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Victims of Holocaust Remembrance Day observance scheduled for April 18; to feature survivor Jay Ipson, 83 SEE PAGE 4

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

April 4, 2019 | Vol. 79, No. 14

Commander’s Commitment Maj. Gen. Fogg sets tone of SAAPM observance during proclamation signing kickoff SEE PAGE 3

PARADE PROCLAIMS START OF MONTH OF MILITARY CHILD Lee teens and some of its tiniest residents took part in a parade around the Child and Youth Services campus Monday to mark the start of April’s MOMC observance

ONLY RAIN GOES DOWN THE DRAIN Team Lee can play a big role in protecting the fragile Chesapeake Bay watershed

CLINIC EVENT WILL ‘REV UP HEALTH’ Community members can get some exercise and pick up wellness information at Kenner’s 5K, Health Fair

HIGH SHOOL TEENS TOUR LEE JOB SITES 59th Ord. Brigade arranges Shadow Day opportunities for Thomas Dale students exploring career choices

SEE PAGES 8-9

SEE PAGE 2

SEE PAGE 5

SEE PAGE 6


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COMMENTARY | ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

Chesapeake Bay takes brunt of harmful storm drain runoff Daniel L. Ernesto

Environmental Engineer, DPW

Wolfgang K. Vogelbein/Virginia Institute of Marine Science

A massive algal bloom at the Monitor-Merrimack Bridge where Route 664 crosses the James River near Hampton Roads. Over-fertilization, animal-waste pollution, deforestation and erosion throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed all contribute to declining conditions in the bay and its tributaries. (Source: Phys.org, Aug. 2016)

Fortunately, efforts to protect the bay are paying off, but the work is still not finished. A good way for Team Lee members to help is maintaining awareness of illicit discharges into the storm-water sewer system. Home car washing, irresponsible dumping of trash and improper disposal of hazardous/toxic chemical substances all contribute to this problem.

Fort Lee

Commanding General ................... Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Hollie J. Martin Public Affairs Officer ............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor ...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments .......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor .................. Amy Perry Production Assistant............................... Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

Waste and sewage from recreational vehicles are among the more disturbing pollutants as well. As good stewards of the environment, Fort Lee maintains a permit issued by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality that enforces illicit discharge detection and elimination programs to prevent contamination of ground and surface water supplies through monitoring, inspection and

The Fort Lee Traveller is an authorized publication for members of the DOD, printed by Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee, Virginia. Contents of the Fort Lee Traveller are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee Public Affairs Office. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services advertised by the U.S. Army or Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc. Everything advertised in this publication will be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher will refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation has been corrected.

ON THE COVER

Sprawled across six states and covering more than 64,000 miles, the Chesapeake Bay watershed is the largest in America. Its network of more than 150 streams and rivers includes a Fort Lee neighbor, the Appomattox, which flows through Petersburg, Colonial Heights and Hopewell before dumping its contents into the James River, a direct tributary for the bay. Because of the proximity of the Appomattox, and the Chesapeake Bay itself, residents of the Tri-Cities and Fort Lee need to remain educated on actions they should take to keep the waterways clean and safe for inhabitants above and below the water as well as the greenery along its shores. Community members should be particularly concerned about issues like over-fertilization of green spaces, animal-waste pollution, wetland destruction for agriculture, and deforestation and erosion from new construction. These activities have resulted in declines and diseases among the marine population and sediment buildup that kills off needed aquatic grasses, which keep the bay clean and provide a habitat for wildlife.

removal. In other words, the best way to fix this problem is to report it so corrective action can be taken. Ways to identify a possible illicit discharge include the following: • Water flowing from a storm-water outfall pipe even though it has not rained for more than three days. • Smelling strange odors (i.e. sewage or gasoline) or seeing unusual colors in runoff water. • Spotting leaking chemical/paint/ cleanser containers in dumpsters or storage areas. Tips for reducing illicit storm-water discharges include the following: • Dispose of household chemicals/ paints at approved collection sites. • Follow label directions when using lawn fertilizers and pesticides (more is not always best). • Limit car washing to facilities that recycle waste water. • Keep yard waste out of the storm drains. • Pick up and properly dispose of pet waste. • Use recycling programs to divert trash from landfills. For more tips or to report a suspected illicit discharge, contact the Fort Lee Environmental Management Division at 804-734-3760 or 734-3772.

T. Anthony Bell

Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, signs a proclamation that declares the installation’s commitment to “building a culture of trust” during the kickoff ceremony for Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month Monday in Mifflin Hall. Watching are Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Perry III, CASCOM CSM; and Staff Sgt. Ilia BerriosCruz, CASCOM victim advocate. For more, see Page 3.


CASCOM hosts ‘data exchange days’ to explore unmanned resupply system

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y oDani

Johnson

CASCOM Public Affairs Officer

t During a firefight, the last thing that should be of concern is whether there is enough rammunition and medical supplies to last. t The Army Futures Command Sustainment Capabilities Development and Innovation eDirectorate, or CDID for short, along with the nMarine Corps Logistics Innovation Office is looking at ways to resupply troops downrange /when traditional methods may not be practical rdue to complicating factors. The Joint Tactical Autonomous Aerial -Resupply System Industry Data Exchange Days were held March 26-28 at Fort Lee to /establish a dialogue between military and industry experts to explore the realm of gpossibilities for future resupply missions sduring multi-domain operations. “The whole purpose of (the three-day tevent) was for us to inform industry partners what the requirements are in terms of concept m

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of operations, what we plan on using the system for and what are the operational requirements for large-scale ground combat operations, in terms of range, distance, the operational environment and threat,” said Maj. Harry Terzic, Air Team officer in charge, Requirements Development and Integration Branch, CDID. “We are going to get the feedback by meeting with each one of the vendors one-on-one and see if they can actually help us out with developing the system.” JTAARS is an unmanned platform that has three proposed systems – large, medium and small. The focus during this data exchange was for a medium-size platform. “We want this to be a category 3 UAS, which means it does not require a pilot and can operate on its own as long as we have a human controller in the loop,” said Terzic. “(We’ll) have a mission command center that can monitor this system, preprogram it

and basically launch from point A, deliver supplies to point B and return back to base.” The joint team is working toward a system to augment the existing logistics platform within a brigade combat team rather than replace it. “We want a sanity check on our requirements. What is in the realm of possibility with this new area?” said Master Gunnery Sgt. Chris Anson, Headquarters Marine Corps Logistics. “Drones are out there but not carrying payloads of 500-600 pounds. (JTAARS) is a good sounding board for our requirements and to hear what industry can provide.” Operations tempo in large-scale ground combat operations is extremely high, Terzic pointed out. Many quick response units carry only one day’s worth of supplies and they can quickly run low on essential items. JTAARS will be able to provide resupply multiple times a day regardless of terrain, weather or

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other limiting factors. “It has been proven that lightening the load on the back of the infantry Soldier or Marine increases their effectiveness,” Anson said. “JTAARS will allow small unit resupply especially in dirty, hot areas taking fire.” “Basically a routine resupply mission can turn into an emergency at any given time because of the high rate of operation,” Terzic elaborated. “So this system will be extremely beneficial to a ground commander.” “It is important for distributed operations since logistics is stretched thin as it is,” Anson further noted. “As we look at the future and distributed operations at the mass level, we need those connectors and this system also provides tactical flexibility to the commander to do what he or she sees fit with an air vehicle.” Over the next three years, CDID, as part of the Secretary of Defense-sponsored Joint Capability Technology Development office, will work on all three of the JTAARS platforms. The industry day gave the team another level of insight into whether a medium-sized system could be developed and what needs to be done to achieve that goal.

SAAPM observance begins with proclamation signing Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, speaks to the crowd gathered for the proclamation signing ceremony Monday in Mifflin Hall that officially kicked off the installation’s observance of Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month. This year’s theme is “Protecting Our People Protects Our Mission.” In that regard, Fogg said he wants to build a climate of trust in which victims can feel free to report acts of sexual misconduct. “One offense is too many,” he said. “We have to stand by each other, and continue to communicate with each other and make sure we have that spirit and culture of trust.” A slew of awareness, motivational and teambuilding events are planned throughout the month. They include Jumping for SHARP set for April 11, weather permitting, at Fort Pickett (details will be announced via LeeKey and the Fort Lee Facebook page). The Army Logistics University Color Me Teal Walk is planned for April 15, 6:30 a.m., starting in the ALU quad. A Garrison SHARP/BOSS Bowling activity will take place April 23 at TenStrike (see details in Calendar, Page 14).

Service w

d e n

T. Anthony Bell


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Easter Sunrise Service Set for April 21

Chaplain (Maj.) Nathan Witham, Army Logistics University chaplain, will be the featured speaker at Fort Lee’s Easter Sunrise Service April 21, 7-8 a.m., at Williams Stadium. The worship event is open to the public and all religious denominations are invited. The theme of the service will be “He Lives.” Music will be provided by a 392nd Army Band brass quintet and the Fort Lee Chapel Choirs. The designated offering will go to the Fort Lee Rock Solid Youth Ministry to assist in their programming and other mentoring activities. After the service, guests are invited to a continental breakfast at the event site. The alternate inclement weather location for the Sunrise Service is the Lee Theater, Mahone Avenue.

Lee to Recognize Community Volunteers

File Photo

Jay Ipson, a Holocaust Survivor and a co-founder of the Virginia Holocaust Museum, Richmond, speaks during a Holocaust Days of Remembrance observance several years ago in the Lee Theater. He is standing next to a photo of his parents who were forced to wear Jewish yellow stars by the Nazis in Lithuania. Ipson will be the guest speaker at this year’s observance set for April 18, 11:30 a.m., in the post theater.

Holocaust Remembrance set for April 18 at theater The Fort Lee community is invited to recognize Holocaust Remembrance Day with an observance April 18, 11:30 a.m., in the Lee Theater. Admission to the event is free and open to the public. The observance supports an annual eightday period called the Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust, which was designated by Congress to help citizens commemorate and draw lessons from one of the most tragic periods in European history when the Nazi regime murdered millions, many of them Jews, under the guise of ethnic cleansing. Jay Ipson, 83, a Holocaust survivor and cofounder and former executive director of the Virginia Holocaust Museum in Richmond, will be the featured speaker. Ipson and his family endured horrific experiences during the Holocaust in Lithuania. In 1941, the Nazis forced Ipson, then 6 years old, his parents and thousands of other Jews into the Kovno ghetto. In 1943, the three escaped and lived safely with a Polish-Catholic

family in their one room farmhouse for several months. His father feared, however, the Nazis could find them, so he dug a 9x12 chamber under a potato field in the nearby woods. For the next six months, the three lived undetected with nine other family members in this hiding place. When the Russians liberated Lithuania, they moved back to their original house for nearly two years. With the Russians creating new dangers for Jews in 1945, they escaped to the American zone of Germany. In 1947, Ipson and his parents arrived in Richmond. CASCOM, the Defense Contracting Management Agency and the Army Logistics University are the hosts for the observance. The theme this year is “Beyond Religious Boundaries: Learning from the Holocaust.” The event will include a special slide show entitled “Holocaust Days of Remembrance” created by 1st Sgt. Julia J. Etheridge, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, ALU Support Battalion, and a lead coordinator for

SEE HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE, page 11

Fort Lee’s annual Volunteer Appreciation Reception is set for April 18, 2-3:30 p.m., at Liberty Chapel, corner of Mahone and C avenues. The event will recognize volunteers and the organizations who support them. Certificates will be presented to people who have achieved gold and lifetime levels of volunteer service in 2018. For details, call Susan Loden at 804-734-9693.

Purple Up Day Features Free Treats for Kids

Children who wear purple while visiting any Army and Air Force Exchange Service restaurant April 13 will receive a free treat. The Exchange is celebrating Purple Up Day, a worldwide acknowledgement of the strength and sacrifice of military children during the Month of the Military Child. The offer is for any military dependent 18 years of age or younger while supplies last. For additional details, call 804-862-4542.

VHM Premieres ‘Battle of the Bulge’

The Virginia War Memorial will premiere the film “Battle of the Bulge” April 11, 6:30 p.m., at 621 South Belvidere St., Richmond. The film documents the struggles Virginia veterans encountered during this last major German offensive on the Western Front in December 1944. Pre-registration is required by visiting vawarmemorial.org/BOTB by April 5. For directions and VWM information, visit www.vawarmemorial.org.

Exchange Rolls Out Contests for Kids

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service and its vendor partners are sponsoring 11 sweepstakes featuring more than $20,000 in prizes to honor military kids during the Month of the Military Child. The prizes include $10,000 in scholarships. Parents can text “PURPLE” TO 89884 through April 30 for a chance to win one $5,000 grand prize and one of five $1,000 first prizes. For a list of all MOMC sweepstakes and how to enter any of the other nine contests through April 30 visit the Exchange Hub page on shopmyexchange.com. No purchase is necessary to enter or win.

Signup Underway for CISM Military Games

All-Army Sports is seeking track and field athletes to compete in the International Military Sports Council World Games set for China in October. U.S. Armed Forces will compete against the military of other countries. Primary considerations will be the 2016 Trial “A” standard with the CISM “B” standard also being considered for the team. View the standards at www.armymwr.com/programs-andservices/sports-and-fitness/all-army-sports. The deadline to apply is April 15 through the Army FMWR web address noted above.


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Rev up health, enjoy outdoors at Kenner Neon 5K, Health Fair Lesley Atkinson

KAHC Public Affairs Officer

Throw on your brightest tennis shoes and most gnarly colored running attire for Kenner Army Health Clinic’s 57th annual Neon 5K and Health Fair set for April 27, 8-11 a.m. Admission is free and open to everyone in the Fort Lee community, including dogs on leashes. This year’s theme is “Rev Up Your Health” and participants can start the day with the invigorating run/walk, mostly along the scenic trails of Petersburg National Battlefield Park. Throughout the morning, attendees also can browse the information booths at the health fair and mingle with the representatives of Kenner and various other customer service providers on site. There will be a blood drive for those who would like to “give the gift of life.” “The spring 5K and Health Fair is one of my favorite Kenner events,” said Lt. Col. Paul. J. Kassebaum, Kenner Army Health Clinic commander. “It’s gratifying to see so many families active together with young and old participating and some completing their first 5K ever. The Kenner staff put a

lot of enthusiasm into the health fair to be enjoyed by all. I hope to see a great turnout from the Fort Lee community.” All of the health fair activities will be located near the circle drive main entrance. Staff members from the Army Wellness Center will talk about their programs and KAHC staffers will discuss nutritional counseling, tobacco cessation, veterinary

clinic services and more. Children will have activities to include a bounce house. The Armed Services Blood Program out of Fort Bragg, N.C., will be directing the blood drive. Donors will receive a free T-shirt. The requirements for donating are 16 years of age or older, weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health. The officer in charge of the 2019 Kenner

event, Maj. Edward K. Osei, said he is excited about the opportunity to mingle and get to know members of the Fort Lee community. “The month of April is filled with many observances, notably, stress awareness, women’s health care, national mental health, suicide prevention and more,” Osei said. “I encourage families and friends to join us to celebrate a month of fitness and health. Wear your neon and run/walk to relieve stress, renew your mind, and rev up your health.” Certificates will be presented to the top overall male and female finishers as well as the top three in each age group, male and female. All children 10 and under who participate in the 5K will get a certificate of completion. Registration for the run/walk begins at 8 a.m., and the start time is 9 a.m. Participants from off post are reminded to use the Lee or Sisisky Avenue gates when coming to Fort Lee, as Mahone Avenue Gate does not open until 9 a.m., and the other ACPs are closed on weekends. In the event of inclement weather, updates on the status of the event will be posted to www.facebook. com/kenner.ftlee.

CASCOM troops honor President Tyler

Dani Johnson, CASCOM Public Affairs Officer

Brig. Gen. Douglas McBride Jr., Quartermaster General, and Command Sgt. Maj. Eric Vidal, QM Corps CSM, render a salute along with other military members in attendance at the President John Tyler wreath-laying ceremony March 29 in Richmond. Acting on behalf of the White House, the CASCOM representatives honored the 10th President of the United States with a ceremony at his gravesite in Hollywood Cemetery. Tyler was born on March 29, 1790, in Charles City County. Initially, the White House Military Office was responsible for coordinating the annual placement of presidential wreaths at the tombs and resting places of former presidents, other famous Americans and at certain memorials of historical significance. President Franklin D. Roosevelt started the practice of having military representatives stand in on his behalf at sites outside the Washington, D.C. area. Ceremonies that were repeated year-to-year led to the development of the “President’s Approved Wreath List” – made official by President Lyndon B. Johnson in August 1966 – and it is expanded with the passing of each former president.


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59th Ord. gives high schoolers an inside look at military life Amy Perry

Production/News Assistant Editor

Serving as lunch buddies, reading partners, meeters and greeters and more, troops from military organizations across Fort Lee are doing their part to promote public education in local-area schools. A “Genius Hour” and Job Shadow Day is among the latest endeavors involving Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 59th Ordnance Brigade, and its adopt-aschool partner Thomas Dale High. Genius Hour is a future-career-interest program that gives students an opportunity to attend special classes focused on activities that interest them. During the March 25 monthly session, 1st Lt. Casey Barnett, HHC’s executive officer, and other unit representatives presented “Leadership with a Twist,” a chat session focused on what it means to serve in the military and influence others as an officer or noncom. “I think these classes are worthwhile because they give students a different perspective and a broader learning experience,” Barnett said. “Regardless of whether they go to our leadership presentation or another teacher’s video game, dance or graphic design class, they are learning about new topics and career fields, and that can help them figure out what they would potentially like to pursue as an eventual career.” Working with high school students, Barnett further observed, is considerably different than volunteering at an elementary school. Success requires a different mindset. “It completely changes the dynamic of how and where you can assist,” he explained. “With an elementary school, you can have reading programs, activity days, lunch buddies, etc. For high school students, it is harder to get them interested in the activities. Elementary students come running as soon as they see you walking up,

Amy Perry

Samantha Slover, a junior at Thomas Dale High, and Marine Gunnery Sgt. Tavis McGregor, lead instructor for the Advanced Culinary Division, Joint Culinary Training Center, watch Marine Cpl. Nathaniel Lagoy, a student from Camp Hansen, Japan, prepare a sushi roll for an hors d’oeuvre exam. Slover shadowed McGregor March 26 as part of theThomas Dale High School Job Shadowing Day, when students chose to follow individuals in a career field they are interested in pursuing.

but high school students are more focused and you have to meet them where they are at. It usually takes quite a bit of coordination and preparation on both the school and the unit’s behalf.” Barnett and his team learned of the March 26 Job Shadow Day opportunity a bit late, but eager and cooperative installation partners quickly came on board to make Fort Lee worksites available. Students were able to shadow a culinary instructor, a chaplain and a military officer. “This was one of those happenstance moments when we attended (Thomas Dale’s) community meeting in hopes of becoming more involved in the school, and we learned they were struggling to find certain professions for some of the students,” Barnett said. “I knew Fort Lee had a lot of the career programs they were looking for and volunteered to help try to coordinate (Job Shadow Day outlets) for them. “The students definitely appreciated the opportunity,” he continued. “With it being so last minute, it was a bit rougher than I would have personally liked, but in reality, I think the students kind of appreciated it because it added a bit more realism to the experience. It was less of a ‘show’ put on to impress and recruit, and more of a window into what some of the professionals on Fort Lee have to do on a day-to-day basis. That is really what they were looking for. All in all, I think everyone who participated here did an exceptional job stepping up to the plate to help out.” Barnett said he’s already excited about next year’s event, seeing more lead time for coordination and planning as a boon to student participation. Kate Dunkum, a junior at Thomas Dale, expressed appreciation for Fort Lee and the 59th’s efforts. She shadowed a chaplain during her visit, and said she enjoyed the spiritual growth and support part of it, but wasn’t as keen about the “amount of paperwork that’s involved” in the career field. “I definitely enjoyed learning what military chaplains do on a daily basis,” she confirmed. “It’s definitely something I’m interested in pursuing in the future.”


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RECOGNIZING CIVILIANS | SPOTLIGHT

Kevin Grobarcik

Hometown: North Lauderdale, Fla. Length of federal service: 30 years Job title: Sling Load Branch Chief, Aerial Delivery and Field Services Department Job duties: “Coordinate and Conduct the Sling Load Inspector Certification Course at Fort Lee and around the world. Manage two teams to train military units on how to inspect cargo to be sling loaded prior to the aircraft arriving. I also do additional duties as assigned.” What do you love the most about your job? “The locations I visit and the people I work with.” What do you consider your greatest achievement? “When my son Casey was born.” Do you volunteer? “I’m a member of American Legion Post 2, and we do a lot for veterans. As the Post 2 American Legion Rider director, we support and conduct fundraising for the American Legion Legacy Foundation, which provides scholarships to families Amy Perry of veterans.” What do you expect from your leaders? “To be honest and What is your greatest fear? “Not accomplishing everything I set upfront.” out to do.” Where would you most like to live? “Somewhere in between a What is it that you most dislike? “People driving in the fast lane beach and mountains so you can have the best of both recreational on the highway and going 10 mph below the speed limit.” attractions.” What are your future aspirations? “To retire and travel this great When and where were you happiest? “When I met and married country of ours.” my wife Kim.” – Compiled by Amy Perry, Fort Lee Public Affairs

Do you have an outstanding co-worker (any government civilian or contractor) you would like to recommend for this Recognizing Civilians column? Send your recommendations, along with contact information for the individual, to armyfortlee.pao@mail.mil. Recognizing Civilians is published every other week in the Traveller, alternating with America’s Military.


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Fort Lee Military Youth of the Year Brittney Gardner teams up with Kaya Boyd to sing the national anthem during the opening ceremony for the parade.

Col. Hollie Martin, Fort Lee garrison commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. Vittorio DeSouza, garrison CSM, proudly display the Month of the Military Child banner as they lead the procession out of the Youth Center parking lot during Monday’s kickoff parade for the April observance on the CYS campus. Also pictured is Darrell Clay, director of Family and MWR at Fort Lee.

Photos by Patrick Buffett

Children of the Yorktown Child Development Center recite the Pledge of Allegiance as the opening ceremony gets underway for the Month of the Military Child kickoff parade Monday on the Child and Youth Services campus. The same youngsters were spotlighted in a special performance of “God Bless America” at the event.

Two-year-old London Morris waves her pompom in unison with other assembled youngsters as they await the start of the parade. London was accompanied by her mom, a Family Child Care provider on the installation.

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Staff Sgt. Jason Binde and Sgt. Matthew Compton perform as part of a 392nd Army Band brass quintet during the arrival of participants and guests for the parade. Other band members supporting the event were Sgt. Peter Schiller, Sgt. Melvin Cueras and Sgt. Michael Saias.

March for MOMC

Youngsters celebrate the joy of reading while taking part in the Month of the Military Child kickoff parade Monday along the housing area streets near the Child and Youth Services Campus. Representatives of the Fort Lee Community Library are marching directly behind the kids.

The long procession of youths, garrison leaders and local community guests stretches along Yorktown Drive as the Month of the Military Child kickoff parade comes close to completing its circuit around the CYS campus Monday. Organizers reminded participants in the event’s final moments that the second large-scale celebration of the observance, the MOMC Spring Fling, is set for Friday from 2:30-5 p.m., also on the CYS campus.

Brandi Dillon, a caregiver at Child Development Center Yorktown, laughs at the antics of her walking partners – Harlie, Riley and Shilo – as they make up a song that include the lines “one, two, buckle my shoe.”

With flashing lights and blasts from its distinctive air horn, an engine from the Fort Lee Fire Department served as the exciting lead vehicle for the Month of the Military Child kickoff parade Monday. Firefighters Clinton Vinup, Sean Rogers, Aaron Watts and John Culler were aboard the vehicle in support of the event.

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CASCOM Soldier lands spot as All Army assistant coach T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

A Fort Lee Soldier has been selected as an assistant coach for the All-Army Men’s Basketball Trial Camp that kicks off May 11 at Fort Hood, Texas. Sgt. 1st Class Ray Johnson, Headquarters and Headquarters Company CASCOM, will serve under head coach Capt. Carl Little who has led the program since 2013. Army has amassed an 18-3 win-loss record in Armed Forces Championship play. The team won silver in 2014 and gold in 2016 and 2017. As a former NCAA athlete, Johnson has been acknowledged as one of the Army’s best basketball players, earning invites to the service-wide tryout camps in 2004, 2006 and 2008. Deployments and familial obligations, however, always seemed to block his chances of representing the armed forces’ preeminent hoops program during its yearly spate of games. “Without a doubt, this new opportunity is a dream come true,” said the 15-year Soldier. “Just being selected amongst hundreds of applicants in the military who want to be a part of the All Army program is a huge achievement and honor. It checks a box for me because this is something I plan on doing when I retire.” While the 38-year-old admits to being “far removed” from his prime playing days, he’s confident about bringing the juice courtside. He has served as an assistant coach at Augusta State University in Augusta, Ga., and Indiana University Southeast in New Albany, Ind. He currently moonlights as a game day operations assistant at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. A native of Decatur, Ga., Johnson played at East Mississippi Junior College – featured in the Netflix docu-series “Last Chance U” – for two years. He then transferred to the University of Southern Miss, an NCAA Division I school. He played one year for the Golden Eagles before joining the Army in 2003.

As a Soldier, Johnson played for intramural teams for several years between deployments. Sustaining a broken fibula during a game in Guam five years ago, he recognized his playing days were numbered. “I told myself at that point, ‘Hey, it’s time to convert. You’re getting a little older; you’re getting a little slower.’” Coaching was a natural progression for the experienced player who had seen success at the high school and college levels. He described himself as having “an analytical mind” that is constantly breaking down strategies, player strengths and weaknesses, T. Anthony Bell and execution at critical game junctures. “Other people watch the game, but I would going for vacation?’ We’ll spend two or three record it, watch it through and after it’s over, weeks on vacation because of everything I get pen and paper and draw up plays,” he do throughout the year.” Thoughts of summer leisure are probably said. “I’ll look at how offenses execute plays and strategize ways to beat them.” Johnson said the biggest difference between playing and coaching is the ability to manage. “As a coach, you’re a leader,” he said. “You have to look at things as a player and as a coach. If you haven’t played at a certain level, it will be difficult to coach at that level. There are a lot of different aspects to coaching, but basically, there are a lot of meetings, a lot of watching film and telling players what’s good and bad about their game and whether or not they can play at a certain level.” Johnson said he has been diligent in not allowing his coaching obligations, no matter how considerable, to overshadow his responsibilities as a Soldier and family man. The balancing act has been tough, he noted, but a supportive family has allowed him a measure of flexibility. “If it wasn’t for my wife and children, there wouldn’t be much basketball,” he acknowledged. “I do try to concentrate on family, and sometimes I do miss out on things. The summer, however, is family time. My kids will say, ‘Dad, you’ve been doing this and that all year, so where are we

Sgt. 1st Class Ray Johnson, CASCOM G3/5/7, has been named as an assistant coach for the All Army Men’s Basketball Team. The team starts its trial camp May 11 at Fort Hood, Texas. The Army team is scheduled to play in the Armed Forces tourney June 1-9, at Naval Station Mayport, Fla.

the furthest thing from Johnson’s mind just weeks from hitting the camp hardwoods at Fort Hood. He is undoubtedly thinking Xs, Os and player talents as his fellow staffers approach the job of paring down the pool of roughly 75 hopefuls. In doing so, Johnson will join former Fort Lee Soldier and All Army basketball player Staff Sgt. Ron Bartley and other staff seeking to do their part in keeping traditional rival Air Force from unseating the champs during the Armed Forces tourney scheduled June 1-9 at Naval Station Mayport, Fla. “We want to win gold again,” said Johnson. “Coach Little has done a tremendous job with the program, and we’ll be there to support him with whatever he needs.”


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Pet of the Week

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DCMA photo by Thomas Perry t r g lDr. Lauranett Lee from the University of Richmond’s Jepson School of Leadership Studies speaks at gthe Defense Contract Management Agency Women’s History Month celebration here March 28. Among eher many accolades, Lee is the founding curator of African-American history at the Virginia Museum of

Observance focuses on Va. heroines

History and Culture. During the agency’s Equal Employment Opportunity office event, Lee highlighted many of Virginia’s historically significant women. Grace Arents, also known as the Angel of Oregon Hill, . was among those celebrated. According to the Library of Virginia, “she developed a special concern for h the plight of the local poor and on their behalf unselfishly made donations that were often unsolicited tand anonymous.” She also championed education and community-based buildings throughout her life.

HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE, the observance. The 392nd Army Band will provide music during the program. According to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Congress unanimously passed legislation in 1980 to establish the United States Holocaust Memorial Council, which oversees the museum. The council, which succeeded the President’s Commission on the Holocaust, was charged with carrying out the following recommendations: • That a national day of remembrance of victims of the Holocaust be established in perpetuity and be held annually.

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• That a living memorial be established to honor the victims and survivors of the Holocaust and to ensure the lessons of that period of history will be taught in perpetuity. • That an educational foundation be established to stimulate and support research in the teaching of the Holocaust. Additional historic information can be found at www.ushmm.org or www.vaholocaust.org. For further details on the Fort Lee observance, contact Etheridge at 804-765-8131 or alternate coordinator Julia Smith at julia.j.smith18. mil@mail.mil.

Ray Kozakewicz

Zeus, an American Mastiff male dog, is available for adoption at the Fort Lee Stray Animal Facility on 38th Street, near the Defense Commissary Agency Headquarters. He is six years old, weighs 108 pounds, loves affection and is friendly, microchipped and up-to-date on his rabies shots, according to his caretakers. He does not like cats and should have a fenced-in yard. There are no adoption fees for any animals at the facility. The shelter also has cats waiting for good homes. Volunteer help is always needed as well as donations of cat and dog food. For details, contact Officer Rob Moore, PMO animal control officer, at 804-721-9291.


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Installation honors eight retirees

Scott Block

The Fort Lee community celebrated the dedicated service of eight Soldiers during the bi-monthly installation retirement ceremony March 28 in Wylie Hall auditorium. The event was hosted by the Army Garrison headquarters.The retirees are Maj. Charlie A Cummings Sr., Headquarters and Headquarters Company, CASCOM; Master Sgt. Carroll R. Hopkins, U.S. Army Human Resources Command, Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall; Sgt. 1st Class Eugene C. Randolph, U.S. Army Recruiting Battalion, Richmond; SFC James B. Medina, U.S. Army Recruiting Bn. Raleigh, N.C.; SFC Douglas A. Dombkowski, 262nd Quartermaster Bn.; SFC Justin V. Betony, 262nd QM Bn.; Staff Sgt. Victor D. Hernandez, 16th Ordnance Bn.; and SSG Daniel Elliot, HHC, 704th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Infantry Bde. Combat Team, 4th Inf. Div., Fort Carson, Colo.

Contributed Photo Contributed Photo

Service with a smile

Bravo Company, 266th Quartermaster Battalion, Soldiers happily pose for a photo during a recent morning meal service that was part of QM Field Training Exercise rotation 19-17. The 7th platoon “Hulks” were the first to perform a newly introduced tactical field training element of the exercise. According to a post on the unit’s Facebook page, exercise leaders and instructors had “nothing but great things to say” about the 92G culinary arts specialists who kept their fellow Soldiers well fed. In addition, they reportedly did an outstanding job out on the round robin and STX lanes. Their motivation, discipline and team work earned accolades as the Task Force Command Team selected B Company as the QMFTX hero for rotations A and B.

Fort Lee Area Spouses’ Club makes Feed More contribution

Michelle Daniels, Fort Lee Area Spouses’ Club president, and Melissa Thompson, treasurer present a $500 check to Elaine Esposito of Feed More, a Richmond-based nonprofit organization that prepares and distributes food to low-income and unemployed individuals in the local area. It also operates a Meals on Wheels program for the elderly and homebound. The donation was presented at FLASC’s monthly luncheon two weeks ago in the Lee Club. The group raises money by operating the on-post Thrift Shop and organizing various fundraising activities throughout the year. Spouses interested in joining FLASC or participating in its next luncheon set for April 16 can find more info at www.facebook.com/fortleeareaspousesclub.


Under new policy, troops can seek voluntary alcohol-abuse healthcare Tanya Schusler Army Medicine

WASHINGTON – A new directive endorsed by Army Secretary Mark Esper on March 25 allows Soldiers to voluntarily seek alcoholrelated behavioral healthcare without being mandatorily enrolled in a substance abuse treatment program. This policy encourages troops to take personal responsibility and seek help earlier, thereby improving readiness by decreasing unnecessary enrollment and deployment limitations. The directive’s goal is for Soldiers to receive help for self-identified alcohol-related behavioral health problems before they result in mandatory treatment enrollment, deployment restrictions, command notification and a potentially negative career impact. “This is a huge historical policy change that will address a longstanding barrier to Soldiers engaging in alcohol-related treatment,”

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observed Jill M. Londagin, director of the Army Substance Use Disorder Clinical Care Program. “Alcohol is, by far, the most abused substance in the Army. Approximately 22 percent of Soldiers report problematic alcohol use on Post Deployment Health Reassessments. “However, less than two percent receive substance abuse treatment,” she emphasized. “This is due, in part, because historic DOD and Army substance abuse treatment policies and practices discouraged Soldiers from selfreferring for alcohol abuse care.” Substance Use Disorder Clinical Care providers are now co-located with Embedded Behavioral Health teams across the Army. “This integration into our EBH teams allows for more seamless, holistic, far-forward care than we have ever been able to provide in the past,” said Dr. Jamie Moore, the service’s EBH director. The directive creates two tracks for SEE New army policy, page 15

Graphic by Rebecca Westfall, Army Medicine

Soldiers can voluntarily seek alcohol-related behavioral healthcare without being mandatorily enrolled in a substance abuse treatment program.This policy encourages individuals to take personal responsibility and seek help earlier, thereby improving readiness by decreasing unnecessary enrollment and deployment limitations.


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Final Fur Tourney | April 5

The Science Museum of Virginia Rat Basketball Association will hold its 11th annual Final Fur Tournament April 5, 6 and 7 p.m., at 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. During the Science After Dark program, trained female Norway Rats pick up a small plastic ball and put it through a simulated basketball hoop. Participants also can make a basketball net, shoot hoops in mini-basketball competitions and more. The museum opens at 5 p.m. There are admission discounts for military members. For further details, visit www.smv.org.

Rain Barrel Workshop | April 6

April 27, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., at Appomattox Riverside Park, 24909 Ferndale Road, Petersburg. The free event is a day of family fun to inL OCAL A CTIVITIES FOR THE F ORT L EE C OMMUNITY clude fishing, kayaking, hiking, music, food and dozens of educational exhibits and ven7 p.m., at Poplar Forest Plantation in Nelson The Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers dors. For other details, visit folar-va.org. County. Easter Extravaganza is scheduled for April 20, The event will include revelry, a champagne 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., on the Lee Club lawn. Signup Underway for Men’s toast, cake reception and remarks by “Mr. JefThe free event includes an Easter egg hunt Retreat | May 3-5 ferson.” The Sons of Liberty will provide 18th for children up to 12 years old, the Easter BunFort Lee Protestant Men of the Chapel will century dance tunes on violins and fiddles. ny and more. Families should arrive by noon hold a free Christian non-denominational The plantation is located at 1542 Bateman to participate in the hunt. faith-centered men’s retreat and study May 3-5 Bridge Road, Forest. For more information, call 804-765-7651. at the Williamsburg Christian Retreat Center. For other details, call 434-534-8120 or visit The event will be based on “The Purpose Hopewell Craft Beer Festival | poplarforest.org. Driven Life” book by Rick Warren. The retreat

A rain barrel workshop is set for April 6, 10 John Tyler Career Fair | April 15

a.m. - noon, at the Chesterfield County Fairgrounds, 10300 Courthouse Road. Participants will learn how to build a customized rain barrel, the cost-saving benefits and more. The cost is $40. A class also is scheduled for June 15. To register, visit www.eventbrite.com.

Military Brat Patch Available | April 6

A Skilled Trades Career fair will be held April 15, 4-7 p.m., at John Tyler Community College, Moyar Hall, 1st floor, 13101 Jefferson Davis Highway, Chester. Approximately 30 employers will be on hand to meet with participants and share current job openings. For additional details, visit www.jtcc.edu/news.

Bowling Event Signup Deadline | In recognition of the Month of the Military April 15

Child observance, the Army and Air Force Exchange Service will hand out free iron-on “military brat” patches to Fort Lee community children April 6, 10 a.m., in the Toy Department at the Main Exchange. The event will continue for as long as supplies last. Eligibility is limited to those 17 years old and younger. For additional information, call 804-861-5970.

The signup deadline is April 15 for a children’s bowling event set for April 23, 4-6 p.m., at the TenStrike Bowling and Entertainment Center, 2403 C Ave. The hosts are Fort Lee Survivor Outreach Services and Exceptional Family Member Program. The free event is in recognition of Month of the Military Child. Pizza will be served to all. RSVP to SOS at 804-734-6445 or 734-6446 and to EFMP at 734-7965 or 734-6393.

‘Pinocchio’ at Children’s Theatre | SAAPM Bowling Registration | April 6-7 The Virginia Repertory Theatre presents April 19 “Pinocchio” April 6-7, 2 p.m. in the Children’s Theatre at Willow Lawn, 1601 Willow Lawn Drive, Richmond. “Pinocchio” is the classic tale of Geppetto’s little wooden puppet whose only wish is to be a real boy. The one-hour play is recommended for ages four and older. Additional shows are set for weekends through May 5. For more details and tickets, visit www.virginiarep.org.

Thomas Jefferson Celebration | April 13

The signup deadline for a Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month bowling event is April 19. The “Strike Out Sexual Misconduct” gathering is set for April 23, 1-3 p.m., at the TenStrike Bowling and Entertainment Center, 2403 C Ave. It is sponsored by the garrison SHARP office and Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers. The cost is $5.75 per person. For further details, email lauren.p.barboza. civ@mail.mil or michael.k.edwards21.mil@ mail.mil.

Thomas Jefferson’s 276th birthday will BOSS Easter Extravaganza | be celebrated with an evening ball April 13, April 20

April 20

The 4th annual Wonder City Craft Beer Festival will be held April 20, noon - 6 p.m., 403 Appomattox St., Hopewell. Admission is free. More than 30 craft beer makers will participate. Food trucks, live music and children’s activities also will be available throughout the day. Outside food and drink are prohibited. For additional details, visit www.wondercitybeerfest.com or call 1-800-863-8687.

will include group lessons, kettle corn/movie night, teambuilding activities, zip line and tree climbing. The sessions begin 4 p.m., May 3, and conclude at noon, May 5. For registration and details, contact Joel Sinks at fortleepmomc@gmail.com or 804926-1947.

Trans. Corps ACFT Challenge | May 7

Col. Jered Helwig, Chief of Transporta-

Lee Club Easter Brunch | April 21 tion, will host an Army Combat Fitness TestThe Lee Club will host its annual Easter Brunch April 21, 1 p.m. Reservations are required by April 17, but sooner is better because seats fill up fast. The cost is $26.95 per adult; $13.95 per child, ages 3-10; and free for kids 2 and under. The brunch will feature chicken Shenandoah, carved ham, steamed pork buns, stuffed flounder, custom Belgium waffles, an omelet station, gourmet desserts and more. For further details, call 804-734-7547 or 734-7541.

Rescheduled Canvas, Corks Event | April 27

inspired competition May 7, 5-7 a.m., at the Strength Performance Center, 6th St. The ACFT Challenge will be comprised of 3 events – Deadlift and Run, Sprint-DragCarry and Push and Pull. It is open to all active duty military members and DOD Civilians. Only 16 two-man teams will be able to compete, so immediate sign up is recommended. Medals will be awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place for each event. To register, visit https:// transportation.army.mil. For more info, contact Sgt. 1st Class Clifford Kurten at 804-765-7446.

Free Homebuyers Course | May 9

The Virginia Housing Development Authority will hold a free First Time Homebuyers Workshop May 9, 8:30 a.m. - 3 p.m., in room 102A of the Soldier Support Center, building 3400, 1401 B Ave. Participants will learn about personal finance, credit issues, qualifying and applying for a loan, how to receive a first-time homebuyers closing grant and more. The workshop is open to active duty military and spouses, reservists, National Guardsmen, veterans, DOD FOLAR Riverfest | April 27 Civilians and their spouses. The Friends of the Lower Appomattox RivFor registration and details, visit www.vhda. er will present its annual Riverfest celebration com or call 804-765-3862. The 2nd Canvas and Cork painting workshop has been rescheduled to April 27, 4-7 p.m., in the TenStrike Bowling and Entertainment Center, 2403 C Ave. Hosted by the Picture Perfect Frame Shop, the workshop includes wine tastings, light hors d’oeuvres and guidance from trained artists. Registration is required by April 22. The cost is $35 per person. For further details, call 804-734-6137.

For more installation and outside the gate events and activities, visit our online calendar at www.fortleetraveller.com/calendar


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NEW ARMY POLICY, continued from page 13

substance abuse care: voluntary and mandatory. Soldiers can self-refer for voluntary alcohol-related behavioral healthcare, which does not render them non-deployable and doesn’t require command notification like the mandatory treatment track does. Soldiers are entered into mandatory disorder treatment if a substance use-related incident occurs, such as a driving under the influence infraction. Under the voluntary care track, treatment is not tied to a punitive process and is a choice a Soldier can make before a career impacting event occurs. Soldiers in the voluntary care track may discontinue it at any time and can choose to reenter care at any time.

The treatment process begins when a Soldier notices signs of alcohol misuse, which may include frequently drinking in excess; engaging in risky behavior, such as drunk driving; lying about the extent of one’s alcohol use; and memory impairment or poor decision-making. Next, the Soldier self-refers to Behavioral Health for an evaluation. The provider and the Soldier will then develop a treatment plan directed at the Soldier’s goals. The length of treatment will be based on the individual and his or her symptoms. HIPPA privacy laws require that Soldiers’ BH treatment remains private unless it meets the command notification requirements in DoDI 6490.08, such as harm to self, harm to others, acute medical conditions interfering with duty

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or inpatient care. “Only those enrolled in mandatory substance abuse treatment are considered to be in a formal treatment program,” Londagin said. “Self-referrals that are seen under voluntary care are treated in the same manner as all other behavioral health care.” The previous version of the substance abuse treatment policy, Army Regulation 600-85 (reference 1f), required all Soldiers to be formally enrolled in a substance abuse treatment program just to seek assistance, which discouraged Soldiers from seeking help early. “The policy also limited the number of enrollments permitted during a Soldier’s career, possibly preventing someone from seeking more support at a later date without

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risk of administrative separation,” Londagin said. During a pilot phase, 5,892 Soldiers voluntarily received alcohol-related behavioral health care without enrollment in mandatory substance abuse treatment, according to Londagin. “This supports our efforts to provide early treatment to Soldiers prior to an alcohol-related incident and has led to a 34-percent reduction in the deployment ineligibility of Soldiers receiving care. “Early intervention for alcohol-related behavioral health care increases the health and readiness of our force,” Londagin further reiterated, “and provides a pathway for Soldiers to seek care without career implications.”


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Fort Lee Traveller | April 4, 2019  

Fort Lee Traveller | April 4, 2019