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Commanding general shares thoughts about previous assignments, responsibility to ready troops for future Army SEE Page 5

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

February 28, 2019 | Vol. 79, No. 9

Messages of Migration Installation program, historical feature reflect theme of 2019 African-American/Black History Month observance SEE PAGE 8-9, 11 LEADERS, SOLDIERS GATHER FOR POST PRAYER BREAKFAST Annual observance with selfless service theme features inspirational remarks from Col. Gregory B. Walker, senior command Chaplain for the 3rd Infantry Division

IN TUNE WITH TEEN TROUBLES Concerned military mom discovers her daughter’s depression is linked to high school experiences

BUILDING SMART MONEY HABITS Post launches weeklong campaign focused on finances and stashing cash for the future

TRIBUTE TO THE 14TH’S FALLEN Memorial ceremony honors sacrifice of QM Soldiers killed during deployment

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SEE Page 2

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commentAry | BetteR paRenting

Girls will be girls: hidden dangers of social aggression lisa smith Molinari Contributing Writer

Contributed Illustration

Commanding General ................... Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Hollie J. Martin Public Affairs Officer ............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor ...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments .......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor .................. Amy Perry Production Assistant............................... Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

The Fort Lee Traveller is an authorized publication for members of the DOD, printed by Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee, Virginia. Contents of the Fort Lee Traveller are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee Public Affairs Office. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services advertised by the U.S. Army or Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc. Everything advertised in this publication will be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher will refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation has been corrected.

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coVer

Fort Lee

must band together to fight the real problem – male aggression. Few would suspect that girls might actually hurt each other, and subtle “mean girl” manipulations often go unnoticed until lasting psychological damage is done. Although “relational aggression” (see www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/worryfree-kids/201801/why-we-need-addressmean-girl-behavior-early-and-often) has long been considered a form of bullying that can include “gossip, rumor spreading, public embarrassment, social exclusion and alliance building,” this behavior is sometimes

tHe

quagmire of adolescence. But now, Lilly is a freshman in college, struggling with negative body image issues, low self-esteem and depression. Not Lilly! How did this happen? In an attempt to help, I started looking back at Lilly’s seemingly problem-free adolescence for answers. It turns out, her situation was not as ideal as it seemed. In today’s turbulent society, parents, educators and experts are talking openly about the potential dangers of chalking aggressive male behavior up to “boys will be boys.” In the #MeToo era, girls are told they

on

Lilly was our easy child. As a baby, she regularly sat contentedly on my hip while I did home therapy with her developmentally delayed older brother or engaged in one of many arguments with her stronger-willed big sister. In school, Lilly easily made friends at every duty station. Teachers would often move her desk when she got overly chatty with friends, but she would simply strike up new conversations with whomever sat nearby. One afternoon while stationed in Germany, I had forgotten to pick Lilly up from elementary school, and it was raining. Gunning the engine of our minivan up a hill, I saw Lilly happily running alone down the sidewalk, arms outstretched and eyes closed, her backpack flopping under her bob of sandy brown hair. As fat raindrops splatted on her sweet face, she grinned from ear to ear with pure joy. That was Lilly. Not surprisingly, she amassed a sizeable group of seventeen girlfriends in high school, despite being the military kid on scholarship at a prestigious private learning institute. I snapped copious photos of her fun-loving group dolled up for dances, so proud that Lilly’s easy-going personality had allowed her to breeze through the complex social

accepted by parents and educators as a rite of passage for girls. However, research indicates (www. verywellfamily.com/bullying-linked-toeating-disorders-460616) that this type of subtle bullying can lead to the development of low self-esteem, eating disorders, anxiety, depression and even suicide for both the victims and the mean girls themselves. Although Lilly hid her angst from us to keep her “happy-go-lucky” reputation in our family, she has now admitted what was really going on in high school. Although she still fiercely defends the loyalty of her friends, she admits there was a social ladder she precariously clung to, with two particular girls consistently hovering at the top. These “ringleaders” were often mean in subtle ways – using their control to temporarily exclude or shame members of the group over minor conflicts. The ringleaders were intimidating enough that the other girls in the group did not stick up for each other for fear that they might be the next victims of embarrassment or isolation. Petty jealousy over a boy who had a crush on Lilly prompted one ringleader to scream at her to, “Get the f*** out of my room!” Even though the dozen other girls present later admitted that the ringleader’s behavior was completely unjustified, not one of them came to Lilly’s defense. She was not

T. Anthony Bell Dr. Gina Paige talks about the lineage research conducted by the organization she co-founded during the installation’s African-American/Black History Month observance Feb. 22 at the LeeTheater. During her speech, she stressed the importance of ancestry knowledge to help people understand where they originate to better connect with who they are. For more, see Page 11.


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Post Prayer Breakfast speaker delivers spirited message about selfless service Patrick Buffett Managing Editor

Packing a powerful message about selfless service, the National Prayer Breakfast observance here Feb. 22 was attended by well over 300 installation leaders, Soldiers and community guests. Col. Hollie J. Martin, Fort Lee garrison commander, established the significance of the event in her opening remarks. Citing highlights from the NPB’s 90-year history, the colonel noted how it has served as an “enduring reminder” of America’s religious freedoms and the shared belief that unified communities can overcome any adversity. “Today, our National Prayer Breakfast remains an inclusive event where we can all renew our trust and confidence in the nation, acknowledge the importance of freedoms we hold so dear and unite with one another in our commitment to service,” Martin said. The morning meal served by the attentive Lee Club staff was accented by music from a 392nd Army Band woodwind quintet and a solo performance of “My Country Tis of Thee,” sung by Naomi Baccich, spouse of Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Edward Baccich, deputy garrison chaplain. Featured speaker Chaplain (Col.) Gregory B. Walker, senior command chaplain for the 53rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart and Hunter Army Airfield, Ga., said he never gets used to seeing his bio in event programs and name in post newspapers. “I don’t think of myself as someone all that special,” he admitted with a brief pause to gather his emotions. “My rank, my family and the opportunity to serve are all blessings I am extremely grateful for, and will never take for granted.” Introducing his wife, Roxanne, and son, Caleb – an Army private first class who serves as a medic at Kenner’s Troop Medical Clinic 1 – Walker focused the audience’s attention on the overarching theme of the morning, “Selflessly Serving God and Country.”

(CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT) • Chaplain (Col.) Gregory B. Walker, senior command chaplain for the 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart and Hunter Army Airfield, Ga., speaks at the installation’s National Prayer Breakfast observance Feb. 22 in the Lee Club. The featured remarks were focused on selfless service, one of the seven personal values the Army instills in its Soldiers. • Naomi Baccich, spouse of Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Edward Baccich, deputy garrison chaplain, sings “My Country Tis of Thee” during the installation’s National Prayer Breakfast. A woodwind quintet from the 392nd Army Band also performed during the morning meal. • Pfc. Caleb Walker, a combat medic assigned to Kenner Army Health Clinic, attentively listens to his dad’s message.

Photos by Patrick Buffett

“What does it mean to be selfless?” Walker posed. “I’m a simple guy, so I went straight to Webster on this one. It is to be concerned more for the needs and wishes of others than one’s own. “I believe … people are naturally selfish,” he continued. “You may not agree with me, but trust me, they are. I’ve been doing the chaplain thing for a long time with a customer service job before that, so I’m speaking from experience. “This behavior is in our wiring as part of the survival instinct. A baby’s first thoughts and words are food, change me, I’m tired, ‘no’ and ‘mine,’” Walker said as the audience chuck-

led in agreement. “Many of you would agree a similar thought process continues through the teen years and maybe a bit beyond.” Adults have a tendency to overinflate their importance, he further observed. Work and community sacrifices are typically met with the thought, “what’s in it for me?” It’s that societally ingrained perspective that necessitates the Army’s emphasis on the seven personal values expected of its Soldiers – selfless service being among them. “During my upbringing, it took some serious parental training, time and maturity to realize that, unless you’re a ruthless dictator, you’re going to be a servant for someone no

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matter what kind of job you have,” Walker said. “That’s a point I make often when meeting with the unit ministry teams under our command … I remind them I’m the highest paid servant in the room. My rank is a blessing that I never use to benefit myself. I use it to empower, support and benefit others. “My rank and position requires that I not only serve others but I put their well-being before myself. That’s important, and I don’t think any of us should forget that,” he observed. Quality of service also matters. Customers desire the absolute best in product and the manner in which it’s provided, Walker emphasized as he referenced a passage in the Bible (John 13, verses 1-5) that talks about Jesus washing the disciple’s feet, a menial task he did not see as beneath his stature or pass off as someone else’s responsibility. “I discovered one of the greatest examples of selfless service while I was preparing a speech back in 1986,” Walker recalled. “The topic was courage, and I found numerous Medal of Honor recipient citations but one stood out to me in particular. A young man and combat veteran by the name of (Cpl.) Desmond Doss. “The citation describes how he lowered 77 men down the side of a cliff on the southern end of Okinawa, Japan. What I didn’t know until I saw the movie (‘Heartbreak Ridge,’ released in 2016) was the details of his life in the military (after refusing to fight as a conscientious objector). He was belittled. He was harassed. He was beaten. He was outcast because of his belief. “Yet he was there when his fellow Soldiers needed him most,” Walker recounted. “One of the greatest scenes in that movie is when he stayed on that ridge to lower those men down, each time praying, ‘Lord, give me one more.’ He said, ‘God give me one more each time.’ “We selflessly serve our nation and our communities when we put others before ourselves and inwardly proclaim, ‘God, just give me one more,’” the chaplain emphasized. “We selflessly serve God as we show love and kindness to others; when we put our care for other’s personal and spiritual well-being into action. … We have to love, truly love, our fellow man as much as ourselves.”


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First TARP Briefings Set for March 13

The first Threat Awareness and Reporting Program briefings for this year are set for March 13, 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., at the Lee Theater. The training is a mandatory annual requirement for military members, DOD employees and contractors with a security clearance. Personnel are reminded to bring their CAC for verification of attendance and to arrive at least 15 minutes prior to the start time to complete the sign-in process. Additional quarterly briefings are scheduled for May 8, Aug. 21 and Nov. 13. For other details, call 804-734-1569 or email charles.s.white8.civ@mail.mil.

Public Invited to Joint Culinary Exercise

Amy Perry

Stephanie Parker, Army Community Service director, and Chief Warrant Officer 4 Antonio Belmar from CASCOM, cut the cake to kick off Fort Lee’s observance of Military Saves Week Feb. 25 in the Main Exchange mall area. Other participants pictured include Edwin Moralez-Aviles, ACS Financial Readiness Program manager, on left, several Fort Lee Soldiers, and Amanda Wilson and Justin Lundie from the Fort Lee Federal Credit Union, on right.

ACS kicks off campaign for good financial habits

Amy Perry

Production/News Assistant Editor

Military members, Army Community Service staffers and Fort Lee Federal Credit Union employees kicked off the Fort Lee observance of Military Saves Week Monday in the Main Exchange mall area. The group set a celebratory tone with cake-cutting festivities and then got to work providing information to visiting patrons from the community The MSW observance runs Feb. 25 - March 2, which coincides with America Saves Week. It is part of the Department of Defense’s Financial Readiness Campaign, which seeks to persuade, motivate and encourage military families to save money every month, in addition to convincing leaders and organizations to be aggressive in promoting automatic savings, said Edwin Moralez-Aviles, ACS Financial Readiness Program manager. Promoters of the campaign encourage all service members, their families and civilian employees to “take the Military Saves Pledge.” Savers who take the pledge can opt to receive

Military Saves educational and motivational communications and savings-related text message tips/reminders. Military Saves also works with the defense credit unions, military banks and other non-profit organizations to promote savings and debt reduction. Morales-Aviles, an 18-year Army veteran and 18-year ACS employee, is new to Fort Lee. Since his arrival in November, he has dedicated all available resources to promoting financial education. “Improving financial education is important because our main goal is to teach the troops how to be more financially responsible,” he said. “We are making partnerships on the installation – with some of the credit unions, for example – to help me teach classes.” Although the week encourages everyone to focus on savings, Morales-Aviles reminds the community there is more to it. “Savings is a year-round commitment,” he said. “This is just a week to encourage people to look at their finances and plan for good spending and investment habits that continue SEE Military saves, page 16

The public days for the 44th Joint Culinary Training Exercise are set for March 9-14, 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., in MacLaughlin Fitness Center, building 4320, near C Avenue and 19th Street. More than 200 military culinarians from all five service branches as well as a few foreign countries are expected to participate. During the Military Hot Food Challenge each day, teams prepare and serve meals to members of the public in a restaurant-style environment. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. and sell out fast, so be in line as soon as they’re available. For updates about the JCTE, visit www.facebook.com/army.culinary or call 804-734-3106.

Exchange Continues Free Friday Giveaways

Authorized Army and Air Force Exchange Service customers have an opportunity to win prizes ranging from riding mowers or barbecue grills to household furniture or appliances through this year’s Friday giveaway program, a continuation of a popular contest that started in 2018. The total cash value of this year’s prizes is approximately $20,000. To enter, patrons should visit www.facebook.com/shopmyexchange and answer the question on each Free Friday post and comment with their name and local Exchange. The deadline to post is 11:59 p.m. Central Standard Time. Drawings are held on the Monday after each Free Friday giveaway promotion period.

CYS Needs Youth Coaches for Spring Sports

Fort Lee Child and Youth Services is seeking volunteer coaches for the upcoming spring sports season to work with youth, ages 3-14. Coaches are needed for soccer, track and baseball. Children of head coaches can participate without a fee. For details, contact Brenda Alvarez at 804-734-3069.

AAFES Food Services Open to All

While Army and Air Force Exchange Service shopping privileges are open only to the military community, anyone with installation access can dine in Fort Lee Exchange restaurants or pick up grab-and-go fare from Express locations. Army Regulation 215-8/Air Force Instruction 34-211 (I) lets anyone – including visitors, contractors and DOD Civilians – dine at any Exchange restaurant worldwide. The regulation also authorizes anyone to buy grab-and-go food and beverages from any Exchange Express location as long as the items are consumed on the installation.

Shepherd’s Center Seeks Volunteers

The Shepherd’s Center of Chesterfield has a critical need for volunteer drivers to transport seniors to medical and dental appointments, grocery stores, pharmacies, food pantries and other locations. Volunteers also can take part in a repair service called “HandyHands” and other special assistance efforts. For details, call 804-706-6689 or visit shepcenter.org.

WOA Scholarship Window Open

The U.S. Army Warrant Officer Association, Crater Chapter, awards at least two $1,000 scholarships annually, and the deadline for submissions is April 1. The scholarship program is open to all dependents or spouses of chapter members employed or residing in the Fort Lee area. Applicants must plan to attend or continue their education in an accredited American college, university, vocational or technical institution on a full-time basis. To apply, visit woaonline.org/crater. Award winners will be announced in May.


Amy Perry

Production/News Assistant Editor

Several months into their latest assign-

ment as the “first couple” of Fort Lee, Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg and his wife Janie are as eager as ever to serve the Sustainment community and ensure families are taken care of while Soldiers undergo the rigorous training requirements of the Army’s future capability strategy. The Fogg’s returned to Fort Lee in September, called back to fill the Combined Arms Support Command’s top spot after an unexpected vacancy. Three months prior to that, the family had said farewell to the community when he relinquished command of the Quartermaster Corps, pinned a second star on his collar and headed off to Redstone Arsenal, Ala., to serve as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics and Operations at Army Material Command. Other assignments over the past decade that make Fort Lee familiar territory for the general include a stint as commander of the 49th Quartermaster Group, a Forces Command organization that he helped deactivate in September 2012. Fogg also served as the CASCOM G-3 after that assignment. “Being a career quartermaster, my beginnings are here,” Fogg proudly stated. “I walked up the steps of old Mifflin Hall as a second lieutenant, not knowing anything about the Army. I progressed through multiple assignments that have taken me around the world and all over the place, but every time, I touch back home here at Fort Lee.” It was his lineage of assignments within CASCOM that really prepared Fogg for the CG spot. He said, getting that previous Training and Doctrine Command experience proved vital for understanding how to be successful in preparing the command for the future. “You can make long-term Army changes in a positive way,” Fogg observed. “Being the QM General definitely helped me understand how to work higher-level Army processes.” He’s also keenly tuned into the Army’s need for fully capable sustainers who are ready to deploy and support operational forces on the day they show up at their first units of assignment. Highest among the major

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Command

Perspective Maj. Gen. Fogg discusses strategy, vision, impact of multiple key assignments here

Amy Perry

priorities for Fogg is the increased rigor and warriorization of the troops in training here, specifically advanced individual training Soldiers and new lieutenants in the Basic Officer Leader Course. “We want to make sure Soldiers and leaders are as prepared as we can make them moving into their first duty assignments,”

(LEFT) Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, is pictured at his desk in Mifflin Hall, the command’s headquarters building. (BELOW) Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg happily greets Soldiers at the Garrison Dining Facility during the Thanksgiving meal service on Nov. 22. He and other senior leaders served nearly 10,000 patrons – most of them new Soldiers in training at Fort Lee.

Stephen Baker

Fogg said. “(We want them) in the field environment to make sure they can operate under austere conditions. If we train them to cook or work on the engine of a truck or if they are a lieutenant who is expected to lead troops, we want them to be able to do those things in a battlefield maneuver environment.” Acknowledging the importance of partner-

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ships and leveraging technical expertise and available resources, Fogg said he is appreciative of Army Garrison assets that are engaged in updating training areas here and elsewhere such as Fort Pickett. “Between transportation, ordnance and quartermaster troops, we have 35 percent of the student load from TRADOC,” he said. “We have so many students here at Fort Lee, and as we increase the rigor of their training, we are breathing new life into training areas that haven’t been used in a long time.” Part of improving the training here starts with making sure doctrine is on the right path. “Doctrine is very important because it drives change within your units and organization,” Fogg explained. “It drives change on how you train your people.” Responding to the recent release of Field Manual 3-0, “Operations,” sustainment leaders at CASCOM have invested great time and effort into Field Manual 4.0, “Sustainment.” “This companion manual on how to support (combat operations) with sustainment will be our capstone field guide,” Fogg said. “We put months of effort into it. We have done tabletop exercises with leaders across the Army – logistics and maneuver commanders, strategy experts at the general officer and colonel level, as well as the senior NCO corps. We brought in medical, human resources and finance, and the main thing we’re asking is ‘what are the most important things we need to do on the battlefield?’ (Another goal is) understanding the new concepts that are associated with large-scale ground combat operations and moving away from the (counter-insurgency) fight. “That’s really important and we have made it a major priority,” he continued. “The next thing is making sure we have the right capabilities on the battlefield. We know the things CASCOM does and, with our staff, we have the ability to look at capabilities for sustainment logistics across the battlefield.” During this process, personnel at the Sustainment Center of Excellence took a hard look at capabilities, especially in regard to large-scale ground operations. “What we found is that, maybe, we have potential gaps that are significant,” Fogg

SEE FOGG COMMAND, page 11


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Americas Military | Spotlight

Pvt. Malachi Coleman Unit: 217th Military Police Detachment Military occupational specialty: 42A – human resource specialist Age: 19 Time in service: seven months Hometown: Greenville, S.C. How you spend your free time: “I study my MOS as much as possible because there is a lot to learn about my job. I do have a PS4 (video game) in the room, and I play it when I can.” Describe yourself: “Overall, I’m a happy person, and I enjoy talking and hanging out with people.” What people don’t know about you: “I was a very different person in high school. I wasn’t a criminal, but I was just rolling with the wrong crowd and getting into all types of trouble.” Worst fear: “To be completely honest, I’m

terrified of chickens.” One person you admire: “I admire very successful people. One in particular I’m thinking of is (the rapper and businessman) Jay-Z. He’s hustled for everything he has. Also (fellow hip hop artists), P-Diddy and Dr. Dre – just people who’ve hustled to get to where they are.” The celebrity or historical figure you desire to meet: “I would say (the singer) Rhianna. She’s seems like a very down-toearth person, and she is attractive.” Dream car: “A 2019 Chevy Camaro. I have a 2011 Toyota Corolla now. I could’ve gotten the Camaro, but I didn’t want to be one of those Soldiers just out of basic training with a brand new car (and way too much debt). I did things smart.” Favorite quote: “‘I’m here for a good time, not a long time.’ That’s (hip hop artist)

T. Anthony Bell

Drake.” Talk about your family life: “We weren’t rich, but we weren’t poor, either. My mom always made sure we had what we needed. I have three brothers and one sister. I’m the youngest.”

One life-changing event: “It goes back to when I was really, really young. I bought myself a PSP (a portable video game). It was the first thing I spent more than $3 on. I think at that point, something switched in my head – you work for money; work toward something and you’re able to make a purchase. No one can take it from you because you got it for yourself. Last year, I bought my first car. It’s a lesson that stuck with me.” Why you joined the Army: “I would say for financial stability because I like not having to worry about not being able to get this or that; not that the Army is going to make you rich, but you’re not often going to go without.” Now that you have money in your pocket … “I’d like to say I’m saving it all up to do something big, but I’m just living day to day.” Has your ideas about the Army changed since joining? “I wouldn’t say so. I’ve enjoyed every second of it. I can’t see myself SEE coleman, page 15

Contributed Photo

Academy students serve as judges at JROTC drill meet

A student from the 92Y Senior Leadership Course, Class 19-004, Logistics Noncommissioned Officer Academy, scores the performance of a JROTC team competing in a drill meet at Richmond’s Houghton High School Feb. 9. Twenty-five volunteers from the class served as judges for the event in which competing teams vied for awards in eight categories such as color guard, squad and platoon marching maneuvers, exhibition rifle and more. ALU President Michael K. Williams and Commandant Col. James J. Godfrey also introduced themselves to the cadets and acknowledged their professional dedication. The drill meet drew teams from high schools through Richmond and the surrounding communities. The outreach activity was overseen by Sgt. 1st Class Jose Gonzales, small group leader for the class, and retired Sgt. Maj. Bernard Branch.


Quiet Reflection

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Photos by T. Anthony Bell

(LEFT) A noncommissioned officer sounds a bell as each name of a fallen Soldier is read during a Moment of Silence Ceremony Monday at the 14th Quartermaster Detachment monument on 40th Street. The ceremony included speeches and historical reflections about the Pennsylvania-based Reserve unit and its 14 Soldiers who died as a result of a SCUD missile attack on Feb. 25, 1991, while deployed in support of Operation Desert Storm. The Fort Lee monument is at the entrance of a Quartermaster School training site that bears the unit’s name. (RIGHT) Led by Sgt. 1st Class McAnthony Tadle, students of the 92W Water Treatment Specialist Course bow their heads in silence during the ceremony. The QM School’s Petroleum and Water Department hosted the observance.


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T. Anthony Bell Senior Writer/ Special Projects

A

The first AfricanAmerican president and a former Fort Lee Soldier were born more than 150 years apart in different countries, yet their lives are eternally bound by complex narratives surrounding issues of slavery, oppression, power and freedom. Joseph Jenkins Roberts, a Petersburg native, was born free in 1809. Literate at a young age, the biracial Roberts became relatively prosperous but not necessarily privileged. The relegation likely forced him to pursue opportunities elsewhere, and he departed these shores for West Africa in 1829. Eighteen years later, Roberts became an African head of state. Momo Larmena Jr., a native African and former 92W water treatment specialist who trained here just over a decade ago, is descended from those who followed the tracks of Roberts and others to what became the African country of Liberia. Ironically, he would be forced to find his life and liberty in the same place Roberts was denied his. Roberts and Larmena’s stories of migration in some ways highlight the plight of black people looking to escape bondage, oppression and hostilities since arriving here in 1619. Claude A. Clegg III, a history professor at the University of North Carolina, said relocation – whether forced or not – is a reoccurring episode in the African-American storybook. “If there is one enduring theme of AfricanAmerican history, it is migration (from internal and international perspectives),” said the Lyle V. Jones Distinguished Professor. “African-American history starts in migration with the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade … and other transitions followed.” The Great Migration of the early 20th Century was most significant. It compelled blacks by the millions to head north not only to avoid Jim Crow’s overreaching shadow but to serve their economic interests. It was but one of many population shifts they authored in search of

A F R I C A N

www.fortleetraveller.com | February 28, 2019 | TRAVELLER |

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H I S T O R Y

M O N T H :

M I G R A T I O N S their descendants (called Americo-Liberians) be-

MIGRANT’S TALE The first African-American president, a former Fort Lee Soldier

and their inprobable reverse course through history

Contributed illustration

justice and equality, sometimes with such declarative resignation as “any place is better than here,” said Clegg. Migration was surely on the mind of Roberts. Petersburg in the early 1800s was an industrial town with a large population of free blacks who had access to education, but such advantages were insufficient for the ambitious young man and those like him, said Deborah A. Lee, a Standardsvillebased historian. “I think the best description is they (Roberts and others) had hit the glass ceiling,” she said. “For all their skills, accomplishments and tremen-

dous potential for more, they were limited to what (the dominant society would allow them to) do in this country.” Roberts and several family members left the U.S. for the West African colony of Liberia in 1829. It was established by the American Colonization Society with support from the U.S. government and sold as a black homeland. The idea appealed to Roberts and others who saw the promise of opportunity and freedom – opposite the suffocating, pervasive discrimination they were subjected to in the U.S, Lee explained. By 1843, more than 4,500 African-Americans

had migrated to Liberia, and 10,000 more had traveled to their ancestral home by the early 1900s. Liberia shed its colony status in 1847, becoming Africa’s first Western-styled republic. Roberts was chosen as the first president the same year. He presided over a nation that closely mimicked the one he departed. For starters, Liberia’s flag is similar to the 1847 U.S. flag, all but for the number of stars; and the nation’s founding documents were full of the same freedom and liberty idealism featured in the U.S. Constitution. Most significantly, the American emigrants and

came a ruling class bent on maintaining power. They were 5 percent of Liberia’s general population, yet they systematically subjugated the indigenous peoples, creating a tiered racial order reminiscent of Southern antebellum society, according to Liberian historian Abayomi Karnga in a 1923 publication. “The indigenous African-Liberians were at the bottom of the hierarchy,” he wrote. “These divisions led to de facto segregation amongst the various groups. Specifically affected were the indigenous population.” Liberia was literally a contradiction of its name and national seal motto – “The Love of Liberty Brought Us Here.” Despite the initial intentions of the AmericoLiberians, the country became a state of smoldering tension over the years. It reached an explosive climax in 1980 when indigenous natives led by Samuel Doe staged a coup, executed members of the ruler elite and installed their own government. As a result of the rebellion, the African American vision of a prosperous and free nation in the land of their ancestors had been effectively cast into Africa’s mountainous heap of failed regimes. Following the coup, Liberia was unstable and the potential for violence was great. Beginning in 1989, rival rebel factions clashed, killed and butchered, causing the flow of blood to run swiftly through the streets of the capital, Monrovia – named in honor of U.S. president James Monroe – and elsewhere. More than 200,000 people were annihilated and hundreds of thousands more became displaced in the seven years that followed. The tentacles of Liberia’s violence slithered its way into the Larmena family. Murdered in 1990 was Momo Larmena Sr., forcing Momo Jr., his mother and seven others in the family to flee the rampant chaos sweeping the nation. The act effectively set off a chain of events that led them to America. The Larmenas departed the shores of Africa in 1998. They landed in Sacramento, Calif., under a ref refugee resettlement program. California’s capital city is situated more than 2,700 miles from Richmond, which held a family connection as the former home of relative James Spriggs Payne who similarly discarded American oppression for Africa’s shores of

Untold: Liberia was not an isolated case African American emigration to Africa might be considered extreme by some, but it is probably not the most daring and not an isolated case for blacks leaving this country in search of liberty. ● A few hundred black Americans – some espousing communist ideology – emigrated to Russia during the 1930s and many remained, according the 2014 documentary “Black Russians: The Red Experience.” ● During the 1800s, there were several Haitian emigration movements, most notably during 1824-26. Roughly 20 percent of free black Americans emigrated to the island nation in the 19th Century, according to Matthew Clavin, author of “African American Migration to Haiti.” ● A researcher, Maria Hammack of the University of Texas, noted the Under Underground Railroad also led to Mexico, estimating 5,000-10,000 slaves opted for routes south rather than those well-travelled northward. ● Finally, the southeastern provinces of Canada, especially Nova Scotia, are inhabited by thousands of blacks who are descended from African Americans. Roughly 3,000 departed for Canada during the Revolutionary War when the British offered freedom in exchange for military service, and an untold number came via the Underground Railroad. Of note, a third who sided with the Brits ended up in the colony of Sierra Leone, which borders Liberia to the north.

freedom more than a century before. Momo Larmena Jr. – a former chemist – returned to Liberia in 1999 to support post-war reconstruction efforts. He served as the secretary general of the Liberian Red Cross and as a consultant with the United Nations Development Program. “They had elections, and I believed the war had ended,” he said in a Traveller article published in 2007 while he attended training here. Liberia was more stable but not necessarily saf saf-

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er, as Larmena found out firsthand. In a 2004 flareup in hostilities, men from the same group that murdered his father appeared outside his home. Larmena and two sons narrowly escaped the pending attack after a man he knew to be a U.S. Army Soldier showed up in a vehicle with a driver, whisking him away moments after men began pulling weapons from the trunk of a parked automobile. He departed for Sacramento a few days later. “If it wasn’t for the U.S. Army, I wouldn’t be here,” he said in the Traveller, referring to the heroic efforts of the rescuers. In 2005, Larmena sought to pay his debt to the country that welcomed him. He tried joining the Army but could not because he was few years past the then-maximum age of 36. When the age limit was raised to 42 in 2006, he enlisted in the Army Reserve the following year on his 42nd birthday. In 2007, Spc. Larmena completed advanced individual training at Fort Lee, a mere 20 miles from Payne’s birthplace of Richmond. His graduation was but another golden nugget in a sack full of fortuity that began with a Soldier risking his life to save his. “I don’t consider myself a lucky man,” he said. “I consider myself a blessed man.” Blessed indeed. Larmena resumed his community service work in the Sacramento area, exercising his residency there with a high degree of zeal, gratitude and responsibility. He created HIV/ AIDs education and computer literacy programs for low-income residents, and his efforts garnered praise from throughout the community and from then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and then-President George W. Bush. Larmena later became a Methodist minister and now makes his home in Nebraska. The Army Reserve officer is now addressed as Chaplain (Maj.) Larmena. The 53-year-old recently returned from a Middle East deployment in that capacity. His career in the ministry follows the footsteps of Liberia’s fourth and eighth president, Payne, who Larmena said is his maternal great grandfather. Payne also was Roberts’ fellow passenger on the 1829 voyage to freedom.

SEE MIGRANTS page 15


Somali native gives up American life for military service in his birth nation 10

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T. Anthony Bell

Senior Reporter/Special Projects

It surfaced during his childhood in a typical American suburb setting replete with friends, video games and extracurricular sports. It lingered in high school with a growing comprehension of his good fortune and a burgeoning understanding of world affairs. It persisted as he entrenched himself in study at the University of Southern Maine and further gained a sense of what would give life purpose in his adult years. African-born Mohamed Yusuf Mohamed had nurtured constant suppositions about his fate had his family not immigrated to this country from war-torn Somalia in 1990. “Growing up, I always had a question about who I would be if A, B, C or D hadn’t happened to me,” said the now Somali army captain and recent International Military School graduate of CASCOM’s Army Logistics University. “Would I be a refugee, not having a chance to seek education? Would I be a child soldier? Would I be dead?” Mohamed was a year-old when his family departed Somalia for the U.S. due to an impending civil war. A dual citizen on paper, he sees himself as fully Americanized but unable to erase the cultural and spiritual connection with a homeland that is still rebuilding. The 29-year-old wants to be part of the recovery and summed up his desire with this perspective: “I was afforded this chance, but a lot of people are still suffering,” he said. Meaning there is work to be done, and his fortuitous circumstances would not absolve him from the personal responsibility of helping to pull his countrymen out of the strife plaguing the Somali nation for the past 25 years. Mohamed’s plan to help did not initially include enlistment in the Somali National Armed Forces – which he eventually did in 2017, two years after his college graduation. The international relations major intended to start his work through diplomatic channels in the comfort of an office building in an urban setting. His first opportunity was an internship with the Permanent Mission of the Somali Republic under the United Nations in New York City.

T. Anthony Bell

Capt. Mohamed Yusuf Mohamed of the Somali National Armed Forces, seen here with the national colors, is a recent graduate of the Army Logistics University. Immigrating to the United States with his family nearly 29 years ago, the Southern Maine University graduate was headed for a promising diplomatic career, but a trip to the Somali capital of Mogadishu diverted him to join the military to address the country’s security issues. He said he intends to stay as long as it takes to facilitate change in the East African nation.

“It was unpaid, but that exposure – essentially working as a diplomat there – really gave me hope for the country,” Mohamed said. “What I also began to recognize was the many things needing to be changed that probably wouldn’t happen in that setting.” More of a pragmatist than an idealist, Mohamed knew country-wide reform would not occur overnight and could not be achieved entirely through diplomatic circles. The inherent politics and other factors during a subsequent posting in the Somali capital of Mogadishu convinced him to pursue alternatives. As a result, Mohamed relinquished his diplomatic position but decided to remain in the hometown from which his parents migrated to become more intimate with the country’s issues. “To change any system you have to be in the system to change it,” he said, referring to his 2016 decision to live in the capital. “That’s the idea I formalized.” Soon after, Mohamed went to work for a non-governmental organization whose mission was to reintegrate former members of terrorist factions in the country. The project was clearly meaningful but not without danger from ad-

versaries determined to undermine the progress of their efforts. “You found people were being assassinated or targeted – (human) rights workers, aid workers, anyone who was against their message,” he recalled. “As a humanitarian living in Mogadishu with its bomb and terrorist attacks, I came to the realization my contributions had to be more impactful … something that went at the root of the problem.” Mohamed enlisted in the SNAF in 2017, further abandoning his American lifestyle and a potentially prestigious career in international relations. He began a new journey in an army still rebuilding itself within a country doing the same. His recent promotion to captain and the subsequent opportunity to attend Basic Officer Leader Course training here – he graduated in January – are further examples of Mohamed’s steadfast resolve. Brimming with optimism, he admits Somalia has a long way to go to achieve peace, prosperity and economic stability, but the work has to start somewhere. For him, that means applying the leadership and team management skills he acquired during his recent training, and demonstrating the professionalism he observed daily at Fort Lee. “I suppose the lesson in all this is that I’m trying to make a difference in my own small way. Would it be easier to just walk away and live the American life? Sure, but there are always challenges in life,” he said, “so why not go after the hard ones – the things no one should have any hope for or be optimistic about. Why not?” That kind of sentiment struck a refreshing chord in Donna Wells, IMSO chief, who had no difficulty boasting about Mohamed’s many admirable qualities. “He’s very personable and seems like a young man who is very committed,” she said. “He has passion for his country, loves his people and he believes he’s one of those who can make a difference.” Mohamed – who gave up a career in diplomacy and life in the West for uniformed service in the Third World – said his plans are to serve in the military for however long it takes to paint this picture he envisions for Somalia: “A country that opens its doors to the world; that is developed; that plays its role in the international community in terms of the issues plaguing the citizens of the world, like poverty, climate change, renewable energy and education. “It will all take a while, but we do have some bright stars here and there.” Mohamed’s example of selfless service is without doubt one of them.


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Saluting black history

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t e r g Lesley Atkinson oThen Brig. Gen. Rodney Fogg – serving as the 54th Quartermaster General and QM School tcommandant – enthusiastically raises a company guidon during the Commandant’s Challenge of the Joint Culinary Training Exercise in 2016.

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osaid. “We are defining those gaps to the Army, eand we’re working through the procurement ?processes. We’ve been doing equipment deep ,dives, so we are putting a lot of effort into that. e “Honestly, when you’ve been in yconflict for more than 15 years – doing the counterinsurgency/counterterrorism type of noperations – sometimes you lose sight of the -larger picture that you could have a fight with a near-peer competitor and need the resources it would require. We have atrophied in some rof those areas, and we need to place more eemphasis there.” Another hot topic in the military is yrecruiting the best new Soldiers available, and CASCOM can cite many examples of rleading the way along the lines of providing sopportunities for prospective and newly enlisted troops. “Recently, I read an article about one of the -best ways we bring civilians into the Army to become Soldiers is offering opportunities,” Fogg said. “Opportunity is often linked to education and credentialing. When it tcomes to credentialing, a lot of our military occupational specialties are linked to or tied tdirectly to civilian jobs, like mechanics or cooks. There are ways we have combined

efforts with academia and other organizations to provide credentialing.” Additionally, Fogg said the CASCOM team is working with the local Army recruiting battalion to provide resources to assist in its mission. “We have some pretty interesting equipment, and we have Soldiers who are doing great things that could be of interest to potential recruits,” he said. “We have explosive ordnance disposal robots and riggers who jump out of airplanes. We can partner with them at a location with some of our Soldiers and equipment so we can explain what the military life is like on a day-to-day basis and what opportunities the sustainment community could provide for them if they join the Army.” During a recent presentation at an Association of the U.S. Army leadership development breakfast, Fogg noted how “a window of opportunity” has been opened by service leaders who have vowed to increase Army readiness, lethality and modernization. “We are not shying away from these challenges,” he then asserted. Amid improving troop readiness, updating sustainment doctrine and ensuring the Army is recruiting the country’s best, Fogg said he wants a team who will keep working hard to get the job done.

Photos by T. Anthony Bell

(ABOVE) The Virginia State University Concert Choir performs during the African American History Month program Feb. 22 at the Lee Theater. The annual event – presented by CASCOM, the Ordnance School and Defense Contract Management Agency -also featured a video presentation, Dr. Gina Page as guest speaker and 832nd Ordnance Battalion Soldiers who performed an educational skit. (LEFT) Linda Galimore, right, presents Dr. Gina Paige with a token of appreciation for her presentation on ancestry and genetics. Galimore is the director, Equal Employment Opportunity, Defense Contract Management Agency. Paige, a speaker and entrepreneur, is founder of African Ancestry, Inc.


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Son of famous Navy Chief speaks at Kenner gathering Lesley Atkinson

KAHC Public Affairs Officer

“The message today is to spread the word of diversity, inclusion and overcoming obstacles.” That overarching statement framed the remarks of Chief Warrant Officer 4 Phillip M. Brashear, 80th Reserve Command CWO, during his Feb. 21 talk at an African-American/Black History Month Leader Professional Development event in the Kenner Army Health Clinic breakroom. If the name of the guest speaker rings a bell, that’s no surprise. He is the son of Master Chief Carl Brashear, the highly decorated Sailor and master diver who was the subject of the movie “Men of Honor,” starring Cuba Gooding Jr. Kenner staffers packed the room during the lunchtime presentation that included audio recordings, videos and other visuals depicting the career of the guest speaker’s late father. Brashear said he wanted the audience to get a clearer picture of his dad to understand the type of man he was and the determination he had. During the event, Brashear spoke about motivation, diversity and overcoming obstacles, citing the hardships and hatred his father endured while in the Navy. He has talked about his father’s legacy extensively ever since the movie came out to make certain people got the point of the overall story. Brashear cited the five “Carl Brashear hurdles,” as he labeled them. They are race, poverty, illiteracy, physical disability and alcoholism. He spoke about how individuals

Lesley Atkinson, KAHC Public Affairs Officer

Chief Warrant Officer 4 Phillip M. Brashear, 80th Reserve Command CWO at Defense Logistics Agency – Richmond, speaks to Kenner Army Health Clinic staffers during a lunch and learn Feb. 21 in recognition of Black History Month.

can overcome these obstacles if they remain steadfast in their determination to do so. Societal biases have changed, making it easier to get help and community support; far different than the hurdles his father faced during his military service. In reference to resilience, Brashear singled out the incident during a shipboard operation when his father lost a leg and the Navy sought to medically retire him. His father wanted

to prove he could get fit and stay in uniform. He showed the Navy he was still capable. The guest speaker talked about a few particular pictures of his father carrying heavy weights wearing is prosthetic leg for a medical board. “I know we don’t treat veterans like this today,” he said. “This was a man fighting for his life and trying to save his career, walking up steps with hundreds of pounds of weight on his back in dress shoes. Do we treat service members like that today? No. The fact my father endured that makes my belief in him even stronger and makes the story even greater.” Brashear said his father proved to the military he could do it. “I don’t care what color you are or nationality. For anyone that would have been hard, but he did overcome it. The Navy had to congratulate him because he did make it back to diver status. He made them eat their words when they put him back on active duty status.” Master Chief Brashear was not only the first AfricanAmerican Navy diver, but also the first amputee to return to full duty status. His son explained there are many amputees coming back from war and continuing to serve their country because of the example his father had made. The Army chief is now a reservist and a civilian employee with Defense Logistics Agency – Richmond. Over his nearly four decades in the military, he flew helicopters for 27 years. He said he enjoys sharing life lessons from his father as well as his own accomplishments to promote motivation and inspiration during speaking engagements.

Virginia will honor women veterans March 17-23 RICHMOND – The commonwealth will honor all women who have served in the armed forces during Virginia Women Veterans Week March 17-23. This is the second year of the observance that honors the service and sacrifice of the more than 104,000 women veterans – the highest percentage of any state in America – who call Virginia home. The week coincides with the March celebration of Women’s History Month, designated by Congress and the Virginia General Assembly as a time to honor and celebrate the role of women in U.S. and Virginia history. During times of war and peace, women have served honorably and bravely in the U.S. Armed Forces, upholding the nation’s ideals and protecting freedom through

dedication to duty and sacrifice. Today, approximately 10 percent of veterans are women, according to Department of Veterans Affairs data. It is projected that the share of female veterans is expected to be over 18 percent nationwide by 2045. In number terms, that’s an increase from the current 1.9 million to 2.2 million individuals. “Throughout the history of the commonwealth and our nation, women have served with distinction as a vital part of our military,” said Carlos Hopkins, Virginia Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs. “I have personally served side-byside with women while on active duty and continue to serve with women as a member of the Virginia Army National Guard. Their dedication, energy, leadership and sense of

duty is outstanding and one reason our armed forces are the finest in the world.” “As a woman veteran, I am proud Virginia is giving this special and welldeserved recognition to the contributions of women in our military,” said Beverly VanTull, Women Veteran Program manager at the VDVS. “These women are our co-workers and neighbors; our mothers, grandmothers, aunts, daughters and sisters. Not only have they unselfishly served our country, they also have returned to the civilian world as leaders in government and business, and of their families and communities. Our commonwealth is stronger and economically healthier because of their presence here.” VanTull noted that special events will be held in Richmond and throughout the state

during the special week. In addition, women veterans can visit any of the commonwealth’s 32 DVS offices March 18-22 to receive a lapel pin to honor their service. To see a full list of locations, visit www.dvs.virginia.gov. On March 19, 11 a.m., a Women Veterans Pinning Ceremony with gift presentations will be held for women veterans of World War II, the Korean War and Vietnam War era at Sitter and Barfoot Veterans Care Center, 1601 Broad Rock Blvd, near McGuire VA Hospital. On March 23, 1 p.m., a free seminar titled “Virginia Women Warriors: Grit and Grace” is scheduled at the Virginia War Memorial, 621 South Belvidere St., Richmond. The event is in partnership with the U.S. Army Women’s Museum at Fort Lee. For details, visit www.vawarmemorial. org/. For a complete list of events, visit www. dvs.virginia.gov.


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Kenner Connection | Patient Safety

Patient Safety Awareness, a vital part of healthcare Lesley Atkinson

KAHC Public Affairs Officer

Patient safety is of the upmost importance to the well-being of all beneficiaries and staff at Kenner Army Health Clinic as they recognize the annual event Patient Safety Awareness week. The clinic will observe this event March 10-16 with displays and giveaways in Pharmacy Lobby and main entrance to inspire action to improve the safety of healthcare delivery. Deneen Archer from Patient Safety and Infection Control at Kenner explained that the origin of Patient Safety Awareness week is from the non-profit organization National Patient Safety Foundations, which has now combined with Institute for Healthcare Improvement. During the week, both IHI and NPSF advance important discussions locally and globally with the intent to inspire action to improve the safety of the healthcare system for patients and the workforce. Preventing harm in healthcare settings is a public health concern. One of the ways Archer said they maintain safety practices at Kenner is by following the Joint Commission National Patient Safety goals. This, for example, means the usage of medications safely, to identify patients correctly, prevent infections, and prevent mistakes during surgery or procedures. “We encourage patient engagement in

their healthcare by promoting ‘Ask 3,’ which are three questions patients are suggested to ask during their encounter with their provider,” said Archer. “We also encourage patients to maintain a list of their current medications.” 1. What is my main problem? 2. What do I need to do? 3. Why is it important for me to do this? According to IHI, there have been advances made in patient safety over the past two decades, current estimates place patient harm as the leading cause of death worldwide. Some studies suggest that medical errors may cause as many as 400,000 deaths in the U.S. each year, and not all errors result in death. In a recent survey of a representative sample of Americans, 41 percent said they had experienced a medical error in their

own care or in the care of a close relative or friend. The harms resulting from these errors can have a long-term impact on the patient’s physical health, emotional health, financial well-being, or their family relationships.

Errors and safety lapses can occur in any setting and take many forms: there are errors in an outpatient setting, medication errors, diagnostic error, which can occur in both outpatient and inpatient settings. It will take all of us involved in our healthcare to prevent errors. Archer mentioned this week is not just a Kenner focus but a national focus for total system and patient safety in healthcare. In addition, to ensure that the care they are receiving is safe. She encourages everyone to stop by the tables to get educational information and giveaways to focus on patient safety. Any concerns about ones’ safety, contact Deneen Archer at deneen.h.archer.civ@ mail.mil or contact Kenner’s Patient Advocate at 804-734-9512.

Pet of the Week

Ray Kozakewicz

Storm, a Russian Blue mix male cat, is available for adoption at the Fort Lee Stray Animal Facility on 38th Street, near the Defense Commissary Agency Headquarters. He is between 2-4 years old, loves affection and is friendly, according to his caretakers. There also are other cats and a dog available. There are no adoption fees for any animals at the facility. The shelter also is seeking new volunteers and donations of cat and dog food. For details, contact Officer Rob Moore, PMO animal control officer, at 804-721-9291.


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Thrift Shop Story Time | Thursdays

A story time activity for children is offered each Thursday, 6-6:45 p.m., at the Fort Lee Thrift Shop, building 5105, Lee and B Avenue. The next event is Feb. 28. Parents can enjoy leisurely shopping at the facility while their children are entertained with a story. For additional details, email ftleethriftshop@gmail.com or visit the facility’s Facebook page.

Berkeley Homeschoolers Month | March 1-31

Homeschooled students and their families will receive a special rate during March at Berkeley Plantation in Charles City County. Students can learn about life in the 18th century, tour the plantation, view centuries of artifacts in its museum and more. The homeschool rate is $8.50 per adult and $5 per student, kindergarten through high school. Children under age 6 get in free. Reservations are required for groups of 10 or more. The historic site is located off Route 5 between Richmond and Williamsburg. For additional details, call 888-466-6018 or visit www.berkeleyplantation.com.

Dr. Seuss Birthday Bash | March 1

The Fort Lee Community Library is hosting a Dr. Seuss Birthday Bash March 1, 5-7 p.m., in Bunker Hall Cafe, building 12500, Army Logistics University campus. The free event to celebrate the author’s 115th birthday will include cake, games, a story hour and prizes for the best Seussical costume. Registration is suggested. For other details, call 804-765-8095 or 7658173.

Garden Brothers Circus | March 3

Everyone in the Fort Lee community is invited to the Garden Brothers Circus event at VSU’s Multipurpose Center, 20809 2nd Ave., Peterburg, on March 3, 4-7 p.m. The whole family can enjoy the thrills of animal performances, racing motorcycles and acrobatics. A kid zone features elephant, camel and circus pony rides; a giant slide and bouncy house; and face painting. Vendors will be on site with circus-style food. For additional information and tickets, visit www.gardenbroscircus.com.

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The cast includes over 40 young actors who bring to life a play the whole family will love. Additional performances are March 9 and 15 L ocal A ctivities for the F ort L ee C ommunity at 7 p.m. and March 10, 16, and 17 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $7 for general admission seating Lee Newcomers’ Orientation | 555th PIA Meeting | March 6 and may be purchased at the door. The Jessie J. Mayes Tri-Cities Chapter of March 4 For reservations or more information, call Military spouses, service members and ci- the 555th Parachute Infantry Association, Inc. the box office 804-734-6629. vilian employees new to Fort Lee are invited will hold its monthly meeting March 7, 6 p.m., to the Army Community Service Newcom- at the Petersburg Public Library, 201 West Final Snow Xperience Trip | ers’ Orientation held every Monday, 2 p.m., Washington St., Petersburg. Prior airborne ex- March 9 at the Soldier Support Center, 1401 B Avenue, perience is not a prerequisite for membership Registration continues for the final Family or attending. building 3400. and MWR Outdoor Recreation Center disFor more details, call 804-733-2177. Participants will learn about the Army and counted Snow Xperience Trip of the season to Air Force Exchange, Child and Youth ServicWintergreen Resort set for March 9. es, Directorate of Public Works, Safety, Hous- Insurance Assistance Session | The reduced-rate cost varies for skiing, ing, Family and MWR, and other community March 7 snowboarding or tubing rentals and lift ticket A Blue Cross/Blue Shield representative packages. Transportation leaves for the resort support agencies. will visit the Civilian Personnel Advisory at 7:30 a.m., so guests should meet at 7:15 For further info, call 804-734-6762. Center March 7, 1:30-3 p.m., building 12400, a.m. For registration and details, visit Outdoor Tobacco Cessation Classes | Quarters Road. Recreation, building 15014 on 5th Street, or Employees can ask questions concerning call 804-765-2212. March 6, 13, 20, 27 Kenner Army Health Clinic’s next series of health insurance coverage and enrollment for Tobacco-Free Living/Tobacco Use Cessation BCBS. An agency representative will return to Chester Library MB3 Concert | classes is scheduled for March 6, 13, 20 and the base each quarter for similar sessions. March 9 27, 11 a.m. - noon, on the second floor of the MB3 of Central Virginia will perform a Author Talk at Pamplin | medical facility. The sessions are free. big band concert March 9, 2-3:30 p.m., at the For additional information and enrollment, March 7 Chester Library, 11800 Centre St., Chester. Jerry “Dez” Desmond, executive director call 804-734-9304 or email cynthia.e.rice4@ The family friendly event is free. No regof Pamplin Historical Park and The National istration is required. This will be the first in a mail.mil. Museum of the Civil War Soldier, will speak series of concerts. Expecting Parent Class | at the Petersburg Civil War Roundtable March For further details, call 804-318-8977. March 6 7, 7-8 p.m., 6125 Boydton Plank Road., PeA free class titled “What to Expect Now tersburg. CG Golf Scramble | March 15 That You’re Expecting,” presented by the The presentation is titled “Maine Troops at The Commanding General’s Golf Scramble Army Community Service Family Advocacy Gettysburg” and is based on his book “Turning is set for March 15, noon, at the Cardinal Golf Program, is set for March 6, 1 p.m., in building the Tide at Gettysburg: How Maine Saved the Club. The event will be a 4-person captain’s 1231, Mahone Avenue. Union.” The group meets on the first Thursday choice. The fee is $35 for members and $45 The session will cover body changes dur- of each month. Non-members can attend for for all others. This includes green fees, a cart ing pregnancy, family financial considerations $5 per meeting. and food following the scramble. Prizes will and communications, childbirth labor and Call 804-861-2408 for more information. be awarded. The registration fee must be paid delivery, what dads need to know to support by 4 p.m. March 8. mom, and more. For registration and details, ‘Fiddler on the Roof Jr.’ Opens | For details email daniell.s.trevino.mil@ March 8 call 804-734-6381 mail.mil or call 804-892-3903. The Theater Company at Fort Lee opens its Wheelhouse Wednesday at Ten- second KidKapers production of the season, Emergency First Aid Class | Strike | March 6 “Fiddler on the Roof Jr,” on March 8, 7 p.m., March 18 The Transportation Corps hosts a social at the Lee Theater, 4300 Mahone Ave. An emergency first aid class is scheduled for event on the first Wednesday of each month. This timeless play tells the story of Tevye March 18, 6:30-8:30 p.m., at LaPrade Library, The next one will take place at Fort Lee’s and his daughters as they navigate the cross- 9000 Hull Street Road, North Chesterfield. TenStrike Bowling and Entertainment Center, roads between tradition and a rapidly changThe free workshop is a FEMA-developed 2403 C Ave., on March 6, 5 p.m. ing world in Anatevka, a small Jewish village program in which adult participants learn how Wheelhouse Wednesdays connect students, in Russia. The play features memorable songs to provide lifesaving care in the crucial minsenior leaders and friends of the Transporta- such as “Matchmaker, Matchmaker,” “If I utes before professional help arrives. Registration Corps in a relaxed atmosphere. Were a Rich Man,” “Sunrise, Sunset” and “Far tion begins March 4. Space is limited. For other details, call 804-765-7447. From the Home I Love.” For more information, call 804-318-8988.

For more installation and outside the gate events and activities, visit our online calendar at www.fortleetraveller.com/calendar


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SOCIAL AGGRESSION, continued from page 2 accepted back into the group for a week. Also, comments made within the friend group about weight profoundly affected Lilly. On one occasion, her friend held up a very large pair of pants she found in her room and said in front of the group, “Lilly, these are way too big for me, but it looks like they might be your size.” I assume this friend hadn’t meant to hurt her, but soon Lilly stopped eating in the dining hall. This and other weight-related comments were permanently burned into her fragile adolescent psyche. Now, I grit my teeth. I should have asked more questions when I had the chance. But instead of seeing the insidious dangers under the surface, I obliviously snapped photos of those beautiful, glittering girls and ignorantly assumed their mere friendship meant everything was OK.

Other online resources with valuable information on this topic include the following: • www.stopbullying.gov • www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/youthviolence/bullyingresearch/index.html • w w w. m e l i s s a i n s t i t u t e . o rg / d o c u ments/2006/Meich_06_genderdifferences. PDF • www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC4695776/ • www.washingtonpost.com/news/parenting/wp/2018/07/26/little-mean-girls-helping-your-daughter-swim-in-those-choppysocial-waters/?utm_term=.653cc782efba • www.verywellfamily.com/relational-aggression-bullying-460498 • www.scholastic.com/parents/family-life/ social-emotional-learning/social-skills-forkids/bullies-disguise.html.

COLEMAN,

best to stay motivated about things and keep it moving.” What makes a bad Soldier? “Taking shortcuts and the easy way out. Everybody thinks they can beat the system, but they can’t.” What you would change if you were the Army Chief of Staff: “The age at which (people are allowed to) join the Army. Most people enlist straight out of high school, and most still have that high school mentality. In basic training and AIT, some of those people grow up and they get it, but a lot of them are not mature enough. They complain, don’t like being yelled at and don’t like being told what to do.” Best thing about the Army: “I would say the PT. Doing it every day is a big thing for me because it keeps you from getting complacent.” Worst thing about the Army: “The small things like not being able to walk and talk with your phone (while in uniform). I’m sure there’s a reason why you can’t do it, but …” Future plans: “I’ll probably be working at something the rest of my life. I’m not sure what that’ll be, but I’m enjoying what I’m doing now. I’ll ride this out until the wheels fall off.” – Compiled by T. Anthony Bell

continued from page 6

doing anything different.” What you enjoy most about being in uniform: “The fact I’ve found a career straight out of high school. I’m doing something better than working at a sandwich place. It’s something I can be proud of.” Why you chose your MOS: “I’ve always liked the idea of keeping things organized. I like seeing the whole picture and knowing everything that is going on. The work I do is very rewarding and satisfying to the things I already like doing.” What it means to serve your country: “I enjoy the 42A work I do, but at the same time in the back of my mind, if something pops off and I have to do what I have to do, I’m ready for it. There are some people out there who do their jobs, but they’re not thinking, ‘There may be a time in which I have to step outside my comfort zone to something different.’ For me, that’s the biggest part of wearing the uniform.” What makes a good Soldier? “Motivation – I think there are times you have to do things you don’t want to do. You can’t argue about it, and if you don’t do it, you won’t get far. You just have to do everything, and so it’s

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TRAVELLER

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February 28, 2019

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MIGRANTS, continued from page 9

Ironically, Larmena’s 1998 flight to freedom can be viewed as a metaphorical return trip for Roberts, Payne and 15,000 AfricanAmericans who emigrated to Liberia over the course of 90 years believing they could never be described as American. Indeed, the America today bears no resemblance to the version that forced them away. It is comprised of a phenomenal patchwork of races, ethnicities, colors and nationalities who have unparalleled access to prosperity, equality, justice and freedom. More than 1.3 million people immigrating to this country last year thought so. That is not to say the country’s current state was a flight through time without turbulence. Such events as the Civil War, the Civil Rights Movement, labor disputes and contemporary issues such as the #Me-Too Movement and Black Lives Matter all have served as a gauntlet testing the strength and integrity of America’s founding documents. Those events are indications America is not without fault but has its shining moments

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when society seeks to repair itself. It will continue to evolve at the behest of people like Larmena and 300 million others who can freely strive to be productive parts of a greater whole dedicated to the ideals of freedom, justice and equality. Ironically, Larmena’s 1998 flight to freedom can be viewed as a metaphorical return trip for Roberts, Payne and 15,000 African Americans who emigrated to Liberia over the course of 90 years believing they could never be described as American. Indeed, the America today bears no resemblance to the version that forced them away. It is comprised of a phenomenal patchwork of races, ethnicities, colors and nationalities who have unparalleled access to prosperity, equality, justice and freedom. More than 1.3 million people immigrating to this country last year thought so. That is not to say the country’s current state was a flight through time without turbulence. Such events as the Civil War, the Civil Rights Movement, labor disputes and contemporary issues such as the Me-Too Movement all have served in a gauntlet testing the strength and in-

tegrity of America’s founding documents. Those events are indications America is not without fault but has always fought to repair. It will continue to evolve at the behest of people like Larmena and 300 million others who can freely strive to be productive parts of a greater whole dedicated to the ideals of freedom, justice and equality.

Military saves, continued from page 4

all year long.” People often put off starting a savings account, he said, but that’s not the smart move. “Often, people will wait until they make more money to start saving,” Morales-Aviles said, “but that’s not how it works. You make more money, you spend more money. You don’t discipline yourself to save. This campaign reminds you to start saving – even a little bit – to get into the habit.” All DOD ID cardholders can receive assistance with financial planning and establishing savings through the FRP. To make an appointment, call 804-734-6388.

Profile for The Progress-Index

Fort Lee Traveller | Feb. 28, 2019  

Fort Lee Traveller | Feb. 28, 2019