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Tornado Drill: Exercise set for March 19; Team Lee members asked to respond as if it’s a real emergency SEE PAGe 5

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

March 14, 2019 | Vol. 79, No. 11

Artists at Work 44th Joint Culinary Training Exercise showcases talents of teams, individuals

SEE PAGES 3, 8-9 DMV GRAND OPENING DRAWS HOUSE SPEAKER, VA SENATOR Officials say new branch location in Soldier Support Center will better serve patrons and show the state’s commitment to supporting the military community

WHM EVENT SET FOR MARCH 21 Lee Theater program to feature poetry readings, music, guest remarks by retired Lt. Gen. Gainey

AGENCY HONORS HOF INDUCTEES Aerial Delivery, Field Services Dept. inducts 7 riggers into its newly named hall of fame

LEADERS SHARE ACTION PLAN Tenant bill of rights, quality control checks among cited fixes for Army housing issues

SEE PAGe 7

SEE PAGe 4

SEE PAGe 10

SEE PAGe 12


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commAnD sPotliGHt | Stopping SeXUAl ASSAUlt, SUiCiDe

Senior leaders tell troops, ‘don’t be a bystander’ As members of the United States Army, each of us has an obligation to promote a climate of trust – our profession’s bedrock – throughout every organization. The way we do this is by living the Army Values: loyalty, duty, respect, selfless service, honor, integrity and personal courage. From the newest Soldiers in basic training to our most senior leaders, these traits bind us together as a profession. While much is changing for the Army right now, our values will not. They are enduring and remain as relevant today as they were when first created. When it comes to living the Army Values, there can be no bystanders. Across the Total Army, we continue to focus on eradicating sexual harassment and sexual assault from our ranks. We must do everything within our power to rid the Army of these crimes. This is a readiness issue that affects our ability to accomplish the mission. Over the past several years, we have placed a high priority on our prevention efforts, and although we are on the right trajectory, we still have significant room to improve.

In all components, sexual assault reporting is increasing, which is an indication our uniformed personnel trust their leaders to address the situation in a professional manner. We all have a responsibility to look out for one another – there can be no bystanders. Stay alert when the warning signs become present, and if you see something, ACT! Leaders and Soldiers have an ethical obligation to intervene and stop sexual harassment and sexual assault from happening. Those who do not, violate the nation’s trust and that of their peers. The Army will continue to improve the effectiveness of its prevention efforts moving forward. In April, we will co-lead a Joint SHARP Conference hosted by the military service academies that will bring together college and university leaders from across the country to share best practices. As our society wrestles with this difficult problem, the Army will continue to take a leading role in developing solutions. This starts by ensuring that the perpetrators of sexual harassment and assault are held accountable and the vic-

U.S. Army Photo

U.S. Army Photo

tims are protected without fear of retribution. Throughout the force, we also must continue to focus on preventing suicides. Although self-inflicted deaths fell by 1.3 percent across the Total Army in 2018, active Army suicides increased by a troubling 18 percent. Our most vulnerable population consists of junior Soldiers. Leaders and teammates must watch attentively for suicide indicators and inform their chains of command when they know trouble is on the horizon. Every loss of life from suicide is a tragedy that could have been prevented. Our NCOs are the first line of defense – we expect you to know your Soldiers, visit them in the barracks, and provide them the care and assistance they need and deserve.

We’re counting on each of you to help solve these problems. Every instance of sexual assault or suicide has a moment when someone could have intervened to change the outcome. Have the courage to stand up and act when you see something wrong. Seize the opportunity to get your teammate help or to remove your battle buddy from the environment when warning signs become present. We need everyone on this team to be ready to fight when called upon, which can only happen if we look out for one another. Let us all reaffirm our commitment to our values and to one another. In doing so, we will remain the strongest Army on the face of the earth. – Mark T. Esper, Secretary of the Army; Gen. Mark A. Milley, Chief of Staff

Picking up poo among ‘doodies’ of dog ownership on and off base lisa smith molinari

blue-skied day. A bit of fresh air and sun does stout English Lab kisser. I sip my travel mug However, our mutual bliss is inevitably wonders for my soul during these long, chilly of coffee, communing with nature and my interrupted by a main goal of our outing — There’s nothing that fights winter mel- months. Moby trots happily a leash-length trusty canine companion. getting Moby to do his business. As he does ancholy like a brisk dog walk on a brilliant ahead of me, his tongue wagging below a Life is good. SEE Poo PATrol, page 13

Fort Lee

Commanding General ................... Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Hollie J. Martin Public Affairs Officer ............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor ...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments .......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor .................. Amy Perry Production Assistant............................... Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

The Fort Lee Traveller is an authorized publication for members of the DOD, printed by Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee, Virginia. Contents of the Fort Lee Traveller are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee Public Affairs Office. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services advertised by the U.S. Army or Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc. Everything advertised in this publication will be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher will refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation has been corrected.

on tHe coVer

Contributing Writer

Dani Johnson Sgt. Nickesha Carmichael, representing Fort Drum, N.Y., decorates a cake while vying for the Pastry Chef of the Year title Saturday at the Joint Culinary Training Exercise. The MacLaughlin Fitness Center event wraps up today. The exercise is showcasing the talents of more than 200 military chefs, including members of three international teams. For more, see Pages 3, 8-9.


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Chef of Year a shining start to annual Culinary Exercise T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

Chefs decked out in aprons and toques hustling about the kitchen. The sizzle of meat as it comes into contact with a hot skillet. A symphony of aromas permeating the classroom kitchens and beyond. All of these sight, sounds and smells – accented by the spice of pure professionalism – signaled the start of the Joint Culinary Training Exercise, the Quartermaster School’s long-running, omulti-layered showcase of the military food service profession. This year’s feast for the senses attracted more than 200 personnel from each of the five uniformed services representing installations all over the world, as well as a contingent of international participants. The JCTE’s marquee event, Armed Forces Chef of the Year, kicked off the training agenda Friday at Fort Lee’s Joint Culinary Training Center. AFCOY requires military personnel to prepare a four-course meal in four hours with the help of an apprentice. Sounds simple, right? Not so much. The main ingredients for the meal are not revealed to participants until a few minutes before start time. The mystery basket, as it is called, requires contestants to demonstrate composure and creativity in using what is provided along with the ability to think quickly. Staff Sgt. Carlos Mercado from Fort Campbell, Ky., was among the 19 culinarians who fired up stoves for the occasion. “This event is awesome,” said the culinary specialist who has prior experience at the JCTE. “Just to see all my battle buddies here from every branch of the military … and it’s just amazing to see the craft and the skills we all have. We’re sisters and brothers with two jobs: protecting the country and feeding our Soldiers.” Mercado sees AFCOY as an exercise in quick decision mak3ing and efficient execution of required tasks. Second-guessing and slipups can turn the best laid plans into chaos. “You never know what they’re going to throw at you,” he said. “You can plan ahead, but you never know.” When the surprise ingredients were all laid on the table, so to speak, Mercado said he kept the menu basic – cilantro rice with roasted pork, red wine sauce and sautéed vegetables for his entre and bread pudding with fruit coulis for dessert. “I’m a simple man,” he said, smiling. “I just cook.” A heavily emphasized point about AFCOY is that it’s not merely a contest but more of a culmination exercise requiring participants to bring with them everything learned as culinarians – from the management techniques gleaned over the years of preparing meals for large groups to the intricate knife-cutting skills required for special events – along with the ability to push

Photos by T. Anthony Bell

(ABOVE) Staff Sgt. Daniela Marquez, a member of the Fort Bliss, Texas, culinary team, prepares one of her dishes for the Armed Forces Chef of the Year category of the 44th Joint Culinary Training Exercise. The opening event took place Friday in the classroom kitchens of the Joint Culinary Training Center. The exercise continued through the week, wrapping up today, at the MacLaughlin Fitness Center. (BELOW) With very little time remaining to complete his meals, Staff Sgt. Carlos Mercado rushes from a utensil rack to the stove during the Chef of the Year event Friday. Mercado participated with the Fort Campbell, Ky., culinary team.

through the intangibles that make the event challenging and competitive. That’s what attracted participants like Sgt. Daniela Marquez, a member of the Fort Bliss, Texas, culinary team. “I wanted the challenge and a new experience,” she confirmed. Marquez competed in another capacity at the JCTE two years ago, and with various experiences under her belt, felt sufficiently confident to enter the signature event. She began training five months ago.

“It was more challenging,” she said of the actual competition. “I thought it was going to be a little easier.” She struggled with the mystery basket but received assistance and support from judges. JCTE is unique because of its sanctioning by the American Culinary Federation and the squad of experts from that organization who serve as mentors and teachers at the event, providing participants with thorough critiques after each cooking session. Appreciating the emphasis on camaraderie and creativity, event mainstays that foster the interactive experience, Marquez confirmed the positive outcome for her was the opportunity to gain knowledge and skills from the AFCOY heat. “It was worth it,” she said of her preparation and event participation. “It was a good experience. I don’t think a lot people want to compete for this event, or take the time to train for it, but it was worth what I got from it.” The same can be said for the apprentices assigned to each of the chefs. They can gain just as much as the participants fetching ingredients, preparing cooking areas and test-tasting the creations. Pfc. Tahandra Honore, the apprentice for Mercado, did not downplay her second-fiddle role, saying it is an experience that pays dividends. “I feel like sometimes you have to be a follower before you can be a leader,” she observed. “A lot of people see apprentices as a ‘do-boy’ or ‘do-girl,’ but it’s a great opportunity and a way to get your name out there. If you don’t know how to be an apprentice, how can you know what it takes to be a chef?” Honore, who is assigned to a dining facility at Fort Campbell, said one of the most important lessons she learned was time management and making quick decisions. “The DFAC has a much slower pace,” she said. “You have a lot more time for people to work with you on things. Here, there’s a much faster pace, but you just have to figure it out. Something goes wrong, just figure it out.” Honore has plans to become certified through the ACF. To that end, the foundation provides various credentialing opportunities for all food service personnel to pursue at their home stations; a point it actively promotes at the training exercise. The final results for AFCOY will not be known until the awards ceremony set for Friday at the Lee Theater. Sgt. 1st Class Stephen Behr from Fort Carson, Colo., was last year’s AFCOY gold medalist. In addition to the award hardware for each of the JCTE’s competitive categories, participants are afforded the opportunity to earn spots on the Army Culinary Arts Team, which represents the U.S. Armed Forces in events such as the Culinary Olympics held in Germany. The Quartermaster School’s Joint Culinary Center of Excellence administers the JCTE. It was established in 1973.


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PX Outdoor Living Area Opens March 30

A grand opening celebration for the Outdoor Living department at the Fort Lee Exchange is set for March 30, noon, inside the store. All eligible shoppers are invited to this family friendly event. There will be giveaways, food samplings, a grill demo, kid’s activities and more. For additional updates, visit www.facebook.com/LeeExchange.

Vietnam War Commemoration Set for March 29

The Freedom Support Center welcomes Fort Lee community members to attend its 50th Anniversary Commemoration of the Vietnam War March 29, 2 p.m., at 32 W. Washington St., Petersburg. The event will honor and thank Vietnam-era veterans and those who made the ultimate sacrifice during the conflict that stretched from Nov. 1, 1955 to May 15, 1975. For more information, call 804-451-0205 or email avincent@petersburg-va.org. Contributed Photos

(LEFT) Retired Lt. Gen. Kathleen M. Gainey, former deputy commander of the U.S. Transportation Command, Scott Air Force Base, Ill., will be the guest speaker at Fort Lee’s Women’s History Month observance set for March 21. (RIGHT) Members of the 59th Ordnance Brigade perform a historical vignette during the 2018 Women’s History Month observance at the Lee Theater. This year’s event will feature a poetry reading and music performed by advanced individual training students.

Lee Women’s History Month observance set for March 21 Community members are invited to a Women’s History Month observance set for March 21, 11:30 a.m., at the Lee Theater. Retired Lt. Gen. Kathleen M. Gainey, former deputy commander, U.S. Transportation Command, Scott Air Force Base, Ill., will be the guest speaker. The 2019 national theme for the observance is “Visionary Women: Champions of Peace and Nonviolence.” The hosts of the Lee program are CASCOM and the 23rd Ordnance Brigade. The 392nd Army Band will perform. Gainey retired in 2013 after completing over 35 years of service. Her active-duty career started in 1978 when she graduated from the ROTC program at Old Dominion University and received a bachelor of science degree in special education. The Army Sustainment officer’s resume of top assignments includes command of the 5th Heavy Boat Company, Ford Island, Hawaii; 6th Transportation Battalion, Joint Base Langley-Eustis; 7th Corps Support Group, Bamberg, Germany; Defense Distribution Center, New Cumberland, Pa.; and commanding general, Surface Deployment and Distribution

Command, headquartered at Scott Air Force Base. In addition, Gainey served in the following capacities: chief, Container Freight Branch, Military Ocean Terminal Bay Area, Oakland, Calif.; program analyst, U.S. Armament, Munitions and Chemical Command, Rock Island, Ill.; executive officer, 2nd Area Support Group, 22nd Support Command; S-2/S3, 702nd Transportation Battalion, Saudi Arabia; Division Transportation Officer, 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized), Fort Stewart, Ga.; and special assistant to the Army Chief of Staff, Washington, D.C. Following her military career, Gainey moved to Arlington with her husband, retired Brig. Gen. Edward Donnely and became senior vice president for logistics, Cypress International. The couple now lives in Ashville, N.C. Also scheduled for the March 21 observance is a poetry reading by privates Rode Alexis and Tori Hart, Golf Company, 244th Quartermaster Battalion; and a choir performance by Take 4 Quartet, a group of Fort Lee Soldiers. Pvt. SEE women’s history month, page 15

Over $17K in Prizes Up for Grabs

Authorized Army and Air Force Exchange Service shoppers can rake in some big prizes, with a total cash value of more than $17,000, by submitting entries in any of three ongoing contests. In the Trolli Sweepstakes through 11:59 p.m., March 21, three people will receive a basketball autographed by NBA All-Star James Harden of the Houston Rockets. Each prize is valued at $500. Winners will be notified by April 15. In the Bose Soundsport Wireless Headphones Sweepstakes through March 31, five winners will receive a pair of wireless headphones – each valued at $249 – plus a $100 Exchange gift card. Winners will be contacted by April 15. In the Monster Energy KHS Mountain Bike Sweepstakes through April 30, 20 grand-prize winners will each receive a mountain bike valued at $614, plus a bike helmet. Thirty second-prize winners will each receive a bike helmet, valued at $75. Winners will be notified by May 17. To enter any of the sweepstakes, visit shopmyexchange.com/sweepstakes. No purchase is necessary to enter or win.

County Agency Conducts Diaper Drive

Chesterfield-Colonial Heights Families First, a program of Chesterfield County’s Department of Mental Health Support Services, is holding a diaper drive this month to assist its enrolled families. All Chesterfield County public libraries will accept unopened packages of regular and pullup diapers as well as diaper wipes during regular business hours. For library locations and hours, visit library.chesterfield.gov/ or call 804-751-2275.

Pamplin Launches Photo Contest

Pamplin Historical Park and The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier has launched a 25th Anniversary Photo Contest through May 10. The contest is open to U.S. residents, age 18 and older. The photographs must be presented in digital format and depict exterior locations at PHP during the contest period. Prizes will be awarded. For other details, visit, pamplinpark.org or call 804-861-2408.

Exchange HUB Offers Store Info, Events, More

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service continues to expand its online Hub, shopmyexchange.com/community, with resources for the military community and robust information for veterans. The simple-to-navigate source of information includes news about installation-wide events and activities; military family resources; a BE Fit page; a Careers tab and more. It also includes Chef Shop and Beauty Bar tabs with recipe and personal care information.


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Team Lee to join March 19 tornado drill; DPTMS emphasizes planning, proactivity Patrick Buffett Managing Editor

“We’ll worry about it when it gets here, if it ever happens.” That’s typically the mindset of most of the American populace when it’s suggested they prepare for natural disasters during the education and awareness campaigns that occur throughout the year. Convenient excuses like “I’m too busy at work” and over exaggerated statements along the lines of “how many times do we need to do this?” are the equally common roadblocks to the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s goal of ensuring community members have done everything possible to ready themselves for the quite-real threats of mother nature. “You would think it would be different in a military community where readiness and resilience are daily used terms,” observed Thomas Loden, installation emergency manager for the Fort Lee Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security. “However, I can say with 100 percent confidence that as prepared as we are, we still have the need to improve. It’s every leaders responsibility to keep the awareness and action campaigns going. Every gain we’re able to make could mean one less family struggling for help in a devastating situation because they did nothing to prepare.” With that thought in mind, Loden shared details of the installation-wide tornado drill set for March 19, starting at 9:45 a.m. Similar exercises will be conducted simultaneously in communities throughout Virginia. Team Lee members will be notified the event is underway through emergency communication channels, including post-wide email, the AtHoc message system, and the “big voice” outdoor speaker system. The announcements will be preceded by the words “test, test, test.” “As soon as the announcement is made, community members should respond in the same manner as an actual tornado warning,” Loden noted. “Go to the designated shelter-in-place location. Discuss the response plan. Anything that’s proactive in this area will put participants in a better position to deal with an actual emergency. “Keep in mind also, this is an all-encompassing preparedness drill … everyone needs to participate, including family housing occupants and those engaged in administrative activities,” he added. Individuals who take emergency drills seriously are more

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likely to follow up with well-thought-out response plans that enable them to react quickly and decrease potential harm to themselves, their coworkers or their families, according to FEMA. The agency recommends that exercise participants be particularly mindful of anything that would hinder their response time or capability. Small details like checking the location and contents of emergency response and first aid kits is considered an essential element of these rehearsal drills. “Above all, don’t accept complacency,” Loden advised. “Knowing what to do before, during and after a devastating weather event can save lives.” According to statistics found online, more than 991 tornadoes touched down across the United States last year. Nineteen occurred in Virginia, ten of them kicked up by the remnants of September’s Hurricane Florence that caused massive damage and flooding along coastal areas in North Carolina. A nearby Chesterfield County worker was killed in a building collapse caused by one of the storms. A series of seven confirmed tornadoes spawned by the remnants of Tropical Storm Michael in October caused five deaths – all as the result of massive flooding. “Hopefully, everyone will key-in on not only the immediacy of

these accounts, but also the proximity and timing,” Loden observed. “There should be no question about the likelihood of tornadoes in this area or why emergency awareness and rehearsal are essential during this time of the year. As a team, we have to be prepared – that’s an undisputable fact.” Loden shared the following tornado awareness tips and safety reminders that Fort Lee community members should keep in mind: • Know the terms – a watch means weather conditions are favorable for the formation of a tornado; a warning means one has been sighted or is forming according to Doppler radar. The best time to take action is when the weather watch is issued. Warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property, and individuals should be moving to a location that offers greater protection such as a basement, storm cellar or an interior room without windows like a closet, hallway or bathroom. • Know your community’s warning network – at Fort Lee it includes the “big voice” outdoor speaker system, internal voice alarms in many administrative buildings, the ArmyFortLee Facebook page, and the AtHoc message system (a replacement ALERT system is coming; an article about the switchover will be presented in a near-future edition of the Traveller). • Get a kit – with careful thought, it will be useful regardless of the hazard. Just plan for what you or your family would need if basic services like electricity and water were not available for several days, and running out to the store, bank or gas station was not an option. For a checklist of recommended preparedness kit items, visit www.ready.gov. • Make a plan – do you know where to go if told to take shelter? Can the area be improved to increase its utility and decrease the potential of injury? Does everyone in the office/home know where the emergency supplies are kept? Who is going to remove/secure outdoor items to keep them from becoming projectiles? Is there a plan to account for all personnel/family members after the storm? These are just a few of the questions a good response plan should answer. • Be informed – knowing what to do before, during and after an emergency is a critical part of being prepared and may make all the difference when seconds count. Use rehearsal drills to improve response times and increase awareness of potential problems. Understand the threat and pay attention to important details like evacuation routes and the location of community shelters. Emergency preparedness is both concrete actions and a state of mind.


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Americas Military | Spotlight

Pfc. Gino Jin

(Editor’s note: This week’s Soldier is among the more than 200 military personnel who traveled here for the 44th Joint Culinary Training Exercise. Jin competed individually in the Student Chef of the Year category and as a member of Team Alaska.) Unit: 17th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, Joint Base Elemendorf-Richardson, Alaska Military occupational specialty: 92G – culinary specialist Age: 20 Hometown: Sheboygan, Wis. Time in service: one year Personality strengths: “Friendly and always willing to listen.” Personality weaknesses: “Not taking ‘No,’ as an answer.” Pastimes: “Normal teenager stuff – video games, etc. Here and there, I’ll go to the (food service) lab and cook something; try something new.” Worst fear: “Someone saying the food is bad or disgusting.” Favorite culinary dish: “I’m still looking for it.” What you believe in: “That everything happens for a reason.” If you could be anywhere doing anything right now … “I would be in the kitchen testing out something new.” The values you were reared with: “Respect others like you want to be respected; always be willing to listen; always be willing to learn; and work hard.” One person you most admire: “My dad, I guess. My parents are divorced, so I lived with him growing up.” Your aspirations in the culinary arts: “Eventually, I want to open up a restaurant. I’m still exploring French and Italian (cooking) and haven’t decided on one at the moment.” Your ideal life: “Playing with food in the kitchen, I would say.” The celebrity or historical figure you would like to meet: “I would probably say Chef (Gordon) Ramsay – just to meet him. I heard he’s different than the person he plays on TV. The things he does makes me want to pursue cook-

T. Anthony Bell

ing more.” If you won the lottery … “I would use (the money) for culinary school and then open up a restaurant.” Why you joined the Army: “Money and gaining a different view of the culinary world. Also, my friend is in the Army, and he just convinced me. He listed the things I could do in the Army, and it’s what I wanted at that time.” What you love about being a culinary specialist: “Just seeing peoples’ expressions when they eat my food; the smiles and the way they laugh with their friends and everything. Food brings people together, in my opinion.” One way you stay motivated: “By surrounding myself with people who are better than I am. It motivates me to want to better than them.” What it means to wear the uniform: “You’re representing the United States and its people.” Best thing about the Army: “It’s like the family you didn’t know you had – one of those families you sometimes love and sometimes hate. It’s a love-hate relationship.” Worse thing about the Army: “The miscommunication that sometimes ends in redundancies.” Goals: “I want to stay on the culinary team for the remainder of my contract. I’m still debating on whether to reenlist, but if I don’t, I plan on moving out of the states to a foreign country and work my way up at a restaurant out there.” – Compiled by T. Anthony Bell, Senior Writer/Special Projects


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Government leaders, DMV commissioner among attendees of office ribbon-cutting Patrick Buffett Managing Editor

Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates Kirk Cox and Department of Motor Vehicles Commissioner Rick Holcomb were among the dignitaries in attendance at a grand opening celebration here Tuesday, highlighting the new Fort Lee DMV branch office location in the Soldier Support Center. Other significant attendees included Virginia Senator Rosalyn Dance, Delegates Riley Ingram and Emily Brewer; Maj. Gen. Rodney Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general; Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Perry, CASCOM CSM; Patrick MacKenzie, deputy to the garrison commander; and CSM Vittorio DeSouza, garrison CSM. In introductory remarks, Holcomb acknowledged his appreciation of the longstanding DMV/Fort Lee partnership that resulted in the initial standup of a branch office on post in November 2012. It is only one-of-two such offices on military property in Virginia – its older sib-

Patrick Buffett

Virginia government and Fort Lee command team representatives stand ready to cut the ribbon at a ceremony Tuesday marking the official reopening of the Department of Motor Vehicles branch office at its new location in the Soldier Support Center. During remarks, DMV Commissioner Rick Holcomb, pictured far right, said the Fort Lee Branch Office represents the commonwealth’s commitment to making Virginia the most veteran-friendly state in the nation.

ling was established at the Pentagon in 1974. The projects represent the commonwealth’s commitment to making Virginia the most veteran-friendly state in the nation, the commissioner emphasized.

“We couldn’t have asked for a better location,” said Holcomb in reference to the new office digs just inside the main entrance of the SSC, a place where community members and veterans go for military in-processing, ID card

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renewals, retirement and career transition assistance, and much more. “I thank the command for its generosity in completing the build-out that made it possible for us to get this office up and running,” Holcomb continued. “We were certainly busy at the old location (in the Bloom building on Battle Drive), and we expect to be even busier now, which is all part of better-serving the military community.” Fogg praised the state’s support of the Army Family during his time at the lectern. “This is a wonderful example of that commitment to take care of our Soldiers, families and veterans,” he told the assembled guests. “I know I’ve used this facility, and my daughter got her license here … so I recognize the value this brings to our community. We really appreciate it.” Cox said he witnessed the positive attitude toward customer support the minute he stepped inside the branch office. The observation reflected an earlier statement by Holcomb who noted how the service agents at the center are trained and experienced to meet the unique DMV needs of the mobile military family. Alluding to previous comments about

SEE NEW FORT LEE DMV, page 15


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Staff Sgt. Eric Meneses

Chief Warrant Officer 5 Cortez Frazier, ADFSD senior airdrop advisor; Wayne Cross, son of retired Col. Thomas Cross; Brig. Gen. Douglas McBride Jr., QM General; Jason Hanifin, ADFSD director; and Master Sgt. Reuben Greene, ADFSD’s senior enlisted leader, take part in a Feb. 25 ribbon-cutting ceremony to officially dedicate the Aerial Delivery and Field Services Department Parachute Rigger Hall of Fame room to Col. Cross, the creator of the Army rigger badge.

Rigger school inducts 7 veterans; dedicates hall of fame exhibit area Dani Johnson

CASCOM Public Affairs Officer

The Aerial Delivery and Field Services Department here inducted seven accomplished veterans of the 92-Romeo career field and dedicated its Parachute Rigger Hall of Fame room to the creator of the rigger badge in a ceremony Feb. 25. The PRHF was established in 1976 to honor officers, warrant officers and enlisted whose contribution to the field had received little previous recognition. “This ceremony and dedication honors a cause we share, and the nation we serve,” said Jason Hanifin, ADFSD direc-

tor. “Our motto – ‘I’ll be sure, always’ – speaks to the trust between paratroopers and riggers. “The rigger wings were designed in 1948 by now-retired Col. Thomas R. Cross who was a major at the time,” he added. “We dedicate the hall of fame room to a pioneer and designer of our wings, and I’m proud to honor all our outstanding leaders.” Chief Warrant Officer 5 Cortez Frazier, ADFSD senior airdrop advisor, said the inductees contributed more than 210 years of dedicated airborne experience. “If you don’t know what the parachute rigger badge and red

hat means to us,” said Frazier, “it means you pack your own chute and jump it. We are a special breed of paratroopers. We are one of two specialties in which individuals have to stay airborne qualified their whole career and the only quartermaster field that has its own badge.” Cross, who retired from the Army in 1971 and turned 100 years old in February, started his airborne career in 1943. While he was with the 11th Airborne Division in Japan, he was assigned the principal duty of Division Parachute Maintenance Officer where he designed the rigger wings to promote esprit de corps and the red baseball caps to identify riggers at drop zones and other critical areas. The Army officially adopted the design in 1986. “My dad is 100 years old and holding his own,” said Wayne Cross, the colonel’s son, who attended the event. “He understood in Japan that riggers are special and deserve more than airborne recognition. “The (presentation of his PRHF certificate in December) at his nursing home (in Atlantic Beach, Fla.) was a surprise,” Cross also noted. “He hadn’t seen so many red hats in 68 years and was honored by the Vietnam veterans who attended and the induction.” The following individuals also were inducted into the PRHF: • Chief Warrant Officer 5 Leonas J. Venckus • Chief Warrant Officer 5 Gabino Seda • Command Sgt. Maj. Mary L. Brown • Command Sgt. Maj. Tonika E. Scott-Morris • Command Sgt. Maj. Danny Richards • Sgt. Maj. Dale Marks ADFSD is one of five major training departments at the Army Quartermaster School. It oversees initial entry training for two military occupational specialties, 92R Parachute Rigger and 92S Shower and Laundry Specialist. The ADFSD also is the proponent for the Sling Load Inspector Certification Course and numerous functional area courses.

Military engineers support JEJ Moore activity

Contributed Photo

Erik Haglund, mechanical deputy director with Mason & Hanger, discusses a design drawing with 6th and 7th grade students during Engineer’s Week at JEJ Moore Middle School in Prince George County Feb. 22. Haglund and Carl Cunningham, structural deputy director with the firm, served as hosts for the Society of American Military Engineers, Central VA Chapter, Fort Lee Post, event. MH provides engineering and architectural services to Fort Lee and many other government facilities and military installations. The daylong event featured presentations and discussions on the importance of mechanical engineering in everyday lives with many examples to include HIVAC systems, water heaters, fire sprinkler systems and others. The discussions also covered the basics of structures and bridge building. The students were engaged and encouraged by the hosts and two other engineers in solving real-life problems and scenarios as well. Chaundra Taswell, Fort Lee School Liaison Office, helped coordinate the event.


Reserve unit realigns under CASCOM; move enhances ‘Total Army’ training

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Dani Johnson

0CASCOM Public Affairs Officer

. The Combined Arms Support Command sformally added the 58th Transportation Batetalion to its roster of assigned organizations trecently. p Located at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., the eunit will fall under 2nd Brigade, 94th Division, a Reserve Component training brigade, eand the Transportation School. The move en-ables a “Total Army” approach to 88M motor ntransport operator advanced individual training and is another step in the transformation of )the course to better support large-scale ground ”combat operations. s Prior to the realignment, initial entry trainding for 88-Mikes – the largest sustainment military occupational specialty – was under :the mission command of the Army Chemical School. “(They) did an excellent job of leading and caring for the 58th Transportation Battalion, but we needed to bring the execution of 88M training back under CASCOM to facilitate the transformation of all AITs in support of largeescale ground combat operations,” said Col. -Jered Helwig, Chief of Transportation and ecommandant of the Transportation School. D “The program of instruction revisions have nalways been the responsibility of the Transportation School,” Helwig further noted, “but the funding and structure was not. Fixing the responsibility and accountability under the same command ensures focus and supports Army readiness.” One of the reasons the 58th Trans. Bn. was under the Chemical School was that the Transportation School didn’t have a brigade headquarters to provide it support. The 2nd Brigade, 94th Training Division, which is responsible for all the U.S. Army Reserve transportation training, moved to Fort Lee in May 2016 and has the capacity to provide this support. “This serendipitously allowed us to solve many problems,” Helwig said. “It is also offered a great opportunity to further develop the One Army School construct, and we now

have a single entity responsible for holistically bringing together across multiple components the entire transportation training enterprise.” “It makes sense that the Army’s Transportation Corps training brigade be within compo 2/3 (Reserves and National Guard),” said Col. Keith Barta, commander, 2nd Bde., 94th Div. “As the Army’s ready, certified and accredited Total Force generator of transportation professionals, we are responsible for training 88-series Soldiers nearly every day of the year.” Approximately 70 percent of the Transportation Corps training, education and execution resides inside the Reserves and Army National Guard. According to Helwig, to ensure continuity of support, a full-time school integration team has been embedded inside the brigade headquarters to facilitate and assist with component-specific systems and needs. An approved memorandum of agreement was established to ensure actions that cannot be performed by the brigade on a daily basis are supported. “By consolidating institutional training under a single command element, we believe it will improve our ability to conduct talent management, consolidate training, prioritize resources and manage the training population,” Helwig said. “The multi-component training brigade places the majority of the transportation training enterprise under one command allowing improved coordination, training planning and execution as well as quality control resulting in improved readiness.” The brigade will relocate to the Transportation School headquarters and bring more indepth reserve component involvement into course development, programs of instruction, resourcing instructors, and a more efficient certification of instructors across all components in support of large-ground scale combat operations. “Our end-state is to have a fully integrated Army transportation training enterprise,” Barta confirmed, “that’s ready and fully resourced to execute our training mission and deliver professional transporters to the operational force.”

Contributed Photo

Troops bring happiness to Walnut Hill Capt. Carmen Lockett and 1st Sgt. Curtis Dickens, the commander and senior enlisted leader, respectively, of Victor Company, 262nd Quartermaster Battalion, pose with playful youngsters at Walnut Hill Elementary School, Petersburg, during a March 1 community outreach event in recognition of Read Across America Day. The leaders and drill sergeants from the company read Dr. Seuss books to students in first through fourth grade. Similar activities took place at other schools in the area with military volunteers from the Ordnance, Quartermaster and Transportation schools. The National Education Association started RAAD in 1997 with the idea of rekindling the love of reading among America’s youth.

Contributed Photo

Visits promote good dental care

Maj. Thomas Welnak, a dental health provider from Mosier Troop Medical Clinic 2, uses a stuffed animal prop to teach a youngster how to correctly brush her teeth during a Fort Lee Child Development Center presentation in February. Promoting the youth education and awareness goals of National Children’s Dental Health Month, staffers from TMC2 and Bull Dental Clinic led presentations at each of the three CDCs here as well as the Bettye Ackerman-Cobb facility at Defense Supply Center - Richmond. A total of 285 children participated in the program.


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Army reveals plans to improve military housing to Congress WASHINGTON – Army senior leaders introduced an action plan to lawmakers Thursday that outlines steps to remedy military housing issues. The plan includes a draft Tenant Bill of Rights, which is a joint effort by all military services expected to be finalized in the coming weeks. In it, there are 12 rights intended to protect residents of privatized military housing. “The recent reports of substandard conditions in some of our military housing units are deeply troubling,” said Secretary of the Army Mark T. Esper. “It is unacceptable for our families who sacrifice so much for our country to endure these hardships in their homes.” Testifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill, Esper said garrison leaders will soon be given more oversight to ensure housing companies on installations are held accountable. Current proposals are for garrison staffs to conduct quality control checks on all life, health and safety work orders performed by contractors. They will also be present every time a resident moves in or out of a home. To better empower them, members of garrison staffs will even be trained on contracting and housing management, he added. A reporting system is being developed as well that will allow residents to rate the timeliness, quality of work and customer service of contractors that will be relayed to garrison teams. “Many Army families are concerned that they lack the ability to hold the privatized housing companies accountable for poorly performed services,” Esper said, “and are inadequately protected from retaliation.” The Army has about 104,000 houses and apartments worldwide, and of those about 89,500 have been privatized under the Residential Communities Initiative. Seven private companies now manage the properties across 49 installations, he noted. While the initiative helped tackle inadequate housing at the time, Esper said

Dawn M. Arden

Soldiers ask a military family to respond to a survey as part of an ongoing Army-wide effort to resolve inadequate housing on installations. Army senior leaders introduced an action plan that outlines steps to remedy military housing issues to the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., March 7.

the Army eventually lost sufficient oversight of the program. “In too many cases, it is clear that privatized housing companies failed to uphold their end of the bargain, a failure that was enabled by the Army’s insufficient oversight,” he said. Within hours of the first Congressional hearing to address housing concerns last month, the Army took actions to fully understand the scope and scale of the problems, he said. Senior leaders have since visited families in homes affected by lead paint, mold and other toxic hazards at Fort Meade, Md.; Fort Bragg, N.C.; Fort Campbell, Tenn.; Fort Jackson, S.C.; Fort Belvoir; and the U.S. Military Academy in New York. Garrison commanders have been ordered to complete a 100 percent screening of installation housing by March 18. Town halls have also taken place across the Army. “This has provided families a forum to voice their concerns and to report problems

directly to garrison commanders,” the secretary said. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley also testified that chains of command need to step up to ensure their Soldiers have adequate housing. “Our duty as commanders is to be responsible for everything our units fail to do or succeed at,” he said. “I want all of the Soldiers out there to know that their chain of command is now

fully engaged,” he added. “It is our personal responsibility and we will be held personally accountable for the condition of their living quarters or their houses.” Ongoing housing inspections also include barracks for single Soldiers, Esper said, adding that Soldiers and families living in off-base homes should be checked on, too. “We have a responsibility to take care of our Soldiers (and their dependents) wherever they live,” he said. Following meetings with senior leaders, housing companies also agreed to have a sufficient number of trained technicians and staff on installations to handle issues in a timely manner. “All of the housing contractors are committed to working together to find ways to improve customer service and increase transparency,” he said. Senior leaders even ordered the Army inspector general to investigate the service’s privatized housing to find the best way forward. By 2021, plans already call for the Army to eliminate its lowest level of military housing, known as Q4. Only 190 families are currently living in Q4 housing, Sgt. Maj. of the Army Daniel A. Dailey told lawmakers last month. Providing a safe, quality living environment, the secretary said, is critical to the readiness of the force. “This is essential to building trust, so when Soldiers deploy they can rest assured that their families are taken care of back home,” Esper said. “To do this, the Army needs to get back involved in the housing business.”


Kenner Connection | Awareness Campaign

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Kick Butts Day raises awareness with youth

poo patrol, continued from page 2

his best kangaroo impression on someone’s front lawn, I set my travel mug on the curb and reach into my pocket. Every coat I own is stuffed with dog waste bags, so I invert one onto my gloved hand, and close my nasal passages in preparation for the loathsome task. Even with my fingers fully ensconced in protective plastic, picking up dog poo is a revolting experience. I grab the pile quickly, then tie a knot in the top of the bag without breathing. My job is done. I am proud to be a rule-follower, a model citizen, a conscientious neighbor. But how can I continue my soul-cleansing journey while carrying this disgusting bag of foulness? Having a bag of dog waste swinging from one’s hand puts a significant damper on communing with nature and enjoying one’s coffee. Do I find the nearest

March 20 is National Kick Butts Day and Kenner Army Health Clinic is supporting the campaign by hosting numerous events over the next few months at Child and Youth Services facilities on Fort Lee. Sponsored by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Kick Butts Day is an annual celebration of youth leadership and activism in the fight against tobacco. This year, Kick Butts Day is focusing attention on the need to reverse the skyrocketing youth use of vaping and other e-cigarettes, which have become, by far, the most popular tobacco products used by kids. There have been great strides made in the fight against tobacco. But every day, more than 3,000 kids under 18 try smoking for the first time and 700 kids become new regular, daily smokers. Tobacco use is still the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., killing more than 480,000 people every year. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports

trash receptacle – usually a garbage can on the curb in front of a house or a dumpster at a construction site – and toss in the noxious bundle? Or, do I lug Moby’s steamy business all the way home, ruining my daily sojourn? With almost 90 million pet dogs (www. statista.com/statistics/198100/dogs-in-theunited-states-since-2000) in the United States, about 30,000 tons of dog poo (www.livescience.com/44732-eliminating-pet-pooppollution.html#.UwFyq_aA08Y) is deposited on lawns, parks and sidewalks every day. Dog waste is not a natural fertilizer like cow dung. Due to a carnivorous diet, it is full of acid, toxic bacteria and parasites. Studies indicate about 90 percent of fecal coliform bacteria, which is used as a measure of water health and quality, is mostly from abandoned canine feces. Two or three days’ worth of abandoned waste from 100 dogs can increase bacteria levels in water enough to warrant closing swimming and shell fishing areas. So, it’s no surprise that many munici-

that there is an increasingly popular e-cigarette called Juul, which is in the shape of a flash drive that has been commonly used product among U.S. middle and high school students. By getting involved in Kick Butts Day and other activities, America’s youth can raise awareness about the tobacco problem, encourage peers to be tobaccofree and support effective solutions to reduce tobacco use. Events planned for the 2019 Kick Butts campaign include: performance art by the Virginia Repertory Theatre; art activities; teen-led tobacco cessation promotion; presentations at the CYS Spring Fling; and a concluding Kick Butts Basketball Tournament on May 31. For more information about the events contact Hattie Winfield, Preventive Medicine, at hattie.l.winfield. civ@mail.mil. – Kenner Army Health Clinic

palities, homeowner’s associations, landlords and military base housing authorities have issued ordinances and policies requiring pet owners to pick up waste. Many have posted signs and provided bag dispensers and waste receptacles in public spaces. But ironically, as the biodegradable dog waste bag industry booms, scientists warn that dog feces biodegrading in landfills will eventually release methane gas and contribute to global warming. Who knew the pooper scooper issue was this complex? Despite it all, only about 59 percent of dog owners (onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ abs/10.1111/j.1559-1816.2000.tb02525.x) pick up their dogs’ feces. That’s more than 8 billion pounds of abandoned dog droppings per year. One study attempted to profile dog walkers, finding five typologies: 1. Those “proud to pick up” and carry dog poo; 2. Those who “do the right thing” by picking it up, but seek to dispose of the waste as

soon as possible; 3. Those who feel they’ve “done their job” by bagging the poo but leave the bag for others to deal with; 4. Those who only pick up in the presence of others; and 5. Those who are so “disengaged” they won’t pick up at all. My sister-in-law, who carries a dog waste bag filled with two clementines to give the appearance of being a pooper scooper but never actually picks up her boxer’s business, is a four and a half. The last time we lived on a military base, there was an unidentified number five in our neighborhood who caused much drama and finger-pointing. And with a tiny pang of guilt, I admit I’m a number two (insert childish snicker here). Since my daily dog walks serve the dual purpose of both cleansing Moby’s bowels and my soul, I commit the minor infraction of throwing my dog’s bagged poo into other people’s trash cans. I ask for leniency because, besides my dog Moby, nobody’s perfect.


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Young cast presents mature “Fiddler” play

Contributed Photo

Elizabeth Christian (Golde) and Judd Blake (Tevye) act out a scene from “Fiddler on the Roof Jr.” during Kidkapers youth theater group dress rehearsals earlier this month at the Lee Theater. The production opened last weekend, and additional performances are scheduled for March 15 at 7 p.m., and March 16 and 17 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $7 for general admission seating and all shows are open to the public. This timeless play tells the story of Tevye and his daughters as they navigate the crossroads between tradition and a rapidly changing world encroaching on a small Jewish village in Russia. The play features memorable songs such as “Matchmaker, Matchmaker,” “If I Were a Rich Man,” “Sunrise, Sunset” and “Far From the Home I Love.” The cast includes over 40 young actors. For additional information, contact the box office at 804-734-6629.

March Madness DVD Giveaway | March 15

The Fort Lee USO will be giving away Disney DVDs March 15, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., at 1403 Mahone Ave., building 9028-A. Participation is limited to active duty military personnel, reserve/national guard members or their dependents. A valid military ID must be shown. Individuals can select up to three DVDs along with other special movie-watching treats. The event will conclude when the donated supply of videos runs out, so it’s recommended to arrive early. For further details, call 804-765-3045.

St. Patrick’s Day run | March 16

The Fort Lee Chapter of the Sergeant Audie Murphy Club will hold a St. Patrick’s Day 5K Run/Walk March 16, 8 a.m., starting at CASCOM Headquarters, 2221 A Ave. The event is open to all military members, spouses and friends of Fort Lee. The cost is $25 per adult runner if the individual wishes to receive an event medal. Individuals are welcome to run the course for free. To register, visit www.raceentry.com/races/ samc-st-patricks-day-5k/2019/register. Onsite registration opens at 7 a.m. race day.

FMWr St. Patrick’s Day Shindig | March 16

A St. Patrick’s Day Shindig is scheduled for March 16, 8 p.m., at the HideAway, 5th Street, building 15013. The celebration includes games, Karaoke, door prizes and bartenders’ specials. There is no

CYS track Season registration | Until March 22

L OCAL A CTIVITIES

FOR THE

F ORT L EE C OMMUNITY

For additional details, call Andrea Farmer at cover charge. The doors open at 6 p.m. For additional details, call 804-765-1755 or 804-765-8883. 734-7457.

Cardinal Opener/Demo Day | Military through Ages Program | March 23 March 16-17 The Cardinal Golf Club will host its Season Visitors can experience centuries of military history during the “Military Through the Ages” program March 16-17, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., at Jamestown Settlement, James City County. The event will feature a special salute to women’s roles in the military and their contributions during times of war. Representatives from the U.S. Army Women’s Museum at Fort Lee will take part. For more information, call 888-593- 4682 or visit www.historyisfun.org/jamestown-settlement/military-through-the-ages.

ALU Plans Mini Education Fair | March 19

The Logistics Noncommissioned Officer Academy will host a Mini Education Fair March 19, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., in the MultiPurpose Room at ALU, building 12420, 34th Street. The event is open to all DOD ID cardholders. Scheduled to attend are representatives from Central Texas College, Central Michigan University, Florida Institute of Technology, Old Dominion University, Saint Leo University, Troy University and Virginia State University.

Registration for youth track and field, ages 7-15, will be available through March 22, 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., at CYS Parent Central Services, building 10624, Yorktown Drive. The season runs from April-May. The cost is $45 for active duty military, DOD Civilians and DOD contractors, and $55 for all others. Proof of age and a current sports physical is required. Coaches are needed for several upcoming spring sports. For registration, call 804-765-3787 or 7343069.

Opener Scramble March 23, 8 a.m. The four-person format event is open to all players. The cost is $35 for members and $50 for all others. The registration fee must be paid by March 21. The fee includes golf, a cart, beverages, lunch and prizes. Vendors from Titleist, SrMC Blood Drive | March 22 Callaway and Ping will demonstrate their prodSouthside Regional Medical Center will host ucts from noon - 3 p.m. an American Red Cross blood drive March 22, For other details, call 804-734-2899. noon - 6 p.m., at 200 Medical Park Blvd., PeBerkeley Homeschoolers Month | tersburg. All blood types are needed. The event will be through March 31 in Classrooms A and B. Homeschooled students and their famiTo register, visit redcrossblood.org. lies can receive a special rate during March at Berkeley Plantation in Charles City County. Students can learn about life in the 18th century, tour the plantation, view centuries of artifacts in its museum and more. The homeschool rate is $8.50 per adult and $5 per student, kindergarten through high school. Children under age 6 are free. Reservations are required for groups of 10 or more. The historic site is located off Route 5 between Richmond and Williamsburg. For more details, call 888-466-6018 or visit www.berkeleyplantation.com.

Pamplin 5K run | March 23

The annual Tri-Cities Road Runners 5K Run/ Walk will be held March 23, 9-10:30 a.m., at Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier, 6125 Boydton Plank Road, Petersburg. Participants will travel along Civil War battlefield trails. Race-day registration opens at 7 a.m. For details, visit runsignup.com or call 804861-2408.

For more installation and outside the gate events and activities, visit our online calendar at www.fortleetraveller.com/calendar


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WOMEN’S HIStOrY MONtH, Romeo Hall, Golf Co., 244th QM Bn., is scheduled to sing the “Star Spangled Banner.” The event also will include a video, “I Serve Because.” The month-long national celebration honors women who have shaped America’s history and its future through public service and government leadership. WHM is an off-shoot of International Working Women’s Day that started in 1911. The first Women’s History Week was observed in 1978. In February 1980, then President Jimmy Carter issued the first proclamation for a national weeklong observance honoring women. The proclamation stated,

cont. from page 4

in part, “From the first settlers who came to our shores, (and) from the first American Indian families who befriended them, men and women have worked together to build this nation. Too often the women were unsung and sometimes their contributions went unnoticed. But the achievements, leadership, courage, strength and love of the women who built America was as vital as that of the men whose names we know so well.” The first Women’s History Month took place in 1987. The Fort Lee observance is open to the public. – Staff Reports

NEW FOrt LEE DMV, continued from page 7

Virginia being a veteran-friendly state, Cox asked for the audience’s indulgence as he “bragged a bit” about the general assembly. “We’ve done a lot,” he said. “I think we now have about three or four state-of-the-art veteran care centers (including Sitter and Barfoot within the McGuire Veteran’s Hospital footprint). They are an example of how we honor our service men and women no matter when they served. “We started the V3, Virginia Values Veterans, program last year,” he continued. “It addresses a key issue of how our military transitions to the private sector (by providing support services and business-owner networking events). That’s so important because what we hear time and again from employers is the best employees come straight out of the military because

Fort Lee

Classifieds CONtACt:

DEADLINE

Susan Irgens

reader & Display:

757-477-7104

Thursday 4:00pm (week prior)

susanlou.irgens@gmail.com

reach more than 10,000 active duty military, civil service employees, retirees, their spouses and the civilian community.

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they’re on time, eager to learn and passionate about professionalism. “These are examples of our commitment to you and the reason I’m here today,” Cox concluded. “It’s an honor, and we cannot thank you enough for what Fort Lee does for our community.” Ingram, Dance and Brewer also expressed their appreciation to the community and acknowledge the importance of their partnership with Fort Lee. The distinguished guests then took their place alongside installation leaders for the ribbon cutting, which concluded the ceremony. The DMV branch office is located in Room 118 at the SSC. Its hours of operation are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is a full-service location providing vehicle licensing and registration, requests for vital records, fishing and hunting licenses, road testing and more.


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Profile for The Progress-Index

Fort Lee Traveller | March 14, 2019  

Fort Lee Traveller | March 14, 2019