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Panhandle Leadership. . . a Lasting Legacy

Pa n h a n d l e

R e g i o n a l

P l a n n i n g

2010 Annual Report

C o m m i s s i o n


Legacy of History & Beauty The cover photo is taken in the Palo Duro Canyon State Park, the second largest canyon in the country. This canyon, which opened as a state park in 1934, is a legacy of beauty and history for the Panhandle. The rock formation shown is called The Lighthouse. This formation, along with the entire expanse of Palo Duro Canyon, draws thousands of visitors every year to view its magnificent beauty.


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egacies can be attributed not only to the past, but also to the present and future. The word legacy can refer to a piece of history that helps define today, a thing of beauty that people can enjoy forever, or a leader who helps guide us in a positive and forward direction. The Panhandle has many legacies that represent our history, our region’s beauty, and our lasting accomplishments. These accomplishments were made possible, in part, because of the hundreds of men and women throughout the Panhandle who have provided critical leadership to move us in the right direction. u The railroad system, which helped build our vast region, is now known

as a historic legacy . Railway system artifacts, such as depots that have been restored and are now used for other purposes, are maintained as a reminder to us of their historic importance. u The Palo Duro Canyon, the nation’s second largest canyon, is an

example of a legacy of beauty that exists in the Panhandle for present and future generations to visit and enjoy. u Individuals serving as Judges, Mayors, Commissioners, Board Members,

Committee Chairs, and hundreds of other positions, represent a legacy of leadership. The leadership roles these men and women have accepted have made the Panhandle a better place to live and work.

This Annual Report is a tribute to the leaders who have served and are serving now in various capacities throughout our region. These leaders have given their time and talent to help ensure the Panhandle will be a better, more vibrant place for future generations. Their legacies are invaluable. This Report is also a call to men and women who have not yet served as leaders to consider doing so. Thanks to our leaders, past and current, the Panhandle has a lasting and positive legacy. On behalf of the Panhandle community, thank all of you for your service, dedication, and willingness to provide leadership.


PANHANDLE REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION The Panhandle Regional Planning Commission is a voluntary association of cities, counties and special districts in the Texas Panhandle. Established in 1969, the Planning Commission assists local governments in planning, developing and implementing programs designed to improve the general health, safety and welfare of the citizens in the Texas Panhandle. The Planning Commission is an organization of, by and for local governments. It was created based on the concept that more can be accomplished by local governments acting cooperatively rather than alone. Since 1969, the Planning Commission has been involved in a wide range of projects and programs. Activities currently include programs in the areas of workforce development, aging, local government services, economic development, dispute resolution, 9-1-1 services, criminal justice, solid waste management, emergency preparedness, transportation planning services, water planning, regional services and technical assistance to the local governments of the Panhandle. The Panhandle region covers a 26-county area consisting of almost 26,000 square miles. The region’s population is 402,862. The Panhandle Regional Planning Commission has 93 member governments – including all 26 counties, 59 incorporated cities and 8 special districts.

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Letter From the Board Chair

Zelda Lang PRPC Board Chair Dalhart City Council

When I learned that this Annual Report was titled Panhandle Leadership … A Lasting Legacy, I began thinking about the meaning of legacy to those of us who call the Panhandle home. Most of the programs and projects the PRPC focuses on today – from water planning, to 9-1-1 upgrades, to emergency preparedness – will have a lasting legacy for our region. Our children, grandchildren, and generations beyond them will look back on the decisions we make today and understand the importance and impact those decisions have had on our region. The Planning Commission has always attracted, retained and empowered exceptional leaders. My colleagues on the Board of Directors perform their roles tirelessly with the sole goal of making the Panhandle a better place to live, work, and raise families. They continually look for ways to collaborate, share resources, motivate communities to get involved, and anticipate and remedy issues that to some would seem insurmountable. Such characteristics of leadership are at the core of the Planning Commission’s Board. In many cases, our Panhandle local government officials serve in statewide leadership roles as well. Amarillo Mayor Debra McCartt is the current head of the Texas Municipal League. Roberts County Judge Vernon Cook serves as President of the Texas Association of Counties, and David Landis, City Manager of Perryton, is the President Elect of the Texas City Management Association. On behalf of the Board of Directors I want to thank Gary Pitner and his entire staff for the day-to-day leadership they provide the Panhandle. Never have so few individuals with such limited resources accomplished so much. It is a tribute to the staff’s competence, determination, and creativity in every aspect of what they do. At the end of this report is a listing of names of individuals who serve on PRPC committees. Many, if not most of these men and women, have served in a leadership capacity with the Planning Commission for decades. Such a listing certainly does not do justice to the amount of time and talent these leaders provide this region, but it does serve as a public ‘thank you’ for their contributions. The leadership that occurs in so many ways from so many people will have a lasting impact on our communities. Their legacy will impact the Panhandle in the near term, as well as on future generations. Leadership truly is a lasting legacy that this region is fortunate to have in abundance.

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B O A R D O F D I R E C TO R S

ZELDA LANG, Chair

WAYNE NANCE, Vice Chairman

DEBRA McCARTT, Secretary Treasurer

PRPC Board – 8 years Dalhart City Council - 12 Years

PRPC Board – 5 years Briscoe County Judge – 8 years

PRPC Board – 3 years Amarillo Mayor – 6 years Amarillo City Commission – 4 years

*DON ALLRED

TOM BAILIFF

JEFF BRAIN

PRPC Board – 20 years Oldham County Judge – 20 years

PRPC Board – 12 years Greenbelt Municipal & Industrial Water Authority – 30 years

PRPC Board – 1 year Borger Mayor – 6 years Borger City Commission – 7 years

BRIAN GILLISPIE

BOB GOBER

PETE DeSANTIAGO PRPC Board – 4 years Minority Citizens Representative, Perryton

*JUAN CANTU

*VERNON COOK

PRPC Board – 9 years PRPC Board – 20 years Lipscomb County Roberts County Judge – 20 years Commissioner – 8 years Booker City Council – 2 years

PRPC Board – 1 year PRPC Board – 18 years Spearman Mayor – 4 years N. Rolling Plains R C & D – 30 yrs Spearman City Hemphill County Judge – 26 years Council – 10 years Hemphill County JP – 8 years

*RONNIE GORDON

*JACK HALL

PRPC Board – 16 years Hartley County Judge – 18 years

PRPC Board – 12 years Donley County Judge – 13 years

SAUL HERNANDEZ

ERNIE HOUDASHELL

JOHN JAMES

HAROLD KEETER

*JAY MAYDEN

PRPC Board – 1 year Minority Citizens Representative, Amarillo

PRPC Board – 1 year Randall County Judge– 8 years

PRPC Board – 2 years Collingsworth County Judge – 6 years

PRPC Board – 4 years Swisher County Judge – 15 years

PRPC Board – 6 years Childress County Judge – 8 years

HARVEY PEREZ

*TOM SIMONS

TOM VELASQUEZ

ARTHUR WARE

JED WELCH

TRESA WHALEY

PRPC Board – 5 years Minority Citizens Representative, Hart

PRPC Board – 16 years Deaf Smith County Judge – 23 years

PRPC Board – 3 years Minority Citizens Representative, Wheeler

PRPC Board – 14 years Potter County Judge – 19 years

PRPC Board – 7 years Canyon City Commission – 18 years

PRPC Board – 12 years Minority Citizens Representative, Vega

* Indicates past PRPC Board Chair

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Letter From the Executive Director

Gary Pitner PRPC Executive Director — 25 years PRPC Staff Member — 33 years When I reflect on what makes our region so great, I continually place one factor above all others. Our leaders! The Panhandle is so fortunate to have the depth of leadership we have in every aspect of our governance. In light of this fact, the phrase Panhandle Leadership … a Lasting Legacy offers a fitting title for this year’s Annual Report. In the book A Leader’s Legacy by Kouzes and Posner there is a great description of leadership legacy. “Asking the question about legacy brings forward another central observation: leadership is not solely about producing results. Success in leadership is not measured only in numbers. Being a leader brings with it a responsibility to do something of significance that makes families, communities, work organizations, nations, the environment, and the world better places than they are today. Not all these things can be quantified.” These words describe the legacy of leadership very effectively. Results are great and we always strive to achieve them. But sometimes what is not as obvious as the quantifiable results are the intangible accomplishments that occur because leaders bring out the best in others. They step forward to discuss tough issues, they are visionary and can see what others cannot, and they implement creative solutions in order to progress. The Panhandle has, and has had, hundreds of dynamic individuals serving in leadership roles. They range from our congressional representatives, to our Panhandle legislative delegation in Austin, to the region’s city and county elected officials, to the members of the PRPC Board of Directors and to the dozens of Panhandle citizens serving on PRPC advisory groups. In addition, I’m proud to add the 45 PRPC employees who offer a combined total of 423 years of service. The leadership legacies of these men and women are quite impressive. We must never lose sight of the importance of our leaders. Their legacies are diverse, their methods unique, and their strengths varied, but these men and women are making the Panhandle a much better place to live, work and raise our families. It’s nearly impossible to quantify their efforts, but so obvious to see their results.

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Jamie Allen Tom Dressler Cristy Henderson Gary Pitner Gracie Aragon John Dubina Melissa Henderson Chuck Rivas Cindy Bagwell Reeves Easley-McPherson Kyle Ingham Rebecca Rusk Sharee Bailey Kyler Estes John Kiehl John Schaumburg Cindy Boone Pamela Frisk Sharla Leggett Janet Schulte Heike Bowen Yvette Gaytan Julie Lyles Marcus Smith Terrie Campbell Russell Green Judy McClendon Elizabeth Thomas Dave Cann Elizabeth Gresham Christina Montana Stacey Urbanczyk Melissa Carter Lisa Hancock Doug Nelson Teana Waller Pam Coffey Leslie Hardin Nancy Nickles Tony White Pamela Deemer Sean Hardman Michael Peters Inger Williams Pam Zenick

PRPC Staff 5


Workforce Development

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ith almost $6 million in stimulus funds provided to the Panhandle through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the Workforce Board was able to provide hundreds of additional area residents with employment, training and child care services.

The region’s workforce development programs help Panhandle employers recruit, hire and retain qualified personnel. They also provide workers with the information, assistance and training needed to obtain and keep jobs that offer good wages and benefits, and enhance their ability to support their families. These efforts are planned and overseen by the Panhandle Workforce Development Board, a group of dedicated volunteers who are appointed by local elected officials. PRPC serves as the administrative and fiscal agent for the Board. Services are provided by the Huxford Group, LLC, a private sector contractor with staff located in eight Workforce Solutions offices around the region, and through a related website.

A summer jobs program for over 350 youth from low-income families was conducted this year. The initiative, which was funded with stimulus monies, provided approximately $600,000 in wages and fringe benefits to participating young people. Private and public sector employers throughout the region provided the needed jobs to ensure the program’s success. As part of Texas Lieutenant Governor David Dewhurst’s ‘Texas Back to Work’ initiative, the Board also provided financial incentives to dozens of private sector employers for hiring approximately 100 unemployment insurance recipients. Occupational training remained an important offering of the Board. Approximately $560,000 was provided to area universities, community colleges and trade schools to help over 650 unemployed and low-income individuals prepare for new careers.

The Board continued its focus on child care services during the past year. An estimated 3,000 low-income families received more than $9.5 million to help purchase services for their children. Approximately $300,000 in learning materials, equipment and furnishings were bought for area child care providers. The Board also provided training through Amarillo College and other organizations to help hundreds of Panhandle child care workers improve their professional knowledge and skills.

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v Provided child care services to more than 5,500 Panhandle children from low-income families v Assisted 34,000 Panhandle workers with their search for employment v Helped more than 3,000 area employers to recruit qualified workers

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Golden Plains Community Hospital in Borger works with Workforce Solutions in several ways, using the local office to recruit job applicants and participating in related programs designed to return people to work. Pictured are (from left) Jennifer Harvey, Human Resource Coordinator; Dennis Jack, CEO; and Jessie Jones, Registered Nurse.

Lisa Herndon, Amarillo

Debra McCartt, Amarillo

Chair, Panhandle Workforce Development Board

Chair, Panhandle Workforce Development Consortium’s Governing Body

Legacy of Leadership “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has.”

~

Margaret Mead

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Area Agency on Aging

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his past year the Area Agency on Aging (AAA) team took training on the road, setting up education and enrollment events throughout the region. The Medicare Part D training, which was held in Amarillo, Dalhart, Dumas, Clarendon, Hereford, Perryton, and Borger, provided one-on-one education to more than 750 individuals on Medicare Part D. The AAA worked with various senior advocacy organizations to promote the events to residents.

The Area Agency on Aging (AAA) serves as a visible advocate and leader for the Panhandle’s elderly population. The AAA offers a range of comprehensive and coordinated programs and services to accom plish its mission of promoting dignity, independence and quality of life for older people and the friends and family members who care for them.

AAA staff members provided residents with cost and formulary comparison data for available Medicare plans during open enrollment. More than half of those who met with AAA staff changed their plan for the coming year. For the 5th consecutive year, the Caregiver Workshop was held in November at the Amarillo College Business and Industry Center. More than 150 men and women attended the event, which featured internationally known author Doug Manning. More than a dozen service providers were on hand to educate caregivers about vital programs and resources available to help keep caregivers healthy and safe themselves.

Feeding more seniors with home-delivered meals was an important focus this past year. Through the collaborative efforts of AAA, the Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS), and the Texas Department of Agriculture, the Panhandle’s home-delivered meal programs received education on available funding from a $10 million state-wide grant called Texans Feeding Texans. This grant, authored by State Representative Warren Chisum of Pampa, was designed to involve communities in feeding their seniors by requiring counties to provide funding in order to be eligible. Ten programs received funding, totaling $139,033.

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Tri-County Meals in Quitaque received $20,382 in funding through the Texas Department of Agriculture for its homedelivered meal program. The program is a unique model, completely staffed by volunteers except for two paid positions, a full-time cook and an assistant cook.

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Jim Kiper, Amarillo  v Delivered 143,592 congregate and home-delivered meals to seniors throughout the region  v Provided 5,850 hours of in-home respite care for caregivers  v Fielded 4,154 information referral & assistance calls

Chair, Area Agency on Aging Advisory Committee

Legacy of Leadership “Leadership is the special quality which enables people to stand up and pull the rest of us over the horizon.” ~  James Fisher

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Local Government Services

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ommunity Development Block Grant (CDBG) projects continue to be an important initiative for the Planning Commission. Ten such projects were funded in 2009, and eight projects have been funded in 2010. This is the largest number of these types of projects funded ever in a biennium. A high percentage of these grants are used to fund water system improvements. Two projects, Bovina’s water well and Panhandle’s water line replacement, were funded with stimulus money awarded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. A project in Pampa, also a water line replacement, was funded with dollars allocated by Texas Legislature. For the second year the Planning Commission offered members strategic planning services. By providing facilitation expertise, the PRPC helps communities identify problems and needs, develop the associated goals and objectives to resolve them, along with the strategies necessary to meet those goals and objectives. PRPC staff assisted Canadian in developing a strategic plan to strengthen community involvement, remedy its water/sewer issues, and address fluctuating tax income concerns. Spearman utilized strategic planning to develop future initiatives for its infrastructure to meet needs in the years ahead.

The PRPC staff assisted the City of Dalhart in securing funding from the Texas Parks & Wildlife’s Trails Grant Program to improve and expand a walking trail for the community at Rita Blanco Lake.

The Local Government Services (LGS) staff spent significant efforts this year helping to build model subdivision rules for five entities. This initiative is designed to help communities develop formalized rules to prevent new non-border colonies. After development of subdivision requirements, communities can apply for funding through the Texas Water Development Board’s (TWDB) Economically Disadvantaged Program (EDAP). Addressing the need for recreational resources, the LGS staff assisted the communities of Vega, Miami, and Fritch in developing Master Park Plans. Each plan includes a survey/needs assessment of the community, a comparative analysis with other like-size communities, identification of funding sources, and the passage of a resolution to adopt the park plan. The LGS staff also assisted these members, as well as others, in writing applications for grant funding. PRPC staff assisted both the City of Higgins and the City of Childress in securing funds under the Texas Parks & Wildlife’s Trails Grant Program to improve local trails.

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Legacy of History In Panhandle, the historic Railroad Depot served as a bustling centerpiece where men and women traveled to and from the community by rail. Today that Depot remains as a reminder of that period in the region’s history as Panhandle’s City Hall. Following flooding that took place in Spearman and Hansford County, road damage occurred, leaving behind debris and fallen bridges. The LGS staff assisted in the preparation of a Texas Department of Rural Affairs (TDRA) application for $350,000 to provide disaster assistance.

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v Prepared 35 CDBG grant applications for 2011/2012 cycle v Provided over 800 hours in city management services v Attended over 75 council meetings

The PRPC’s Local Government Services Department assists area cities and counties in addressing community development needs. Results of these services can be seen with such community improvements as new parks, water infrastructure, sewer infrastructure, and local planning assistance. The Planning Commission plays a part in multiple phases of these projects for its members, from assisting with grant preparation, to administrative management of construction activities, construction contracts, and compilation, and submission of all required reporting upon project completion. The PRPC also delivers city management services to area municipalities ranging from strategic planning assistance to codification, to long-term management contracts.

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Economic Development

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he Panhandle has fortunately been spared much of the painful economic scenarios seen in other regions where over-valued indicators, such as real estate, prevented a level of sustainability. Much of this stability is attributed to the fact that the Panhandle continues to diversify its economic base which is anchored by the agricultural and oil and gas industries. The Planning Commission’s Economic Development staff is well integrated into the Panhandle’s overall financial picture, especially when it comes to loans to small business owners. Because of the financial crisis of recent years, many banks are more interested in financing deals that offer less risk. Since PRPC’s loan programs reduce risk to traditional lenders, the Planning Commission has become a leading lender, partnering with the banks to successfully get projects financed in the region. To help ensure the region’s continued economic success, the PRPC helps communities build and improve the infrastructure assets they have. One way of accomplishing this goal is through a Texas Capital Fund Downtown Revitalization Grant. This year the PRPC assisted the City of Spearman in writing and submitting a $150,000 grant, which was approved and will begin implementation in the 1st quarter of FY2011. The PRPC’s Contract Procurement Center (CPC) had a busy year assisting small businesses in the region to receive 36 contract awards from federal, state, and local governments totaling $29,804,837.

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v The Texas Panhandle Regional Development Corporation (TPRDC) submitted 13 loans to the Small Business Administration that were approved for $9,567,000. v Three micro loans were approved through the Rural Micro Loan and Amarillo MSA Micro Loan programs totaling $84,150. v Two City of Amarillo Community Development Micro Loans were approved, totaling $43,450.

Legacy of Leadership

Randy Stark, Quitaque

Clint Curtis, Pampa

Chair, Economic Development Advisory Committee

President, Texas Panhandle Regional Development Corporation

“Leaders are the ones who keep faith with the past, keep step with the present, and keep the promise to posterity.”

~

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Peter Ferdinand Drucker and Harold J. Seymour


The Planning Commission’s Economic Development Program is designed to assist local government entities and area businesses in enhancing the economic environment and encouraging the sustainable development of the region. This assistance is accomplished through six initiatives. Acting as the Economic Development District, assistance is provided with regional economic planning, grant preparation and administration, and topical workshops. The Texas Panhandle Regional Development Corporation (TPRDC) provides financing to small businesses for fixed assets through the SBA 504 Loan Program. Loans are also provided through three micro loan programs: PRPC’s Rural Micro Loan program, offering financing to small businesses in the region who create jobs; the Amarillo MSA Micro Loan program, helping finance small businesses in Potter and Randall Counties with a focus on low to moderate income business owners; and the Amarillo Community Development Micro Loan program, offering financing to only low to moderate income small business owners in the City of Amarillo. Finally, the Contract Procurement Center (CPC) offers services and counseling to businesses interested in obtaining and performing on government contracts.

James “Snuffy” Boyles, owner of BJM Sales and Service in Hereford, Texas, accessed financing from the SBA 504 Program through TPRDC. BJM Sales and Service is a dealer for Roto-Mix livestock feeding equipment, Supreme Mixers, and DigiStar Electronic scales. The company also sells used livestock feeding equipment, trucks, manure spreading equipment, and portable loading chutes and panels. BJM Sales and Service has a full service shop and parts department along with service trucks to complete repairs at the customer’s location.

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Criminal Justice

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sing funds made available to the Panhandle through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, PRPC staff continued to help with the expansion of projects intended to assist the region’s victim services agencies and the Panhandle’s law enforcement community. The Panhandle Regional Information and Data Exchange (PRIDE) project was started and continues to expand using Reinvestment Act monies. Approximately $800,125 was made available to the region to begin the creation of a Panhandle-wide mobile data environment to support law enforcement data sharing and exchange. So far, 140 Mobile Data Terminals (laptops for police cruisers) have been purchased and are being installed for law enforcement departments throughout the region. Victim services agencies provide a unique and unduplicated array of vital services to victems of crimes within their unique service area. Each of these agencies relies, for the most part, on federal and state funding to support their delivery of services.

PRPC’s Criminal Justice Program has been designated by the Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division as the responsible entity for regional criminal justice planning efforts for the 26-county area. Under this program, the Planning Commission acts as a catalyst for positive change and innovation through regional agencies and to enhance the quality of life for residents of the Panhandle Region by providing services that facilitate the effective planning, implementation and assessment of regional criminal justice initiatives. Regional planning activities include coordinating and consolidating activities of the criminal justice agencies to maximize available funds and resources. This process involves identifying local crime problems, resources, goals and objectives and projecting programs and funding needs. The department assists in administering, monitoring and reviewing grants for a range of activities that are designed and coordinated through local governments and victim services agencies. The grants provide services in areas such as victim’s services, prosecution, crime prevention, juvenile justice prevention and intervention and law enforcement training.

Over the past few years, the funding in support of victim services agencies had declined, forcing agencies to curtail or even eliminate services. Because of this, numerous initiatives were started using ARRA dollars to stabilize their financial situations. Grant money in the amount of $406,211 was awarded to these agencies, helping purchase legal services, provide employee training and assist in the certification of sexual abuse nurse examiners. The PRPC’s Criminal Justice Department assisted nine regional victim services agencies apply for 14 general victim assistance grants. These agencies include victim shelters, hotline services, transitional housing and many others. Twelve entities received funding, totaling $487,846. The Planning Commission also assisted four cities apply for general criminal justice grants, funded through State of Texas and the Federal Justice Assistance Grant Program. The applications ranged from the purchase of a drug dog, to computers for police cars. Funds were also awarded in the amount of $98,052 to assist Amarillo College with the continuing operation of the Panhandle Regional Law Enforcement Academy.

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The PRPC facilitated the development of a regional grant application by Randall County under the Justice Assistance Grant program which resulted in the purchase and installation of 140 in-car computers in law enforcement vehicles around the Panhandle. Parmer County Sheriff’s Office Randy Geries is shown with one such unit in a County patrol vehicle.

Legacy of Leadership Dena McCaslin, Tulia Chair, Criminal Justice Advisory Committee

“Leadership should be more participative than directive, more enabling than performing.” ~  Mary D. Poole

The PRPC helped local entities apply for funding from the Criminal Justice Division of the Governor’s Office. These applications sought general Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention grants to support programs that prevent violence near schools and improve the juvenile justice system. The PRPC also received monies to contract with the regional juvenile probation offices to help defray their costs for detention services.

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v 770 officers received a total of 10,540 hours of mandatory training through the Panhandle Regional Law Enforcement Academy. The Academy also graduated its 100th and 101st classes with a total cadet graduate count of 47. v Developed contracts, totaling $56,609, with the 13 juvenile probation offices to assist in offsetting costs for juvenile detention services v Assisted 17 agencies with 23 grant applications totaling $880,137

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Regional 9-1-1 Network

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ithin the past year, the Panhandle’s 18-year-old analog 9-1-1 equipment has been completely removed and replaced with a digitally networked system. This new equipment has more features, can be customized, and may be maintained and upgraded remotely. This remote access allows 9-1-1 staff to solve problems in minutes rather than the hours involved to travel to the equipment. This new equipment will accommodate integration of future technologies such as text and photos. As the percentage of 9-1-1 calls from cell phones increases, it is critical to locate the caller’s wireless handset or cell phone. This technology is known as Phase 2 technology. The Regional 9-1-1 Network has completed the certification process of all cell phone companies serving our area.

The PRPC’s Regional 9-1-1 Network provides emergency communications services to the residents in 24 Panhandle counties through a network of twenty-three 9-1-1 call centers located in sheriffs’ offices and police departments. These 9-1-1 calls now are received by landlines, cellular phones, and most recently, VOIP or voice over IP. The PRPC provides ongoing training of 9-1-1 call takers, ensures maintenance of the emergency systems, and provides public education.

Training and education to call takers and the public continues to be important for the success of the Regional 9-1-1 Network. No-cost classes were offered to call takers on topics such as equipment training, emergency response, and liability. The 9-1-1 staff also participated in many public venues, including the Tri-State Fair and EMS Days, to help educate the public about 9-1-1.

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v Distributed 18,802 public education items to area residents v Ensured over 100,000 9-1-1 calls were delivered to Panhandle call centers v Offered 43 training classes to call takers

Steve Vandiver, Hemphill County LifeStar, Northwest Texas Healthcare System’s air ambulance service, provides invaluable rural response times, working in conjunction with the 9-1-1 Network.

Chair, Regional 9-1-1 Network Advisory Committee

Legacy of Leadership “Lead and inspire people. Don’t try to manage and manipulate people. Inventories can be managed but people must be led.” ~ Ross Perot

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Solid Waste Management The Regional Solid Waste Management Program was developed to assist the region’s local governments in implementing the recommendations of the Regional Solid Waste Management Plan. The plan was created in response to federal and state regulations that were significantly impacting landfill costs. The primary goal of the plan is to provide guidance in the development and implementation of local and regional alternatives, such as local and mutli-jurisdictional recycling, composting and wood waste reduction programs, over traditional forms of disposal. In its function to promote the region’s waste diversion efforts, the Planning Commission takes a lead role in the development and implementation of cooperative marketing and transportation methods.

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he Panhandle Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee (RSWMAC) is responsible for the oversight of the Panhandle’s regional solid waste programs. In FY10 the RSWMAC recommended the funding of 12 grant projects; totaling over $223,000. This past year, new recycling/baling centers were built in Memphis and in Wheeler and a number of existing programs were further enhanced to increase their waste diversion potential. The PRPC continues to support the mission of the Panhandle Environmental Partnership and in 2010, coordinated the shipment of 91 truckloads of recyclable materials. The proceeds from the sale of those materials generated more than $129,000, all of which went back to the cities that produced those loads. Collectively, these loads diverted 1,261 tons from the landfill, resulting in over $31,525 in avoided landfill fees. Following a full assessment of equipment and structures purchased through the Panhandle Solid Waste Grants Program since its inception in 1993, the PRPC staff identified some unused equipment. Recycling equipment purchased in 2002 by the City of Booker was not being utilized and was available to serve the community in another manner. Students at Booker High School created an action plan to establish a community recycling center. The plan grew to involve the school district, the Booker Economic Development Corporation, and the Chamber of Commerce. The new recycling center, made possible with the previously unused equipment, is now operational and has received its first proceed check in the amount of $2,098.

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Hoyt Manning, Canadian Chair, Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee

Eight students at Booker High School determined that their community needed to do more for the environment. With help from the City of Booker, Booker Economic Development Corporation, and the PRPC, a new citizen drop-off recycling center has opened on property donated by the Chamber of Commerce.

Legacy of Leadership “Leadership is practiced not so much in words as in attitude and in actions.” ~  Harold S. Geneen

v The Solid Waste Grant Program has operated for 17 years v Almost $5 million dollars has been passed through to local jurisdictions 17


Emergency Preparedness

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s one of the newest advisory committees within the PRPC family, the PREMAC has already made some dramatic contributions to the well being of the Texas Panhandle; particularly in the area of public safety.

The Regional Emergency Preparedness Program supports the state’s homeland security Strategic Plan, which in turn supports the National Strategy for Homeland Security. In the Panhandle, the program’s primary goal is to better prepare the area’s first responders to thwart and or respond to and recover from large-scale, man-made or natural disasters. The key objectives are to prevent terrorists/attacks, reduce vulnerability to terrorism or natural disasters, and to minimize losses and affect a speedy recovery when incidents occur. Implementation of the Emergency Preparedness Program is overseen by the Panhandle Regional Emergency Management Advisory Committee (PREMAC). The PREMAC areas of responsibility include the development of regional preparedness plans, overseeing the implementation of regional preparedness programs, and developing recommendations regarding the use of the region’s homeland security grant funding.

Since its original task of developing the Panhandle’s first regional preparedness plan in 2002, the PREMAC has since been responsible for directing the Panhandle’s emergency management programs and for keeping the regional preparedness plan updated. Under the direction of PREMAC Chairman Walt Kelley, PREMAC membership has grown to include 42 individuals that represent every facet of the region’s public safety community from agriculture to law enforcement and fire, to local government. One of PREMAC’s greatest legacies will be the reconstruction of the Panhandle’s public safety communications system; an effort that has been carried out under the banner of PANCOM. In 2002, the region’s infrastructure that supported public safety communications was reaching obsolescence. The handwriting was clearly on the wall that a drastic overhaul of the system was required.

Replacement of the system quickly became Priority 1 for the PREMAC when the region began receiving annual allocations of State Homeland Security Program (SHSP) grant funding. A needs analysis study recommended the development of an engineered “path” for creating a true regional system. PANCOM was to become a network of communications systems, designed to serve the Panhandle’s public safety communications needs for many years to come.

For the past six years, the PREMAC has targeted a significant portion of the region’s SHSP funding toward the completion of PANCOM. By the end of calendar year 2011, having spent nearly $7 million, the state-ofthe-art PANCOM system will become fully operational region-wide. To complement this effort, the PREMAC has also worked to get more user radios in the hands of the region’s first responders. In the past year, using funding from a Public Safety Interoperable Communications grant, the PREMAC directed the distribution of 666 new radios to public safety agencies around the region.

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Walt Kelley, Amarillo In addition, the PREMAC has worked to increase other regional response capabilities. SHSP investments have been made in improving the Panhandle’s ability to respond to events involving explosive devices, hazardous materials, and incidents that require heavy rescue equipment. All this work is being carried out within the context of the Panhandle’s regional preparedness plan. The PREMAC understands the need to have a good regional response strategy but the written plan has to be backed up with the appropriate equipment and training. From its beginning, the PREMAC has operated under the mantra that all SHSP expenditures must have regional impact and the committee has stayed true to this precept ever since.

Chair, Panhandle Regional Emergency Management Advisory Committee

Legacy of Leadership “Great leaders are almost always great simplifiers, who can cut through argument, debate, and doubt, to offer a solution everybody can understand.” ~ General Colin Powell

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v Procured a new robot for the Regional Bomb Squad v Hosted the second annual Regional Preparedness Conference which attracted nearly 500 attendees v Equipped 8 new tower sites within the PANCOM system and worked in cooperation with the region’s 9-1-1 program to install microwave links at 16 sites in the system v Provided funding to keep the Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems under warranty coverage v Procured monitors to test for the presence of lethal biologic materials and other equipment for use by Amarillo’s Urban Search & Rescue Team

After considering the various proposals submitted for consideration under the 2010 regional homeland security program, the Panhandle Regional Emergency Management Advisory Committee recommended the funding of a new robot for the Regional Bomb Squad.

19


Regional Transportation Planning

R

egional public transportation planning is under the oversight of the PRPC’s Regional Transportation Advisory Group (RTAG), a group made up of 19 members from throughout the region who are stakeholders in making sure our counties and cities receive the most effective and efficient public transportation available. This past year, the RTAG reviewed the initial draft of the 2011 Regional Transportation Plan. In 2010, the PRPC Board of Directors created the Panhandle Rural Transportation Planning Organization (PRPO) to serve the 17 counties in the Amarillo TxDOT District. At the first meeting, 11 judges, three TxDOT representatives, and two Amarillo MPO representatives were in attendance. This body laid the groundwork for long-term meaningful relationships between local representatives and the Amarillo TxDOT District. It will be advantageous to the cities and counties in the Amarillo TxDOT District to have guaranteed local input into decisions on road projects, maintenance projects, and safety projects in the region. The Childress TxDOT District is made up of 13 counties, with six of those counties in the PRPC service area. For two years, these counties have been served by the Rolling Plains Organization for Rural Transportation (RPORT). Because many of the RPORT counties fall in other Council of Government regions, the PRPC worked with its sister organizations to best serve the counties in the Childress TxDOT District. The PRPC staff met with neighboring regional councils to discuss the need to offer the same transportation planning services throughout the Childress TxDOT District with PRPC serving as the primary contact for the effort. RPORT membership unanimously accepted the offer.

9

One of the newest initiatives for the PRPC involves public transportation research and planning. A study group was established by Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) in early 2005 to review public transportation planning and programming practices within metropolitan, suburban, and rural areas. Under the guidance of the TxDOT, the Planning Commission was selected by area public transportation interests to serve as lead agency for the Texas Panhandle to develop a regional Public Transportation Service Plan. This effort has now evolved into PRPC’s involvement with two Rural Planning Organizations (RPOs) focused on providing local input into statewide and regional TxDOT decision-making processes.

20


Jay Mayden, Childress County

Bennie Wilson, Hansford County

Gerald Payton, Amarillo

Chair, Rolling Plains Organization for Rural Transportation

Chair, Panhandle Rural Transportation Planning Organization

Chair, Regional Transportation Advisory Committee

Legacy of Leadership “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.�

~

John Quincy Adams

Road and highway construction was the biggest single line infrastructure item in the final American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) bill. Projects funded by this stimulus funding, such as road work that took place throughout the region, are marked by an ARRA sign. The PRPO and RPORT, with PRPC assistance, will be reviewing projects of this nature in the future.

v Issued more than 300 surveys for RTAG

v Held four RTAG meetings and three public hearings regarding the Draft 2011 Plan

v Met 100% of targets identified in the 2006 Regional Public Transportation Plan

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Water Planning

T

he most important accomplishment of the past year is the adoption of the Panhandle Regional Water Plan. This marks the third iteration of the plan. Panhandle Water Planning Group (PWPG) members represent municipal, county, agriculture, manufacturing, environmental, and other areas of interest within the region to ensure that the plan is representative of the priorities of each of these areas. After review by the Texas Water Development Board, the 2011 Panhandle Regional Water Plan will be incorporated in the 2012 State of Texas Water Plan. The State Plan is utilized for funding decisions, water usage and conservation measures, and future growth plans. The 2011 Regional Plan revisited groundwater availability modeling and agriculture demands. It included a comprehensive Lake Meredith Study. The Plan also incorporated the Groundwater Management Area (GMA) #1’s Desired Future Conditions (DFCs) into 50-year goals.

Thirteen years ago, Senate Bill 1 mandated that the state of Texas undertake a comprehensive water planning process designed to assist water users and providers in planning for and meeting future water demands and needs. Delegated to the regions to accomplish, the PRPC continues to serve as the administrative agent for this effort at the request of the Panhandle Water Planning Group (PWPG).

The GMA #1 was the first GMA in the state to adopt DFCs for all major aquifers. During the process, the GMA #1 successfully went through the Texas Water Development Board petition process in which its DFC for the Ogallala Aquifer was challenged, setting a precedent for other GMAs in the state. GMA #1 also utilized a number of Groundwater Availability Models to establish DFCs for the Ogallala, Blaine, and Dockum Aquifers.

9

v PWPG members contributed 1,202 hours for $60,100 worth of volunteer time unreimbursed for the five-year plan v

PWPG members drove 32,734 miles to PWPG meetings, donating their mileage in the five-year cycle

v Strategies identified in the 2011 Regional Water Plan addressed deficiencies for 17 area water providers

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Legacy of Leadership “The six essential leadership attributes: set high standards; live your standards and mentor those who follow; create and share a vision; make the hard choices when necessary; be visible and out front; and instill hope in those who follow.�

C. E. Williams, White Deer Chair, Panhandle Water Planning Group

Danny Krienke, Perryton

~

John Di Frances

Chair, Groundwater Management Area #1

The Palo Duro Reservoir is identified as a potential future water source for the region in the 2011 Panhandle Regional Water Plan that PRPC assisted in developing. The reservoir is experiencing record high water levels after summer rains.

23


Dispute Resolution

T

he Dispute Resolution Center (DRC) marked its 20th year of operation, steadily building the number of dispute cases that have been mediated by its volunteers each month. In 1990 the DRC mediated an average of six cases per month; this past year the Center mediated 316 cases, for an average of more than 26 per month. More than 200 mediators have been trained throughout the past two decades.

The PRPC’s Dispute Resolution Center (DRC) is designed to empower residents of this region to resolve all types of conflicts through the use of mediation. The DRC offers mediation assistance for a variety of controversies, including divorce/custody, visitation arrangements, consumer complaints, minor criminal mischief, personal injury, landlord/tenant disputes, property and damage disputes, threats and trespassing, financial disputes, police and court referrals, employer/employee conflicts, and neighborhood and community conflicts. Such resolution is achieved with the assistance of trained, impartial mediators who facilitate meetings between the disputing parties. Continuing education is provided to the mediators, ensuring that their mediation skills are current and effective.

In 1990 most of the cases were involving neighborhood disputes, business disputes, and police referrals. Only about five percent of cases mediated were family issue cases. Twenty years later, more than 90 percent of the cases mediated involve the family, including divorce and modification. DRC mediators began traveling outside of Amarillo to mediate several referrals throughout the region. About one fourth of the DRC’s caseload takes place outside of the Amarillo area. Mediators travel to Pampa, where the region’s northeast quadrant of cases can be served.

9

v More than 220 court dates were freed up in district and county courts at law v More than 90 percent of cases mediated in 2010 were family related v Gwen Murphy has been a DRC mediator since the Center’s creation; she is the only original mediator from the first training class

Legacy of Leadership “People learn to lead because they care about something.”

~

Charlotte Bunch

Cathy Dodson, Amarillo Chair, Dispute Resolution Advisory Board

Volunteers, who undergo extensive mediation training, serve as mediators for the Dispute Resolution Center, under its Director Pam Coffey. 24


Regional Services

T

his year, the PRPC sponsored more than 70 workshops, seminars and hearings to provide members with information on a range of topics. One such session, held in the spring, was the Panhandle Local Government Leadership Forum. Attended by approximately 100 local elected officials from across the region, this event provided insight regarding the issues and challenges facing local government in Texas. The PRPC staff continued to work with Potter County on the multi-year effort to restore the Potter County Courthouse. The planning for this effort actually began over 10 years ago and thanks to the diligence of the Potter County Commissioners and the on-going dedication of many fine County employees, the project has now advanced to the mid-point of the restoration construction phase. As currently scheduled, the project will be fully completed by the end of 2011. This decade of dedication will result in a “new” 1932-era courthouse that not only reflects the historic legacy of the Potter County area but also functions as a fully modernized building that will continue to serve Potter County for many more decades to come.

Featured speakers at the Panhandle Local Leadership Forum, hosted by the PRPC in the spring, are (from left) Frank Sturzl, Executive Director of the Texas Municipal League (TML); The Honorable Debra McCartt, Mayor, City of Amarillo, and President of TML; Vernon Cook, Roberts County Judge and President of the Texas Association of Counties (TAC); and Judge Gene Terry, Executive Director of TAC.

The Texas Revenue Recovery Association (TRRA) is an initiative to help communities recover delinquent utility and solid waste bills. The TRRA has grown to involve 71 cities across the Panhandle as well as portions of the South Plains, Permian Basin, North Texas and Dallas and Houston metropolitan areas. More than 245 past due accounts were cleared by the association this year, collecting a total of $30,467. The PRPC provides a variety of services in response to the common needs of area local governments. Under the heading of Regional Services, the needs of these Pan handle local entities are addressed through services such as workshops and seminars, facilitation of roundtable discusions, grant writing assistance and management of

special projects.

The PRPC financially supports and is involved in the gov- ernance of a variety of regional initiatives such as Class 4 Winds, Inc. and the Entrepreneur Alliance. Established in 2008, Class 4 Winds, Inc. is a 501 (c) (3) dedicated to providing educational opportunities and information to promote the region’s wind energy resources. The mission of the Entrepreneur Alliance is to strengthen and grow the Texas Panhandle economy by promoting and facilitating entrepreneurial activity.

9

25


2010 Budget Summary

BUDGETED EXPENDITURES BY PROGRAM

Workforce Development Aging Local Government Services Economic Development Criminal Justice Regional 9-1-1 Network Solid Waste Management Emergency Preparedness Regional Transportation Planning Water Planning Dispute Resolution Regional Services

$15,420,384 2,074,947 88,248 386,020 249,120 2,775,341 384,780 2,578,474 110,000 326,214 115,873 44,836

Reserve Contribution

4,889

TOTAL 2010 BUDGETED PROGRAM EXPENDITURES

$24,659,126

BUDGETED PROGRAM REVENUE BY SOURCE

Federal Funds Federal Funds through State State Funds State Planning Assistance Funds State Emergency Communications Funds Dispute Resolution Court Fees (Potter & Randall Counties) Contract Service Fees Local Government Membership Dues Local Matching Contributions Interest and Miscellaneous Revenues

$116,412 18,645,005 1,720,934 64,184 2,775,341 51,000 499,529 64,690 682,777 39,254

TOTAL 2010 BUDGETED PROGRAM REVENUES

26

$24,659,126


Advisory Committees

Area Agency on Aging Advisory Council

Jim Kiper,Chair.................. Amarillo Erin Bergin........................ Perryton Grace Blunt....................... Amarillo Desha Butler..................... Amarillo Jean Clark......................... Amarillo Andy Crocker.................... Amarillo Margaret Dunham............ Borger Dolores John..................... Amarillo Marilyn Lumpkins............. Tulia Carl McMillen................... Amarillo Jackie McNeese................ Hereford Jim Murphy....................... Amarillo Karen Russell.................... Canyon Mary Smith....................... Amarillo Lisa Underwood............... Dumas Joyce Williams.................. Amarillo Jim Womack..................... Amarillo

Panhandle Water Planning Group C. E. Williams, Chair.......... White Deer Emmitt Autrey.................. Amarillo Tom Bailiff........................ Childress Joe Baumgardner.............. Wellington Mickey Black..................... Lubbock Cole Camp........................ White Deer Dr. Nolan Clark................. Amarillo Vernon Cook..................... Roberts County Charles Cooke................... Borger Jim Derington................... Spearman Rusty Gilmore................... Dalhart Janet Guthrie.................... Canadian William Hallerberg............ Amarillo Kendall Harris................... Wellington Gale Henslee..................... Amarillo Denise Jett........................ Borger Steve Jones....................... Lubbock Simone Kiel...................... Fort Worth David Landis..................... Perryton Charles Munger................ Canyon Virginia Sabia................... Austin Kent Satterwhite............... Sanford Grady Skaggs.................... Oldham County Dr. John Sweeten.............. Amarillo Janet Tregellas.................. Booker Steve Walthour................. Dumas Ben Weinheimer............... Amarillo John Williams................... Sanford

Criminal Justice Advisory Committee Dena McCaslin, Chair....... Tulia Letta Day......................... Amarillo Jim English....................... Deaf Smith County Jerry Foote....................... Pampa Sace Hardman................. Panhandle Cpt. Carrel Harris............. Amarillo Brent Harrison................. Deaf Smith County Monty Hysinger............... Clarendon Norma Luginbyhl............. Borger Marsha Moberly.............. Amarillo Dwight Vick..................... Canyon Marilyn Reiswig............... Perryton Bruce Scott...................... Dallam County Randall Sims.................... Potter County Jim Womack.................... Amarillo Dispute Resolution Advisory Board Cathy Dodson, Chair........ Amarillo Nancy Bosquez................ Potter County Scott Brumley.................. Potter County Judy Nunn....................... Amarillo Arthur Ware.................... Potter County Lee Waters....................... Gray County Regional Solid Waste Management Advisory Committee Hoyt Manning, Chair . ..... Canadian Pat Avery . ....................... Amarillo Greg Dankworth.............. Amarillo David Denman................. Dimmitt Dan Dible......................... Tulia Cynthia Dove.................... Amarillo Kirby Gardenhire.............. Memphis Van Hagan....................... Amarillo Ed Hansen........................ Spearman Mike Lamberson.............. Stinnett Robert Maddox................ Memphis Jesse Mariscal................... Stratford Dusty McGuire................. Amarillo Steve McKay..................... Dumas Jo Meaker........................ Amarillo Maria Merrell................... Quitaque Richard Morris.................. Pampa Bob Karrh......................... Randall County Jud Pendley...................... Dumas Harvey Perez.................... Hart Jim Powell........................ Perryton Britt Reid.......................... Amarillo Rob Roach........................ Panhandle Joe Shadle........................ Clarendon Greg Smith....................... Sunray James Stroud.................... Dalhart Eddie Taylor...................... Childress

Groundwater Management Area #1

Danny Krienke, Chair....... Perryton Jim Conkwright............... Lubbock Janet Guthrie................... Canadian Jim Haley......................... Canadian Robert Meyer................... Canyon John Spearman................ Pampa Steve Walthour................ Dumas C. E. Williams................... White Deer Panhandle Regional Emergency Management Advisory Committee Walt Kelley, Chair............ Amarillo Dr. James Alexander....... Amarillo Tommy Brooks................ Dumas Terry Coffee.................... Panhandle Ray Cogburn................... Amarillo Vernon Cook................... Roberts County Kelly Daniel..................... Friona Ken Daughtry................. Wheeler County Dr. Bob DeOtte............... Canyon Steve Drillette................. Amarillo Greg Duggan.................. Dalhart Perry Gilmore.................. Amarillo Paul Jenkins.................... Dumas Harold Keeter................. Swisher County Richard Lake................... Potter County Eric Lynn......................... Amarillo Jay Mayden..................... Childress County Jeff McCormick............... Pampa Rodney Mosier................ Amarillo Jim Powell...................... Perryton Dan Reese....................... Canyon Matt Richardson............. Amarillo Rob Roach...................... Panhandle Steve Ross....................... Amarillo Bob Sanders................... Amarillo Jon Sessions................... Wellington Richard Simerson............ Amarillo Janie Singleton............... Amarillo Kevin Starbuck................ Amarillo Mike Taylor..................... Amarillo David Thurman............... Randall County Dean Turney................... Deaf Smith County Derek Vaughan............... Amarillo David Wagner................. Hereford Ben Weinheimer............. Amarillo Theresa West.................. Amarillo Brad Williams.................. Amarillo Ross Wilson.................... Amarillo

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Advisory Committees Regional Transportation Advisory Group Gerald Payton, Chair........Amarillo Lynn Castle......................Lubbock Jim Chilcote.....................Amarillo Vernon Cook....................Roberts County Harold Keeter..................Swisher County Carl McMillan..................Amarillo Trent Morris.....................Amarillo Craig Lawlis.....................Amarillo Tony Luangraj..................Amarillo Jay Mayden......................Childress County Richard Peet....................Gray County Judy Phelps......................Amarillo Laura Reyher....................Amarillo Rowdy Rhoades...............Moore County Joe Rogers.......................Amarillo Claudia Stanford..............Amarillo Susan Stevenson..............Amarillo Susan Stockett.................Amarillo Cindy Vandiver.................Canyon Joe Zilmer........................ Amarillo Panhandle Rural Transportation Planning Organization Benny Wilson, Chair.........Hansford County Don Allred.......................Oldham County Faye Blanks......................Hutchinson County Vernon Cook....................Roberts County David Field.......................Dallam County Ronnie Gordon................Hartley County Ernie Houdashell..............Randall County Earl McKinley...................Ochiltree County Richard Peet....................Gray County Lewis Powers...................Carson County Hugh Reed......................Armstrong County Rowdy Rhoades...............Moore County Tom Simons.....................Deaf Smith County Willis Smith.....................Lipscomb County Steve Vandiver.................Hemphill County Arthur Ware....................Potter County Rolling Plains Organization for Rural Transportation Jay Mayden, Chair . .........Childress County Lesa Arnold ....................Dickens County Charlie Bell......................Foard County Duane Daniel...................King County Travis Floyd .....................Knox County D. N. Gregory .................Cottle County Jack Hall .........................Donley County Jerry Hefley......................Wheeler County Ronald Ingram.................Hardeman County John James .....................Collingsworth County Wayne Nance .................Briscoe County Ray Powell.......................Hall County Ed D. Smith......................Motley County

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Panhandle Workforce Development Board

Lisa Herndon, Chair.......... Amarillo Victor Aguirre................... Sunray Toni Coke.......................... Dalhart Dennis Detten................... Hereford Ruby Depuy ..................... Amarillo Mary Doan ...................... Lubbock Lilia Escajeda ................... Amarillo Floyd Felder...................... Amarillo John Gill .......................... Amarillo Michelle Griffin . .............. Borger James Haile....................... Amarillo Sheryl Hardy .................... Perryton Sam Harper...................... Lubbock Bernard Johnson............... Amarillo Kathy Kingery .................. Silverton Gary Molberg .................. Amarillo Jack Moremon.................. Clarendon Larry Neal......................... Amarillo John Neusch..................... Amarillo JoAnn Perez . ................... Amarillo Connie Ratliff.................... Amarillo Charlie Rivas..................... Amarillo Keila Sandridge . .............. Amarillo David Steele...................... Dalhart Dr. Herbert Swender......... Borger Panhandle Workforce Development Consortium’s Governing Body Debra McCartt, Chair........ Amarillo David Field . ..................... Dallam County Bonnie Heald.................... Parmer County Richard Peet .................... Gray County Jay Mayden....................... Childress County Willis Smith...................... Lipscomb County Lewis Powers.................... Carson County

Economic Development Advisory Committee

Randy Stark, Chair............ Quitaque Chris Alexander................ Friona Mike Amos....................... Borger Beverly Benton.................. Borger Judy Burlin........................ Clarendon Sam Cartwright................ Dumas Cheri DeJong.................... Hartley Linda Drake...................... Vega Sara Northcutt.................. Miami Larry Norton..................... Childress Sheila Quirk...................... Hereford Woodrow Richardson....... Memphis John Teague..................... Amarillo Joe Weaver....................... Tulia

Regional 9-1-1 Network Advisory Committee

Steve Vandiver, Chair ......... Hemphill County Sharon Bohannon............... Perryton C.M. Bryant........................ Armstrong County Juanita Carrasco................. Friona Terri Carter......................... Sherman County Joe Daniels......................... Shamrock Tanya Daniels...................... Collingsworth County Jerry Dorsett....................... Dalhart Eddie Edwards.................... Borger Gary Evans.......................... Hansford County Robin Grice......................... Moore County Randy Immel....................... Higgins Julia Laing.......................... Hereford Connie Lockridge................ Carson County David Medlin...................... Oldham County Brenda Melcher.................. Lubbock Dana Miller......................... Roberts County Cheryl Phillips..................... Donley County Michael Pigg....................... Childress County Salvador Rivera .................. Castro County Kelly Rushing...................... Pampa Carolyn Sabbe.................... Wheeler County Barbara Soto....................... Dallam County Konnie Washington............ Tulia Tim Wiginton...................... Hall County

Texas Panhandle Regional Development Corporation Membership

Clint Curtis, President......... Pampa Quinn Alexander................. Canyon Ashton Allison.................... Amarillo Jason Bagwell..................... Pampa Buzz David.......................... Amarillo Kent David.......................... Canyon Brian Gillispie...................... Spearman Jason Hall........................... Amarillo Mark Hanbury.................... Dalhart Amy Henderson.................. Amarillo David Hernandez................ Amarillo David Landis....................... Perryton Kelly Livingston................... Shamrock Forrest Lloyd....................... Wellington Mark Marrs......................... Amarillo Andrew McMurry............... Dumas Cassi Rash........................... Canadian Dan Redd............................ Borger Jeff Reid............................. Amarillo Zac Rose............................. Amarillo Aaron Sage......................... Amarillo Sid Shaw............................. Hereford Matt Thomas...................... Amarillo Lorie Vincent...................... Stratford Mark Wingate..................... Amarillo


2010 Membership COUNTIES

CITIES

Armstrong

Adrian

Fritch

Panhandle

Briscoe

Amarillo

Groom

Perryton

Carson

Bishop Hills

Gruver

Sanford

Castro

Booker

Happy

Shamrock

Childress

Borger

Hart

Silverton

Collingsworth

Bovina

Hedley

Skellytown

Dallam

Cactus

Hereford

Spearman

Deaf Smith

Canadian

Higgins

Stinnett

Donley

Canyon

Howardwick

Stratford

Gray

Channing

Kress

Sunray

Hall

Childress

Lake Tanglewood

Texhoma

Hansford

Clarendon

Lakeview

Texline

Hartley

Claude

Lefors

Timbercreek

Hemphill

Dalhart

McLean

Tulia

Hutchison

Darrouzett

Memphis

Turkey

Lipscomb

Dimmitt

Miami

Vega

Moore

Dumas

Mobeetie

Wellington

Ochiltree

Farwell

Nazareth

Wheeler

Oldham

Follett

Palisades Village

White Deer

Parmer

Friona

Pampa

Potter Randall Roberts Sherman Swisher Wheeler

SPECIAL DIS TRICTS Canadian River Municipal Water Authority Greenbelt Municipal and Industrial Water Authority High Plains RC&D Area, Inc. Mackenzie Municipal Water Authority North Rolling Plains Resource, Conservation & Development District Palo Duro River Authority Panhandle Ground Water Conservation District Red River Authority


Thanks in part to funding from the Texas Historical Commission, several of the Panhandle courthouses have been restored so they may remain as functional but beautiful icons in the Panhandle. The Potter County Courthouse is currently under restoration. The PRPC is administratively managing the landmark project for the County.

Legacy of History & Beauty


Panhandle Regional Planning Commission 415 Southwest Eighth Avenue, P O Box 9257 Amarillo, Texas 79105 8 06.372.33 81 — w w w . t h e p rp c . org


Annual Report 2010