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Over 100 wishes granted Leadership students grant Winter Wishes By Cloey Patton Pulse Staff Writers December of 2016 marks the first year that leadership classes on campus have attempted to grant Winter Wishes from students. Senior Daxx Milligan and others were sent out to hand deliver the gifts on Dec. 15. Milligan delivered over 100 wishes while dressed as Buddy the Elf. Students on campus submitted wishes for everything from school suppies, to candy, to gifts and parties for friends or classes. “My favorite wishes to grant were the ones that really meant something to the student and were really special to them,” Milligan said. “Being able to grant wishes made me feel good in my heart to give happiness to just everyone and to the people that needed it around

HOLIDAY SPIRIT Senior James Taylor received a box of ramen noodles for his granted winter wish. (Photo by Audrie Chastain)

Christmas. I actually volunteered to be the wish granter because I thought it’d be hilarious and a great way to be a part of the school.” The leadership class granted around

100 wishes in total, with the help of Student Activity Director Jason Jedamski and leadership teacher Whitney Nolan. “Our student activities fund from

dances, fundraisers and sponsorships are what provided the money to give people Winter Wishes,” Jedamski said.

See “Wishes” Page Two


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(Continued from Page One) Senior Lexi Bagrosky helped orchestrate the event by sorting through all of the submitted wishes, looking up schedules, and shopping for the gifted items. “I loved Winter wishes because it gave our sixth hour leadership class an opportunity to grant a lot of students’ wishes and grow closer together as a class,” Bagrosky said. “My favorite part of Winter Wishes was seeing students’ faces light up when they got what they wished for and it was a total surprise to them.” To capture pictures of the grants, senior Audrie Chastain followed the gift-giving group around school and even visited Margaret Hudson to grant wishes. “It was so sweet to get to see everyone getting their winter wishes,” Chastain said. “My favorite part was going to Margaret Hudson and giving them their gifts.” Senior James Taylor’s wish for ramen noodles was granted in full when he received a 48-pack from Milligan during his class. “This is the best gift I’ve ever gotten, ever,” Taylor said. “One time for my birthday I got a 6-pack from my grandma, but this tops that. Thank you, everybody who contributed. This is the best gift I’ve ever gotten.”

WHAT DID YOU WISH? Senior Dax Milligan and the leadership class granted over 100 wishes during classes on Dec. 15. (Photos by Audrie Chastain and Larry Washington)


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Campus offices participate in competition Office B had lights throughout the office, Christmas trees and many other holiday decorations, including turning Every year the counseling offices the counter into a long polar express and the main office hold a holiday train, which the art students helped decorating competition. The offices contribute to. On judging day they all come up with individual plans and had the choir go in and sing, and the Tigettes stand outside and cheer for themes. “The office competitions take them. Office D also had lights in the office, place to create a fun competition during the holidays among the trees and other decorations throughout different administrators, counselors the office, including multiple blow ups. They decorated and secretaries,” My favorite part is the all the windows in senior Mahogany their office. Galloway, who competitiveness of it all. The main office serves as an aid took part in the in the B building Each student has their own festivities as well office, said. office that they are rooting by putting up The offices go lights, decorating all out in their for.” the windows and decorations, putting up trees in including hanging -Senior Cheyenne Gragg the office and in the up lights, putting main lobby area. up trees, decorating This year’s winner of the office the windows and playing music. “My favorite part is the competition was Building B, or the competitiveness of it all,” senior senior office. “The winner of the competition wins Cheyenne Gragg, who is an aid in office A, said. “Each student has their bragging rights,” Building B secretary Kristi Cha said. own office that they are rooting for.” For more information on the tradition Office A’s decorations included lights hanging from the ceiling, trees, and the of the competition, visit any of the office aids dressed up on judging day counseling offices or the main office. to become real life Elves on the shelf. They also had a Polar Express train coming out of the wall, which was made to look like a tunnel. By Shaelyn Disotell Pulse Staff Writer

DECORATED OFFICES Offices all over campus participated in the annual holiday decoration contest. Office B won the competition. (Photos submitted)


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Belle visits elementaries and early childhood centers Krist issues reading challenge to students

her alongside my friends.” Principal Elizabeth Burns feels that the visits are a great way to engage This year, the spring musical for the elementary students and encourage high school drama class is “Beauty and them to read. “Younger kids are easily influenced the Beast.” The show will be directed by drama teacher Jana Ellis, and the by high school kids,” Burns said. leading role, Belle, will be portrayed “They love to see older kids and love to see what older kids are doing. I think it by junior Sophia Krist. “I’m very excited,” Ellis said. “She will do a lot for promoting ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ but will do a great job.” The influence of this activity also hopefully promoting Ellis and reading and how will not end the day Belle Centennial exciting that is.” Middle School comes and reads and then After each visit, drama teacher the elementary or C r y s t a l leaves.” early childhood Krachtt came students have an up with the -Principal Elizabeth Burns opportunity to idea to have enter their names Krist read to in a drawing elementary school students in her Belle costume. to participate in the production of Krist visited eight different elementary “Beauty and the Beast” for a night. In schools in the Broken Arrow district order to enter the drawing, the students from Dec. 8 to Dec. 16 to read to the must read a certain number of books. “The influence of this activity will students. not end the day Belle comes and reads “I’m excited to read to the elementary school students. I read to the children and then leaves,” Burns said. “I think I babysit, so I’ve grown to enjoy it,” it will continue afterwards as the kids Krist said. “I am so ecstatic and grateful continue to try to take that reading for the opportunity to play Belle. I am pledge, and read books and get their in love with musical theatre so getting name in the drawing.” this opportunity is super exciting. I love Belle, and I can’t wait to portray By Dylan Rivera Pulse Staff Writer

READING WITH BELLE Junior Sophia Krist visits and reads with students at Creekwood. Krist also visited Park Lane, Highland Park, and Liberty Elementary to read to and challenge students. (Photos by Greg Spencer)


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Spring musical practices commence Though she believes they will be challenging, Young is excited to get their costumes in order. She expects “Beauty and the Beast” will be this her costume will be one of the more year’s musical, and with a show date challenging ones because she will have of Feb. 9-12 it is quickly approaching. to have her arm bent inside in the shape The cast has just begun preparing for of the arm of a teapot. Senior Connor Blakely will playing their performances. Senior Triston Sutterfield will be the Beast. His lead counterpart, Belle, playing Maurice, Belle’s father, in the will be played by junior Sophia musical. He is most excited to work Krist. Blakely says auditions were frightening at first, with his friends as but once everyone well as new actors “I’m most excited to work loosened up they he has not yet had a chance to work with the wonderful cast I’m had fun reading for different with. and “Gaston is my part of to make a memorable characters singing together. favorite character “I’m most show,” in this musical,” excited to work Sutterfield -Senior Conner Blakely with the wonderful said. “He is so cast I’m a part of to flamboyant and is make a memorable the comic relief of the show. He will be show,” Blakely said. played by Caleb Ricketts and will be Blakely considers himself to be a fun to see on stage,” Sutterfield said. “The most challenging aspect of getting very passive person, so he is sure that the show ready will be working on the grasping the ferocious and threatening accents that go with each character, as stature that makes the Beast who he they are iconic and the show would not is will be difficult. However, with hard work Blakely knows that he will be the same without them.” Senior Lauren Young will perform as perform it well. Performances run from Feb. 9-12 Mrs. Potts, the motherly teapot. Young enjoyed auditioning with everyone. at the Broken Arrow Performing Arts “I’m most excited to see the reactions Center. Tickets will be available soon. to the characters from all the little kids For the latest “Beauty and the Beast” news, follow @bahsdrama on Twitter. in the audience,” Young said. By Kaylie Swatsenbarg Pulse Staff Writer

BREAK A LEG The Beast and Belle (portrayed by senior Conner Blakely and junior Sophia Krist) pause for a quick photo during rehearsal in the Black Box. Members of the cast rehearse for the first time. (Photo submitted)


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Teacher wins radio contest By Ally Coldwell Pulse Staff Writer Senior Larry Washington was on his way to school when he heard a 94.1 KXOJ radio contest that sparked his interest. The contest was put on by KXOJ and sponsored by YME. Washington had to write an essay about why one of his teachers is a good teacher and submit the article in order to enter that teacher in the contest. After hearing the radio ad, Washington wrote an essay as soon as he got home. Washington chose sophomore English teacher and Student Council sponsor Diana Phillips to enter into the contest. “Mrs. Phillips got me more involved with student council freshman year, which led me to joining the OASC (Oklahoma Association Of Student Councils). In joining the OASC, it completely redirected my life, it opened me up and taught me how to be a better leader at my school,” Washington said. “Mrs. Phillips is such an amazing teacher who invests in all of her students, so I figured she deserved to receive something for all of her hard work.” A couple weeks after submitting the essay, Washington got a call at school from the radio station that Phillips had won the contest, and that they were going to come to the school to surprise her. Later in the day, high school

principal Elizabeth Burns walked in to Phillip’s fifth hour along with the radio hosts to present her with prizes and tell her that she had won. “Mrs. Phillips works very hard to give the best for her students. She is a great teacher and very loved,” sophomore student council member and one of Phillip’s fifth hour students Jonahs Habeck said. “It was very touching seeing someone who has worked so hard be rewarded.” The radio hosts walked into Phillip’s room with a bouquet of flowers, bundt cakes for her whole class, as well as her own personal bundt cake and CD’s for the entire class. Phillips was also awarded five or six different gift cards for various places including The Cheesecake Factory and a nail salon. The last prize presented to Phillips was a limo ride to the Lakers vs. Thunder basketball game with private skybox seats for her and her family. “I am so overwhelmed with emotion about it,” Phillips said. “My winning is so much more about how remarkable Larry is than any reflection on me, but I’ll take it. He is truly special, and the best prize of all is having the opportunity and the privilege to positively impact that sweet boy’s life.” SURPRISE Senior Larry Washington nominated sophomore English teacher Diana Phillips for an award from 94.1 KXOJ. The whole crew showed up to her classroom to surprise her with the award. (Photos by Audrie Chastain)


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Two cheerleaders named All-State and jumps. The judges make a decision based on your skill and execution level. The tryouts run from division 2A Seniors Amanda Mages and Maya to division 6A and at least one athlete West from BAVC were recently from each division must be chosen for named as members of the Oklahoma the All-State team. “It was nerve racking, but my coaches All-State cheer team. The Oklahoma All-State team is a compilation of had prepared us well, and because of 16 cheerleaders that make the team. that we weren’t as nervous,” West said. “My favorite In total 64 “It was not surprising they did so part was doing cheerleaders the tumbling tried out. well because they are both very passes with Va r s i t y loads of other Cheer Coach talented cheerleaders.” really good Amy Howe tumblers, and says the try out -Cheer Coach Amy Howe the most nerve process is a bit racking part daunting for was doing the All-State. “They have to make up their own cheer alone in front of the judges.” The All-State team members get to cheer to words that are provided,” Howe said. “They have to perform cheer at the All-State basketball games that cheer, jump and tumble. We had this summer, perform a half-time show them show us their cheers beforehand and will receive a ring for being a part and made minor adjustments so that of the team. “It was very scary to me, you did they would score better. Jumps and tumbling are judged according to a everything one by one, and everyone rubric, so I helped them to decide what was watching you. The most nerve tumbling pass they could do that would wracking part was when you had to score the highest. We were very excited perform the cheer individually,” Mages for them when we found out they made said. “I’m most excited to cheer with the team. It was not surprising they girls from other schools around the did so well because they are both very state.” The All-State cheer team will start talented cheerleaders.” Oklahoma All-State try outs consist practicing this summer to get ready for of showing the judges a cheer, a their games. standing and running tumbling pass, By Ally Coldwell Pulse Staff Writer

Kramer makes a splash By Dylan Rivera Pulse Staff Writer

It’s a common phrase, “records are made to be broken.” It’s used in sports when an athlete finally topples a barrier set by someone who came before them. Broken Arrow had a swim speed record that stood for two decades before freshman Annie Kramer shattered the time and etched her name in the Tiger record books. “When I finished my 100 back and realized I broke the record I was very happy,” Kramer said. “The best part was how excited my teammates were for me, and I was happy to do that for my team.” Setting a record time as a freshman should be enough to make it to the top as someone’s greatest accomplishments, but what Kramer did over the offseason is number one on her list of accomplishments. “My greatest accomplishment as a swimmer so far was this summer when I made a cut time for a swim meet in Texas called ‘future championships,’” Kramer said. “It was an amazing experience to be able to race against a lot of fast and talented swimmers who attended the meet.” Kramer is a sophomore, and after an offseason of hard work, she and

her teammates are looking to make an even bigger splash in this young season. “I’m looking forward to continuing to work hard and have fun with my teammates just as we did last year, and I’m hoping to continue to swim even faster this season,” Kramer said. Kramer’s teammates have nothing but good things to say about who she is both in and out of the water. Junior Abby Meador has a strong relationship with Kramer, and loves going to swim every day to do what she loves right alongside Kramer. “Swimming with Annie is something to look forward to in the day, she’s such a positive light, and nothing can beat swimming with your best friend,” Meador said. Swim Coach Samantha Evans is impressed with Kramer’s love for the sport and drive to always get better. Kramer swims for BA as well as a club team. “Annie’s dedication to the sport is very impressive,” Evans said. “She lives, sleeps, and breathes swimming.” Kramer and the rest of the Broken Arrow swim team will face Bishop Kelley at home on Jan. 26 at the Boys and Girls Club pool.


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Wresting season begins with wins By Hunter Grim Pulse Staff Writer

The Broken Arrow Tigers continued to win in the wrestling world after kicking off their season with a slam. The Tigers wrestling squad opened the regular season with a dual at Muskogee High School. The dual started at 106 lbs and the Tigers came out strong. A win by Jackson Cockrell allowed BA to take a 6-0 lead. The duel continued to 113 lbs and Broken Arrow tacked on another win by Andy Police to move the lead to 12-0. Tyler Lawley, who recently committed to wrestle at the Division II Newman University in Wichita, Kansas, helped expand the Tigers lead to 18-0 by winning his match at 120 lbs. The Tigers went on to win the match 72-0 and all the wrestlers won their individual matches. “It was a good way to start the season,” senior Tyler Lawley said. “I believe that this season will be great for us and I also believe that we have some major talent.” After starting off the season on a dominating note, the Tigers headed north to Cleveland, to start the weekend with a duel versus St Vincent- St Mary High School. The Fighting Irish are ranked nationally in the wrestling world, and their head coach Justin “Harry” Lester is a six-time U.S. Open Champion and two-time Olympic

MEET ON THE MAT Wrestlers started the season off with several wins. (Photo submitted)

Medalist at 156 lbs. the 23rd annual Walsh “It was one of the most “It was one of the Jesuit Ironman. This challenging matches tournament brings I’ve ever been to,” junior together some of the most challenging Aedan Cottle said. “The top wrestlers from crowd was extremely around the country, matches I’ve ever loud, but we managed to to compete under go out and win the dual one roof against each been to.” and we managed to have other. The Tigers some fun while we were -Junior Aeden Cottle had success at the there.” tournament, with The wrestlers then junior Caleb Wise moved on to Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio to finishing seventh place in his weight one of the toughest, most nationally class of 160 lbs, and Trenton Lieurance prestigious tournaments in the country, finished second place in his weight

class of 285. “The tournament went pretty swell, we have a young team that’s only going to get better and better.” junior Brady Mattioda said. “We could all improve on conditioning and some more technique, and then we would be golden.” Students can support the wrestling team in their upcoming tournament on Jan. 5 against Choctaw and Tuttle at Choctaw High School.


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Football Players named All-District By Dylan Rivera Pulse Staff Writer

Every year the most elite players in high school football are recognized by OSSAA for their individual accomplishments. Broken Arrow had thirteen athletes named to the AllDistrict team, including eight defensive players. The Tigers defense was spearheaded by the outstanding linebacking core of sophomore Zach Marcheselli and seniors LaDarren Walker, Austyn Romine and Carder Key. Romine and Key received special recognition, as Romine was named Class 6A-I District 1 Linebacker of the Year for his accomplishments, and Key was named Class 6A-I District 1 Defensive Player of the Year. Key thanked many for helping him earn this outstanding achievement. “I’d like to thank all my coaches and teammates for continuously pushing me to be my best and my family for all their support,” Key said. Romine is taking his talents to William Penn University to become a Statesman. If his high school accomplishments are any indication, he’ll be a force at the college level as well. He looks forward to his new school and competing at a high level. “I’m excited to get to play at the next level and try to make a name for myself and also meet new people,” Romine

said. The Tigers defensive coordinator Aaron Nowell was described his linebackers as some of the hardest workers and best leaders on and off the field that he’s ever had the opportunity to coach. “Carder Key is the toughest football player I’ve ever coached, the type of player you probably get to coach once in a career,” Nowell said. “Austyn Romine has been an incredibly hard worker throughout his four years here, I wish I had 50 Austyn Romines.” Broken Arrow High School senior offensive lineman Blake Batson was one of the four offensive players named to the All District Team. His consistency on the line was recognized by the coaches around the district who vote on who makes the team. Batson is undecided where he’ll play at in college, but would like to thank one person in particular for helping him reach the college level and for helping him get recognized as a standout lineman. “I would like to thank coach Harper for literally teaching me everything I know and for helping me reach my goals,” Batson said. Seniors Chandler Saied and Trenton Lieurance also earned special honors for their outstanding season. Saied, Broken Arrow’s punter and kicker, was named Co-Kicker of the Year as he only missed three field goal attempts

ALL-DISTRICT (Clockwise from left) Carder Key, Austyn Romine, Trenton Liurance, Chandler Saied (Photo from baschools.org)

all season and kicked a Tiger record of five against Westmoore this season. Lieurance was awarded Co-Defensive Linemen of the Year in his sole season as a high school football player. He laid waste to nearly every offensive line that attempted to keep him from making the tackle. Romine, Key, Saied and Lieurance all made the All District team. Seniors

Cade Yeager, Wyitte McAdams, CJ Myers, and LaDarren Walker were also featured on the All District roster along with junior defensive lineman Derrick Shaw, Sophomores Zach Marcheselli and Matt Kaiser and freshman offensive lineman Andrew Raym.


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FCA leads student worship at school Students of any grade are welcome to become a member of FCA. It is recommended by upperclassmen to Fellowship of Christian Athletes is a join the club. “I like that we get a good Christian club that helps students connect with their religious beliefs outside of church. start to our day,” senior Maya West said. FCA varies in member size between “I’d recommend joining FCA because fifteen and thirty people. The sponsor it is an easy way to stay connected to of the club is teacher and coach Tiffany your faith while at school.” One activity the Jones. “I’d reccomend joining club participates in “I have been is Fields of Faith. involved with FCA because it is an easy The event gives FCA for over 20 the students time years and Broken way to stay connected to to give devotion Arrow High and say prayer. Ice School has had your faith while at school.” breaker games are an active huddle also played to get the for the past four -Senior Maya West students comfortable years,” Jones said. with each other. “I love spending “I love being able time with student to take time out of athletes and my day and worship investing in their lives. Watching them grow and with other Christians at school,” senior mature and serve others is an amazing Lorance Washington said. “The Bible says when there are two or more in His opportunity.” The group meets on the second and name, He is there as well.” Another activity is the nationally fourth Friday of every month in the auxilary gym. Donuts are provided at recognized event See You at the Pole. the meetings and time is provided to This event is held on the last Wednesday socialize before the devotion begins. of September each year. This year it Sometimes songs are sang by the was held on Sept. 28. Students gather students, including senior Haley Mills. around the flagpole in the front of the “Being able to get together with school and worship. Any students thinking of joining people who believe in the same religion as me is my favorite part of FCA,” FCA can contact Coach Jones in room D266 or attend a meeting. junior Jaxon Murray said. By Bailey Hill Pulse Staff Writer

FCA MAKES A DIFFERENCE (Above) FCA members pose for a group photo. (Below) FCA members, along with others, gather at the flag pole for the annual See You At the Pole meeting on Sept. 28.


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Academic Team prepares for season By Dominique Potter Pulse Staff Writer

The Academic Team is a team of students that compete with other schools within the area in various academic subjects. English teacher Amy Dyer, along with science teacher Bradley McNutt are sponsors for the team. The teachers help the students prepare for the competitions by having them play academic games in a style similar to Jeopardy. “We have matches against other area schools on Monday evenings,” Dyer said. “We compete in all academic subject areas, as well as questions on pop culture and other fun miscellaneous information.” The team has simulation matches on Thursdays and on Monday they play academic games which consist of trivia questions and complex math equations. The students use buzzers to buzz in their answer before the other team gets a chance to answer. During the competitions this year, the team has won districts. “We simulate matches with buzzers and questions,” senior Eric Devlin said. “Other times we just ask

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each other trivia questions.” The academic team season is only the fall semester and the team has now finished their regular matches for the season, but once January rolls around they will get the chance to compete for a spot in the state competition being held in February, which the team was able to get a spot in last year. “We’ve gone over a wide range of topics from literature to history to pop culture,” senior William Vang said. “The team has done fairly well this year with competitions.” Even though the team’s semester is over, students can visit Mrs. Dyer in D106 or Mr. McNutt in MN204 to discuss joining the team for the 2017-2018 school year.

TIME TO BUZZ IN The Academic Team poses for a group photo. (Photo submitted)

Human Shark Alliance advocates for sharks By Drew Watzke Pulse Staff Writer

Broken Arrow has welcomed a large variety of clubs to the campus during the 2016-2017 year. One of the many clubs that has fallen under the student body’s radar is Human Shark Alliance (HSA). Made up primarily of AP Economics students, HSA has decided to bring awareness to the rocky relationship between humans and the nautical creatures. Junior member Christian Heath is passionate about the club’s purpose. “We care about sharks and are dedicated to stopping the unjust killings of them,” Heath said. As it turns out, the idea of the club originally came from teacher Donna Gradel’s AP Environmental Science classroom, when she showed a documentary encouraging a better connection between humans and sharks. Senior and founder of HSA Annalise Crockett was inspired after seeing the documentary and decided to act. “The club was formed after we watched a documentary in AP Environmental Science,” Crockett said. “I felt that I had to do something.” The majority of the club resides in

Stuart Price’s AP Economics class, where the idea of creating the club became a reality. The students in that class have come together to create an enthusiastic atmosphere. They are focused on one goal which allows the group to operate in an efficient yet relaxed manner. Senior Camdon Cherry is especially proud of the club’s desire to raise awareness for this issue. “Everybody in Mr. Price’s third hour has come together to start the club,” said Cherry. “I joined because it’s an important issue.” The Human-Shark Alliance is a prime example that Broken Arrow students have unique ideas that need to be recognized. It’s been shown that these clubs all have a place on this campus and they hope to make a difference among the students. The students hope that the relationship between humans and sharks in the Broken Arrow community with strengthen due to the student’s efforts. “The club strives to create awareness of the environmental hazards being imposed upon the sharks by humans,” Crockett said. “We hope to counteract these trends.” In the near future, HSA could be seen hanging up awareness posters throughout the high school and doing what they can to save the species.


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Johnathan Rico has talent for video production By Bailey Hill Pulse Staff Writer Senior Johnathan Rico is one of the main video contributors to The Pulse. Rico has been involved in The Pulse since junior year when he first submitted his application. Rico spends anywhere from thirty seconds to four hours editing his work. He puts in an average of ten hours editing a week. “I decided to join The Pulse because at the freshmen academy it sounded like so much fun. Then I got accepted junior year, and I just try my best to be good at what I do,” Rico said. Rico’s favorite events to film are football and soccer. Rico enjoys filming those sports because he used to play soccer, and football was one of the first events he filmed. “Being able to see all the action and the fans getting hyped up for the games is really cool. Seeing all the people so happy or having fun is the most enjoyable thing about it,” Rico said. Most of Rico’s work is largely known around the school, as he works

on the Friday Night Lights videos, Mandatory Mondays, sport highlights, and promos. “It feels weird seeing your work being watched by so many people at times. Sometimes I’m surprised, and I even get nervous that it isn’t good or that I messed up, but that’s just me,” Rico said. Rico’s day consists mainly of filming or editing because he is The Pulse intern. Rico works closely with video teachers Nolan Couch and Greg Spencer. He enjoys working with them because they teach him everything he needs to know or gives him advice to be better. He is always finding ways to improve what he does. “Rico is our most skilled student with the cameras and does a great job capturting everything we ask him to capture,” video productions teacher Nolan Couch said. Rico assists with other students as well when they need help with the cameras, or when they need help with interviews. “Rico helped me a lot when I was

doing interviews and filming things for different projects. He taught me how to get good video angles, and not make interviews awkward,” sophomore Madi Foster said.

Rico enjoys filming so much that he wants to further his film career into college and hopefully go into the film industry after college.

GET THE SHOT Senior Johnathan Rico shoots video for former Oneta Ridge and Haskell students to say hello to their former teachers with The Pulse. (Photos by Greg Spencer)

STAFF

Adviser: Ashley Spencer, aspencer@baschools.org

Ally Coldwell, Shaelyn Disotell, Stone Freeman, Hunter Grim, Bailey Hill, Taylor Lanning, Cloey Patton, Cheyenne Pauls, Dominique Potter, Dylan Rivera, Kaylie Swatsenbarg, Haleigh Tallant, Drew Watske, Caleb Willis The Pulse welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be delivered to room MN106. The Pulse is a student-produced publication produced by the newspaper class SMILE FOR THE CAMERA Senior Miller Godwin poses for a photo shoot of Broken Arrow High School, which also provides written content for bahspulse.com. done by his friend, Kelsey Hausam. (Photo submitted) LOTS OF LOVE Students congratulate BAHS Teachers of the Year Donna Notice of Non-Discrimination- There will be no discrimination in the District because of race, color, sex, pregnancy, gender, gender expression or identity, national origin, religion, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, age, or genetic information

Gradel and Tiffany Jones. byyouth Greg Spencer) in its programs, services, activities and employment. The district also provides equal access to the Boy Scouts of America and(Photos other designated groups.

Pulse Dec. 20, 2016  
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