Page 1

Inactivation of 392nd Army Band set for Sept. 15; leaders cite readiness priorities as motivating factor SEE PaGe 3

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

April 18, 2019 | Vol. 79, No. 16

Tarmac Testimony

Victim shares sexual assault story at Blackstone Airfield ‘Jumping for SHARP’ event SEE PAGeS 8-9 DMV REPORT SHOWS RISE IN TEEN DRIVER, DUI FATALITIES Results of 2018 survey should motivate discussion and re-energize focus on risk management as warm weather activities increase, noted Lee PMO representative

TEAM GATHERS FOR ‘TEAL WALK’ Community members show determination to end sexual assault at ALU-sponsored march

DIGNITY, RESPECT AT CORE OF POLICY DOD sets new guidelines for transgender personnel; those serving can do so as long as they meet standards

HYDRATION A MUST TO AVOID INJURY Kenner experts underscore importance of replenishing fluids to avoid potentially serious heat-related harm

SEE PaGe 4

SEE PaGe 6

SEE PaGe 10

SEE PaGe 11


2

|

TRAVELLER

|

April 18, 2019

|

www.fortleetraveller.com

coMManD sPotligHt | earth day 2019

Sustain the environment to secure the mission On April 22, the United States Army will join the nation in celebrating Earth Day. It is an opportunity to emphasize our commitment to stewardship of the lands and environmental resources entrusted to us; the lands where our Soldiers, families and civilians train, live and work. The Army’s participation in Earth Day aims to inspire awareness and appreciation of our natural surroundings and how sustaining the environment secures the military mission. The success of the Army’s warfi ghting readiness goal is inseparable from the environmental resources that are essential to accomplishing that mission. Readiness and modernization require access to realistic natural landscapes and environmental conditions that Soldiers

experience during combat. The Army sustains our environment by maintaining and enhancing natural and cultural resources, and making certain our air and water is clean and safe. Through these ongoing efforts, the Army secures the mission by ensuring installation lands have the capability to support readiness and modernization. This Earth Day, and every day, we all have an opportunity to make a difference. With the right choices today, our Army will remain the world’s premier military force U.S. Army Photo well into the future. Please take the time to fi nd out what the Army is doing for Earth Day sustain the environment – the mission of the 2019 (service-wide information available at Army depends on it! aec.army.mil/index.ph/earth-day). – Honorable Alex Beehler, Assistant I encourage you to participate in Army Secretary of the Army, Installations, Earth Day events. Do your part to help Energy and Environment

Military spouse confesses to being a ‘TV junkie’ Contributing Writer

In the basement of a dingy community center, a fl orescent light buzzes over a dozen or so people seated in a circle of metal folding chairs. Some nibble anxiously at store-bought sandwich cookies while others fi dget in ner-

vous silence. There is a screeching of chair legs against linoleum as one bleary-eyed woman stands to speak. “Hello, (clears throat) my name is Lisa ... and I ... I am a binge watcher. “It’s been one week since my last television fi x, and I’m here to share my story.” Believe it or not, there was a time when I

Fort Lee

Commanding General ................... Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Hollie J. Martin Public Affairs Officer ............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor ...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments .......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor .................. Amy Perry Production Assistant............................... Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

didn’t even know what binge watching was. In fact, while our Navy family was stationed in Germany, we felt lucky that Armed Forces Network aired day-old episodes of “Survivor” and “American Idol.” The rest of the time, we entertained ourselves with middle-of-thenight live football broadcasts, quirky BBC cooking shows, and strange AFN public ser-

The Fort Lee Traveller is an authorized publication for members of the DOD, printed by Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc., a private fi rm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee, Virginia. Contents of the Fort Lee Traveller are not necessarily the offi cial views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee Public Affairs Offi ce. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services advertised by the U.S. Army or Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc. Everything advertised in this publication will be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affi liation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confi rmed, the publisher will refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation has been corrected.

on tHe coveR

Lisa Smith Molinari

All community members are welcome to participate in this Fort Lee and Friends of the Lower Appomattox River-sponsored event that will take place April 27, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., at Ferndale Riverside Park, 24909 Ferndale Rd., Petersburg. Admission is free and it is open to all ages. Planned activities include the following: • Youth fishing workshops • Obstacle course • Canal natural history ride • Archaeological demonstration by Fort Lee preservationists • Guided walk to view rare plant life • Displays and talks about birds, fish, reptiles and more There will be live music throughout the event, and on-site food vendors. The parking area is located across the bridge on River Road in Motoaca. A shuttle is available to the event site. More info is available at folar-va.org.

vice announcements. But when we moved back to the states, my husband and I discovered the joys of digital video recording. Initially, our television use was purely recreational. We were mere “social watchers,” catching a recorded program here and there, and streaming a movie over the weekend. Little did we know, we were perched on the slippery slope of instant

SEE tV JUnKie, page 4

T. Anthony Bell

During the April 11 Jumping for SHARP event at Fort Pickett, detailed advanced individual training Soldiers cross the Blackstone Army Airfield tarmac after retrieving the flag that was delivered by a freefall parachutist during the program’s attention-getting air jump. Other event activities included a talk by a sexual assault victim who revealed details of her experience for the first time. For more, see Pages 8-9.


www.fortleetraveller.com

Contributed Photo

The 392nd Army Band woodwind quintet, “Sustainment Winds,” performs during a mid-March Music in Our Schools Month event at Cool Ridge Elementary School in Petersburg. Future support of the educational enrichment program will be at the discretion of the TRADOC Band at Fort Eustis after the 392nd inactivates in September.

Band inactivation set for Sept. 15; availability to decrease after July Patrick Buffett

Managing Editor

Fort Lee’s 392nd Army Band has been ordered to inactivate on Sept. 15. Preparations for that shutdown, noted its commander Chief Warrant Officer 2 James Landrum, will greatly reduce the music group’s ability to support command and community events after July 31. “A system is being implemented by the Training and Doctrine Command Band at Joint Base Langley-Eustis to accommodate supportable requests in this area when the 392nd is no longer available,” Landrum said. The decision to shutter the 392nd is largely due to manpower reshaping initiatives designed to enhance the services deploy-

ability and lethality within the confines of tighter budget authorizations. Service leaders are emphasizing the hard decisions being made to ensure the Army’s focus is on readiness – streamlining requirements not associated with training or equipping the force is a necessity. “TRADOC fully understands that each military space in the total Army structure needs to contribute to readiness,” wrote Maj. Gen. Paul Benenati, the command’s deputy chief of staff, in a recent memorandum. “As the organization responsible for Accessions and Initial Military Training, we see value in the tremendous outreach our bands provide for an Army increasingly isolated from the U.S. population as a whole. Whether at a young

Soldier’s graduation from BCT or an event in a town that has no military presence other than a recruiting station, Army bands are a tangible demonstration of the disciplined and professional Army this country is fortunate to have.” The message went on with its recommendation to inactivate the 392nd and ensure continued support for Fort Lee events with other Army band assets. To accommodate that decision, the TRADOC music group – understrength and rebuilding after weathering its own announced inactivation/reactivation in 2018 – is projected to grow to 53 members over the next two years from its current strength of around a dozen Soldiers. Conversely, the 392nd’s personnel

|

April 18, 2019

|

TRAVELLER

|

3

numbers will decrease as musicians complete their tour of duty and head elsewhere without replacement. Landrum said approved band requests between now and September will be carried out with a combination of Fort Lee and TRADOC-assigned musicians. To facilitate this coordination, he is emphasizing the need for early band support arrangements. “We will obviously lose capability as this progresses over the coming months,” he noted. “There will be fewer instances when we’re able to support small-venue events like ethnic observances and off-post community concerts, and there likely won’t be enough resources to support many of those types of programs by bussing musicians up here from Fort Eustis, which also could be the case once we’re fully transitioned. “The bottom line is the band support program in a few months will be quite different than it is now, so customers need to get used to the idea of coordinating early through the appropriate channels and clearly identifying what the need is so the best resourcing decisions can be made.” Landrum said his band is not planning a farewell concert similar to the one that occurred in 2016 when it was facing inactivation then – a decision that was reversed a short time later. His group is viewing its grand performance at the annual Fourth at the Fort celebration in Williams Stadium as its final thank you for the community’s support. Requests for Army music support from the TRADOC Band should be made at least 90 days in advance of official military functions, or 120 days for off-post activities being hosted by civilian/community organizations. Details on requesting support are available at www. tradoc.army.mil/Organizations/TRADOCStaff/TRADOC-Band. The 380th Army Reserve Band, based in Richmond, also supports military ceremonies and official functions in this area. They can be contacted through either of the following websites: https://sites.google. com/site/380tharmyband or https://twitter. com/380thArmyBand. The 29th Infantry Division Band (Virginia National Guard) is based in Troutsville and its current point of contact can be reached at richard.a.carr.mil@ mail.mil.


4

|

TRAVELLER

|

April 18, 2019

|

www.fortleetraveller.com

Drop in Virginia highway deaths a good news, bad news situation Patrick Buffett Managing Editor

For the first time in four years, the number of crash fatalities on Virginia roadways decreased in 2018, with 819 incidents reported compared to 843 in 2017 – a 4-percent difference. While that’s certainly good news, the same report released by the Department of Motor Vehicles last week emphasizes the 2018 numbers are still far higher than the record low number of crash fatalities (700) in 2014. The DMV analysis also is showing a 23 percent increase in teen driver-related fatalities, a 12 percent spike in alcohol-related deaths, an 8 percent surge in pedestrian fatalities, and a 7 percent bump in deaths attributed to speeding. “Any time the number of people killed in senseless crashes goes down instead of up, that’s a good thing,” observed DMV Commissioner Richard D. Holcomb, the commonwealth’s governor-appointed Highway Safety Representative. “However, we still have a long way to go toward our goal of reaching zero fatalities in Virginia,” he said. “Just four years ago, we were able to save 119 more lives on our roadways than we could in 2018. I challenge Virginians to drive the numbers even lower this year. Everyone can do their part by following the posted speed limit, focusing behind the wheel, always buckling up, and never driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol.” Reacting to the DMV report, representatives of the Provost Marshal Office here pointed out the harsh reality of the findings – the 339 individuals whose lives were cut short because someone was in a hurry or trivialized posted speed limits; the 278 losses of life because a person lacked the understanding that alcohol impairment makes it unsafe to operate a motor vehicle. “In all likelihood, the 70 teen driver-related fatalities listed in the report were mostly due to something we all recognize as a chronic traffic safety problem, distracted driving, and those are the sorts of things everyone has the power to change,” observed Chief of Police Joseph Metzger. The DMV report did show a 39 percent drop in distracted driving-related fatalities in 2018, but it clarified that the decreased number was likely due to a change in the way those types of incidents are reported to the department. “What reports like this should do is encourage conversation,” Metzger further observed. “It’s not just fixing one problem where statistics show an increase in fatalities, with

File Photo

A young driver focuses on her cellphone messages instead of the road ahead. Distracted driving is believed to be a major contributor to fatal accidents, particularly those attributed to teen and novice drivers. There was a 23-percent increase of such incidents in Virginia last year in comparison with 2017 data. Alcohol-related crash fatalities also climbed by 12 percent.

the exception of drinking and driving that stands on its own as a major killer on our roadways. We should be looking at all these causes of traffic deaths and honestly acknowledge the risks we take behind the wheel with the understanding that one unfortunate twist of fate could put us or our loved ones in the rollup of next year’s fatality numbers.” Supervisory Police Officer Courtney Varner provided recent traffic incident data for Fort Lee. Over the second quarter of this fiscal year (Jan-Mar), 173 speeding citations were issued, 11 motorists were cited for cellphone use (distracted driving), and 24 individuals were pulled over for failing to yield or stop in accordance with posted signs at intersections. Reckless driving (eight citations) and operating a vehicle with a suspended license (11 citations) also were listed. “Again, this all goes back to context,” Metzger said. “It is an indicator of risk that could easily result in serious injury or a fatality on post just as easily as what’s reported as happening off post. Metzger also acknowledged the timing of the report and its intended accident-prevention goals. “We’re heading into the summer months when there is a huge increase in highway travel activity and a corresponding uptick in accidents,” he said. “We have to use what we know – the fatality statistics related to not wearing seatbelts, speeding, and distracted and impaired driving – to motivate our risk assessments and train our younger drivers to think and act responsibly.”

tv junkie,

cont. from page 2

gratification. Eventually, we needed more and more episodes to be entertained. Our digitally savvy kids introduced us to the allure of streaming services such as On-Demand, Netflix, Amazon Prime and Hulu. How intoxicating it was to take a double hit of “The Bachelor” and chase it with “Deadliest Catch” all in one evening! Soon, we were hooked, and there was no going back. Before we knew it, we were spending perfectly sunny weekends holed up in the family room of our base house watching episode after episode of random television shows. We told everyone that we were “just catching up on ‘Modern Family’” or “simply wondering what all the hubbub was about ‘Downton Abbey.’” Ironically, it was the show “Breaking Bad” that nudged us into the abyss. We’d been jonesing to see the AMC series for a while, and when we found out the first 54 episodes were OnDemand for a limited time leading up to the final season, we knew we had just scored. During that epic three-week bender, we finally hit rock bottom. Our family room looked like the scene of a rave party, strewn with soda cans, popcorn, Chinese take-out boxes and melting quarts of half-eaten ice cream. Our pupils were permanently dilated as we stared, transfixed, into the psychedelic LCD screen; our cold, clammy fingers gripping the smudged remotes. We were so strung out after that binge, we quit cold turkey for a while, satisfying our cravings with short doses of “House Hunters” and “Seinfeld” reruns in hopes we’d avoid the painful withdrawal symptoms of rapid detox. But our self-discipline soon crumbled when we found shows like “House of Cards,” “Better Call Saul,” “Stranger Things,” “Ozark,” “You” and “Rectify.” After every bender, we’d dry out all over again and pledge to stay clean. However, lately, ads keep popping up for spring premiers of “Our Planet,” “Wife Swap” and “The Handmaid’s Tale.” The eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones” kicked off April 14, and we still haven’t finished “Poldark” and “Homecoming.” What’s a TV junkie to do? Binge watch, of course! I must confess that spring premiere season has triggered my recent relapse. Although I’m not sure there’s a 12-step recovery program for binge watching, I’m absolutely certain I’ll gain 12 pounds if I don’t get my rump off the couch and stop watching so much TV. So, mark my words: I’m over binge watching for good. This time, I’m 100 percent serious. No more lounging in sweatpants on Sunday afternoon pressing “play” hour after hour. Spring has sprung, and I’ll be spending all my time in the great outdoors. I swear, I’m going to do it, and I mean it. And I’ll start just as soon as the “Game of Thrones” final season is over.


www.fortleetraveller.com

Deadline Approaching for Registration is underway for Fort Lee’s Run for the ‘Kids Can’ Contest

Run for Fallen Set for May 11

Fallen, taking place May 11, 8:30 a.m., at Williams Stadium. Participation is free and open to the public. The guest speaker will be Capt. John T. Rhoten who was honored as the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors Military Mentor of the Year in 2018. The opening program also will feature the traditional “survivor’s lap” with families and supporters carrying banners of fallen warriors. Pre-registration is available through May 7 at lee.armymwr.com/programs/runforthefallen or by calling 804734-6445 or 734-6446. Check-in on event day begins at 7 a.m. Unregistered individuals may sign up then. The rain date is May 18. Photographs of fallen military service members for display along the run route may be submitted to angela.m.bellamy2.civ@mail.mil or christine.i.murphy.civ@ mail.mil through May 7.

Military Kids Invited to PX ‘Nerf Fest’

Entries are being accepted through April 30 for the 2019 Young Lives, Big Stories contest sponsored by IMCOM G9 Family and MWR. The essay and artwork contest is open to children – preschool through 12th grade – of active-duty, National Guard, Reserve, retired and surviving spouses. The theme is, “Military Kids Can!” When creating entries, children are encouraged to answer the question: What does it mean to you to be a military child? Drawings may be submitted by children, age 3 through third grade. Written submissions may be entered by children in grades four-12. Prizes will be awarded in each age category, and there will be one overall winner. Submissions will be accepted online and by mail. For guidelines and details, visit www.armymwr.com/programsand-services/family-assist/month-military-child/young-livesbig-stories/ylbs-faq.

Get Help with Wellness Goals

|

April 18, 2019

|

TRAVELLER

|

5

DOD Civilians. Each patient receives an Individual Health Assessment and a tailored plan to meet his/her health goals. Other services offered include Healthy Nutrition Education, Stress Management Education, Wellness Counseling, Healthy Sleep Habits and Tobacco Education. AWC is open MondayFriday, 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. For details, call 804-734-9925.

Certified Military Uniforms Only Available at MCS

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service reminds military members that on-installation Military Clothing Stores are the only authorized source for government-certified, authentic uniforms. All military apparel at these stores is produced by government-approved vendors. The products meet uniform quality standards and comply with regulatory specifications.

Shoppers Can Score $1,000

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service “Nerf Fest” is at Lee AWC Gift Cards coming to Fort Lee April 20, 1-3 p.m., at the Main Store. Community members can receive assistance in meeting Five authorized shoppers will win $1,000 gift cards in The Exchange invites children, ages 8 and older, to test the their wellness goals through the services offered at the Fort the Army and Air Force Exchange Service 2019 ConAgra latest Nerf Blasters. Assorted blasters and darts will be pro- Lee Army Wellness Center, building 9205, Mahone Avenue. Baseball Sweepstakes through April 30. vided. AWC is open to military and their family members (18 and To enter, visit www.shopmyexchange.com/sweepstakes. No For additional details, call 804-861-5970. older), retirees and their family members (with ID card), and purchase is necessary to enter or win.

GI Bill benefit transfer deadline coming soon Devon L. Suits Army News Service

WASHINGTON – Soldiers with more than 16 years of service who want to transfer their Post9/11 GI Bill benefits to a dependent must do so before July 12 to avoid the risk of losing that option. Last year, the DOD implemented a new Post9/11 GI Bill Transfer of Education Benefits eligibility requirement, which instituted a “sixto 16-year cutoff rule,” emphasized Master Sgt. Gerardo T. Godinez, senior Army retention operations NCO with Army G-1. Further, Soldiers who want to transfer their education entitlement must have at least six years of service, he said, and they must commit to an additional four years of service. Soldiers going through the medical evaluation board process cannot transfer GI Bill benefits until they are found fit for duty under the new DOD

policy. “For Purple Heart recipients, these rules do not apply,” Godinez noted. Prior to the new policy, there were no restrictions on when Soldiers could transfer their education benefits. Since 2009, over 1 million of them have done so. “To transfer their GI Bill, Soldiers have to go into the milConnect website, login with their common access card, then select the tab there that talks about the transfer of education benefits,” Godinez said. If a Soldier needs additional help, he or she can visit the installation’s service and career, or education counselors. In July, the new rules will be in effect and those Soldiers with more than 16 years of service will not be eligible to transfer education benefits. Pat Molnar “Soldiers need to (review this benefit) to make Soldiers with more than 16 years of service who want to transfer their Post-9/11 GI Bill an educated decision,” Godinez advised. benefits to a dependent must do so before July 12 to avoid the risk of losing that option.


6

|

TRAVELLER

|

April 18, 2019

|

www.fortleetraveller.com

t w F

Color Me Teal

Photos by

Patrick Buffett

(ABOVE) Michael K. Williams, Army Logistics University president, shares his thoughts on stopping sexual harassment and assault in the military ranks during opening remarks at Wednesday’s Color Me Teal Walk on the ALU Campus. “What I expect from you as members of the greatest team in the world, which is the United States Army, is to look out for each other and take care of each other,” he told the assembled crowd of Soldiers, civilians and family members. “Preventing sexual misconduct is up to you. That’s the point we need to reflect on this morning as we spend this time together and enjoy our beautiful surroundings at Fort Lee.” Many of the estimated 400-plus participants wore teal-colored t-shirts and ribbons for the morning stroll. One carried a small bell that was rung every 92 seconds – the frequency of an individual being sexually assaulted in America. Another reminder of the event’s purpose was a row of t-shirts dangling from a line strung across the wooded portion of the walking path. The hand-decorated garments bore the sentiments of ALU team members, with printed statements like “Not in Our Army” and “One Team, One Fight.” (BELOW) Williams, his deputy David Rohrer and assistant commandant Sgt. Maj. Michael Warren, lead the long procession back into the ALU quad area where representatives of the James House, a protective shelter for women in crisis, Army Community Services and other support agencies were on hand with reference materials.

“ s

e C g

c

t


www.fortleetraveller.com

|

April 18, 2019

|

TRAVELLER

|

7

Recognizing Civilians | Spotlight

Leslie “Buddy” Mayo

Hometown: Natural Bridge Length of federal service: 9.5 years Job title: Security Manager and Anti-Terrorism Officer for the Logistics Exercise and Simulation Directorate Job duties: “Responsible for the physical security of our facility as well as all personnel, industrial and information security actions for our organization.” What do you love most about your job? “In this day and age, security procedures are constantly changing. You have to stay on top of your game because people’s lives depend on what I do to ensure their safety whether it is at work here on Fort Lee or if they are traveling overseas.” What do you consider your greatest achievement? “Retiring from the military after 23 years and 8 months of service.” Do you volunteer? “Yes, I volunteer at my granddaughters’ elementary school every opportunity I get and with the Amy Perry Civilian Welfare Fund on Fort Lee. They provide some really great services for the civilian employees who work here.” When and where were you happiest? “I try to be happy What do you expect from your leaders? “Fairness and a everywhere I go. I try not to dwell on the things I can’t clear path of direction.” change and try to make the most of my situation wherever Where would you most like to live? “Buxton, N.C. It has it may be.” the best surf fishing in the world.” Do you have any pet peeves? “When people say ‘It’s not

their job’ but then turn right around and ask for help with their tasking.” Which historical figure would you most like to meet? “Anyone of our country’s founding fathers. They were wise beyond their years.” What is your greatest fear? “The political path this country is currently on. I do not want the ones who served this country to have it been in vain.” What is your greatest extravagance? “I am not an extravagant person. I have always tried to live within my means.” Which talent would you most like to have? “I have always wanted to learn to fly helicopters.” What’s your motto? “‘Be true to yourself, if not others have no reason to be.’” Who are your role models? “My parents. Both were hard workers and they taught me that if you want things in life you have to work for it.” What is it that you most dislike? “Dishonesty.” What is something people would be surprised to know about you? “That I grew up raising and showing horses.” What are your future aspirations? “Future promotions, of course, but my main aspiration is to retire early from federal service and move to the Outer Banks in North Carolina.” – Compiled by Amy Perry


88 |

|TRAVELLER TRAVELLER|April | 18,April 18,| 2019 | www.fortleetraveller.com 2019 www.fortleetraveller.com

www.fortleetraveller.com | April |April 18, 2019 | TRAVELLER www.fortleetraveller.com 18, 2019 | TRAVELLER | |

99

(CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT) Students watch as free-fallers descend from an aircraft during SHARP training that took place at Blackstone Army Airfield, Fort Pickett, April 11. • Rigger course students make their way to an aircraft. • Marine Master Sgt. Jason Elson descends after free-falling. • Students listen with unease to the guest speaker. • Staff Sgt. Bianca Love recounts her story to attendees. • Sgt. 1st Class Michelle Metzger welcomes guests.

DROPZONE CLASSROOM Unconventional airfield location serves as backdrop for SHARP instruction

Photos by T. Anthony Bell

T. Anthony Bell Senior Writer/Special Projects Initial entry training Soldiers receive many hours of instruction on the Army’s Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention program. As a result, they are familiar with behaviors leading to sexual misconduct, what constitutes sexual assault and ways to report it. They also are taught how such acts affect individuals, units, missions and the Army. A great deal of this learning is facilitated by PowerPoint presentations, classroom

discussion and written materials. On April 11, however, the message delivered to a group of 40-or-so Quartermaster School advanced individual training students was quite out of the ordinary and vivid. The training took place on the tarmac of Fort Pickett’s Blackstone Army Airfield at an event titled “Jumping for SHARP,” hosted by the Aerial Delivery and Field Services Department. The day started with various advocacy organizations providing information briefings amid the distant hum of an aircraft rolling into the training area and the toils of nearby troops readying for a pending

airborne operation. An assortment of SHARP banners and posters fluttered in the display area, acting as a backdrop for the event. When the C17 lifted off and gained altitude, all eyes focused skyward to see the first canopies open and travel in circular patterns as the operators – most of them students in training themselves – steered them to the specified landing area. A freefall team of instructors also exited the aircraft with a large SHARP banner that they delivered by parachute to the training site. That display of professionals at work was followed by the event’s most poignant

moment – a first-hand survivor’s account by ADFSD instructor Staff Sgt. Bianca R. Love. The 12-year rigger Soldier recounted how she was sexually assaulted twice in a matter of months at her first duty station. “Needless to say, my first year in the Army was not what I thought it was going to be,” she told the attentive audience. Candid and brutally forthright in her account, Love said she frequently tells students about her first sexual assault as a teaching point and way to help her cope. What she hadn’t revealed publically up un-

til that day is a second case of sexual violence; one in which she blamed herself for setting the stage that allowed it to happen. “I’ve never told anybody about the second time – the one that really impacts me the most,” she admitted to the crowd. “This is the first time I’ve spoken about it outside of counseling. “I know they say rape is never your fault,” she continued, “but to me, I felt like this time it was my fault.” Love said the first assault, which was reported, caused her to shut down her

emotions and dull the painful memories with alcohol. One night, she found herself drinking with two people who turned out to be perpetrators rather than friends. “Had I not been drinking; had I not gone over there; if I had just gone to counseling; then maybe it wouldn’t have happened again,” she revealed from behind the lectern. Nonetheless, Love fought through her tribulation with the help of one Paige Harper, a Soldier she knew from AIT. A battle buddy like no other, according to Love’s description, Harper ensured she got to places on time, ate regular meals and kept her spirits up. Page’s intervention pushed Love’s life back to normalcy. “I know what Page did is the greatest gift I wish I could repay – she restored my faith in people. She taught me that everyone would not break my trust; that some people really do want to help and care; that I was strong, and I could overcome any-

thing with a little help from my friends … just like that Beetles’ song.” Love did overcome her ordeal through counseling and support, but it left her with wounds she said will never fully heal. “I am standing here today, still in the Army 12 years later telling my story, because I am a survivor,” she said. “Anything worth wanting is hard. Nothing in life is easy, and I will have to keep working to make it better.” At the conclusion of the staff sergeant’s speech, the hum of aircraft was more prominent as well as the sound of the wind occasionally rippling the banners. The audience members – mostly 20-somethings – sat in silent contemplation and astonishment. Some were visibly shaken. One was Pvt. Michelle McKeiver, who said Love’s story was painful to hear. “Deep down, I was in shock,” said the SEE SHARP, Page 13


10

|

TRAVELLER

|

April 18, 2019

|

www.fortleetraveller.com

Updated DOD transgender policy based on treating all with dignity

Transportation Artifact of the Month

I

Jim Garmone

w

WASHINGTON – Updates to the DOD’s transgender policy took effect Friday, and defense officials stressed the new approach is anchored in the core value of treating all service members with dignity and respect. Anthony Kurta, performing the duties of Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, told Pentagon reporters that those most immediately affected by the update have the information they need about the policy. Anyone currently serving or under contract to enter the military who has been diagnosed with gender dysphoria is grandfathered, he said. “They remain under the 2016 policy for the remainder of their careers. They can reenlist and stay in the military.” However, beginning April 12 for those wishing to join the military, “a diagnosis of gender dysphoria is presumptively disqualifying under the new policy, just as it is under the 2016 rules, absent a waiver,” Kurta said. There are recognized exceptions, he continued. Applicants must demonstrate stability in their biological sex for 36 months and “be able to meet all applicable standards of those associated with their biological sex.” For those currently serving, future diagnoses of gender dysphoria will be dealt with on an individual basis, Kurta noted. “If the service member can continue to meet all standards, including those related to deployablity and all those associated with their biological sex, then the service member can continue to serve without waiver.” For those who require gender transition to treat their dysphoria or who cannot or will not meet the standards will be referred to the disability evaluation system. Kurta stressed that under the policy, all military troops will be treated with dignity and respect, and every service member is able to express their gender identity. “DOD will take no

i o a t c –

Defense.gov

Contributed Photo

US Army Photo

action solely based on gender identity,” he said. By definition, gender dysphoria means there is clinically significant distress that impairs an individual in work or other important areas. Health care teams would provide treatment for the condition. “Very often, the first step is behavioral health counselling,” Kurta said. If through counselling, individuals decide they can meet all standards and serve in their biological sexes, “nothing happens,” he said. “They just continue receiving any treatment they need.” If gender transition is needed to treat the condition, the case would be referred for determination of separation. The department can cite numbers for those receiving care for gender dysphoria, but it does not track the transgender status of all service members. “It’s something we don’t ask of people,” Kurta stated. A voluntary workplace and gender relations survey conducted in 2016 indicated just under 9,000 service members consider themselves transgender individuals. The department knows that 1,400 service members have been diagnosed with gender dysphoria. Fewer than 10 are receiving gender reassignment surgery.

This M911 Commercial Heavy Equipment Transporter is part of the Army Transportation historical vehicle collection at Joint Base Langley-Eustis. Based on the Oshkosh J-2065 commercial tractor, it replaced the M123A1C, XM523E2, and eventually the M746 tractors used by the Army for heavy equipment long haul missions. Paired with the M747 60-ton trailer, the combination became the standard tank hauler throughout the 1980s. During Operations Desert Shield/Desert Storm, the conditions encountered in Saudi Arabia, combined with the increasing growth of the M1A1 Abrams tank, led to the Army’s decision to field a replacement design. By the mid-1990s, the M911 began to be phased out in favor of the new M1070 tractor. This particular vehicle was last fielded by National Guard units in Kentucky and Tennessee. The Transportation Museum is located at 300 Washington Blvd. It is open Tuesday - Saturday, 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

a m t s r a l

s


www.fortleetraveller.com

Kenner Connection | Beat

the

|

April 18, 2019

|

TRAVELLER

|

11

Heat, Stay Hydrated

It’s important to drink fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty

Adequate hydration is vitally important when working and playing outdoors. Many assume additional water intake is only necessary when it’s extremely hot outside or when engaged in highly strenuous activities. What is actually true is that any time the body sweats – which can occur in cooler weather and while lying on the beach – it is releasing fluids that cool through evaporation and keep important organs from overheating. This results in a lot of lost moisture that needs to be replenished. The human body is comprised of approximately 50-60 percent water. In addition to acting as a cooling system, it maintains the proper balance of electrolytes to allow bodies to function properly. Our systems and organs depend on water for regulation of cell health and vitality. This affects everything from the brain, heart and lungs to kidneys, muscles and skin. “Hydration is key, not only for the summer months but also for health needs all

on an upset stomach, irritability, a mild headache, achy joints and overall decreased performance. Moderate dehydration can cause muscle and abdominal cramping, nausea, vomiting, profuse sweating, dizziness and confusion. When urine is dark, rather than a light yellow or clear color, it’s a good indicator the body is not getting enough water. Severe dehydration is a dangerous condition that requires immediate medical attention. Sometimes when dehydrated, a person cannot sweat enough to cool their body. High humidity also can make it difficult for sweat to evaporate and keep an individual cool. When sweating is not sufficient to Lesley Atkinson, KAHC PAO bring down the body’s temperature, it can Pfc. Jordan Westdyk from Troop Medical Clinic 1 starts an IV drip while treating Seaman Apprentice rise to dangerously high levels, causing heat Danico Grepo, a member of the Navy Detachment here, during an appointment last week when the stroke. Sailor presented symptoms of dehydration. Signs and symptoms of heat stroke year long,” said Kimberly Schoen, Family Even mild dehydration can make are extreme exhaustion, disorientation Medicine Clinic nurse manager. individuals feel quite ill. It can bring SEE staying hydrated, page 15


12

|

TRAVELLER

|

April 18, 2019

|

www.fortleetraveller.com

Contributed Photo

USAF ladies take volleyball title

The Air Force women’s volleyball team poses with its award plaques after winning the initial entry training student league championship March 28 at Clark Fitness Center. The USAF ladies rallied from a first set loss, winning the next two, in a match against Alpha Company, 16th Ordnance Battalion. The team also posted an undefeated record during regular season play.

Contributed Photo

King wins long-drive qualifier

Mike King, Todd Dalton and Dan Trevino pose for a publicity shot after placing 1st, 2nd and 3rd, respectively, during Saturday’s Military Long Drive Qualifier at Fort Lee’s Cardinal Golf Club. King’s 337yard shot earned him the top award and a prize of $500. He will go on to compete against 11 other top players from Army installations across the nation in the next qualifying round at Fort Jackson, S.C., set for May 5-7. The payout for the winner there is $10,000 and an invitation to the 2019 World Long Drive Championship. Dalton picked up a $200 check for his 289-yard shot, and Trevino received $100 for his 260-yard drive. The competition was open to all services and military retirees. The event is sponsored by the Army and Air Force Exchange Service and is being conducted in partnership with Family and MWR.


www.fortleetraveller.com

SHARP continued from page 9 19-year-old assigned to Charlie Company, 262nd QM Battalion. “Personally, I know someone who’s been through a similar situation, so for her to come out and actually present that was pretty brave. I commend her for that.” Additionally, McKeiver said, it was difficult for her to grasp the concept of Soldiers

– sworn to protect others – committing violent crimes. “I’m a bit upset that something like that actually happens in the military,” said the Richmond native, “especially knowing we enlist to protect others and ourselves as well. How can we protect others if we can’t protect our own?” McKeiver’s observation was similar to that of Pfc. Valentino Hanson, a 28-year-old Atlanta native.

“It was hard to hear, but wonderful to know that she came so far to overcome it,” said the Charlie Co., 262nd Soldier. “I love hearing from people who have gone through struggles and use it to encourage others. That’s what we need the most. A lot of times, unfortunately, people don’t receive what you’re telling them unless they know you can empathize.” Moving forward, McKeiver said Love’s story was a wakeup call

in a sense; Soldiers need to support one another in a way that screams “I got your back.” “We need to come together more and more – not like units – but like family,” she said. “For example, like one of the sergeants said, when someone tells you they’ve been raped, you have to believe them. They have to depend on you for support.” McKeiver’s assertion of trust and dependency parallel with the goals of Sgt. 1st Class

|

April 18, 2019

Michelle Metzger, the 92R Parachute Rigger Course manager who coordinated Jumping for SHARP. She said the event was designed to show Soldiers how sexual assault can affect people and operations. “An event like this gives the subject flare,” she said of the airborne operation/ SHARP union. “If I was a student being taught by PowerPoint, I don’t think I would absorb the info like I would in this type

|

TRAVELLER

|

13

of environment.” In addition to Love’s recount, students received information briefings from the James House crisis intervention agency, the Army Criminal Investigation Command and Fort Lee’s Family Advocacy Program. Jumping for SHARP was among the many installation activities highlighting the April observance of Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month.

Tigers donate time to Lakeview

Contributed photo

Bravo wins Battle of Bridge

Contributed photo

A Soldier from Tango Company, 266th Quartermaster Battalion, shares her time with students of Lakeview Elementary School, Colonial Heights, Friday. A group of Tango Tiger drill sergeants and junior enlisted members spent the morning at the school reading stories, playing games and answering questions about military service. Many Fort Lee organizations engage in these types of volunteer activities encouraged by the installation’s Adopt-A-School program.

Ordnance School Soldiers perform marching movements with M4 Carbine Rifles during the inaugural Battle of the Bridge Drill and Ceremony Competition March 23 on Whittington Field. The event pitted units of the 832nd Ordnance Battalion against the Quartermaster School’s 266th QM Battalion. In addition to a formal drill category in which teams had to correctly perform a specified list of marching movements, there was an accompanying freestyle category that was judged on creativity, precision, attitude and teamwork. With an overall score of 284 out of 300 possible points, Bravo Co., 832nd Ord. Bn., won the competition and took possession of the “Golden Boot” trophy. Those troops were led by Staff Sgt. Kenneth Wright II.


14

|

TRAVELLER

|

April 18, 2019

|

www.fortleetraveller.com

S

Free Concert Tickets Available | Ongoing

An Armed Forces Day concert featuring musicians from Fort Lee’s 392nd Army Band and the TRADOC Band at Joint Base Langley-Eustis is set for May 14, 7 p.m., in the Grace Street Theater, Virginia Commonwealth University, 934 W. Grace St., Richmond. While admission is free, tickets are required due to limited seating. The musicians will showcase an evening of jazz throwbacks – Glen Miller, Benny Goodman and others – in tribute to the military services and the 75th Anniversary of D-Day. The Truetone Honeys will be the special guests for the show. To reserve a ticket, visit www.facebook. com/392ndarmyband.

Science on Tap for Adults | April 18

The Science Museum of Virginia will host an adults-only Science on Tap: Planeteers Night April 18, 6-10 p.m., at 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. Participants, age 21 and older, will learn how to make green-focused decisions while engaging in fun activities including upcycling, making art out of bottle caps, composting and more. Guests can dress like superheroes. Local food and brewery trucks will be on hand. For additional details, visit www.smv.org.

Easter Weekend Play | April 19-21

The Easter passion play “The Empty Tomb” will be presented April 19-21 at the Rock Church of Petersburg, 2301 County Drive. The play is set for 7 p.m., April 19-20 and 10 a.m., April 21. The production features special effects and lighting, and the whole family is welcome to attend. For other details, call 804-733-3973.

Heirloom Plant Sale | April 20

Henricus Historical Park will be selling a variety of heirloom plants for home gardens April 20, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., at 251 Henricus Park Road, Chester. The plants include vegetable, herb, fruit and flower seedlings. All proceeds will go toward Henricus’ agricultural-related educational programs. For further information, call 804-748-1611 or visit henricus.org.

L ocal A ctivities

for the

F ort L ee C ommunity

24909 Ferndale Road, Petersburg. c For signup and further information, call 804-543-0325.

Colonial Heights Cleanup |

The participation fee is $40 for members and April 27 $55 for all others. This includes golf, a cart, Volunteers are needed for a city-wide The Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers lunch, beverages and prizes. Adopt-A-Roadway community cleanup in The registration fee must be paid by April 25. Colonial Heights April 27, 8 a.m. - noon. Easter Extravaganza is scheduled for April 20, For other details, call 804-734-2899. 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., on the Lee Club lawn. Participants can form groups to volunteer or The free event includes an Easter egg hunt join other teams. It is open to families, students, for children up to 12 years old, the Easter Bun- Kenner Neon 5K, Health Fair | businesses and others. All are welcome. A ny and more. Families should arrive by noon April 27 kickoff event with remarks by Mayor Gregory Kenner Army Health Clinic will sponsor a Kochuba is set for 8 a.m., at the Community to participate in the hunt. Neon 5K Run/Walk and Health Fair April 27, Center, 157 Roanoke Ave. Refreshments and For more information, call 804-765-7651. 8-11 a.m. The event is free and open to all. T-shirts will be provided. To register, email Exchange Easter Egg Hunt | Registration for the run/walk begins at 8 disonp@colonialheightsva.gov. April 20 a.m., and the start time is 9 a.m. Participants For other details, call 804-520-9230. A free Easter Egg Hunt will be held April will travel mostly through the trails in the Pe20, 1 p.m., at the Main Exchange. tersburg National Battlefield Park. All chil- Revolutionary War There also will be games, giveaways and dren 10 and under will receive a certificate of Re-Enactment | April 27 refreshments at the event. Activities are geared completion. The booths at the health fair will Revolutionary War re-enactors will re-create toward preteen and younger children. be located near the KAHC circle drive main the 1781 Battle at Osborne’s Landing April 27, For additional information, call 804-861- entrance. There also will be a blood drive 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., at Henricus Historical Park, 5970. hosted by the Armed Services Blood Program 251 Henricus Park Road, Chester. from Fort Bragg, N.C. Visitors will learn how Maj. Gen. William History of Weapons Talk | Leashed pets will be allowed. Participants Phillips ordered British forces including April 25 from off post should use the Lee or Sisisky Av- Benedict Arnold to attack the supplies of the The Army Transportation Museum will enue gates when coming to Fort Lee, as Ma- Virginia State Navy and Virginia Militia. host a free brown bag lecture titled History hone Avenue Gate does not open until 9 a.m., For more details, call 804-748-1611. of Weapons April 25, 5 p.m., at Joint Base and the other ACPs are closed on weekends. Langley-Eustis. In the event of inclement weather, updates on Prince George Kite Festival | The talk will focus on why and how the status of the event will be posted to www. April 27 Prince George Parks and Recreation will weapons changed over time with examples of facebook.com/kenner.ftlee. hold a Kite Festival April 27, 11 a.m. - 3 p.m., rare and iconic pieces for viewing. SHARP Track, Field Meet | April 27 at Temple Recreation Park, 14307 Prince For further details, call 757-878-1115. The 23rd Quartermaster Brigade 3rd annual George Drive. ‘Hire Vets Now’ Event | April 25 SHARP Relay Track Meet is scheduled The family friendly event will feature kite Hire Vets Now, a Virginia initiative focused for April 27, beginning 8 a.m., in Williams demonstrations and fun contests for all groups. on transitioning service members and veter- Stadium. Participants will have the opportunity to build, ans, will hold a networking event April 25, The events i nclude the 4x100 through fly and take home their own kite. A 1K Fun 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., at the Soldier Support 4x800 relays as well as an individual Run for ages 5-12 starts at 11 a.m. Center, Room 125, building 3400, B Avenue. 1-mile run and a 100-meter dash. Medals For additional details, call 804-458-6164. This free event also is for military spouses. and ribbons will be awarded to winners and To register, visit www.vachamber.com/ runners up, respectively. Members of the Resume Writing Workshop | hirevetsapr25. For more information, email community are welcome to come out and April 30 The Soldier for Life Transition Assistance r.dare@vachamber.com. cheer for the Soldier competitors. For additional details, call 804-586-9324 or Program will host a free resume-writing Cardinal Golf Spring Fling | workshop April 30, 9 a.m. - noon, at the email camilla.f.lewis.civ@mail.mil. Soldier Support Center, Room 126, building April 27 3400, 1401 B Ave. A Spring Fling golf event is set for April 27, Riverfest Volunteers Needed | Participants will receive tips on fine-tuning 7:30 a.m., at the Cardinal Golf Club. April 27 The 18-hole stroke play event – gross and Volunteers are needed to support the objectives, crafting work history, showcasing net – is open to all players. There will be a di- Riverfest celebration being held by the Friends skills and more. For registration, call 804-734-6612 or email vision for those without USGA handicaps who of the Lower Appomattox River April 27, 10 will be using the Callaway scoring method. a.m. - 3 p.m., at Appomattox Riverside Park, army.lee.sfltap@mail.mil.

BOSS Easter Extravaganza | April 20

For more installation and outside the gate events and activities, visit our online calendar at www.fortleetraveller.com/calendar


www.fortleetraveller.com

StAYinG HYDRAteD,

continued from page 11

or unconsciousness, severe cramping of muscles, seizures, dizziness, headache, nausea and vomiting. The body’s cooling system has shut down completely in these instances, and skin will feel hot and dry. This is a life-threatening medical emergency – call 911 if someone is seen exhibiting these symptoms. All members of Team Lee must plan ahead to prevent heat injuries. Stay informed about weather conditions, and avoid strenuous activities between 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. on extremely hot days. Drink water or sports drinks every 20 minutes. Keep water available, and wear loose, light-colored clothing. Parents should take their kids into consideration as well because they are just as susceptible to heat injury and less likely to take hydration breaks that will interrupt their fun. “If you know a day of strenuous outdoor activities is coming up, please ‘pre-hydrate’ by beginning to drink more water the day or two beforehand to build up the fl uids in the body,” Schoen said. “It’s also important to understand the difference between regular water and sports drinks. When exercising in hot and humid conditions, athletes may benefi t from sports drinks in a couple of ways. It replaces the fl uid and electrolytes lost when sweating, and the carbohydrate calories fuel muscles, as well. Energy drinks, however, can cause dehydration, and it is recommended not to load up on them before or during increased physical activity.” The Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention recommends that individuals on a low-salt diet, have diabetes or high blood pressure, or any other chronic conditions talk to their doctor before drinking sports beverages. Those who are not “water drinkers,” can often get adequate hydration from alternative sources like coconut water, milk, fruit-infused water, probiotic water, guayusa tea, beet juice, aloe water and low- or no-sugar smoothies. Caffeine-based products like coffee or colas are not a good option because they will actually contribute to dehydration, as is the case with alcohol in any form. Pay attention to heat index warnings, especially heat categories 4 and 5, and respond by increasing periods of rest in cool, shaded areas or in an air-conditioned space. As a general rule, take a break for 30-40 minutes after every 20-30 minutes of vigorous exercise or work. There’s an app for everything – including staying safe in the heat. Downloading the OSHA-NOISH Heat Safety Tool is another way to stay informed about weather conditions to calculate the heat index, or get reminders to drink and stay hydrated and plan rest breaks. To download the tool, visit www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_ index/heat_app.html. Kenner Army Health Clinic wants to ensure all community members have a safe and fun summer. To schedule an appointment at the clinic, call the patient line at 1-866-533-5242. For after-hours care, use the Nurse Advice Line at 1-800-TRICARE and choose option 1. – Kenner Army Health Clinic

|

April 18, 2019

|

TRAVELLER

|

15

Fort Lee

Classifieds Reach more than 10,000 active duty military, civil service employees, retirees, their spouses and the civilian community.

COntACt: Susan irgens

susanlou.irgens@gmail.com

757-477-7104

DeADLine Reader & Display: thursday 4:00pm (week prior)


16

|

TRAVELLER

|

April 18, 2019

|

www.fortleetraveller.com

Troops practice perimeter setup

Contributed Photo

Scouts experience life at Lee

Staff Sgt. Jerica Ogle, Aerial Delivery and Field Services Department, and Marine Staff Sgt. Travis Ryan, Marine Corps Detachment, pose with Scouts at the Transportation School training site during the Scouts of America Bootcamp Weekend here recently. During the occasion, Scouts were afforded the opportunity to interact with military members while participating in several events to include physical readiness training and combatives. They also visited the Quartermaster Museum and were treated with an ice cream social with military members who supported the visit as volunteers.

Contributed Photo

Junior Soldiers from Delta Company, 832d Ordnance Battalion, practice Entry Control Point setup procedures during field training recently. Conducted regularly, Ordnance Exercises are among the final requirements to graduate from advanced individual training courses administered by the Ord. School at Fort Lee. The three-day/two-overnight events are an opportunity to rehearse the warrior tasks and battle drills taught since basic training and the technical skills learned in respective military occupational specialty courses here. The exercises are one more way the Ord. School ensures its aspiring professionals are fully prepared for the operational Army assignments that lie ahead.

Profile for The Progress-Index

Fort Lee Traveller | April 18, 2019  

Fort Lee Traveller | April 18, 2019