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OhioHealth Westerville Medical Campus

Your wait is almost over Prepare to experience a new kind of emergency care June 20, 2012

The new Emergency Care Center at OhioHealth Westerville Medical Campus opens June 20, 2012. This state-of-the-art facility will be: + the first of its kind in Westerville and Delaware County + staffed by central Ohio’s largest and most experienced emergency physician group + the same physicians who treat patients at OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital, Grant Medical Center and Dublin Methodist Hospital

Get a sneak peek at our Community Open House on June 9 from 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Or, learn more at OhioHealth.com/Westerville.

A FAith-BAsed, Not-For-ProFit heAlthcAre sYstem 8 HOspitals + 20 HealtH and surGery Centers + Wellness priMary and speCialty Care + urGent Care + HOspiCe HOMe HealtH + 21,000 pHysiCians, assOCiates and VOlunteers


Westerville

TM

Peace of Mind Enjoy the security of a true life-care senior living community, with a full continuum of on-site care, including: independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing and memory care. Call (614) 890-8282 today to schedule a personal tour of Friendship Village of Columbus – named 2010 “Best of Business ” among retirement communities in Central Ohio.

781 Northwest Blvd., Suite 202 Columbus, Ohio 43212 614-572-1240 • Fax 614-572-1241 www.cityscenecolumbus.com Charles L. Stein Kathleen K. Gill Dave Prosser Christa Smothers Garth Bishop Lisa Aurand Duane St. Clair

5800 Forest Hills Blvd • Columbus, OH 43231 (614) 890-8282 • www.friendshipvillageoh.com 48163

Chief Executive Officer President/Publisher Chief Creative Officer Creative Director Editor Contributing Editors

Christopher Braun Tyler Davis

Contributing Writers

Natalie Kish

Advertising Director

Gianna Barrett Julie Camp Pam Henricks Molly Pensyl

Ready. Set. Go.

Friendship Village of Columbus is a not-for-profit life-care retirement community managed by Life Care Services LLC

magazine

Sadie Bauer

Advertising Sales

Sales Associate

Lynn Leitch

Controller

Circulation:

614-572-1240

City of Westerville Christa Dickey

Community Affairs Administrator

www.wester villemagazine.com

Signature Senior Portraits

NOW SCHEDULING CLASS OF 2013

614 839-9163 portraitsbywes.com 9 East College Ave., Westerville, Ohio 43081 4

The Publishing Group Ltd. also publishes: CityScene Magazine www.CitySceneColumbus.com Dublin Life Magazine www.DublinLifeMagazine.com Tri-Village Magazine www.TriVillageMagazine.com Healthy New Albany Magazine www.HealthyNewAlbanyMagazine.com Pickerington Magazine www.PickeringtonMagazine.com The publisher welcomes contributions in the form of manuscripts, drawings, photographs, or story ideas to consider for possible publication. Enclose a SASE with each submission or e-mail gbishop@pubgroupltd.com. Publisher does not assume responsibility for loss or damage. The appearance of advertising in Westerville Magazine does not constitute an endorsement of the advertiser’s product or service by the City of Westerville. Westerville Magazine is published bimonthly in January, March, May, July, September and November. For advertising information or bulk purchases, contact Emily Steel at 614572-1252. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publishers. Westerville Magazine is a registered trademark of The Publishing Group Ltd. Printed in the U.S.A. www.westervillemagazine.com


Inside 09

City Reporter

News and Information from the City of Westerville

MAy/JUNE 2012 Vol. 11 NO. 5

06 community calendar 09 city reporter

News and information from the City of Westerville

16 faces

Come in and see us!

Drum As You Are Independent rocker happy to continue making great music

Come in and see us!

19 Three Cheers for Six Nears

20

The Library

Chamber Foundation scholarship gives Westerville grads a boost

20 in focus

Basil Instinct High school hydroponics program supplies food and educates students

Come in and see us! Sun 1-6pm Mon-Thurs 9am-9pm Fri-Sat 9am-6pm 126 South State Street (614) 882-7277 westervillelibrary.org Visit us on __

23 Emergency Efforts

Free-standing ER facility is unique in Westerville

26

26 home

Blue Sensation Well-decorated yard is a sight to behold

28 on the table

Whole Lotta Cakin’ Goin’ On Home-based baker creates sweet treats and elaborate designs

30 bookmarks

Recommendations from the Westerville Public Library

Visit our new state-of-the-art facility Behind the Community Center

385 County Line Road West Westerville, OH • Gentle, trusted & experienced • For a beautiful, healthy & affordable smile • For your whole family

Find Westerville Magazine on Facebook and Twitter Read more online at WestervilleMagazine.com www.westervillemagazine.com

On the Cover:

Westerville resident and Guided by Voices Drummer, Kevin Fennell Photo by Wes Kroninger

Call us today to set up an appointment!

614.882.4032 5


2012

SAT FRI THU 4 3 2 11 10 9 18 7 17 6 16 5 15 25 14 24 13 23 12 22 21 31 20 30 19 29 28 27 26

WED TUE MON 1 SUN

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

8

May 2-30

Uptown Westerville Farmers’ Market 3-6 p.m. Wednesdays, corner of North State and East Home streets Area farmers offer certified organic and conventional produce and artisan foods.

May 3-5

Otterbein University presents Gypsy Fritsche Theatre at Cowan Hall, 30 S. Grove St., www.otterbein.edu

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Located in office complex, last building on the left by the bike path.

westervilledentalhealth.com 6

May 6

Otterbein University String Orchestra 7:30 p.m., Grave Evangelical Lutheran Church, 100 E. Schrock Rd., 614-882-3026 Part of the A Joyful Noise free concert series.

May 11-12

Westerville Garden Club Plant Sale Noon-6 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Hanby Shopping Center, 320 S. State St., www.westervillegardenclub.com Buy plants for fairy gardens, Mother’s Day baskets, garden art, vegetable plants and more.

May 12

MAY May 13

Westerville Symphony presents Ron Lykins Masterworks Series II 7 p.m., Fritsche Theatre at Cowan Hall, 30 S. Grove St., www.westervillesymphony.org Featuring Beethoven’s Symphony No. 1 in C Major and Shostakovitch’s Symphony No. 5 in D Minor.

May 13

Westerville Community Band Spring Concert 3 p.m., Westerville Central High School, 7118 Mt. Royal Ave., www.westervillebands.org

May 14

GEM Awards Ceremony 6:15 p.m., Westerville South High School, 303 S. Otterbein Ave., www.westerville.k12.oh.us The Westerville City School District recognizes individuals who have gone above and beyond to support students.

May 20

Otterbein Commencement Noon, Rike Center, 160 Center St. The Baccalaureate service begins at 9 a.m. at Cowan Hall. The commencement march begins at 11:45 a.m. and the undergraduate commencement ceremony begins at noon.

May 25

OhioHealth 4th Friday: Back to Nature 6-9 p.m., Uptown Westerville Enjoy arts, vendors, live entertainment and extended hours in the Uptown shops.

May 25-28

Sunrise Rotary Field of Heroes Westerville Community Center, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., www.fieldofheroes.org A display of 2,500 American flags honors our community’s personal heroes.

May 26

Westerville City Schools Commencement May 17 Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. Discover the Dream 17th Ave., Columbus, 6 p.m., Columbus Zoo and www.westerville.k12.oh.us Aquarium, 4850 W. Powell Rd., Powell, www.stjude.org/discover- All three of Westerville’s high schools hold their graduation thedream Support St. Jude Children’s ceremonies – South at 10 a.m., Research Hospital at this event North at 2 p.m. and Central at celebrating the hospital’s 50th 6 p.m. anniversary.

Profencing Elite Youth Fencing Cup 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Blendon Middle School, 223 S. Otterbein Ave., May 19 www.profencing.org Westerville Education FounChildren ages 7-14 from all dation Mini-Golf Fundraiser around the Midwest compete. 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Westerville Golf Center, 450 W. Schrock Rd., 614-794-0401 Adults $10, children 13 and under $6. The event features celebrity golfers, mascots, food vendors, magic shows, raffles, a silent auction and more.

May 28

Memorial Day Parade 9:45 a.m., Uptown Westerville Starting from the intersection of College and State streets, the parade makes its way to Otterbein Cemetery, where a ceremony takes place.

May 31

Party at the Creek 6-8 p.m., Alum Creek Park North, 221 W. Main St., 614-901-6500 See page 9 for details.

Sponsored by the Wester ville Visitors & Convention Bureau

www.westervillemagazine.com


JUNE June 1

221 W. Main St., 614-901-6500 Sponsored by Westerville Parks and Recreation, this series includes performances by Dwight Lenox, the Westerville Community Band and Brian Michael Smith.

Westerville Lions Club Chicken Dinner 4-7 p.m., American Legion Young-Budd Post 171, 393 E. College Ave., www.westervillelions.org Proceeds from this annual event June 13-27 help needy kids get eye exams Family Concert Series 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Alum and glasses. Creek Park Amphitheater, 221 W. Main St., 614-901-6500 June 1-17 This concert series includes the Curtain Players Theatre magic of Stephen Knight and presents The House of Yes performances by Endless ReCurtain Players Theatre, 5691 cess and Matt Jergens, juggler. Harlem Rd., Galena, www.curtainplayers.com In this dark but humorous drama, a dysfunctional family struggles to cope with the introduction of the son’s new fiancée into their midst.

June 4-15

Summer Splash Enrichment Academy Westerville North High School, 950 County Line Rd., www. wcsoh.org, 614-797-5887 This Westerville City Schools program gives motivated students preparing to enter grades two through eight the opportunity to study visual arts, performing arts, math, science, technology and social studies.

June 7-16

Otterbein Summer Theatre presents Barefoot in the Park Campus Center Theatre, 100 W. Home St., www.otterbein.edu This Neil Simon play follows two newlyweds as they deal with the trials and tribulations of their new marriage and their tiny Greenwich Village apartment.

June 10-24

Sounds of Summer Concert Series 6:30 p.m. Sundays, Alum Creek Park Amphitheater,

June 15

Spring Rd., 614-901-6500 This family bike ride sponsored by the Westerville Parks Department costs $10-15 and includes a ride from Highlands Park Aquatic Center to Millstone Creek Park and a grilled breakfast at the end of the ride. All riders must wear helmets.

June 17

Music in the Gardens: Concert by Arnett Howard 3-5 p.m., Inniswood Metro Gardens, 940 S. Hempstead Rd., 614-895-6216 Free concert with music legend Arnett Howard at the Inniswood Metro Park.

Westerville Community Dance 7 p.m., Westerville Community Center, 350 N. Cleveland Ave. June 21-30 Open to anyone 18 and older. Otterbein Summer Theatre Admission is $5 at the door. presents Circle Mirror Transformation June 15 Campus Center Theatre, 100 W. Outdoor Classic Movie Series Home St., www.otterbein.edu Dusk, Everal Barn and Home- This new play follows five peostead, 60 N. Cleveland Ave., ple through their experiences in 614-901-6500 an adult summer acting class. Join the Westerville Parks and Recreation Department for June 22 movies in the park. Featuring OhioHealth 4th Friday: Treasure Island. Safety Fest 6-9 p.m., Uptown Westerville June 15 Franklin County agencies will Uptown Shuffle provide information and activi5 p.m., The Old Bag of Nails Pub, ties for parents and kids to help 24 N. State St., promote a safe summer. Enjoy www.westervillechamber.com street vendors, live entertainThis event, presented by the ment, special displays and Westerville Area Chamber of more. Commerce Young Professionals Network, begins with a pre- June 28 party at the Old Bag of Nails. A Haunted Columbus scavenger hunt throughout Up- 7-8:30 p.m., Westerville town Westerville follows, then Public Library, 126 S. State an after-party back at the Old St., 614-882-7277 Bag of Nails. Register before June 27 to hear local author Nellie Kampmann June 17 speak about Ohio’s haunted Father’s Day Bike & Breakfast history. 9:30 a.m.-noon, Highlands Park Aquatic Center, 245 S.

For more events, visit www.visitwester ville.org

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Surgery is never routine. Especially when it’s your child. Surgery is always serious business. For you. For your child. And for us. At Nationwide Children’s Hospital Westerville Surgery Center, all of our specialists are pediatric experts. And now, their expertise is available

at a state-of-the-art facility conveniently located nearby at 455 Executive Campus Drive in Westerville. Everything about this facility was designed to achieve one goal. To provide your child with the very best care.

See inside. NationwideChildrens.org/Westerville-Virtual-Tour

8

www.westervillemagazine.com


CityReporter News & Information from the City of Wester ville

Party at the Creek to Showcase Green Westerville In follow-up to last August’s “Party on the Bridge,” which marked the end of the 14-month West Main Street bridge reconstruction project, this event celebrates the environmental features of the Alum Creek Park North area, which also underwent improvements and a lengthy closure related to the bridge project. Party at the Creek is scheduled for Thursday, May 31 from 6-8 p.m. “The ‘Party on the Bridge’ ended up being the community party of the year,” said Mayor Kathy Cocuzzi. “We’re using a similar model to showcase the improvements and expansions made underneath the bridge and through the park. This will be an opportunity to get back to nature and explore a bit more now that we have access back into the park and under the bridge.” The party will be set throughout Alum Creek Park North, lined with vendors providing environmentally-friendly demonstrations and exhibits. Regional wildlife – including turtles, birds and snakes – will capture the attention and imagination of kids and adults alike, and educational opportunities ranging from arts and crafts to local safety programs will be featured. Free hot dogs, drinks and popcorn will be available for everyone throughout the event. In addition to the shelter house, a large family area will be reserved for picnicking on the lawn. Two events produced each year by the City – WessieFest and the Plan-It Green Exposition – will take place as part of Party at the Creek rather than independently this year. WessieFest traditionally brings groups to Otterbein Lake to ex-

What to bring: 1. Blanket, chairs and food if you wish to use the lawn for picnicking

2. Clothes and shoes that can get dirty or muddy

3. Socks … if kids plan to jump in the bounce house

4. A bag to carry things home

www.westervillemagazine.com

plore how nature and wildlife interact in our community. The Plan-It Green Expo is designed to increase awareness of Westerville initiatives, programs and activities that encourage conservation, recycling and eco-friendly practices. The Westerville Parks and Recreation Department is organizing games and activities, including Frisbee golf, sand volleyball, basketball and canoeing. Kids will also love minicheerleading clinics provided by AmeriCheer cheerleaders and music from Matt Ryan Mobile DJ Entertainment. A special appearance by Ronald McDonald is also planned. Hands-on activities will be everywhere, including creative art projects using recyclable products. Drop-off containers for recycling eyeglasses and cell phones will be on site, as will a bin to place retired American flags. Tours will be offered of the Westerville Water Treatment Plant at 312 W. Main St., leading visitors through the facility that treats 7.5 million gallon a day. The tour will explain the water treatment process, including filtration, fluoridation, disinfection, softening and distribution, to more than 15,000 homes and businesses in the City.

The inaugural “Party at the Creek” Run/Walk 5K will be held in conjunction with the event, beginning at 6:30 p.m. For more information, or to Don’t miss: register online, visit www.columbusrunWater Treatment Plant Tours: 6:30 and 7:30 ningcompany.com and click “Events.” p.m. Tour groups will gather by Shelter House in The cost is $25 to participate. Alum Creek Park North 10 minutes in advance of “Come rediscover and reconnect with each tour (6:20 p.m.; 7:20 p.m.). Look for the sign. nature in a great party setting,” said MayBoater Safety Demonstrations and Canoeing: or Cocuzzi. “Our community partners Certified Parks & Recreation staff members will have been so generous with the time demonstrate boater safety techniques and proand energy they have devoted to bring vide canoe rides down a portion of the creek. together all of Westerville’s programs focused on a healthy, sustainable and Food and Fun. Get there early enough to grab environmentally-friendly community, so it a hot dog, snow cone and other free snacks. is really going to be a fun learning experience for all ages.” 9

w ww. we s t er vil l e . or g

Explorations of nature, tours of scenic green spaces and waterways, and family-friendly fun are the featured themes of the last-day-in-May “Party at the Creek.”


News & Information from the City of Wester ville

Safe, Clean Neighborhoods Are the Mission of Code Staff Profile: Skip Kraft, Code Enforcement Officer yard sale signs are not permitted in the right-of-way.

Skip Kraft Skip Kraft started his career in law enforcement. After working as a police officer in Lancaster, Ohio, he retired and picked up another enforcement profession. Now one of two code enforcement officers in the City of Westerville Zoning Division, Skip works with residents on property compliance issues to ensure safe, clean and friendly neighborhoods throughout the community. Where are you from? I was born in Philadelphia, where my dad was stationed in the Navy. We moved to Lancaster when I was 6 months old. I’ve lived in Ohio since that time. How long have you been working in code enforcement? I’ve spent nearly 14 years in code enforcement. I first started this part of my career as a housing rehabilitation specialist at the Fairfield County Regional Planning Commission. We utilized grant funding to inspect housing and make improvements for low-income families. I was also the Assistant Flood Plain Manager for the County. How long have you worked for the City? I started in Westerville in 2003, so I am nearing 10 years. Since I had a back10

ground in law enforcement, I heard about the opportunity from a police officer. What are the most common code violations and complaints in Westerville? Most often, we get complaints about tall grass. When the weather turns warm, most lawns in Westerville are regularly mowed. The problem comes into play when grass and weeds become noticeably overgrown in a yard. But the grass has to be eight inches or higher before we can leave notice, and the weeds have to fall into the category of “noxious weeds.” It’s a common misconception that overgrown dandelions are a violation, but they are not a noxious weed. Westerville’s code lists thistle, burdock, jimson weed, ragweed, milkweed, mullein and poison ivy, among others, as noxious. If you have questions, the best thing to do is Google “noxious weeds” and find a listing, like the USDA plant website, that shows noxious weed categories by state. You can also see images from those websites. We also remove a lot of signs from the right-of-way in a given week. Sales signs or signs for commercial offers are not permitted in the City. Garage and

What’s one of the most common misconceptions about code enforcement in the City? The folks we visit typically are not pleased to see us, but we are out there ultimately to help them and their neighborhood. The City of Westerville has made a commitment to have safe and clean neighborhoods, and this is part of that process. We work to be as reasonable as possible, and will help when we can to resolve an issue. For the neighborhoods’ benefit, our focus is on compliance before enforcement. What are property maintenance tasks that people can take care of this spring to avoid issues? Common things, or a get-started list, may include things like exterior work on a house. Chipping paint, for instance, is something that can happen from season to season and needs to be addressed before the exterior deteriorates. Picking up trash or debris is something you can do without any major investment. Also, picking up after your animals is important. If you’re not keeping up with them in your yard, the stench can be upsetting to neighbors. Are there resources for residents who may need help? If someone is having trouble with home maintenance or other issues for legitimate reasons – like age, disability or financial difficulties due to the loss of a job – there are organizations out there that offer services or volunteers. Check into programs that your church may offer. If a resident receives a violation and needs help, we may be able to connect that person to resources in the community. If a resident is concerned about a violation, how should they report it? www.westervillemagazine.com


Code Compliance Tips and Information: Here are a few tips that can lead to greater compliance with City code and potentially reduce complaints from neighbors. Reprinted from www.westerville.org.

Residents who report an issue can contact us by phone or email. But do remember that reports are not confidential. Sometimes we get asked who called in a complaint and we are obligated to tell them. It’s public record. However, that usually doesn’t detract someone from making the call if something needs to be addressed in their community. Also, it’s important to remember that we code enforcement officers can document only what we can observe from public property, like the sidewalk. If there is something that needs to be seen, the neighbor may need to grant permission to come on their property to view it. View the City of Westerville Code of Ordinances online at www.westerville.org >> Government >> Codified Ordinances.

Home Construction: The best advice is to call the Building Department at 614901-6650 before beginning any home construction project, including (but not limited to) decks, pools, garages, antennas, patios and patio covers, and room additions. There are many issues to be considered, including setbacks, easements, lot coverage, utility locations and deed restrictions. If a contractor is being trusted to handle the permit process, the homeowner should make sure to keep a copy of all applicable permits before the work starts. While most contractors understand and comply with the process, some do not, and the homeowner is ultimately responsible for any work that has been completed. Lots of time, effort and money could be wasted. Homeowners with questions about zoning compliance regarding their home or a nearby property can call 614-901-6660; for building code or related matters, call 614901-6650. Also, keep in mind that your homeowner association may have additional restrictions over and above city code. Excessive Trash or Debris: If you observe excessive trash or debris in your neighborhood, it may be in violation of city code. Call 614-901-6660 to report the situation, and staff will investigate the circumstances.

Recreational Vehicles: In 2004, City Council adopted amendments to the residential parking regulations to restrict the parking of recreational vehicles (RV). City Code now reads that RVs (e.g., boats, campers) must be parked behind the front building line (setback) and be on a paved/hard surface. There is allowance for loading and unloading (e.g., for weekend trips) not to exceed a certain amount of time. If you have questions about these limitations, call 614-901-6660. Fences: Anyone who wants to erect a fence must first obtain permission from the Department of Planning and Development. This can be done by calling 614-901-6660 or bringing in a plot plan to the Planning & Development Department, 64 E. Walnut St. While this may seem like an unnecessary step, height, placement and some subdivision deed restrictions make it necessary. There is no fee for this service. Grass/Weeds: The maximum allowable height for grass and/or weeds in Westerville is eight (8) inches, reduced from twelve (12) inches in 2006. This limitation is enforced only between April and October. Garage Sales: No zoning permits are required to conduct garage sales. The only garage sale stipulations are that only two garage sales per year are allowed per home, and they cannot last more than three days at a time. Signs are not permitted in the public right-of-way or on poles and will be removed.

360

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Enforcement

Number of kindergarten-bound children who will participate in Westerville Safety City this summer. For 35 years, Westerville Safety City has taught children ages five and six critical safety education. These children, preparing to enter kindergarten, learn about how to avoid dangerous situations. The 2012 class starts on Monday, June 4. For more information, please visit www.westervillesafetycity.com. 11


News & Information from the City of Wester ville

Mark Your Calendars Highlands Park Aquatic Center Opening Day: Saturday, May 26, 11 a.m. 245 S. Spring Rd. (614) 901-POOL or www.westerville.org

Field of Heroes

May 25-28 (Opening ceremony: Saturday, May 26 at 9:30 a.m.) Westerville Sports Complex, 325 N. Cleveland Ave. www.fieldofheroes.org Produced by the Rotary Club of Westerville, Sunrise

Party at the Creek

(see page 9) Thursday, May 31, 6-8 p.m. Alum Creek Park North, 221 W. Main St. www.westerville.org

Honor Flight Pancake Breakfast Saturday, June 9, 7:30-10 a.m. American Legion Hall, 393 College Ave. www.facebook.com/westervilleforhonorflight Eat breakfast with members of the Westerville community to support sending WWII veterans to Washington, D.C.

City Partners with Emerson Third-Graders to Salvage, Repurpose Kyoto Tea House Tiles In an effort to preserve a page from Westerville’s past, two classes of thirdgraders at Emerson Magnet School are in the process of refashioning the remnants of the Kyoto Tea House into a piece of public art.

ers and unsuccessful redevelopment efforts failed to save the tea house from foreclosure. The City purchased the dilapidated tea house in early 2011 and approved redevelopment plans later the same year. With the shrine relocated to Franklin Park Conservatory and other artifacts removed from the property, the City focused its efforts on salvaging the mosaic tiles.

Driven by sense of hometown pride and historic preservation, the students, their teachers and the City of Westerville have formed a unique partnership to breathe new life into the colorful mosaic tiles that “The City commissioned Wiebold Stuonce adorned the walls of the renowned dio of Terrace Park, Ohio to remove the tiles of the Mount Fuji mural,” said BasTea House. “Through this project, our students sem Bitar, senior planner for the City of are getting the opportunity to preserve a Westerville. “With the help of community huge piece of Westerville’s history and partners, we delivered the tiles to the stuJapanese culture,” said Kristin Quinn, a dents at Emerson in February. It is our third-grade teacher at Emerson Magnet hope that the students’ creations will be School. “They are getting the chance to installed in a publicly accessible space, learn about our city’s history from experts either as part of the redevelopment of the and then taking all of that information and site or elsewhere in the City.” sharing it with the rest of the community.” Formerly a doctor’s office, the tea house was a 1950s remodel by Army linguist George Henderson and his wife, Opal, upon their return from post-World War II Japan. Over the years, the tea house became a field-trip destination for students and tourists across the central Ohio, who came to visit the moon bridge, carp pond and replica Shinto Shrine. The Hendersons’ son sold the tea house in 2004, after which several own12

From cleaning the recovered tiles to brainstorming possible projects for their reuse, the City has remained an active participant in the effort to find the tea house tiles a new home. “The City has done absolutely everything it could to help us with this project,” said Quinn. “This project has given our students so many great opportunities to learn about not only history, but how a community is run, how decisions are made and what they can do as third-graders to make a difference in the community.”

The City is currently in negotiations with a potential developer that has proposed a mixed-use project for the former Kyoto Tea House site. The Tea House Site Redevelopment Committee has endorsed a preliminary development concept, and if negotiations are successful, the plans will be subject to review and approval by the Uptown Review Board, the Planning Commission and City Council.

www.westervillemagazine.com


Westerville invests in entrepreneurs. Find out what happens when we grow your idea.

Learn more at www.westerville.org or call (614) 901-6403 www.westervillemagazine.com

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News & Information from the City of Wester ville

Westerville Community Contacts FIRE/MEDICAL/POLICE EMERGENCY..................................................... 9-1-1 Gas/Carbon Monoxide Leaks. . ............................................................ 9-1-1 Fire, non-life threatening emergency............................................ 882-2213 Police, non-life threatening emergency........................................... 882-7444 City Website . . .............................................................. www.westerville.org Community Affairs ................................................................ ... 901-6411 Animal Control.......................................................................... 901-6863 Animal Removal (dead at roadside)............................................... 901-6740 Cemeteries.. ............................................................................. 901-6740 City Manager’s Office................................................................. 901-6400 —TDD . . ............................................................................ 901-6413 Clerk of Council........................................................................ 901-6410 Digging (Ohio Utilities Protection Service) . . ............................... 800-362-2764 Economic Development............................................................... 901-6403 Electric Division........................................................................ 901-6700 —Electrical Outages. . .......................................................... 901-6700 —Street Lights.................................................................. 901-6700 —Tree Trimming Near Electric Lines.. ....................................... 901-6700 Finance Department .................................................................. 901-6440 Fire Division Headquarters........................................................... 901-6600 —CPR/First Aid Training...................................................... 901-6600 Human Resources...................................................................... 901-6406 Income Tax ............................................................................. 901-6420 Leaf Collection. . ........................................................................ 901-6740 Mayor’s Court. . ......................................................................... 901-6419 —TDD . . ............................................................................ 901-6418 Parks & Recreation Department.................................................... 901-6500 —Inclement Weather Hotline.. ............................................... 901-6888 —Administration................................................................ 901-6530 —Community Center........................................................... 901-6500 —Everal Barn & Homestead. . ................................................ 901-6570 —Parks Maintenance.. ......................................................... 901-6591 —Highlands Park Aquatic Center............................................ 901-7665 —Recreation Program Center.. ............................................... 901-6531 —Senior Center................................................................. 901-6560 —Shelter Information. . ........................................................ 901-6515 —Urban Forestry. . .............................................................. 901-6598 Permits —Building........................................................................ 901-6650 —Burning. . ....................................................................... 901-6600 —Parade/Block Party.. ........................................................ 901-6410 —Security Alarm................................................................ 901-6482 —Zoning.......................................................................... 901-6650.

All area codes are 614 unless otherwise noted.

Planning & Development Department............................................. 901-6650 —Planning, Engineering & Zoning.......................................... 901-6650 —Traffic Engineering........................................................... 901-6670 —Zoning Enforcement......................................................... 901-6660 Police Division Headquarters........................................................ 901-6450 —Administration................................................................ 901-6470 —Detectives.. .................................................................... 901-6475 —Patrol........................................................................... 901-6482 —Recorded Information Line................................................. 901-6879 —Records. . ....................................................................... 901-6450 Service Department.. .................................................................. 901-6740 —Sewer Emergencies.......................................................... 901-6740 —Sewer Line Maintenance................................................... 901-6740 —Stormwater Hotline. . ........................................................ 901-6740 —Street Emergencies.......................................................... 901-6740 —Street Maintenance Repairs.. .............................................. 901-6740 —Trash/Recycling Collection. . ............................................... 901-6740 —Water Emergencies ......................................................... 901-6740 —Water Line Maintenance. . .................................................. 901-6740 Traffic Violations....................................................................... 901-6419 Tree/Storm Damage (in right of way)............................................ 901-6591 —After hours.. ................................................................... 901-6790 Tree Trimming (in right of way).................................................... 901-6598 Utility Billing. . .......................................................................... 901-6430 Water Plant . . ............................................................................ 901-6770 Other Community Service Contacts Airport—Port Columbus. . ............................................................ 239-4083 Concord Counseling Services........................................................ 882-9338 COTA Bus Service...................................................................... 228-1776 Delaware County —General Information................................................... 740-548-7313 Franklin County —Board of Health.............................................................. 462-3160 —Property Taxes................................................................ 462-3696 —Voter Registration. . .......................................................... 462-3100 Mount Carmel St. Ann’s Hospital................................................... 898-4000 Westerville Area Chamber of Commerce.......................................... 882-8917 Westerville Area Resource Ministry................................................ 899-0196 Westerville City Schools.............................................................. 797-5700 Westerville Historical Society....................................................... 891-0821 Westerville Library. . ................................................................... 882-7277 Westerville Visitors & Convention Bureau........................................ 794-0401

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C it y Manag er Dave Collinsworth 14

Wes t er v i lle C it y C o u nci l

(Back Left-Right) Craig Treneff, L. Pete Otteson, Vice Chair Larry Jenkins, Vice Mayor Diane Fosselman (Front Left-Right) Chairman Michael Heyeck, Mayor Kathy Cocuzzi, Jenifer French

All-City news and information: @tellwesterville Westerville Electric Division: @WvilleElectric Westerville Parks & Recreation: @WestervillePark Westerville Division of Police: @WestervillePD

www.wester ville.org


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15


faces

By Garth Bishop

Photography by Wes Kroninger

Drum As You Are Independent rocker happy to continue making great music

For more than 30 years, Kevin Fennell has been guided by an overpowering urge to make the best rock music fans have ever experienced. His band’s name may, therefore, be a bit of a misnomer. Westerville resident Fennell, 54, is the drummer for independent rock band Guided by Voices. Though its line-up has fluctuated over the last three decades, and the group was disbanded from 2005 to 2010, Guided by Voices has for years maintained a strong following in the indie rock community. Fennell was one of Guided by Voices’ founding members. He, singer and chief songwriter Robert Pollard, and guitarist Mitch Mitchell, all living in Dayton at the time, got together in 1982, running through a long list of temporary band names – the Geese, the Tweezers, the Needmores, Dash Riprock and the Hair16

spray Boys, Coyote Call, Acid Ranch – before settling on Guided by Voices. “We had a different name every week,” says Fennell. Even before the band formed, Fennell and Mitchell were in bands together. Their first effort was a cover band, which they formed with a third bandmate in 1971 when the three were in middle school. Eventually, guitarist Tobin Sprout and bassist Greg Demos joined on from other bands, forming the line-up for which Guided by Voices was best known. It took more than 10 years for the band to find a dedicated audience. It had such a hard time appealing to audiences with its live shows – they tended to not understand the music, Fennell says – that its members focused most of their efforts on recording.

“Our primary focus has been making records from the very beginning,” Fennell says. “We probably made six records before anybody took any notice.” Despite its difficulty gaining traction with audiences, the band soldiered on. Its 1992 album, Propeller, gained it some recognition in major independent rock markets like New York and Philadelphia. But the band’s major breakthrough was its 1994 album Bee Thousand, which became a smash hit. Once unable to garner a positive reaction from even a hometown crowd, Guided by Voices found itself sharing billing with the likes of the Beastie Boys and David Bowie. “People were actually standing up and taking notice,” says Fennell. In need of a break, Fennell left Guided by Voices in 1997. Pollard found other musicians to carry on as members of the www.westervillemagazine.com


Kevin Fennell with his wife, Janet, and her daughters, Elana (left) and Aubrey.

original line-up left, but eventually disbanded the group after a farewell show in late 2004. The band’s line-up during its most popular era in the mid-1990s – Fennell, Pollard, Mitchell, Sprout and Demos – reunited in June 2010 for what was to be a one-time gig in Las Vegas celebrating the 21st anniversary of Matador Records, which put out several of the band’s 1990s albums. That show eventually led to a 22-show reunion tour, then a run of performances at music festivals, then the recording of three new albums – of which the first, Let’s Go Eat the Factory, was released in January, mere days before the band gave a performance on The Late Show with David Letterman. The band’s next album, Class Clown Spots a UFO, is scheduled to drop in May. After that, Bears for Lunch is expected to come out in October. The records just keep www.westervillemagazine.com

getting better as they’re released, Fennell says; Bears for Lunch is his favorite of the three. “I think it’s the best record we’ve ever made,” he says. From the immediately forthcoming album, Fennell is a big fan of the title track, as well as a harder-rocking tune titled No Transmission. “I lean toward more of the rock songs … but Bob (Pollard) writes some slower, more melancholy songs that make you want to cry,” he says. Now older and wiser, the band members get along much better in the studio and on the stage. They are more appreciative of one another’s efforts, Fennell says, and the music has matured significantly.

“I think we have so much left to do,” he says. Fennell did not join any new bands during his 13-year absence from Guided by Voices. The only music he played was at home. “Everything else, I feel, would pale in comparison,” he says. Instead, he went back to school, eventually earning an undergraduate degree from Capital University and a master’s degree from the University of California, both in social work. When not drumming onstage, in the studio or at home, Fennell works as a chemical dependency counselor at Talbot Hall, located in The Ohio State University 17


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‘Proudly serving the community and member businesses for 44 years!’ Your Chamber invites you to experience: NETWORKING, FOOD, DRINKS AND DOOR PRIZES OH MY!! BUSINESS AFTER HOURS KeyBank (Schrock Rd. location) Thursday, May 17, 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE for Chamber Members, $5 for Non-Members

GET YOUR RUNNING SHOES READY! Westerville Young Professionals Uptown Shuffle Featuring a scavenger hunt in Uptown Westerville Friday, June 15, 5:30 p.m. at Old Bag of Nails Pub; All ages encouraged!

39TH ANNUAL MUSIC & ARTS FESTIVAL Saturday, July 14, 11 a.m.-9p.m.; Sunday, July 15, 11 a.m.-5p.m. Heritage Park & Everal Barn in Westerville $1 Admission; Children 16 & under FREE

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Medical Center’s University Hospital East. Though he often puts in more than 40 hours a week on counseling, intakes, assessments, detox and other duties, Fennell is able to make his own hours, allowing him to tour with the band without disrupting his work. Fennell wishes the band could see greater success, but is grateful for the fan base it has and the popularity it has gained from the members’ years of hard work. And he wouldn’t want to see that success come at the expense of the band’s music. Fennell and his wife, Janet, live in Westerville with Janet’s two daughters – Elana, 13, and Aubrey, 9. Janet and the girls are musically inclined, Fennell says, allowing him an opportunity to make music outside of the band. He also has two adult sons. Though he’s loath to compare Guided by Voices directly to any other band, Fennell cites as the band’s influences groups like the members of the British Invasion, as well as other disparate groups such as the Byrds, Pink Floyd, the Doors, Yes, King Crimson, the Ramones, R.E.M. and Emerson, Lake and Palmer. He describes the band’s sound as straight-up rock music with pop, punk, post-punk and even some psychedelic influences. Though the band has not achieved widespread recognition on the level of some of its contemporaries, it does have its outspoken fans. Most recently, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney proclaimed Guided by Voices to be his favorite band. There’s no gray area for those who experience Guided by Voices’ music, Fennell says – either you love it or you hate it. Garth Bishop is editor of Westerville Magazine. Feedback welcome at gbishop@pubgroupltd.com. www.westervillemagazine.com


By Garth Bishop

Three Cheers for Six Nears Chamber Foundation scholarship gives Westerville grads a boost For 15 years, the Jim Near Scholarship has helped Westerville high school graduates clear a path to college. The $1,500 scholarships are awarded each year by the Westerville Area Chamber Foundation, a charitable arm of the Westerville Area Chamber of Commerce. The award’s namesake was a Westerville resident and chairman and CEO of Wendy’s International known for his charitable contributions to the community. The six high school seniors, two from each school, who will receive this year’s scholarships are: Daniel Donovan, Westerville North High School, Cornell University Renee Geiger, Westerville North High School, Columbus State Community College Rachel Kerr, Westerville Central High School, Otterbein University Rachel Kreider, Westerville South High School, The Ohio State University Aryan Moarefdoust, Westerville Central High School, Brigham Young University Rachel Sylvester, Westerville South High School, college undecided

Jim Near Scholarship winners (from left) Daniel Donovan, Rachel Sylvester, Rachel Kreider, Renee Geiger, Rachel Kerr and Aryan Moarefdoust. Students become eligible by complet“We’ve helped many (students) who ing applications, each of which must normally wouldn’t quality for scholarinclude a letter of recommendation from ships,” says Mark Ginty of the Chamber a teacher or school counselor and an Foundation. essay describing the student’s goals, Funding comes from Chamber benefit strengths and community activities, as events like the Westerville Community well as their reasons for deserving the Bowl-a-thon. scholarship. The foundation selects stuGarth Bishop is editor of Westerdents based on extracurricular activities, ville Magazine. Feedback welcome at community involvement and financial gbishop@pubgroupltd.com. need.

Get your camera ready. It’s time for

SHUTTERBUGS!

Send us your photos for the annual Shutterbugs issue of Westerville Magazine! Images should be of: People/Pets in Westerville Places in Westerville Events in Westerville

Deadline: June 7

Email hi-res digital files to westervillemag@gmail.com www.westervillemagazine.com

Images can be in color or black and white. The top photos will be featured in the July/August issue of Westerville Magazine. Up to 10 images may be submitted per entry. All images must be submitted as digital, high resolution photos.

19


in focus By Tyler Davis

Photography by Westerville North student Cheyenne Pierce

Basil Instinct

North senior Glen Gainer adjusts basil plants under the grow lights.

We’ve all had a few moments when we’ve looked at our food and wondered, “Where did this come from?” That question is almost always a tough one to answer. But if you’re eating in or around Westerville, there’s always a chance some of the meal came from right here at home – and if it did, its origin may just have been Westerville North High School. Jeff Bracken’s primary job is as a Westerville North High School chemistry teacher. But when he’s not teaching, he’s working with students of all disciplines on the school’s hydroponics program. In hydroponic gardening, plants are grown using water and mineral nutrient solutions, but no soil. Today, the program is responsible for supplying many local businesses with produce and herbs, and provides a valuable, hands-on type of education for participating students. 20

“Back in 2007, I was searching online for hydroponics information and went to Indoor Gardens to buy a water pump to make a basic experiment for class,” Bracken says. “I saw so many amazing things growing in the store, I just had to take a look at the chemistry behind hydroponics.” A lot of work goes into setting up a proper hydroponic garden. North has very few windows, making it difficult for the plants to get sufficient lighting, and that was the first problem Bracken hoped to solve.

Bracken then spoke to Rick Tirburzio, the high school’s police/resource officer, who told him about illegal drug hydroponic systems that are confiscated in drug busts. “They’re usually destroyed, but the officer and I managed to work out an arrangement where a lot of the equipment is donated to North,” Bracken says. Along with four high-pressure sodium (HPS) grow lights donated by the Westerville Division of Police in 2007, the program received a $1,000 grant from the Westerville Education Foundation. “That grant was critical to starting our program with significant financial support,” Bracken says. Since then, the program has expanded, and has gathered more than $7,000 worth of equipment, including 15 400watt HPS grow lights, various haNorth seniors Amanda Alvarado (left) and Emma Feder show off packages of lettuce produced by the school’s hydroponics program.

www.westervillemagazine.com


High school hydroponics program supplies food and educates students

lide grow lights and an expansive Aeroflo 60 system that houses 60 different plant sites, which the students hope to use to grow strawberries. A few years ago, the autism unit at the school planted lettuce as part of a school project. The special education teachers at North used the practice as a way of helping students become interested in what they were learning about through handson experience. The lettuce project worked, and after years of fine-tuning, students are able to harvest 49 heads of Bibb lettuce every week. The students have about 245 heads growing in different stages. The vegetables were first used in the school cafeteria, but when there was too much produce, it often went to waste. For a while, extra lettuce went to staff members who were happy to take fresh lettuce with legitimate, sealed packaging. Using different environments – such as raised plant beds and PVC hoop houses – that created a budget greenhouse, students also tried to grow cabbages, carrots and radishes. “The neat part is that you can control all the variables,” Bracken says. “The chemicals, the nutrients, 16 hours of artificial sunlight, the temperature … you can turn it all into a clockwork of the growing process.” As he and his colleagues worked to chart and determine the growing process, the students in the program began to grow another product: basil. The basil was an immediate hit with local businesses. Restaurants such as Wendell’s Pub and Marcella’s Ristorante began to buy bulk basil from the school on a weekly basis. Last October, the program had 840 basil plants, making $120 per week for the school. www.westervillemagazine.com

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How does the hydroponics program keep up with the demands of local businesses? There is a system in place for recycling plant material, which eliminates the need to buy more seeds or growing materials. “Marcella’s needs two pounds of basil leaves for an order, for example,” Bracken says. “The stem from the basil plant is put in an aeroponic cloner that will enable the basil stem to grow roots and thus produce more leaves.” No basil seeds have been bought for more than a year now – there’s no need. As the equipment and number of peo-

ple involved in the hydroponics program grew, the basil rafts and different hydroponics began to spread out to locations around the high school, such as the principal’s office and the library. The hydroponics program is mostly faculty-run, with lots of students doing harvesting work, but there is no student leadership as of yet. “In class, students would create sugar solutions, other tasks, and solutions would just get thrown away. Jessica Waites developed an experience where the kids develop calcium nitrate or potassium nitrate solutions, and then the solutions (can) be used in the hydroponic systems,” Bracken says. “The hope is that every chemistry student will feel a connection to the project and the community.” With the program’s ever-expanding produce options, which now include hot peppers and pineapples, the students of North continue to flock to the sustainable and fun experience of hydroponic growing. “Once we’ve figured out more variables about how to hang lights and so on, we want to share more with other schools,” Bracken says. “The goal is to

Above: Gainer tends to the cherry tomato plants in the hydroponics labs. Left: Young basil plants are grown for the program.

put all the information into a manual that other teachers all around the U.S. could use to develop their own hydroponics systems, probably with basil as the base.” Tyler Davis is a contributing writer. Feedback welcome at gbishop@pubgroupltd.com.

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Emergency Efforts By Duane St. Clair

Free-standing ER facility is unique in Westerville OhioHealth is working to make the typically stressful emergency room experience as hassle-free as possible. On June 20, the doors will open at the newest addition to the OhioHealth Westerville Campus, located on Polaris Parkway: a free-standing emergency facility. The new Emergency Care Center will treat patients and send them home to their doctor or to a hospital. Unlike most emergency facilities, OhioHealth’s is not connected to a hospital, streamlining the trip from front door to ER. The new facility adjoins a three-yearold multiple-use medical building that contains outpatient surgery; physical rehabilitation, including a swimming pool; doctor’s offices; and other facilities. The Westerville City School District also has an office there for student registration and other matters. Neither OhioHealth facility can accommodate overnight patients. The attached two-story, 16-bed emergency facility is designed so the staff can quickly greet the sick or injured, get them into a room and begin diagnosis and treatment. A nurse will see each patient within 15 minutes of arrival. Jean Halpin, OhioHealth’s vice president of health center operations, oversaw design of the center. The rapid population growth and demographic changes in the Westerville area and the kinds of patients the facility will serve were the main data used in determining its size and facilities. Physicians provided more input about treatment needs. The facility addresses numerous patient priorities, Halpin says – to get in and out quickly, to be greeted and told where they are going, to be seen as quickly as possible to determine whether more testing

www.westervillemagazine.com

is needed. Blood work, X-rays, CT scans and ultrasounds are among the tests possible in the facility. Because the center is not equipped or designed to give complete treatment to heart, stroke or serious injury patients, local emergency squads are not exFrom left: Emergency Care Center Medical Director Dr. Thomas Gavin, Emergency Care Center pected to deliver those patients to the Administrative Nurse Manager Steven Taylor and OhioHealth Vice President of Health Center Operations Jean Halpin. emergency facility. OhioHealth has to a hospital after the Emergency Care talked to local squads about the types Center staff stabilizes him or her. “We of patients that should be taken directly work through the Mt. Carmel or Riverside to other emergency rooms. If they arrive transfer centers” to designate the hospital, anyway, the Westerville center will stabi- Halpin says. lize the patients before they’re moved for Ambulances were selected as an alterproper treatment. native to potential helicopter flights partly Walk-in patients are the other side of because neighbors worried about noisy the coin. A friend or relative might bring flights. “We were happy to hear the in someone with chest pains with a seri- concerns and have the input of the comous injury. And that’s no problem. munity,” Halpin says. Besides, a waiting With a staff of physicians, nurses and ambulance – all are equipped to be trauma others on duty at all times, a proper diag- units if a nurse comes along for the ride – nosis can be made quickly. Colin Yoder, may move a patient more quickly than OhioHealth media relations director, de- would a helicopter that’s several minutes scribes the “golden hour,” the all-impor- away. tant time period during which diagnosis Patient rooms – all equipped with teleis made and a patient is stabilized before visions, large windows and space for treatment. As the result, “The chances of visitors – have solid walls and doors, assurvival go up significantly,” he says. suring comfort and privacy; “no curtains If a patient needs to be hospitalized, in here,” Halpin says. The emergency defully equipped MedCare ambulances – partment rooms in Dublin Methodist Hosowned by the company that also owns pital, another OhioHealth facility, were MedFlight helicopters – will be on the the model, she says. grounds at all times to deliver the person

23


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While 90 percent of emergency room patients do not need to spend the night in a hospital, such facilities in central Ohio and across the country are faced with overcrowding. Yoder says, “Wait times are a huge issue” the center is built to avoid, he says. The system suggests those with minor ailments go first to their doctor or to an urgent care center rather than the Emergency Care Center. Still, Halpin says, the numbers of seriously ill or injured and the numbers of those with minor illness or injury are increasing at the same levels, despite the widespread notion that the crowds are caused by growing numbers with minor issues using emergency rooms as doctor’s offices. The center is moving into the high-tech age with call-ahead registration, which allows for the use of smart phones, and a free Emergency Care Center app to facilitate it. Incoming patients can use the app to submit a short form detailing symptoms, basic personal information and other pertinent details while en route so the staff will be ready when they arrive.

An app might be overly cumbersome for someone afflicted with serious injury or illness, but in those cases, it’s more likely to be used by physicians sending patients for more testing, Halpin says. OhioHealth’s electronic medical records will allow treating physicians and others with legitimate access to the system to get up-to-date patient information throughout testing or treatment. “Personal doctors can be part of the decision-making,” she explains, adding that patient information is not available from other such systems or sent to them. “There’s no shared access in the United States” as there is in other countries, she says.

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When To Seek Emergency Care Difficulty breathing, shortness of breath Broken bone

Uncontrolled bleeding Coughing or vomiting blood

Chest, abdominal pain or pressure

Severe or persistent vomiting or diarrhea

Fainting, sudden dizziness, weakness

Suicidal feelings

Changes in vision

Difficulty speaking

Confusion or changes in mental status

Directed by physician or unable to get timely physician appointment

Any sudden or severe pain

Generally, other problems can be addressed by your physician or an urgent care center. Dr. Thomas J. Gavin will be medical director, and Steven A. Taylor will be administrative nurse manager. Both, along with Halpin – herself an OhioHealth employee for 20 years – are Westerville residents. The medical staff is employed by Mid-Ohio Emergency Services, which operates emergency departments at OhioHealth’s Grant, Riverside and Dublin Methodist hospitals. The center will add 100 employees, including up to 25 physicians, nurse

practitioners, nurses, technologists and social and environmental services specialists. An around-the-clock operation, the center will have at least one physician on duty at all times and as many more as needed during the typical heavy patient load hours, generally between 2 and 10 p.m., Halpin says. The center is designed to treat 20,000 people annually. If it’s not large enough, “we have room to expand” on 20 more acres on the cam-

pus, she says. But there are no plans for doing so yet. “A lot can be built on 20 acres.” The Emergency Center will have a public open house from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 9. Duane St. Clair is a contributing editor. Feedback welcome at gbishop@ pubgroupltd.com.

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25


living

By Garth Bishop

Blue Sensation

Sheryl Meyer’s yard might give

you the blues, but like an elephant, you’ll never forget it. Meyer’s front yard, side yard and front porch on Old County Line Road are filled with all manner of projects and decorations – the results of her decision, years ago, to spruce up the space that was just plain grass. “I call it my playground,” she says. It centers on three themes: blue-andwhite patterns, cobalt blue glass and elephants. The themes are tough to miss when looking at Meyer’s house from the street – whether it’s the blue-and-white lanterns, the blue elephant mirrors, the collections of blue bottles suspended on rods like glass peacock plumage, the huge upright elephant wearing a dress or the blue woodpecker slyly suspended from a tree in the front yard. For the last 31 years, Meyer, an engineer by trade, has owned Meyer Machine Tool Co., an aerospace machine 26

shop at Port Columbus International Airport. She keeps a busy schedule, but her workspace allows her the opportunity to tinker with new projects for her yard when she has the time. “I welded a four-foot-high, free-standing fireplace (for) out in the yard,” she says. “I could fit a two-foot-diameter stump in there.” Her decorative theme began with a piece of her great-grandmother’s Blue Willow China. The china pattern dates back to the 1500s, and the colors – as well as Sheryl Meyer

the prints, which often feature elements like birds, water and willow trees – inspired Meyer to seek out more. The elephants are a little harder to explain; Meyer has collected elephant memorabilia since she was a teenager, but does not remember why. She had a few hundred pounds of concrete elephants in the house, and her yard project just gave her a reason to relocate them. She always has an eye out for potential additions. Yard sales, flea markets and even the closets of friends and family have provided her with opportunities. Recently, the deep blue bottles of Budweiser’s new Bud Light Platinum beer have caught her eye, and thanks to some generous donations of empties, she has about 100 bottles waiting to be used. “I’ve had people just drop bottles off,” Meyer says. “A school bus driver left me a note: ‘Can I take some pictures? I’ll bring you some blue bottles.’” The impetus to work on the yard came to Meyer in 1999, seven years after she www.westervillemagazine.com


Left: An upright elephant wearing a dress is positioned between two blue bottle sculptures and a variety of smaller elephants. Top: Blue elephants are arranged in a marching pattern. Above: A banner hangs over the entrance to Meyer’s side yard in the summertime.

Well-decorated yard is a sight to behold moved in. Two years earlier, she had been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and subsequently, she found herself spending a lot of time at home, looking out the window at her featureless yard. The yard became her focus, giving her an outlet for her creative energy and helping her build up the strength she lost as a result of the cancer. At first, she called it her “healing garden” – and after she finally beat the cancer, it became her “victory garden.” Though it’s not one of the key thematic elements, water is an important part of Meyer’s yard, too. About 14 years ago, she installed a fish pond 15 feet in diameter. Today, it plays host to fish year-round and also sees visits from bullfrogs, tree frogs, toads and snakes. “It keeps itself going,” says Meyer. “I just add water every now and then.” She also has an assortment of water fountains in the front yard made of scrap pieces, galvanized stainless steel and othwww.westervillemagazine.com

er materials, many of them in the shapes of people and animals – including, of course, elephants, one of them appearing to spray water out of its trunk. The stone walls on the property have a degree of significance, too. The back wall and the lining for the pond contain pink limestone from the now-razed Ohio State Penitentiary; a friend of Meyer’s happened to be on the work crew the day then-Columbus Mayor Buck Rinehart personally started demolition of the old prison without permission. And the front wall contains 19th-Century curbstones from Neil Avenue in downtown Columbus. “In 1997, when they did all the streetwork, I got a couple of truckloads of that,” Meyer says. Filling out the yard is an interesting collection of foliage – a grove of hardy banana trees, 20-foot-tall bamboo shoots and a variety of other tropical-themed plants. The idea is for the plants, in conjunction with the elephants, to provide

a jungle-like atmosphere; last summer, Meyer would go out in her own “jungle” to watch Tarzan movies from the 1950s. Everything in the yard is perennial, Meyer says; all she needs to do is cut down the ornamental grasses once each spring. Not only is Meyer forever rearranging the decorative elements in her yard, she also makes a point to decorate for holidays. The house’s proximity to Olde Town Park, a walking trail and a nursing home gives it a good audience, and Meyer likes to keep things fresh. She has also had the house on the WesterFlora Garden Tour three times. Meyer’s yard has weathered all manner of climate conditions, and no matter the season, just looking out at all she’s accomplished since her fight with cancer always makes her happy, she says. Garth Bishop is editor of Westerville Magazine. Feedback welcome at gbishop@pubgroupltd.com. 27


on the table By Christopher Braun

Whole Lotta Cakin’ Goin’ On Home-based baker creates sweet treats and elaborate designs

Pineapple Fluff Bess Daniel has been bak-

ing for her bread for seven years, but her relationship with sweets goes back a long way. Daniel, owner of Bess’ Cakery in Westerville, acquired her passion for baking from her mother. She started out watching her mother work in the kitchen, then graduated to helping her and eventually to baking on her own – though she still credits Mom with having “always made the best baked goods.” After high school, Daniel made her way to the Academy of Culinary Arts at Indiana University of Pennsylvania to hone her skills. Upon graduation, she came to central Ohio to intern for Master Chef Harmut Handke of Handke’s Cuisine, then briefly worked for a bakery before taking a job decorating cakes at a retail store seven years ago. After leaving her job there, she began receiving countless requests from friends, family members and previous customers for her edible designs. The orders kept pouring in, and in 2006, Bess’ Cakery was born. Daniel does all her baking and decorating solo and out of her own home, fully licensed by the USDA and a registered business with the state of Ohio. She accepts orders for custom cakes and gourmet cupcakes, and her red 28

velvet and cookies-and-cream cupcakes are among her most popular products, but her interest is clearly focused on a specific pastry form. “I love to do wedding cakes,” says Daniel. “I love anything that can challenge me, and wedding cakes are normally the most complex and elegant.” While Daniel astounds buyers with her decorating skill and artistic styling, it is her icing that always keeps customers coming back for more. “The icing recipe I use is my own personal recipe,” says Daniel. “It’s what draws people to my cakes and what draws people back. It’s totally off the hook.” On April 20, Bess’ Cakery participated in the annual Taste of Westerville for the first time, sharing her cupcakes for all of Westerville to enjoy. The event, held at The Lakes Golf and Country Club, also featured food from Bel Lago Waterfront Bistro, Cantina Laredo, Chocolaterie Stam, Cold Stone Creamery, Costco, Friendship Village, Great Harvest Bread, J. Gilbert’s WoodFired Steaks, McDonald’s, the Old Bag of Nails Pub, Sandman Gourmet, Skyline Chili, Starbucks and the Lakes. Christopher Braun is a contributing writer. Feedback welcome at gbishop@ pubgroupltd.com.

Ingredients: • 8. oz package of cream cheese • ½ cup granulated sugar • 8 oz. bowl of whipped topping (Cool Whip) • ¼ cup milk • 1 cup drained, crushed pineapple Directions: Using an electric mixer or handheld mixer, combine cream cheese, sugar, milk and pineapple until smooth. Fold in whipped topping and chill until ready to serve. To jazz it up, add a sprig of mint and serve in a glass dessert cup. Enjoy! www.westervillemagazine.com


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29


bookmarks

From the Westerville Public Library

Youth Reads Selected by Becky O’Neil, Youth Services

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Your Healthy Plate Series (Juvenile Nonfiction) By Katie Marsico

In this early-reader series, bright photographs and simple text teach healthful eating habits. Titles include Dairy, Vegetables, Fruits, Protein, Grains and Oils and Fats.

To Market, to Market Diet Information for (Picture Book) Teens: Health Tips By Nikki McClure about Nutrition FunA mother and son damentals and Eating visit a farmers’ mar- Plans Including Facts ket and ponder how About Vitamins, Mineach product arrived erals, Food Additives, there. Intricate cutand Weight-Related paper illustrations Concerns showcase locally(Teen Nonfiction) Edited by Zachary grown foods.

Adult Reads

Edible: A Celebration of Local Foods By Tracey Ryder and Carole Topalian

Community information Contests Giveaways and More! 30

Klimecki and Karen Bellenir

Including 80 recipes featuring local foods from across the country, this is a must-read for anyone interested in the local food movement, environmental issues or just a great meal!

Sizzle (Teen Fiction)

By Lee McClain

14-year-old Linda Delgato has always loved cooking fresh Mexican food and blogging about it, but her skills are challenged when she moves in with an aunt who hosts a TV show called Cooking from Cans.

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The One-Block Feast: An Adventure in Food from Yard to Table By Margo True and the Staff of Sunset Magazine

The Locavore’s Kitchen: A Cook’s Guide to Seasonal Eating and Preserving By Marilou K. Susko

The Wholesome Baby Food Guide: Over 150 Easy, Delicious, and Healthy Recipes from Purees to Solids

Savor foods grown locally by cooking By Maggie Meade Discover ways to and preserving the Filled with informatransform a backfreshest ingredients. tion on nutrition, yard or garden allergies, myths and into a self-sufficient the best practices for locavore’s paradise. introducing foods to Pointers include your little ones. garden plans for four seasons.

The Westerville Public Library 126 S. State St. • Phone: 614-882-7277 • www.westervillelibrary.org Mon.-Thurs.: 9 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Fri. & Sat.: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Sun.: closed. www.westervillemagazine.com


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Westerville Magazine  

May/June 2012

Westerville Magazine  

May/June 2012

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