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Enlisted promotion system changes will ensure advancement of highly motivated, proficient Soldiers

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

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April 25, 2019 | Vol. 79, No. 17

Preventing fatal accidents a focal point of May’s Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month campaign

SEE PAGE 2 IMCOM CSM TOURS FORT LEE; FOCUSES ON FAMILY HOUSING Taking the time to visit post homes and listen to what Soldiers are experiencing here, CSM Melissa Judkins gathered information to shape future health and welfare decisions SEE pAGe 3

‘ANYTHING GOES’ OPENS MAY 17 Final show of Playhouse platinum season will be presented each weekend through June 2 at theater

TRUCK DEDICATION HONORS 88-MIKE’S Trans. Corps family, future equipment developers pay homage to service of fallen motor transport operators

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PHOTOS DEPICT COMMUNITY LIFE Pictorial presentation highlights exciting Easter activities and first-time SAAPM bowling event SEE pAGes 8-9


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commAnD sPotliGHt | MotoRcYcle SaFetY aWaReneSS Month

Preventing harm on highways a two-way street, says experts

Fort Lee

Commanding General ................... Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Hollie J. Martin Public Affairs Officer ............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor ...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments .......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor .................. Amy Perry Production Assistant............................... Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

Getting back to the NHTSA’s point about motor vehicle operators sharing the responsibility for motorcycle safety, it is fairly common for bikers to be overlooked by other drivers. Collisions and crashes are often attributed to a regular motorists violating a motorcyclist’s right of way. With bike’s being the smaller vehicle, they’re easier to overlook, particularly when traveling alongside a car or truck in the “blind spot.” There also is a tendency for people to forget bike riders often have to employ evasive maneuvers to avoid road hazards. “There is a continuing need to help other motorists think of motorcycles and to educate bike riders to be aware of this problem,” emphasizes the NCS on its website. Information campaigns like Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month, the agency noted, are meant to generate discussion

The Fort Lee Traveller is an authorized publication for members of the DOD, printed by Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee, Virginia. Contents of the Fort Lee Traveller are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee Public Affairs Office. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services advertised by the U.S. Army or Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc. Everything advertised in this publication will be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher will refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation has been corrected.

and encourage greater focus on habits that prevent accidents. Young and inexperienced motor vehicle operators in particular need to hear the message and develop safe, lifelong habits like avoiding distracted driving and extending the same courtesy to motorcyclists as others on the road. The May observance also calls for the full attention of motorcycle enthusiasts, reminding them if they’re going to keep riding safely, they need to commit to a lifetime of learning new skills and brushing up on old ones that may have been dulled or forgotten. Here’s an interesting fact from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety website – riders 50 and older made up 36 percent of all motorcycle fatalities in 2016. Many had previously been on a bike in their 20s and decided to take it up again in their 40s-60s. What they didn’t account for was more traffic, more powerful bikes, more distracted drivers and diminished physical skills. That sort of proves the point that neither age nor perceived experience are guarantees of safety when straddling a motorcycle engine. It’s for this reason, and the health and safety of its members, that the Army mandates various levels of training for Soldiers who ride. The instruction includes the Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic Rider Course, Experienced Rider Course (or BRC II), the Military Sport Bike Rider Course and Motorcycle Refresher Training for those deployed more than 180 days. For more details, contact the Garrison Safety Office at 804-765-3127. Course signup is SEE moTorcycLe sAFeTy, page 11

on tHe coVer

In recognition of Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month in May, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is reminding riders and regular vehicle operators they share responsibility for keeping everyone safe on the roads. Two unfortunate side effects of Spring Fever are overzealous motorcycle enthusiasts foregoing safe riding measures as they charge out onto the roads to blow the wintertime storage dust off their machines, and other drivers not recognizing the uptick in bike traffic and/or forgetting they too are partners in accident prevention. According to the latest statistics listed on the National Safety Council website (nsc. org), 5,172 motorcycle riders and passengers died in crashes along America’s highways in 2017. The number of fatalities had more than doubled since a decade earlier. Closer to home, the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles reported 107 motorcyclists were killed in 2017 and 88 last year. Other thought-provoking statistics offered by the NSC include the following: • The federal government estimates that per-mile traveled in 2017, the number of deaths on motorcycles was nearly 28 times greater than the number in cars • Motorcycle crashes accounted for 14 percent of all traffic fatalities in 2017 • 28 percent of riders who died in a motorcycle crash in 2017 were alcohol-impaired • 91 percent of riders who died in a motorcycle crash in 2017 were male

File Photo by Patrick Buffett

A Motorcycle Safety Center of Virginia instructor demonstrates a “Total Control” riding position that promotes better stability during high speed turns. The demonstration was part of a 2015 safety class at the Fort Lee Motorcycle Training Area on the corner of Mahone and A Avenues. Similar safety-focused events will take place here in May as the post recognizes Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.


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IMCOM CSM explores housing, support services during Lee visit T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

“As a leader, someone can sit in their office and give direction or they can be present to assess how things are going and what changes may be needed,” observed Command Sgt. Maj. Melissa A. Judkins, the senior enlisted leader for the San Antoniobased Installation Management Command. “I think presence is absolutely a must,” she continued. “It does two things in my opinion: No.1, you get to find out what the problem sets are and how the command can help, and No. 2, (the workforce recognizes) you actually care.” Belief in that credo brought the 29-year Soldier to Fort Lee for an April 17-18 visit as a command representative of IMCOM, which is responsible for installation infrastructure and services such as fire, police, housing and child care. She spent her time here engaging leaders, visiting facilities and talking with troops across the spectrum. Generally, she was struck by the installation’s aesthetics. “It’s a gorgeous post,” she acknowledged. “Fort Lee is fortunate to have as many newer facilities as it does. There are some older structures, but the amount of new builds helps the installation use its sustainment dollars well and direct modernization and restoration funds for other things besides strictly repair and renovation. It’s a blessing to have as many new facilities as this command does here.” The implementation of 2005 Base Realignment and Closure decisions brought $1.2 billion in new construction to Fort Lee, mostly in the form of state-of-the-art training facilities. Additionally, the installation’s housing is on the newer side of the Army inventory, with most of the privately managed units being less than 15 years old. Judkins said her visit was partly related to recent concerns about privatized housing here

T. Anthony Bell

Command Sgt. Maj. Melissa Judkins, IMCOM CSM, listens to garrison senior noncoms during a sensing session April 18 at the TenStrike Bowling Center. The 29-year Soldier also visited troop barracks, family living quarters and other facilities during her tour of the installation.

and at other military installations. Though problems are much greater at other locations, she said military members and their families Army-wide need assurances the leadership is working to solve maintenance and quality of life issues. “If you don’t take the opportunity to help people understand you care, then the turmoil at the bottom can be worse than anything that happens at the top,” she said after recounting trips made to three states over the past three weeks. “So, being at the different installations explaining why things are done and helping take back (those garrison’s) problems to help fix them is important.” Judkins said that when installation housing problems stemming from a lack of oversight gained national attention last fall, Army leadership mobilized with vigor and resolve. “I watched this true concern by leaders across the Army that we had to do something different,” she recalled when the story emerged. “We had to attack the problem. We

could not sit back and watch it as a spectator. We had to be in the game. There was and is a true concern at all levels of the Army to try and get this right.” As a result, “The Army is working with the other services in conjunction with partners (privatized housing managers) to create a bill of rights for Soldiers when they sign for partnership homes,” she said. “We’re also working to ensure that if Soldiers have life, health or safety problems not just the partner knows but the chain of command knows.” The crux of housing problems, Judkins said, have been maintenance issues leaders were not aware of due to how the privatized housing agreements were structured. “The partners have the ultimate responsibility of performing the maintenance, but we have the ultimate responsibility to care for our Soldiers enough to ensure they are taken care of,” she said. “We did not stay engaged enough. Our eyes were not on the ball. Now our eyes are on the ball, and the

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partner’s eyes are on the ball, too.” Housing occupants also bear responsibilities to notify leaders when maintenance issues are not being resolved, Judkins emphasized. “We as leaders didn’t do what was needed to make sure our Soldiers know they could trust us to help them,” she said. “We have to reconfirm to our Soldiers that we as leaders are here to support them and make them feel comfortable enough to say there’s something wrong.” In addition to making adjustments to the privatized housing program, IMCOM is due to receive more resources to bolster its oversight efforts. “For RCI housing, the Army is providing us with 114 authorizations,” she said. “We will have the personnel to go back and perform quality-control inspections of the work completed by partners. That’s something we didn’t have the manpower to do in the past.” Fort Lee has already added three inspectors to its Garrison Housing Services Office to conduct such work. There also is a similar commitment to support barracks maintenance, Judkins noted. Lastly, Judkins said Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley and Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James C. McConville have strong interests in holding responsible parties accountable. “The chief and the vice are going to make sure leaders are taking care of their Soldiers,” she said. “That point is unquestionably clear.” In addition to talking with garrison and privatized housing officials and visiting with Soldiers at their installation residences, Judkins’ itinerary included speaking with Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers representatives and touring barracks old and new. It was an opportunity to learn about Lee’s military transition function and openly chat with garrison personnel. In regards to the latter, she said she particularly enjoyed the casual atmosphere afforded her during Right Arm Night on April 17 at the Lee Club’s Overtime Sports Bar.

SEE imcom csm visit, page 12


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Army eyes new measures to boost security, access

Devon L. Suits

Army News Service

FORT MEADE, Md. – The Army is working on additional authentication measures to provide more options for access of online resources while maintaining the security of information-technology systems. CIO/G-6 officials are brainstorming with Program Executive Office Enterprise Information Systems to develop alternatives to the Army’s current multi-factor authentication process. MFA requires users to prove their identity by presenting at least two points of verification across three major categories: something they know, something they have, and something they are, officials said. “The commercial industry has seen there’s a greater need for protection, making sure the right people are accessing the right accounts,” said Thaddeus Underwood, Identity Management and Communications Security division chief. “It makes sense that the Army is moving in the same direction. We are better protecting access to our IT networks to improve our cybersecurity posture by replacing username and password logins across the Army with MFA-secured options.” Current MFA measures force Soldiers to use their CAC and personal identification number to log into a government computer system, Underwood said. However, with a large percentage of the Army serving in the Reserve or National Guard, some don’t have consistent access to government computer systems. “We’ve got Reserve and National Guard members who only come to a government facility on the weekend for their drill training,” Underwood said. “If there is online training they need to do … (the only way to) potentially get it done home is having a CAC and reader. So, the question is, how do we provide them access without having to use a CAC?” The Army is considering two alternatives: an authentication-type application that Sol-

diers can download to their mobile device, and a pre-registered USB-type device, known as a Yubikey. For the first one, Soldiers – in theory – would download the app to their smartphone and register their device online, linking it to their Army identity, Underwood said. Once the app is registered, users could then log into official Army websites with their username and password. The site will trigger an MFA process and send a one-time-use passcode to the app on their device. After entering the passcode into the website, the Soldier will be authenticated to the site. The MFA process will provide access to personnel records, online training, and other applications without the need of a CAC-enabled computer. “We are at the final stages of developing the requirements. Next, we are going to ask commercial vendors to provide solution options,” Underwood said. “We expect to have an initial-app prototype by this fall.” The alternate Yubikey option being considered by PEO EIS would require a registered USB-type device that would mimic the interface of a CAC and its associated reader. The device would serve as a second form of authentication after the user logs into an official website using username and password. “The Yubikey solves the problem of not having a CAC and reader, but it doesn’t solve needing a physical piece of equipment,” Underwood said. “This device will probably be a better solution for some of our mission partners such as the American Red Cross, and first responders who act when an incident happens … and don’t have a CAC to get access to our resources.” Yubikeys are currently going through integration testing by PEO EIS, Underwood said. “Anytime you have new technology, you want to introduce it to existing technology and make sure it will work,” he said. “We expect user testing and field testing to begin in May.”

Renovation Affects MP Desk Operations

The Fort Lee Military Police desk sergeant and dispatchers will be temporarily stationed at the Installation Operations Center while renovations are being performed at their normal location in the MP building along Mahone Avenue. The project is scheduled to be completed in October. Individuals requiring emergency assistance should continue to call 911 to reach a dispatcher. For non-emergency calls, dial 804-734-7400. Community members should not go to the IOC for assistance. To accommodate walk-in customer needs, there is a phone in the lobby of the MP station that can be used to call the desk sergeant who will dispatch a patrol to assist the caller. There also is a list of numbers to dial from the lobby phone to reach administrative personnel within the station, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday - Friday, except for federal holidays. The renovation project will enhance the installation Computer Automated Dispatch system.

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k t Teams Sought for ACFT Challenge I Teams are needed for an Army Combat Fitness Test-inspired competition May 7, 5-7 n a.m., at the Strength Performance Center, 6th Street. I At the event hosted by Col. Jered Helwig, Chief of Transportation, there is room for 16 two-man teams, but only a few have signed up to date. The ACFT Challenge will be comprised of 3 events – Deadlift and Run, Sprint-Drag-Carry, and Push and Pull. It is open s to all active duty military members and DOD Civilians. Sign up is encouraged. Medals will be awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place for each event. To register, visit https://transportation. g army.mil. For other details, contact Sgt. 1st Class Clifford Kurten at 804-765-7446. F p VWM Program Features WWII Veterans Three World War II veterans will describe their wartime experiences during an event r titled “The Greatest Generation Speaks: The Voices of World War II,” April 27, 11 a.m., at the Virginia War Memorial, 621 S. Belvidere St., Richmond. Admission is free and open to y the public. I The three Army Air Corps veterans include a bombardier, a glider pilot and a tail gunner. p One was shot down behind enemy lines and another was held as a prisoner of war. It is estimated that only 2 percent of WWII veterans are still alive. The VWM reminds visitors that onsite parking is limited due to building renovations; however, additional free parking is available in the VHDA lot next door. For more info, visit www.vawarmemorial.org or call 804-786-2060.

Community Invited to Spouse Luncheon

The Central Virginia Military Spouse Appreciation and Awards luncheon is set for May 16, noon-1:30 p.m., at the Lee Club. Attendance is free to all spouses of active duty service members. Additional guests are $15. Community members should RSVP by May 9 to www.militarybridge.com/ blog/2019/3/21/1336/register-to-attend-the-2019-heroes-at-home-military-spouse-awards. The Military Spouse of the Year announced at the event will receive a 7-night Mexico resort vacation and an additional $2,000 to use for flights, tours and more. For further details, call 804-734-7955.

Entry Window Opens for Pet Photo Contest

One grand-prize winner will receive a $1,000 Exchange gift card in the AAFES Patriot Pet Just Say “Treat” Photo Contest May 1-31. To enter, authorized shoppers can submit a patriotically themed photo of any pet to ShopMyExchange.com/sweepstakes. In addition, four first-place winners will receive $500 Exchange gift cards. Winners will be selected on or about June 6.


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Americas Military | Spotlight

Spc. Domingue Taylor

Unit: Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Army Logistics University Support Battalion Military occupational specialty: 42A – human resources specialist Age: 31 Hometown: Aliceville, Ala. Time in service: five years Describe your personality: “I’m shy and kindhearted; I treat people the way I want to be treated. I like to laugh and I can get a little silly. I’m also persistent at anything I do. My weakness is that I’m an emotionally driven person. I’m the type who can’t hide my feelings.” Pastimes: “I like to shop and watch TV.” Worst fear: “I have this perception: if you say your fears out loud, negative energy will grab ahold of it and make it come true.” Dream car: “A Range Rover.” Favorite book: “‘The Diary of Anne Frank.’ It’s my favorite because she was very poetic. She was an emotional person, and very raw with her feelings.” Something no one would guess about you: “I like to sing. I don’t do it in public, but I do around my husband. I also like to write poetry.”

The celebrity or historical figure you would like to meet: “I would maybe like to meet Malcolm X. He was very set on his ways, was all for the movement (to elevate AfricanAmericans), and didn’t try to water things down.” If you won the lottery … “I would pay off my student loans and help my family.” Your ideal life: “Being financially comfortable, seeing the same for my family, and being a good mother and wife.” One person you most admire: “I’m going to say my mom because she took care of all her siblings – she was the oldest of eight. She has always been very family oriented.” When you have been most satisfied: “Whenever I’m with my family.” Something that changed your life: “Growing up shy. I always thought people would like me because I was a good person – I didn’t bother other kids or talk about them – but that wasn’t the case. It was sort of a reality check. Just because you’re kind, it doesn’t mean the world is always going to be kind to you. You have to prepare yourself and have thick skin for the things you might face on a daily basis.” Talk about your upbringing: “I’m from a

T. Anthony Bell

small town in west Alabama; maybe 500 people live there. I grew up with two sisters and a brother. I wouldn’t say we were poor; more like working class. I spent a lot of time with my grandmother and grandfather. My grandfather was a happy person who I never saw mad or sad about anything. I think that rubbed off on me. He taught me how to cook, too.” Your aspirations growing up: “I didn’t do what I wanted to do. I didn’t think I would end up in the military. I thought I would become a journalist (laugh), but the counselor at school said, ‘Oh, they don’t make any money.’

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I changed my mind and went to school for respiratory therapy. It didn’t work out too well … I changed my mind a lot. I was indecisive. That’s kind of why I’m here.” Your expectations when you joined the Army: “I feel like my overall goal is in sight (she said in reference to service-connected opportunities to advance her education). I’ll be finished with college next year.” Why you chose your MOS: “I’m majoring in criminal justice, but I chose human resources because it was one of the choices provided.” You were deployed to Afghanistan last year. Share a pleasant memory: “My noncommissioned officer – (now retired) Air Force Master Sgt. April Braswell – was a happy person who was always upbeat. She also was a single mother, had more than 20 years of service and was always helping me out. She inspired me to go back college.” Best things about the Army: “Traveling, meeting new people and the benefits.” Worst thing about the Army: “It’s not really the Army in general, but some of the people who abuse their rank.” Where you see yourself in five years: “I want stability, a home and a career path I know I’m going to stick with – maybe something working with juveniles.” – Compiled by T. Anthony Bell, Senior Writer/Special Projects

Playhouse to Present ‘Anything Goes’

Contributed Photo

Taylor Baltimore, portraying lead character Reno Sweeney, rehearses with the Lee Playhouse cast of Cole Porter’s “Anything Goes” at the post theater last week. The musical opens May 17, with performances every Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m., and Sunday at 3 p.m., through June 2. The show director is Frank Foster. Alyssa Darwin is providing music direction and Kate Belleman is overseeing choreography. Those starring in the production are volunteer actors from the Fort Lee community. All Lee Playhouse performances are open to the public. Tickets are $15 for adults and $7 for youths. The Lee Theater is located on Mahone Avenue, next to Burger King. For reservations or more information, call the box office at 804-734-6629.


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Festivities highlight LTS relocation

Contributed Photo

Col. Hollie J. Martin, Fort Lee garrison commander, is joined by Tina Ostmann, Leisure Travel Services program manager, and Darrell Clay, director of Fort Lee Family and MWR, at a ribboncutting ceremony April 17 recognizing the relocation of the LTS office to the Bloom Building on Battle Drive (across the street from the Lee Club). The grand opening celebration included cake, punch and door prizes. Guests also toured the facility and learned more about the program that facilitates fun and entertaining activities for individuals and families by offering information and often discounted tickets for amusement parks, local and national attractions, concert venues, cruises, hotel stays and more. LTS was previously located in the Warrior Zone, which will become the home of the Fort Lee USO Center in the near future. Leisure Travel’s hours of operation are 9 a.m. - 6 p.m., Monday-Friday. For further details, call 804-765-3789.


Jerome Aliotta GVSC Public Affairs

FORT BLISS, New Mexico – Motor transport operators, or “88-Mikes” as they’re more commonly known in the Army, drive the tactical wheeled vehicles that transport cargo on the battlefield. They are the backbone of the Army’s support and sustainment structure, and what they do makes them highly vulnerable to enemy attack. Sixteen of these Soldiers who paid the ultimate sacrifice during Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and Inherent Resolve were honored in a vehicle dedication ceremony here April 10 at Westbrook basecamp adjacent to the McGregor Training Complex. One by one, 16 experimental vehicles, each fitted with robotic appliqué kits developed by engineers at the Army Ground Vehicle Systems Center in Warren, Mich., were dedicated to the fallen warriors. To keep their memory, a black metal plate with the Soldier’s name and short biography was affixed to the inside driver door panel of each of the vehicles. David Muhr, whose 26-year-old son Spc. Shawn “Ox” Muhr was killed by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan in 2011, represented fallen Soldier families at the ceremony. “It means a lot to us that people are still thinking about these guys,” said Muhr, who attended the event with his son Aaron, himself a former 6-year Army Reservist. “Shawn was a good man – good at home – just an allaround good guy.” Muhr, a veteran wounded in action in Vietnam, said his son “loved” being in the armed forces. “He could have gotten out before his last deployment, but stayed in because he liked serving and had a lot of good friends in the military.” They included Spc. Joshua R. Campbell, killed alongside Shawn in the same IED attack and similarly honored at the ceremony. Maj. Andrew Scruggs had both Campbell and Muhr in his formation during a company command assignment at Fort Bragg, N.C., and he spoke about them as the events’ master of ceremony. “Those two individuals were among many

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Autonomous vehicles dedicated to fallen 88-Mikes at Bliss ceremony

Army photo by Jerome Aliotta, GVSC

Maj. Andrew Scruggs gives remarks as the master of ceremonies with a backdrop of semi-autonomous palletized load system vehicles behind him. Each of the 16 trucks was dedicated to a fallen 88-Mike Soldier during an April 10 ceremony at Westbrook basecamp, Fort Bliss, N.M.

who raised their hand to join my adjacent truck company commander in our battalion to go to Afghanistan to perform that mission, and they did it honorably,” he said. “Unfortunately, those are two Soldiers we couldn’t bring home. I have waited many years to be able to properly honor them and their families. I’m very humbled to be a part of this opportunity to finally dedicate something in their name – to let everybody know we haven’t forgotten their sacrifices.” Scruggs is GVSC’s assistant program manager for Expedient Leader-Follower, a semi-autonomous technology integrated on a set of tactical wheeled vehicles, which for the first time will be used and tested in an operational unit, the 15th and 41st Transportation companies. Soldier feedback is critical to ensure this capability is effective and efficient. “Our real goal is to not only deliver an amazing capability for the Army, but also

something that’s going to help protect Soldiers and have the potential to reduce the amount of Gold Star Families we have in our formation,” Scruggs said. As part of the ceremony, a demonstration convoy of semi-autonomous palletized load system vehicles rolled past attendees, and once coming to a stop, Col. Jered P. Helwig from the Sustainment Center of Excellence climbed from the passenger seat of one of the rigs and strode up to the lectern. “The technology demonstrated today will be incorporated in the Army’s Next Generation Combat Vehicle as the Secretary of the Army recently stated that ‘autonomy is paramount and certainly critical’ to its development,” Helwig said. “The memory of these Soldiers has inspired us to develop our own ways of waging war that minimizes exposure of our troops to harm’s way,” the Army’s Chief of Transportation further observed.

Leader-Follower provides the capability for a designated manned lead vehicle to head up a line of unmanned follower vehicles – up to nine of them – which are remotely operated by a single individual. This capability provides the ground commander options in the employment of Soldiers and the execution of sustainment convoy operations, potentially reducing the number of warfighters exposed to attacks by the enemy. “Leader-Follower technology will even give us a greater sustainment throughput capacity, a means to self-secure transportation convoys, while giving the commander options for protecting Soldiers in a hostile environment,” said Don Overton, TRADOC Capability Manager for Transportation, and principal Leader-Follower Combat Developer. “The Leader-Follower System will change the way transportation units do business,” Overton confirmed.


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Army implementing big changes to centralized promotion system Devon L. Suits Army News Service

WASHINGTON – The Army is revising its centralized promotion board processes to deliver “the right person to the right job at the right time,” according to G-1 officials. Implementation of an improved meritbased promotion system will take three-tofour years, according to retired Sgt. Maj. Gerald Purcell, personnel policy integrator for NCO professional development. The effort centers on a transition from timebased to merit-based policies and practices. Further, the change should ensure the bestqualified Soldier will be the first one eligible for promotion, he said. Soldiers in the active component and those serving in an Active Guard Reserve capacity will be impacted by the change. “This is the first major overhaul to our enlisted centralized promotion board in the 50 years we’ve (used it),” said Sgt. Maj. of the Army Daniel A. Dailey, who set his mind on revamping the system two years ago. “We will see a number of benefits with these changes, but the most important one will be the impact to readiness,” he elaborated. “We will retain our most talented NCOs, and better project force structure requirements by promoting the right people at the right time. “This change will truly reward the most qualified Soldiers who are seeking advancement instead of simply promoting people based on seniority,” he said. Changing History Dating back to 1969, centralization was designed to fill the Army’s ranks with qualified Soldiers, provide guidelines for career progression, and attract and retain high-caliber personnel, according to Human Resources Command officials. Under the legacy system, HRC could “forecast” the Army’s force structure by anticipating the number of Soldiers leaving the service in all grades and career fields –

Army Photo by Devon L. Suits

The Army will spend the next three-to-four years implementing an improved merit-based promotion system. The effort centers on a transition from time-based to merit-based policies and practices. Further, the change ensures the best-qualified Soldier will be the first one eligible for promotion.

sometimes 24 months in advance, Purcell explained. These long-range projections, however, failed to be an effective means to react to emerging requirements. The Army would have to wait for a new promotion cycle to identify and allocate additional personnel. Furthermore, reductions or changes to the Army’s force structure would result in a surplus of promotable individuals, he noted. Even if a Soldier was in good standing and identified as promotable, it didn’t mean it would necessarily happen. “From a readiness perspective, we are creating a process that reacts to emerging requirements, and stops us from creating skill and grade imbalances,” Purcell said. “It produces an environment in which there is no promotion stagnation … or we are forced to separate people because they are in excess to requirements.” Merit-Based Promotion The legacy promotion system generates an order of merit list, which is used to select

Soldiers for promotion. The number of individuals promoted relied heavily on the Army’s annually projected force structure rate. After the Army selected someone for promotion, HRC would assign them a promotion-sequence number. The force would determine this number by a Soldier’s seniority – their time in grade, time in service, and date of birth, Purcell said. “If the best candidate happens to be sequence No. 400 out of 500, based on time and grade – that’s not rewarding and recognizing talent,” he observed. The transition to a new promotion system starts this fiscal year with the master sergeant board. There will be a change to how sequence numbers are informed by OML standings. Eventually under the revised system, the Army will conduct annual reviews of the NCO Corps and maintain an OML for each grade and military occupational specialty, Purcell said, adding the OML will no longer

be used to generate an annual promotion list. Instead, the OML will evaluate the force and determine Soldiers who are “fullyqualified” to promote. From there, the Army will employ a merit-based rating system to order the OML sequentially. “The vast majority of the NCOs are, in fact, fully qualified to promote,” Purcell said. “Fully qualified is a retention standard, it’s not about promotion,” he continued. “I could have an OML of a thousand individuals, and 990 could be fully qualified. The promotion demand might be 40. In this case, the best 40 records … would be identified (for) promotion.” In turn, the Army will now be able to manage its talent better, subsequently improving professionalism and leader development throughout the NCO corps, Purcell said. Further, the Army will use the OML to inform assignment decisions, such as crucial development and career broadening opportunities. “We are calling this a talent management effort,” he said. Additionally, Soldiers will have access to their OML standing by grade, career progression, and MOS through the Army Career Tracker website, Purcell said. ThisM change should be available in the next fewa months. “It will be a private and secure automateds link from the Army to the individual, and no one else will have access to it,” Purcell said.a “Soldiers can go into career tracker and shareb that information with a mentor or a leader ift they so choose, but they’re not required.” a On the other hand, if Soldiers performp subpar and are unable to become fullyp qualified in their respected rank, the reviseds promotion system will provide them notice. The first time a Soldier fails to become fullye qualified, HRC will advise him or her thats continued service may be at risk, he said. h Once a Soldier is found “not fully qualified”l by a board a second time in the same grade,l the Army denies continued service and will establish a mandatory separation timec window six months into the future. w If a Soldier is eligible for retirement, he orm she will be allowed to retire, Purcell clarified.c SEE army promotion system, page15


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Fort Lee officer dies after vehicle injury Ray Kozakewicz

Holocaust survivor Jay Ipson speaks at Lee observance

Jay Ipson, a Holocaust survivor, points to a photograph of Jews being persecuted by Nazis in Lithuania during his Holocaust Days of Remembrance presentation at the Lee Theater April 18. Ipson, co-founder of the Virginia Holocaust Museum in Richmond, shared a number of slides depicting Nazis terrorizing his family and thousands of other Jews in a ghetto during this period. “I was six-and-a-half years old, and I had to watch Jews being hung. They tried to starve us to death in the ghetto. We were given food that amounted to 934 calories for an entire family over seven days,” he noted. “They even slaughtered our pets after we brought them to our synagogue.” Ipson described how his mother, father, he and other family members were befriended by Polish Catholics and were able to hide from the Nazis. They eventually made their way to Germany after the war. In remarks welcoming community members to the observance, Michael Williams, president of Army Logistics University, said, “For me, this observance is always so personal and sad. It is hard to comprehend how human beings could treat other humans so badly. I also think about the perseverance and spirit of mankind to provide selfless service to others.”

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, continued from page 2

available at https://imc.army.mil/airs/. Other recommended safe-riding measures include the following: • Practice operating a motorcycle. Get accustomed to the feel of an unfamiliar bike by riding it in a controlled area. Learn how to handle it in a variety of conditions such as inclement weather or bad pavement. If planning to carry cargo or a passenger, be prepared to make adjustments to the tires, suspension and placement of the load. • Make sure motorcycle is safe. Before every ride, drivers should check the tire pressure and tread depth, hand and foot brakes, headlights and signal indicators, and fluid levels. Also check for signs of oil or gas leaks. • Wear proper protection. If in a serious crash, the best way to protect the brain is by wearing an approved helmet – U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 218. Look for the DOT symbol on the back of the headgear. Plastic

face shields or goggles also are recommended as protection from wind, rain, insects, dust and stones thrown up from cars. Keep in mind, helmet use is a requirement in Virginia and on all Army installations. • Ride responsibly. Obey traffic lights, signs, speed limits and lane markings; ride with the flow of traffic and leave plenty of room between bike and other vehicles; and always check behind you and signal before changing lanes. Remember to ride defensively. • Be alcohol and drug free. Intoxicants can negatively affect judgment, coordination, balance, throttle control and ability to shift gears. These substances also impair driver alertness and reduce reaction time. Even when fully alert, it’s impossible to predict what other vehicles or pedestrians are going to do. Therefore, it’s important to remain alcohol-and drug-free when getting on the motorcycle. – Garrison Safety Office

A Fort Lee officer died Monday from injuries received while rendering aid to a stranded motorist on April 18. Col. Gregory S. Townsend, 23rd Quartermaster Brigade commander, was driving on Highway 460 when he stopped to help a motorist change a tire. He was nearly finished when the US Army Photo vehicle fell on him. He was taken by a Life Flight helicopter to VCU Critical Care Hospital, Richmond, where he received treatment until his death. Townsend, 46, came into the Army on May 18, 1996, after graduating from Auburn University and was commissioned through ROTC into the Quartermaster Corps. He deployed twice to Iraq and once to Afghanistan. He arrived at Fort Lee July 28, 2017, and assumed command of the brigade. His awards and decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Bronze Star Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters, Meritorious Service Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, Joint Staff Commendation Medal, and Army Commendation Medal. “The loss of Col. Greg Townsend is devastating for his family and the Army. He was a dedicated leader and the most genuine man you could meet,” said Brig. Gen. Douglas M. McBride Jr., 55th Quartermaster General and QM School commandant. “Our thoughts and prayers are with Greg’s family and friends during this very difficult time. His legacy as a servant leader will live on in the hearts and minds of all Soldiers that he has served with and led.” A memorial service for Townsend is set for April 30, 2:30 p.m., at Memorial Chapel, corner of Battle Drive and Sisisky Avenue. – CASCOM Public Affairs Office


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imcom csm visit, continued from page 3

“It was really good to see all the garrison employees there,” she recalled. “Now granted, some of them were leaders, but it’s just good to see because it’s an indication there’s a healthy environment.” In reference to other issues, Judkins said she is proud of IMCOM’s ongoing efforts to improve barracks living conditions and is enthusiastic about its work to enhance military childcare, specifically ways to reduce wait lists at child development centers. “What we’ve done to try to solve them is use a Tiger Team of CPAC, ourselves and other agencies, host hiring fairs, then hire qualified personnel immediately,” she said. Another wait-list mitigation measure is an IMCOM program in which childcare providers may transfer from one CDC to another without undergoing the same backgrounds checks, Judkins said, adding that IMCOM is also studying ways to increase hourly services at the CDCs. In the area of fitness, IMCOM is looking at ways to certify instructors at the

Contributed Photo

Soldier re-ups at D.C. landmark

Staff Sgt. Derek Alford from Headquarters and Headquarters Company, CASCOM, repeats the oath of enlistment as its read by Col. James Becker, Ordnance School assistant commandant, during an April 17 ceremony on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Alford committed to another three years of service. The “magnitude of the location” and its notoriety as a national landmark is why he chose the memorial as his reenlistment backdrop. Alford is a 94E Radio Equipment Repairer who has served in the Army for 10 years. Becker was Alford’s first battalion commander.

installation level and is seeking to allow employees three hours of exercise time per week during duty hours on a permanent basis. Employees are currently permitted three hours of on-duty fitness time for six months. Highlighting other efforts, Judkins said she is proud of IMCOM’s Service Culture Campaign that aims to improve customer service. “It’s really getting down to the basics of how you treat one another,” she said. “Not only are our customers the outsiders, they are also the insiders. If we treat customers across directorates and staffs well and the leadership treats them well – and we pledge that we will –trust will increase. As a result, there will be a lot more growth. I think it’s a win-win for the Army.” Judkins began her tenure at IMCOM nearly three years ago and is scheduled to depart in November. She expressed deep appreciation for the opportunity she has been given to serve as a leader in an organization that oversees services and facilities support, impacting 52,000 employees at more than 150 installations worldwide.


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Kenner Connection | Recognizing Caregivers

w r

Occupational Health, here to protect Fort Lee’s workforce

d Lesley Atkinson x KAHC PAO

d Staff from Kenner Army Health Clinic’s Occupational Health Clinic, a part of rPreventive Medicine Department, recognized Occupational Health Nurses’ Week April 15f19. The OHC team brought awareness to federal employees and active duty military y swith handouts, static displays, an ice cream esocial and a one-mile health walk to inform ethe community about their goal to protect the ,health, safety and well-being of workers. “Occupational Health Nurses’ Week showcases the incredible work that Moccupational and environmental health nurses are doing to promote healthy lifestyles and keep workers safe,” said Darcel Spragley, Occupational Health supervisor. n Services are focused toward prevention ,of occupational illness and/or injury, health nmaintenance and prevention/monitoring of occupational hazards. “Workers come in to the OHC for annual physicals, injuries on the job, bloodborne pathogen exposure and other OSHA mandated physicals or other requirements for condition of employment,” said Spragley. The services offered include: • Pre-placement physicals • Periodic Medical Surveillance • Fitness for duty physicals

• Disability retirement physicals • Workman Compensation • Termination Examinations • Illness/Absence Program (Return to Work) • Pregnancy Surveillance • Vision Conservation • Hearing Protection • On the job injury/illness, immunizations, employee assistance program • Ergonomic Evaluations • Medical Records • Overseas Deployment Physicals An employee injured at work should follow these steps: • Seek medical care immediately in case of an emergency • Notify supervisor • Supervisor completes FL Form 1051 online • Injured employee reports to Occupational Health Clinic, Kenner Army Health Clinic or to a facility of their choice. • Employee and supervisor complete CA-1 online at www.ecomp.dol.gov. The Occupational Health clinic is open Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m., and can be reached at 804-734-9159. To find downloadable forms, visit Kenner website at www.kenner.nrmc.amedd.army.mil under Healthcare Services/ Occupational Health.

Lesley Atkinson, KAHC PAO

Kenner Army Health Clinic staff members pose after a one-mile fitness walk that was part of the Occupational Health Nurses’ Week activities here April 15-19. The observance spotlighted the medical department’s role as a facilitator of wellness among military members, post workers and their families. Occupational Health develops programs that foster healthy lifestyles, which leads to engaged and productive employees.


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ARC Sound Alarm Day | April 27

Community members who would like to help the American Red Cross and local fire departments install smoke alarms in Petersburgarea homes as well as four other surrounding cities and counties are asked sign up by sending an email to christy.carneal@redcross.org. The project is planned for April 27, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Neon 5K, Health Fair | April 27

Kenner Army Health Clinic’s Neon 5K Run/Walk and Health Fair is set for April 27, 8-11 a.m. The event is free and open to all. Registration for the run/walk begins at 8 a.m., and the start time is 9 a.m. All children 10 and under will receive a certificate of completion. The health fair will be set up outside of the circle drive main entrance of the clinic. Activities include a blood drive hosted by the Armed Services Blood Program from Fort Bragg, N.C. Participants from off post should use the Lee or Sisisky Avenue gates when coming to Fort Lee, as Mahone Avenue Gate does not open until 9 a.m., and the other ACPs are closed on weekends. In the event of inclement weather, visit www.facebook.com/kenner.ftlee for updates.

Riverfest 2019 | April 27

The Friends of the Lower Appomattox River will present its annual Riverfest celebration April 27, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., at Appomattox Riverside Park, 24909 Ferndale Road, Petersburg. The free day of family fun will include fishing, kayaking, hiking, music, food and dozens of educational exhibits and vendors. Fort Lee is among the event’s co-sponsors. For other details, visit folar-va.org.

Jefferson-Adams on Stage | April 27

A two-act drama, “Jefferson and Adams: On Stage and In Conversation” will be presented April 27, 7:30 p.m., at the Academy Center of the Arts, Historic Academy of Music Theatre, 600 Main St., Lynchburg. The production will be hosted by Jefferson’s Poplar Forest. For additional info, visit academycenter.org or call 434-846-8499.

MakerSpace is free and open to all ages. Participants can use tools, techniques and hands-on learning with the goal of inspiring L ocal A ctivities for the F ort L ee C ommunity and nurturing their interest in science, technology, engineering, art and math. faith-enrichment lessons, a kettle corn/movie Petersburg Symphony For other details, call 804-765-8095 or 765night, teambuilding activities, zip-lining and Performance | April 28 8173. The Petersburg Symphony Orchestra will tree climbing. The sessions begin 4 p.m., May present its third and final concert for the 2018- 3, and conclude at noon, May 5. Overnight Backpacking For registration and other details, contact Adventure | May 10-11 2019 season April 28, 4 p.m., in the Petersburg High School auditorium, 3101 Johnson Road. Joel Sinks at fortleepmomc@gmail.com or Fort Lee Outdoor Recreation will host a This “Conductor’s Choice” program is a 804-926-1947. backpacking trip to Dobie Mountain in George tribute to Maestro Ulysses Kirksey’s 30th year Hospice Thrift Shop Celebration | Washington National Park May 10-11. as music director of the orchestra. Registered participants will depart at 7 a.m. May 4 For further details, visit www.petersburgMay 10 from the recreation facility at 15014 Crater Community Thrift Shop will celsymphony.org. 5th St. Upon arrival, the group will take a ebrate its 6th anniversary May 4, 10 a.m. - 5 7-mile trek through GWNP – one of Virginia’s p.m., at 3916 S. Crater Road, Petersburg. Resume Writing Workshop | most scenic locations – and along the way The event will feature storewide sales, door April 30 they will be trained in the principles of water The Soldier for Life Transition Assistance prizes, refreshments, a plant sale and more. filtration, campsite selection, natural shelters, For further details, visit www.cratercommuProgram will host a free resume-writing workbackcountry cooking and more. The group shop April 30, 9 a.m. - noon, at the Soldier nityhospice.org. returns Saturday afternoon. The trip is open to Support Center, Room 126, building 3400, HenROCKus at Henricus | May 4 ages 16 and older. The cost is $69 per person. 1401 B Ave. For signup, call 804-765-2212. An event titled “HenROCKus: Bands and Participants will receive tips on fine-tuning Brews” is set for May 4, 1-8 p.m., at Henriobjectives, crafting work history, showcasing cus Historical Park, 251 Henricus Park Road, Run for Fallen | May 11 skills and more. Registration continues for Fort Lee’s Run Chester. For registration, call 804-734-6612 or email for the Fallen, taking place May 11, 8:30 a.m., The celebration will feature four local bands army.lee.sfltap@mail.mil. at Williams Stadium. Participation is free and and more with proceeds benefitting the Henopen to the public. ricus Foundation Children’s Education Fund. Alzheimer’s Prayer Breakfast | The guest speaker will be Capt. John T. For more information, visit www.henricus. April 30 Rhoten who was honored as the Tragedy AsAn Alzheimer Prayer Breakfast in honor of org. sistance Program for Survivors Military Menadvocate Sheriff Vanessa R. Crawford will be Library Hosted Journalism Class | tor of the Year in 2018. held April 30, 9-11 a.m., at Masonic Temple of Pre-registration is available through May 7 May 9 Petersburg, 1004 Halifax St. at lee.armymwr.com/programs/runforthefallThe Fort Lee Community Library will Proceeds will benefit the Alzeimer’s Assohost a free class for aspiring writers and en or by calling 804-734-6445 or 734-6446. ciation of Greater Richmond. photographers May 9, 3:30-4:30 p.m., at the Check-in on event day begins at 7 a.m. UnregFor more information, call 804-733-2369. TenStrike Bowling and Entertainment Center, istered individuals may sign up then. The rain date is May 18. Photographs of fallen military 2403 C Ave. 555th PIA Meeting | May 1 Journalists from the Fort Lee Traveller service members for display along the run The Jessie J. Mayes Tri-Cities Chapter of the 555th Parachute Infantry Association, Inc. and Petersburg Progress-Index will discuss route may be submitted to angela.m.bellamy2. will hold its monthly meeting May 1, 6 p.m., the process of writing news stories and civ@mail.mil or christine.i.murphy.civ@mail. at the Petersburg Public Library, 201 West feature articles and offer tips on taking “eye- mil through May 7. Washington St., Petersburg. Prior airborne ex- appealing” photos. Mother’s Day Brunch | May 12 For other details, call 804-765-8095. perience is not a prerequisite for membership A Mother’s Day Brunch will be held or attending. May 12, 1 p.m., in the Lee Club on the Youth MakerSpace Activity | For more details, call 804-733-2177. corner of Mahone Avenue and Battle Drive. May 10 Signup for Men’s Retreat | The Fort Lee Community Library will Reservations are required by May 9. The meal will feature prime rib, grilled May 3-5 offer its next MakerSpace program May 10, Fort Lee Protestant Men of the Chapel is 5 p.m., in Bunker Hall Cafe, Army Logistics and steamed shrimp, stuffed chicken breast, a organizing a free Christian non-denominational University campus. Those interested should breakfast bar, desserts and more. The cost is faith-centered men’s retreat and study May 3-5 arrive as close to the start time as possible in $26.95 per adult, $13.95 per child (3-10 years at the Williamsburg Christian Retreat Center. order to complete the project before the event old) and free for children 2 and younger. For more information, call 804-734-7541. Planned activities for the weekend include is over.

For more installation and outside the gate events and activities, visit our online calendar at www.fortleetraveller.com/calendar


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ARMY PROMOTION SYSTEM, continued from page 10 If ineligible for retirement, the Army will opt to separate the Soldier involuntarily. This system is slated to be implemented by fiscal 2021. “There is a place for everybody in the Army as long as they are performing,” he said. “At the point when it is determined an individual is not contributing to the team and essentially drawing a paycheck, we’re going let the person know his or her service is at risk. If it continues … then we are going to tell them their tenure with the Army is over. This sets conditions to eliminate archaic time-based retention control points.” Monthly Promotion Across Ranks Slated for fiscal 2021, the Army will post a 90-day forecast for all NCO promotions, from sergeant to sergeant major, and implement a monthly selection process. Soldiers fully qualified to promote based on completion of mandatory professional military education – and being in good standing with the Army – can monitor these quarterly promotion windows through the HRC website. Based on their OML standing, a Soldier can then estimate his or her date of promotion. Further, HRC intends to announce the names of all Soldiers selected for promotion on the 15th of each month, with an “effective promotion date” on the first day of the following month, Purcell said. Announcing on the 15th will give Soldiers a two-week notice of their promotion selection. The biggest challenge in Purcell’s estimation will stem from the cultural shift created by the revised promotion system. “In the past when a Soldier was selected, they were considered ‘promotable,’ assigned a sequence number, and waited for it to roll around. Now, promotion will be based on the OML standing and needs of the Army.” To be eligible for promotion, Soldiers are required to complete the Distributed Leaders Course, Purcell said. In the past, some did not finish the online training before a board convened. Now, there is a DA policy to suspend promotion eligibility for specialists and sergeants who fail to complete this

mandatory requirement. By fiscal 2021, that will be applicable to all ranks through master sergeant. Three-Phased Approach Over the next three years, the Army is projected to implement its revised centralized promotion system. The following is a list of anticipated milestones: • FY 2019 o Integrate merit-based promotion sequence numbers for all ranks. o Use the OML to inform command sergeant major and sergeant major eligibility and slating. o Under Army Career Tracker, NCOs will be able to access their OML standing. • FY 2020 o Use the OML to assist with assignment and training decisions. o Identify NCOs not fully qualified and notify them their continued service is at risk. o Under Army Career Tracker, Soldiers receive board OML feedback and OML ranking. • FY 2021 o Revise all policies, eliminating the use of “P” status for all NCO ranks E-6 and above. o HRC starts posting 90-day promotion forecast for NCO promotions. o Army moves away from annual promotion selection system and implements a monthly process for all NCO ranks. o Separation process starts for Soldiers who fail to be “fully qualified” for second time in same grade. o With implementation of merit-based promotion system, Army plans to eliminate retention control points. “If you excel at what you do, we’re going to promote you; that’s what Soldiers need to remember,” Purcell assured. “Everything is predicated on everybody doing what they’re expected to do – leaders and Soldiers alike. We’re trying to create an environment to facilitate all of that.” Soldiers can look for updates about the new system on the new G-1 website, www. army.mil/g-1.

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Classifieds Reach more than 10,000 active duty military, civil service employees, retirees, their spouses and the civilian community.

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757-477-7104

DEADLINE Reader & Display: Thursday 4:00pm (week prior)


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Profile for The Progress-Index

Fort Lee Traveller | April 25, 2019  

Fort Lee Traveller | April 25, 2019