w w w. b r o k e n a r r o w p r i d e . c o m .

DO IT WITH PRIDE The Pride of Broken Arrow performs their show at halftime during the game against Yukon. (Photos by Ashley Spencer)


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Advancing into AP Club By Dominique Potter Pulse Staff Writer Advanced Placement classes, also known as AP classes, allow students to get a higher education in their choice classes. To commemorate those students, a few AP teachers have put together an AP Club. The main sponsors of the club are foreign language teacher Shelley Mashburn and science teacher Donna Gradel, along with seniors Jacob Taylor and Jada Holliday as the co-presidents of the club. “Our purpose is to promote and support AP programs and students,” Mashburn said. The 2016-2017 school year is the first full year the AP Club has been intact. This year the club has over 150 members. To be a member of the AP Club, students have to be part of at least one AP class. “The main recurring meeting is every other Wednesday,” Taylor said. “We have about three or four AP teachers, one from each subject, come and help students study for their class.” The club has planned several activities for the students within the club to destress. These activities include yoga, painting and visiting dogs and animals. In the second semester, the club plans to play

ultimate frisbee to allow the members to relax with each other. The club has different committees to help organize and plan different activities the members of the club will participate in. During each meeting, the members of each committee update the club on how they can become involved with the committees and ask for any ideas the members have for the club. The committees range from a stress relief committee to the annual banquet committee. “There is a lot of research that goes into planning events, so that we can have effective stress leaving techniques that are beneficial and not just entertainment,” Holliday said. After all of the AP tests have been taken by the students, the sponsors of the club plan to host a banquet in April to celebrate all of the AP testtakers. “AP Club has been very useful in helping myself and other students to conquer rigorous classes in a stress-free manner,” senior David Kubis said. “This club has helped in managing studying time, homework and easing off burdens from school.” If students would like to join the AP Club, visit Mrs. Mashburn in A136 or Mrs. Gradel in A258 for details.

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Newspaper creates after school club By Cheyenne Pauls Pulse Staff Writer

After attempting to recruit people for the third hour newspaper class, the paper’s editors, seniors Ally Coldwell, Cheyenne Pauls, and Dominique Potter, made the decision of creating an after school club for students who do not have the ability to change their schedules. “We started the club because we had a lot of students asking if they could still write for the newspaper, even if they weren’t in the class,” Potter said. “It’s a way to allow students to still be in newspaper without making them change their schedule.” The club will be exactly like the class and will last an hour after school every Tuesday. Students will begin with writing a test article to see what they need to learn then they will decide on a category they prefer to write in. Stories will be assigned each week and staffers will be expected to have their stories in on deadline. “Writing for newspaper is something I really enjoy doing, and I am really excited to see other students get involved as well,” senior Bailey Hill said. “I hope other students take advantage of this opportunity and join the club.”

The club will offer plenty of opportunities for students to get out and be involved with school events. Being a member of the club will guarantee admission into the newspaper class if the student decides to take it in future years. Staffers will be expected to abide by the AP style rules. “I wanted to join newspaper because the prospect of writing academically outside of class was actually exciting since it is something that I enjoy, and I might be able to use it with a career in science which made me even more excited for the class,” senior London Willson said. “I was devastated that I couldn’t join newspaper because of my schedule.” Staffers will have an assigned category to write in that is supervised by one of their three student editors, which students can refer to for help with writing their article. Students interested in joining Newspaper Club can contact Newspaper Adviser Ashley Spencer in room MN106, one of the the paper’s editors, or visit the BAHSPulse.com to sign up for the club. Students will be required to fill out a form and will need English teacher recommendation.


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Aurasma, the future of yearbook By Bailey Hill Pulse Staff Writer

The Aurasma app will be used for the first time in this year’s yearbook. The app is a code reading device that can display videos on a phone. A code will be embedded on certain pages and users will be able to scan the page and watch a video or view additional content. The yearbook class is teaming up with the Pulse class and will be using some of their videos. Pulse video student and senior Jonathan Rico feels this will give more coverage for the readers as well as help the pages stand out more. “It won’t be just pictures. Things would basically come to life,” Rico said. “It feels great to know that a lot of my work will be in the book, especially since this is our first year using this app.” Yearbook adviser Ashley Spencer traveled to a yearbook conference in Norman over the summer, and that is how the app was discovered by Broken Arrow’s yearbook team. Norman High School used this app during their yearbook creation process last year. The Aurasma app went along with the

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theme and helped bring their book to life. “We decided to use Aurasma this year so that we could display more pictures or videos with our yearbook pages,” senior managing editor Cloey Patton said. “This will be good for our yearbook because pictures or videos that we’re not able to use in the yearbook can still be featured. It will also give us the ability to add coverage of graduation and prom, even though the yearbook final deadline is before those things happen.” Broken Arrow High School’s yearbook is very focused on the students and wants to try and make each yearbook better and better. “Our society is becoming more dependent and invested in technology, it’s important for us to create new ways to keep our book interactive,” senior editor in chief Gracelyn Basinger said. “I think it will definitely be used for yearbooks in the future.” Students interested in seeing the pages come to life in this year’s yearbook should make sure they pre-order now in MN106 or at jostensyearbooks.com. The app Aurasma is available in the Apple store or Google store.

NEWS

Seniors choose favorites By Ally Coldwell Pulse Editor

Every year the seniors of Broken Arrow High School vote for their class favorites. The polls were open Oct. 25 and 26 and the students have decided a senior quote, a senior song and a senior flower. “I like senior favorites because it gives us individuality for our senior year,” senior Erin Herndon said. This year, the polls were open Oct. 25 and 26 for seniors to vote on their favorites. The quote that won out for senior favorite is a tribute to a friend lost in a tragic accident over the summer, Travor Brown. The quote is his famous phrase, “If anyone’s interested, I’ve got some free love to give.” “I think it’s incredible that we as seniors are honoring Travor in that way,” senior Jacob Howard said.

The winning song is “I’ll Always Remember You” by Miley Cyrus. The song is all about graduation and moving on, so many student feel as though it is perfect for a senior song. The song will be sung by the choir at graduation. “I’m really glad this song was chosen to be our senior song because Hannah Montana is very dear to my heart and it’s about graduation, so why not,” senior Anna Stoner said. The winning flower for the 2016 senior class is a sunflower. “I’m glad that the sunflower won senior favorite because it is my favorite flower,” senior Cass King said. “It reminds me of beauty that is more than just looks. It is beauty that shines and stands out from other things.” All of the senior favorites will be played or displayed at graduation, a date that is yet to be set but will be taking place at the end of May.

IN LOVING MEMORY Senior Noah Osborne has a ukulele and Brown’s quote on display in the back of his car as a tribute to his good friend. (Photo by Ally Coldwell)


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Empty Bowls, charity event a success By Cloey Patton Pulse Staff Writer

The annual Empty Bowls event took place on Tuesday, Nov. 15 in the BAHS Cafeteria benefitting BA Neighbors and BA Food for Kids. Attendees received a full meal and a bowl of their choice for the $10 ticket price. The cause for Empty Bowls is to create awareness for famine through an event comprised of students making bowls that are either sold, or auctioned off, for charity. The project is open to anyone and 90 percent of the proceeds are given to charity. Students were given the chance to help out and set up the event alongside making bowls. Senior Paxton Belcher has made a bowl every year that she’s been at BAHS. She also volunteered to help set up this year and last year. “It feels good to use my artistic talent to help out others in the community,” Belcher said. For entertainment, the event opened with an orchestra that transitioned into spoken poetry and choreographed dance pieces. There was also an air dry clay bowl-making station for children to interact with. Dance teacher Katie McCall’s beginning, intermediate and advanced dance classes performed choreographed pieces to spoken poetry. Senior Jordan Erwin danced with her fellow classmates.

“It was a different type of abstract dancing that you don’t usually see,” Erwin said. Senior Shay Wren performed a spoken piece of poetry, “That’s your Community; Your Family,” while junior Sophie Lowther and senior Ellyce Hill danced. “I was really nervous performing my piece because I knew it wasn’t one of my best.” Wren said. “I did better than I thought I would have and I had a lot of fun.” The Empty Bowls tradition started at a high school in Michigan and quickly became an international trend. BAHS has participated for the last three years. For more information on how to get involved with the planning of next year’s event, please visit Mrs. Jennifer Deal in VPA 104.

PICK A BOWL, ANY BOWL Students show off their talent with bowls being auctioned off (top) and dances to spoken poems (bottom). (Photos by Cloey Patton and Audrie Chastain)


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PEEK-A-BOO Senior Cloey Patton (top) and Newspaper and Yearbook Adviser Ashley Spencer show off their new bowls after enjoying soup and salad. (Photos by Audrie Chastain) STUDENTS DISPLAY MULTIPLE TALENTS Students danced (top and bottom), read spoken word poems (top) and chose bowls to be taken home from Empty Bowls (middle). (Photos by Audrie Chastain)

CHOOSE WISELY Advanced Dance performs to spoken word poetry (top). Various bowls were on display both in the silent auction area and for attendees to choose from. (Photos by Audrie Chastain)


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Two Teachers of the Year named By Cheyenne Pauls Pulse Staff Writer

AP environmental science teacher Donna Gradel and social studies teacher Tiffany Jones were awarded the title of Teacher of the Year for Broken Arrow High School. This year is the first year that the high school was allowed to select two teachers for title due to the number of students and faculty on the campus. “I am so happy for Mrs. Gradel for winning teacher of the year,” senior Johna Pulliam said. “Not only is she a great teacher, but she truly is a great role model as well. She cares about every student that comes in her classroom and can change their mood no matter what’s going on.” The teachers of the year are selected through an election. All the teachers will nominate their peers, and the teachers nominated will then be voted

on by their peers to determine who will represent their school. “I believe it is a great honor to be selected by your peers at any site,” senior principal Larry Lewis said. To announce that Jones was one of the chosen teachers of the year, Lewis called her down to the D building office and surprised her with the title and a bouquet of roses. A few of her students, leadership class members and administration congratulated her with confetti. “It was definitely a surprise and very humbling to think my colleges chose me to represent them,” Jones said. “We have some teachers who are unbelievable and I was honored just to have been nominated.” Both Gradel and Jones will now represent Broken Arrow High School as Broken Arrow Teacher of the Year candidates.

SAY CHEESE Teachers of the Year Donna Gradel (top) and Tiffany Jones (bottom) pose with students after the announcement. (Photos by Greg Spencer)

STAFF

Adviser: Ashley Spencer, aspencer@baschools.org

Ally Coldwell, Shaelyn Disotell, Stone Freeman, Hunter Grim, Bailey Hill, Taylor Lanning, Cloey Patton, Cheyenne Pauls, Dominique Potter, Dylan Rivera, Kaylie Swatsenbarg, Haleigh Tallant, Drew Watske, Caleb Willis The Pulse welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be delivered to room MN106. The Pulse is a student-produced publication produced by the newspaper class of Broken Arrow High School, which also provides written content for bahspulse.com.

LOTS OFor identity, LOVE Students congratulate BAHS Teachers Yearinformation Donna Notice of Non-Discrimination- There will be no discrimination in the District because of race, color, sex, pregnancy, gender, gender expression national origin, religion, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation,of age,the or genetic Gradel and Tiffany Jones. byyouth Greg Spencer) in its programs, services, activities and employment. The district also provides equal access to the Boy Scouts of America and(Photos other designated groups.

Pulse Nov. 22, 2016  
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