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Housing town hall set for Feb. 27, 6 p.m., at Lee Theater SEE PAGe 3

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

February 21, 2019 | Vol. 79, No. 8

Water Dawgs Quartermaster School improves training site for riverside operations

SEE PAGE 7

TEEN’S STELLAR TRAITS EARN TOP YOUTH TITLE Brittney Gardner clearly exemplifies the strength and resiliency of military youths, making her the right choice as Fort Lee’s Youth of the Year

FIRE SAFETY Keep family safe; avoid tampering with post housing smoke detectors

GARRISON NEWS Installation support personnel realigned under U.S. Army Materiel Command

PILOT PROGRAM Army to introduce physical therapists, sports trainers to brigades soon

SEE PAGe 5

SEE PAGe 2

SEE PAGe 4

SEE PAGe 11


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coMManD sPotligHt | Fire SAFetY

Those on Army installations such as Fort Lee can typically count on safe living and working conditions as a result of code-compliant construction, regular maintenance and a facility inspection regimen mandated by government policies. One fact proven by annual statistics is there are fewer serious fires on military posts nationwide than in civilian communities of comparable size. This achievement can be attributed to the aforementioned safeguards as well as a continuous awareness and education campaign that discourages apathy, or in the case of this column, outright safety violations. Fort Lee Fire and Emergency Services has recently noticed a dangerous trend when responding to fire alarm activations in lodging and barracks-type facilities. Investigations have found several instances in which smoke detectors have been covered with bags or tape to prevent activation while vaping or smoking. This increase in intentional risk can be catastrophic for occupants. Tampering with smoke detectors or any life safety equipment can be fatal! According to the 2018 International Fire Code. Section 901.8, tampering with any life safety equipment is illegal. In addition, in accordance with Army Regulation 600-63, the use of electronic smoking devices or any tobacco product is prohibited in interior spaces of all federal facilities and is only permitted in exterior designated smoking areas. When fire strikes, the opportunity to escape is before the

Fort Lee

Commanding General ................... Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Hollie J. Martin Public Affairs Officer ............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor ...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments .......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor .................. Amy Perry Production Assistant............................... Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

Metro Ceative

sleeping space becomes filled with toxic gasses, and this time is measured in seconds, not minutes. Without the benefit of a working smoke detector, there is little chance anyone who is sleeping will be alerted about the fire in time to make an escape before they are overcome by the smoke and noxious fumes. Even the smallest of fires can be deadly. A single piece of furniture going up in flames can produce enough toxic gasses to make an entire floor of a building uninhabitable in less than one minute. Even with the early warning afforded by a properly working smoke detector, escape is difficult. The smoke and

The Fort Lee Traveller is an authorized publication for members of the DOD, printed by Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee, Virginia. Contents of the Fort Lee Traveller are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee Public Affairs Office. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services advertised by the U.S. Army or Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc. Everything advertised in this publication will be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher will refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation has been corrected.

coveR

Chief Fire Inspector

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Mike Lecik

toxic gasses within the space substantially limit visibility and the ability to breath. These conditions deteriorate very quickly with each passing second. Family housing and barracks occupants need to be prepared to wake up, alert the remainder of the people affected and be out of the building in less than one minute. The only way to accomplish this is through the development and regular rehearsal of a fire escape plan that identifies two ways out of the structure, a meeting place outside, and ensures everyone understands that under no circumstances are they to return to a burning building once they have made it outside. Get out, stay out and call 911 when safe. Similarly, a non-working or missing smoke detector is useless. Fort Lee fire prevention and garrison life safety contract teams work daily to ensure your safety. Many smoke detectors are found to be inoperable because the occupant has removed it, tampered with it or failed to call in work orders for the equipment when damage is found. Never remove a battery from a smoke detector in a barracks or lodging facility. If it goes off accidentally, report the situation immediately. Do not hesitate to call in a work order or notify the fire prevention staff if there are any problems with smoke detectors. Know the emergency evacuation plan for your facility and practice it. It’s a common practice for people to rehearse fire drills at work or in school during the day, yet a majority of fatal fires do not occur at those locations. Almost all fire fatalities occur when building occupants are asleep. Let’s prevent anyone who lives, goes to school, or works on Fort Lee from suffering unnecessary tragedies. If you see someone tampering with a smoke detector, please stop them from doing so or report the unsafe action immediately. Fort Lee Fire and Emergency Services actively promotes fire safety to all who work, live and visit Fort Lee. For questions or assistance, contact the Fire Prevention Office at 804-734-6138.

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Smoke detector tampering illegal cautions Fort Lee F&ES officials

T. Anthony Bell Prior students of the Quartermaster School’s 92W Water Treatment Specialist Course place a strainer in the water at the Mechling River Training Facility during a class exercise in October. Two new piers at the training area will simplify this task, increasing efficiency and reducing the risk of potential accidents. See story, Page 7.


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Fort Lee schedules town hall to discuss housing concerns As part of an ongoing Army-wide effort to resolve unsatisfactory conditions in Army family housing, Fort Lee leaders will hold a town hall to provide information and gain feedback from residents. The meeting will take place at the Lee Theater from 6-7 p.m. Feb. 27. This town hall is an internal forum where installation leaders will connect with Soldiers, Army families and other residents of Fort Lee to help ensure the obligations of providing safe, quality family housing are being met. In a recent statement, Secretary of the Army Dr. Mark Esper stated, “We are deeply troubled by the recent reports highlighting the deficient conditions in some of our family housing. It is unacceptable for our families who sacrifice so much to have to endure these hardships in their own homes. Our most sacred obligation as Army leaders is to take care of our people – our Soldiers

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provide housing as part of the Residential Communities Initiative. Senior members of Hunt Military Communities, the RCI partner at Fort Lee, will join Quartermaster General Brig. Gen. Douglas McBride and Garrison Commander Col. Hollie Martin to engage post housing residents. These leaders want to ensure residents understand their rights as tenants in privatized housing, how to report a concern and receive prompt action, and how to seek further action on any complaint they feel is unresolved. Additional information and updates on questions asked at the town hall will be disseminated through installation command information channels as needed after the event. Community members are reminded also that comments about facilities and/or services provided on the installation can be submitted through the Interactive Customer Evaluation, or ICE, system that can be directly accessed through the image link on the Fort Lee homepage. Metro Ceative The Secretary of the Army’s website and our family members.” obligations to provide safe, high-quality containing recent new releases, photos Esper added, “We will hold our chain family housing.” from his installation visits and responses to of command and private contractors The contractors he refers to are private questions from the military community is accountable to ensure they are meeting their companies who partner with the Army to available at www.army.mil/leaders/sa.

CASCOM conducts quarterly NCO Day

T. Anthony Bell

Sergeant Maj. Jeri Pihlaja and Sgt. 1st Class Samantha Leaupepe from the Ordnance School gather responses from the audience during a noncommissioned officer professional development session Feb. 14 in the Army Logistics University multipurpose room. The training was part of CASCOM’s latest NCO Day observance that started with an early morning motivational run and concluded with a late-afternoon teambuilding event at the TenStrike Bowling Center. Discussions at the NCOPD session covered a variety of topics, ranging from problemsolving techniques and improving communication to developing future Soldiers and enhancing their own careers. NCO Day is a quarterly event directed by the CASCOM CSM.


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Installation Management Command to realign under Army Materiel Command WASHINGTON – The Installation Management Command will realign as a major subordinate command under the Army Materiel Command by March 1 to enhance readiness across Army installations, officials announced Friday. “The Army is implementing aggressive reforms to free-up resources for readiness and modernization efforts and to improve overall efficiency,” said Brig. Gen. Omar Jones, the Army’s chief of public affairs. Headquartered at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, IMCOM was created in 2002 to integrate and deliver base support to enable readiness for a globally-responsive Army. IMCOM’s 50,000-strong workforce will remain at their current locations, including Fort Lee’s garrison employees, and no positions will be physically relocated or eliminated during the transition, officials said. If a review later determines certain positions should be relocated or eliminated, no changes will occur until the incumbent either decides to leave the organization or is properly reassigned, they added. AMC, a four-star command, currently performs installation support for depots, ammunition plants and other facilities. It provides service functions from the management of installation power-projection platforms to installation contracting services. The upcoming realignment will consolidate base operations and other similar support functions as well as leverage existing Army expertise in logistics, sustainment and services, officials said. The move is one of several ongoing management and headquarters reforms to ensure the Army is efficient and prioritizes resourc-

es to readiness and modernization – the service’s top priorities. Last summer, for instance, the Army stood up the Army Futures Command to combine efforts on tackling modernization. The new four-star command represented the most significant Army reorganization effort since 1973. Then in December, AFC took command of the Army Capabilities Integration Center, which was renamed the Futures and Concepts Center that is tasked to study and prepare the Army for future warfare. Last month, the Army’s Research, Development and Engineering Command, or RDECOM, came under Futures Command and was renamed Combat Capabilities Development Command. In the Army’s latest transition, IMCOM directorates will initially remain functionally aligned with their supported Army commands and Army service component commands. AMC and IMCOM leadership will then conduct an assessment to ensure all IMCOM directorates are best aligned to effectively support senior commanders, officials said. Fort Lee is currently in the IMCOM-Training Directorate. Realignment under one command, along with continued oversight by the Army secretary, will also increase advocacy within the Army for installation requirements. “This transition establishes unity of command and effort on our installations, improves the readiness of our Soldiers and formations, and strengthens the well-being of our Soldiers, civilians and families,” Jones said. – Army News Service

Bone Marrow Drive Set for Feb. 23

A bone marrow drive is set for Feb. 23, 9 a.m. - noon, at the Lee Theater, Mahone Avenue. Held in coordination with the Nu Omicron Lambda Fort Lee chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Inc. and the C.W. Bill Young/Department of Defense Marrow Donor Program, the event will feature an Army veteran/leukemia survivor as the guest speaker. Interested registrants will be given a buccal (cheek) swab packet and asked to fill out donor information and a health screen questionnaire. For other details, visit www.salutetolife.org/.

Public Invited to Joint Culinary Exercise

The public days for the 44th Joint Culinary Training Exercise are set for March 9-14, 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., in MacLaughlin Fitness Center, building 4320, near C Avenue and 19th Street. More than 200 military culinarians from all five service branches as well as a few foreign countries are expected to participate. During the Military Hot Food Challenge each day, teams prepare and serve meals to members of the public in a restaurant-style environment. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. and sell out fast, so be in line as soon as they’re available. For updates about the JCTE, visit www.facebook.com/army.culinary or call 804-734-3106.

Mac to Close for JCTE, Renovation

Family and MWR’s MacLaughlin Fitness Center will be closed Feb. 26 - June 15 to accommodate the annual Joint Culinary Training Exercise (Feb. 26 - March 15), followed by an interior renovation project. During the MacLaughlin closure, the Strength Performance Center and the Clark Fitness Center will extend their hours of operation to accommodate the anticipated increased traffic in their facilities. Both facilities will operate 5 a.m. - 9:30 p.m., Monday - Friday; and 8 a.m. 4 p.m., Saturday, Sunday and holidays. For further details, contact FMWR Director Darrell Clay at darrell.w.clay.naf@mail.mil or 804-734-7199.

CWF Initiative Begins with Wintergreen trip

The Fort Lee Civilian Welfare Fund is partnering with the Family and MWR Directorate here to offer free or partially paid trips and events for DOD Civilian employees. The first CWF Experience is a day trip to Wintergreen Resort March 9. CWF will pay for lift tickets and equipment rentals, a $60 value, for up to 30 DOD Civilians. Free round trip transportation is provided by FMWR for the first 10 eligible individuals who register. All others will have to provide their own transportation. To sign up, contact Outdoor Recreation at 804-765-2212.

Kenner Offers Tobacco Cessation Classes

Kenner Army Health Clinic’s next series of Tobacco-Free Living/Tobacco Use Cessation classes is scheduled for March 6, 13, 20 and 27, 11 a.m. - noon, on the second floor of the medical facility. The sessions are free. If people are unable to attend all four classes, they should call 804-734-9304. For additional information and enrollment, call 804-734-9304 or email cynthia.e.rice4@ mail.mil.

Motorcycle Up for Grabs in AAFES Contest

Authorized Army and Air Force Exchange Service shoppers have a chance to win a 2018 Indian motorcycle through April 30. The prize is valued at $19,000. To enter, visit shopmyexchange.com/sweepstakes. No purchase is necessary. The winner will be notified on or before May 15.

CPAC Hosts Insurance Assistance Sessions

A Blue Cross/Blue Shield representative will visit the Civilian Personnel Advisory Center March 7, 1:30-3 p.m., building 12400, Quarters Road. Employees can ask questions concerning health insurance coverage and enrollment for BCBS. A agency representative will return to the base each quarter for similar sessions.


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Installation Youth of Year a poster child for resiliency

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Amy Perry

Production/News Assistant Editor

Brittney Gardner – daughter of 1st Sgt. Lemakius Gardner and an 8th grader at N.B. Clements Junior High in Prince George County – has been selected by Fort Lee Child and Youth Services as the installation’s Military Youth of the Year. “I was shocked when I heard the staff and other youth center members nominated me,” Brittney responded. “It is a huge honor to have this title.” Vedia Blanks, program manager at the Youth Center, said Brittney is loved by the staff as well as other patrons of the Family and MWR facility. “Brittney is mission-driven, focused, open-minded, approachable and willing to help,” she further noted. “Based on her lifestyle skills and creativity, all of her peers and the staff recommended her for Youth of the Year. “We had four others nominated,” Blanks elaborated. “She really stood out for her perseverance and resiliency. Brittney shows others that you can be yourself. She is really a role model. She shows others that you can be young and have fun, but also have to buckle down to get something done.” Brittney’s mother – the first sergeant for Whiskey Company, 244th Quartermaster Battalion – said she knew her daughter was working on an essay for the youth center, but wasn’t aware what it was all about. “When we got the letter announcing she had won for Fort Lee and would be moving forward to the next level, that was very exciting,” Gardner said. “I’m thrilled for her, just like we are always excited for each other’s accomplishments. “It’s not really a surprise though,” she also noted. “She is in a lot of clubs and was a homecoming queen. She wins a lot of stuff; this one was just different.” Gardner said her daughter has a sense

Photos by Amy Perry

(ABOVE) Brittney Gardner chats with friends at the Youth Center. Brittney was recently selected as Fort Lee’s Military Youth of the Year. (LEFT) 1st Sgt. Lemakius Gardner, Whiskey Company, 244th Quartermaster Battalion, and Brittney Gardner.

of maturity beyond her years, always working hard to keep their lives stress-free. The duo has tackled PCS moves to five different states since Brittany was born 13 years ago. Like other military kids, she has endured lost friendships and the anxiety of separation while her mom was deployed. “All she has seen is me by myself,” said the single mother whose husband died while deployed to Iraq a few months after Brittney was born. “My mom and dad and his mom and dad back me up, however, she sees me and the struggles of being a Soldier, so she’s tough for me. She sees the stress I have in the Army, and she tries her hardest so she doesn’t add any stress to our home.” Gardner acknowledged the Army’s support system and the help she has received from battle buddies has been instrumental to her years of success. “I (deployed) the first time when she was 1 or 2 years old,” she said. “While that was hard, we didn’t leave the Army because the Army took care of us. I could have gotten out because of the situation, but they were caring and they didn’t have anything negative that made me want to hang it up. Brittney was around five months old (when

her dad died) and I was a young mother, and they took care of us.” There have been other deployments and departures for military schooling, and Gardner spoke highly of her daughter’s ability to adapt. “Every holiday, I try to be with her. If I’m away, I always make sure I (make flight arrangements) to get to her or fly her to me. I may be away for a year, but I take advantage of every four-day weekend to get home to see her, and I’ve been pretty fortunate that my chain of command has always been supportive of that.” Additionally, having familial support has been instrumental to the Gold Star Family’s resiliency. Gardner said her parents are always willing to care for Brittney, often for school years at a time, and her sister has lived with them from time to time as needed. For the next chapter of the Gardner family, the first sergeant is preparing to attend the Sergeants Major Academy and Brittney is set to join the 9th grade while residing with her grandparents. “I would love to take her because they gave me that option,” Gardner said. “But

with all the activities she does, and the school work I’ll need to complete, we decided it would be best for her to return to my parents’ house. When I talked to Brittney, she told me to go to be a sergeant major and that she would start 9th grade with her grandparents, and they would both win.” It’s the latest example of resiliency, Gardner noted, that has always helped the family cope with any of the life challenges that have come along. “I’m not like that – if you tell me something bad, it takes me a bit to bounce back,” the first sergeant admitted. “But Brittney, I could tell her some bad news and she may be mad for a little bit, but then she’s back on track with seeing the positive side of things.” Being a military child means you have to be able to bounce back, Brittany observed. “Moving can be hard. I’ve seen it among my peers, but it’s not that bad for me,” she said. “I always know we are going to move again, so I make sure I’m ready for it. I want to be able to adapt to wherever we go. As I’m getting older, I understand that when it’s time to go, I’m ready.”


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Recognizing Civilians | Spotlight

Ralph K. Simcox Hometown: Detroit Length of federal service: 15 Years Job title: KAHC command group secretary Job duties: “Research, tracking deadlines, scheduling meetings for the (command team), reviewing and editing policies, creating and updating correspondence, assisting both internal and external customers with their varied administrative needs, and for a time, providing back-up Patient Advocate services.” What do you love most about your job? “The interaction; providing creative solutions to problems, and simplifying processes along the way.” Do you volunteer? “Not right now. With a full-time and two part-time jobs, evening, plus graduate studies, and family time with my beautiful wife and two daughters (ages 1 and 3), time is simply at a premium. In the future, I do look forward to volunteering at the VA hospital.” What do you expect from leaders? “To lead from the front, not the rear. As a matter of integrity and by virtue of their positions, leaders are expected to ‘walk the walk’ and be positive examples to those who follow them.”

surroundings, and the peace and tranquility that came with the location.” Do you have any pet peeves? “When the milk cap is not screwed on tight.” Which historical figure would you most like to meet? “I would have been honored to have met President Ronald Reagan. He embodied many of the personal values that seem to have gone by the wayside today.” What is your greatest fear? “I fear losing hope. Having it gives us a sense of purpose – something to look forward to – and when generally applied can be even something cathartic when shared with others.” What is your greatest extravagance? “A good bottle of wine with my wife on a special occasion. Besides, I have kids and so providing for them is what takes precedence, and spending time with them and my wife that’s the best extravagance possible.” Which talent would you most like to have? “I would like to develop great empathy and unconditional positivity regarding with people I engage with on a daily basis.” What’s your motto? “Sorry, I’m not smart enough to Amy Perry come up with one myself, so I’ll borrow one from another. Where would you most like to live? “In Malta or Avila, St. Iraneus once said, ‘The greatest glory of God is to see man Spain.” fully alive.’ This statement may be met with some hesitancy, When and where were you happiest? “Sitting on top as it references God, Christianity, etc., but if it’s really of Mount Krizevac contemplating the awesomeness of my SEE SIMCOX, page 15


New piers to enhance operations at Mechling River Training Site

T. Anthony Bell

Senior Reporter/Special Projects

Soldiers undergoing Quartermaster School instruction at Fort Lee’s Mechling River Training Site will benefit from the construction of two new piers that were projected to be ready for use this week. Also called Training Area 28, the site is located on the Appomattox River just off River Road opposite the McLaney Drop Zone. It is one of several facilities used to train Soldiers enrolled in the 92W Water Treatment Specialist Course. School administrators said the pier completion is symbolic of the cooperative spirit within CASCOM and the QM School to accomplish missions. “This is almost like a dream come true,” said William A. Quimbayoglen chief of the Petroleum and Water Department’s Water Training Division. “Just having the ability to improve our training platform and having the support of our leadership – within the department, the schoolhouse and CASCOM – is a blessing. It is an excellent example of working together to improve our training.” The piers were needed to remedy the frequency of river traffic and its effect on the areas where student training takes place, among other reasons, said Johnny Brown, site manager. “In the past, we’ve had a lot of erosion taking place over here,” he said, pointing

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to an embankment. “It made it difficult for Soldiers to go out there and deploy their anchors and strainers because of the barges that come through here three times a day.” Anchors and strainers must be placed in the water to operate water purification systems. Waves from the barges, Brown explained, tended to move equipment positioned in the water, which required Soldiers to retrieve them. That has long been a safety concern. “With these piers, the Soldiers don’t have to go into the water,” he said. “They can walk 30 feet out on the pier, drop the anchor and strainer and start the system up.” The two piers are spaced roughly 30 feet apart; extend 30 feet out from the embankment; and are 30 and 40 feet in width, respectively, said Brown. Their construction is part of ongoing efforts to better accommodate Soldiers. “We never stop improving the training sites,” he said. “We want to make these facilities better than when we arrived. The more we can improve training, the more we can entice Soldiers’ desire to train.” Erosion problems at the pier were first identified five years ago, said Brown. Construction began in December at a cost of roughly $350,000, he added. PWD graduates roughly 700 water treatment specialists on a yearly basis, said Quimbayoglen.

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(BELOW) Sgt. 1st Class Elain ColonSilva, a Petroleum and Water Department instructor, stands on one of two new piers at the Mechling River Training Site along River Road where he shared details and safety information about the structures during a Feb. 12 tour for Quartermaster School leaders and PWD instructors.

T. Anthony Bell


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Staff Sgt. Desirae Delarosa, a drill sergeant for Charlie Company, 832nd Ordnance Battalion, watches Soldiers train during the pilot testing of the Hand Grenade Range Feb. 7.

Contributed Phot

832nd OD Soldiers test out new hand grenade range 1st Lt. Kami Miles 832nd Ordnance Battalion

Soldiers from the 832d Ordnance Battalion, 59th Ordnance Brigade, piloted the first training session Feb. 7 at the installation’s newly built Hand Grenade Qualification Course. The hand grenade range at Training Area 18 was developed and constructed by the 59th Ordnance Brigade in order to increase rigor and rehearse Warrior Tasks and Battle Drills in the Initial Entry Training Program of Instruction. The location has two separate training areas: the Hand Grenade Familiarization Range and the Hand Grenade Qualification Course. The HGFR replicates the dimensions and safety areas found at a typical qualification

course. At this first familiarization station, trainees were instructed on the qualification procedures, identified their throwing habits and form, and demonstrated the correct throwing procedures. The second portion of the qualification course, HGQC, consists of seven stations that requires engaging targets and identifying hand grenades. Soldiers were guided through and assessed on engaging targets at the first six stations: engage a group in the open from a two-man fighting position, engage a bunker using available cover and concealment, engage a fortified enemy mortar position, engage a group of enemy targets, clear an entry point to a trench line, and engage enemy troops in a halted, open-type wheeled vehicle. At the seventh station, Soldiers had to identify

grenades by type and purpose, using the shape, color and markings depicted by a training aid. Pvt. Jaimel Hester and Pvt. Brandon Nguyen were two of the Soldiers who had the opportunity to participate in the hand grenade range debut. “It was an exciting experience,” said Hester. “I’m glad that we are able to go through this again and improve the skills we learned in basic combat training. The training in basic happened so quickly and I feel like I was not able to fully absorb the skills needed to complete the different stations.” Nguyen concurred with that assessment. “This was the best part about basic combat training, and I’m glad that AIT is bringing it back,” he said. “I feel more confident and

prepared for my next unit, especially if I find myself in a combat situation.” Staff Sgts. Desirae Delarosa and Michael Hilgendorf, drill sergeants assigned to Charlie Company of the 832nd Ord. Bn., were the primary and alternate instructors for the training. Utilizing knowledge gained from her first drill sergeant assignment with Fort Jackson’s Basic Combat Training program and applying the training requirements Delarosa, along other 832nd OD Bn. troops, executed the Fort Lee Hand Grenade Range pilot. Units throughout Fort Lee will now have the ability to plan and conduct training on the course, thus providing the operational Army with Soldiers who are prepared to contribute upon arrival at their first units of assignment.


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Transportation Artifact of the Month

Contributed Photo

The M10170 Heavy Equipment Transporter pictured is on display at the U.S. Army Transportation Museum, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. In the late 1980s, the Army realized that as a result of the continued development of the M1 tank, the M911/M747 tank transporter had reached its limit. In 1993, the Oshkosh-designed M1070 entered Army service. Paired with the M1000 trailer, the vehicle transported, deployed and recovered M1 tanks and other heavy equipment. The M1070 first saw service during Bosnia and Kosovo peacekeeping missions, but truly proved its worth during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Based in Camp Arifjan, Kuwait, HETs traveled throughout Iraq moving armored vehicles to their required destinations. To further protect crews, the trucks were outfitted with a protection kit around the cab and fire suppressant blankets around the fuel tanks. This particular HET was last used by the 1st Transportation Brigade conducting operations in Operation New Dawn before being shipped to the museum in 2011.

Pet of the Week

U.S. Army Photo

Log LT finishes third in cross country meet

First Lt. Jennifer Hannigan, a Captain’s Career Course student at Fort Lee’s Army Logistics University, competes in the Armed Forces Cross Country Championship Feb. 2 in Tallahassee, Fla. Hannigan finished third among military women with a time of 38:05, which helped the Army clinch its fifth consecutive women’s team title. The Army also captured the men’s championship title at the meet. Hannigan, a West Point graduate and Aurora, Colo., native has competed at the collegiate level and spent the past three years representing the All-Army team. She hopes to continue her servicelevel competition endeavors. “I love running, competing and just the camaraderie in the All-Army program,” she said.

Ray Kozakewicz

Nani, an Alaskan Malamute mixed female dog, is available for adoption at the Fort Lee Stray Animal Facility on 38th Street, near the Defense Commissary Agency Headquarters. She is approximately nine months old, is microchipped with all her shots and full of puppy energy, according to her caretakers. They recommend someone with a fenced-in yard consider adopting her. There also are three cats available. There are no adoption fees for any animals at the facility. The shelter also is seeking new volunteers and donations of cat food. For details, contact Officer Rob Moore, PMO animal control officer, at 804-721-9291.


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Team Lee members show caring during Hope Center meal service T. Anthony Bell

Senior Reporter/Special Projects

About 25 Navy and Air Force culinary students, instructors and support staff ventured out into the local community Feb. 8 to do something quite different from their everyday classroom and unit training routines. The volunteers lent their skills to the lunchtime feeding operation at The Hope Center, a nonprofit facility in Petersburg operated by Downtown Churches United, Inc., with a goal of easing hunger and financial stress for less-fortunate citizens. Scott Fisher, executive director of the facility, said Fort Lee volunteers have supported the operation in the past, but never in the food preparation category. “This is the first time since I’ve been down here that we’ve had the military come down in a volunteer capacity to cook,” he said. The Fort Lee group prepared meals for about 30 people, set up feeding lines and served the food – tasks that are nearly identical to the duties the students in training will perform as trained culinarians. Deborah Pulliam, who coordinates the feeding operation, said the troops lent a bountiful hand and their actions were meaningful. “It lets (our patrons) know others do care,” she

said. “It’s the willingness and enthusiasm of volunteers that makes outreach events like this so special.” The Hope Center serves meals every weekday, and on two Sundays a month. The operation is year-round and includes ancillary services like faith counseling and financial assistance for emergencies. It is supported by Petersburg’s faith community. In addition to earning praise from the off-post organization, the volunteer project provided a lesson about compassion, dignity and respect, noted Lauren P. Barboza, the garrison’s sexual assault and response coordinator who orchestrated the event. It “sets the appropriate tone,” she said, for an organization that’s deeply invested in promoting positive values among its military personnel, many of who are students in training. Future projects are assured, Barboza noted while citing the thought-provoking name of the initiative – Army Community Service’s Teal Team Six. Through community service work, the group leaders are endeavoring to provide troops with unique perspectives that will broaden their understanding of people in need. “Teal Team Six is a mentoring initiative we developed as a part of our sexual assault prevention strategy,” she said. “One of the elements of the strategy is outreach and community sup-

port. Of course our community is the military, but we wanted to broaden and expand that and have the military community support our neighbors in the local area.” Barboza said TTS intends to pursue community service as a part of its battle rhythm. “At least once a quarter, we want to do something that is greater than ourselves and do it in a community other than our own,” she said. The junior troops who volunteered for the Hope Center event also were part of the planning committee and coordinated the logistics for the occasion, said Barboza, noting Navy and Air Force noncommissioned officers served as mentors throughout the process. It is another aspect of the effort that keeps the spotlight on positive action, she added. “It’s an opportunity for us to continuously develop the mindset and desire so we can focus on taking care of people, treating people with dignity and respect and not focusing on behaviors that are negative or that might lead to misconduct, or worse, sexual violence,” she said. Teal Team Six was rolled out October 2018, said Barboza. The Hope Center feeding operation was its first event. Barboza is setting her sights on many more. For more information about TTS, call 804-734-7083.


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Lara Poirrier

Capt. Brian Harris runs on the Assault AirRunner during the U.S. Army Warrior Fitness Team tryouts Feb. 8-10 at Fort Knox, Ky.

Improvements to Army health, fitness system in upcoming pilot Gary Sheftick Army News Service

WASHINGTON – The Army may soon place nutritionists, physical therapists and sports trainers at the unit level to improve individual readiness, said Secretary of the Army Mark T. Esper. The idea is “to really start looking at Soldiers as professional athletes,” Esper said Friday morning while speaking at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. The athletic trainers and therapists are set to be assigned to brigades and some battalions later this year as part of a pilot program under the Army’s holistic health and fitness system. The H2F system is overseen by the Center for Initial Military Training and a spokesperson there confirmed that 130 military authorizations will be allocated to units by the end of fiscal year 2019 to “enhance personnel readiness.” Occupational therapists may also be in that mix, Esper said. Most of the positions will go to brigades, but some will be assigned to Army Forces Command battalions selected last fall. FORSCOM selected 30 battalions to train

with health and fitness professionals with an expectation to reduce overall Soldier injuries. “In the future, once these take place and really take hold, we’ll have a more deployable and more capable force,” Esper said. In 2016, the Army began placing athletic trainers at its initial-entry training centers. That year, 20 of them went to Fort Benning, Ga., to work with Soldiers at all five of the post’s training battalions. One goal was to prevent musculoskeletal injuries. Athletic trainers were also brought into basic combat training sites at Fort Jackson, S.C.; Fort Sill, Okla.; and Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. The sports trainers not only educated Soldiers on injury prevention, they also provided treatment to Soldiers following injuries to reduce their recovery time. Instead of sending injured Soldiers to hospitals, they were treated at their units and this saved a significant amount of training time, officials said. The Army is also extending infantry initial-entry training to improve personnel readiness. A pilot program last year at Fort Benning, Georgia, extended the infantry oneSEE army fitness, page 15

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Kenner Connection | American Heart Month

Heart to heart: what makes us tick? Kenner Army Health Clinic’s commitment to its beneficiaries is to provide access to high-quality health care while empowering patients to take the steps necessary for leading a happy, healthy lifestyle. February is American Heart Month and the perfect opportunity for patients to energize their bodies and minds by paying attention to one of their most important “engines” – the heart. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is still the leading cause of death for men and women. The numbers reflect 1- in-every-4 deaths are due to this ailment. Heart disease complications last year accounted for the untimely death of some notable people. Americans are at the greatest risk for complications due to other medical conditions. Although not everyone with other medical conditions and poor dietary habits will experience heart disease, a healthier lifestyle may reduce other factors that influence heart disease complications. Kenner providers recommend patients get an annual health checkup. One of the first steps to maintaining a healthy heart is to understand how to keep it in top form. Learn to recognize the early signs and symptoms of stroke and heart attacks. The American Heart Association website has information on many different types of complications associated with heart disease. Typical warning signs are chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations and even fatigue. Warning signs for women may differ, and staying in “tune” with one’s body may help individuals recognize other warning signs. The “Go Red for Women” campaign has a website to educate women by sharing personal stories of heart attack and stroke survivors. Unfortunately, there are just as many myths in regards to heart disease as there are facts based in research. “Many patients miss the warning signs or think I am just

getting older,” said Stephen P. Boychuck, MSN, FNP. “If you are experiencing a decrease in your exercise tolerance, are getting easily fatigued doing your normal activities, get short of breath walking up a flight of stairs, please see your provider.” The American Heart Association website at https:// www.heart.org/en is a great resource showing popular topics – TIA, Cardiac Catheter, Cholesterol, Heart Attack and Stents. Cardiovascular disease is complex. There are many factors that contribute to heart disease. Know your risk for heart disease. Call for a referral or schedule preventive health screenings for colon cancer, breast cancer, cervical cancer, diabetes and other preventive health services.

Discuss risk factors with your provider and learn which ones can be modified. There are some ways to stay on top of your own health. Know your cholesterol numbers. High cholesterol contributes to a build-up of plaque along the walls of arteries that can interfere with blood supply to the heart. This condition can lead to reduced blood flow, which could put you at risk. Know your numbers for “good” and “bad” cholesterol and know what you can do to manage blood pressure, blood sugar and weight. We all memorize numbers every day. Do we take the time to know the numbers that impact our lives? Check your blood sugar with an A1C test at least annually. Diabetic complications can seriously impact health and lead to heart complications. Monitor your weight. Take advantage of KAHC resources. We have a full-time dietician. The clinic has an outstanding Army Wellness Centers on Mahone Avenue. The AWC is of no cost for beneficiaries. Stop smoking. The provider team Metro Ceative can help you enroll in the smoking cessation class offered by the clinic. With a few changes to everyday activities, we can show one of our most vital organs – our hearts – some extra love this month. Make your medical appointment today; scheduling an appointment with Kenner is quick and easy. Patients have the option of scheduling appointments in one of two ways. TRICARE Online Patient Portal, available 365/24/7 at www.tricareonline.com for selfservice and is a convenient and easy way to book an appointment. Beneficiaries also can call the Patient Appointment Line at 1-866-LEE-KAHC (533-5242) from 7 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday - Friday.

– Kenner Army Health Clinic


Joe Lacdan

Army News Service

WASHINGTON – As service members continue to be heavily tasked overseas, separation from families and the impact of deployments on children rank as top areas of concern, a Blue Star Family survey revealed. The 2018 Military Family Lifestyle Survey, which evaluated responses of more than 10,000 service members, spouses and veterans, also showed quality of life remains a key issue. “Improvements in our quality of life for our men and women and their families is our focus each and every day,” said Lt. Gen. Gwen Bingham, the Army’s assistant chief of staff for installation management. “I think when we do this well, our Soldiers, civilians and families really prosper. Additionally, military spouse employment also scored high, as spouses often must transition their careers and home life to frequent deployments and change of duty stations. ACSIM has partnered with Army Training and Doctrine Command to develop a vision for future installations and the services provided for the comfort and well-being of military families and spouses. ACSIM conducted surveys among younger Soldiers and their families. The results showed the top priority was accessibility and interaction through social media to learn about installation benefits and services, Bingham said. She addressed concerns of veterans and military families during a panel discussion in Washington Wednesday. “They want to be connected in a way that gives them that instantaneous response,” she said of young Soldiers.

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Quality of life, retention, among service priorities

Joe Lacdan

Lt. Gen. Gwen Bingham, the Army’s assistant chief of staff for installation management, discusses concerns of Soldiers and their families during a panel discussion in Washington, D.C., Feb. 6.

Bingham added the Army is looking into the possibility of adding more self-service cash registers at installation facilities to expedite the purchasing process for service members and their families. Partnering with local community leaders will also be crucial to improving quality of life for service members, as on-average, only 35 percent of an installation’s population lives on base, she said. “That’s really one of the things that we benefit from: those strong relationships and partnerships,” Bingham said. “We cannot do it by ourselves.” Lt. Gen. Nadja West, Army surgeon general

and commander of Army Medical Command, addressed the issue of long-term retention in the service in another panel discussion. The general said the Army must gain an understanding of young recruits’ career aspirations. When Army leaders and recruiters can help chart the path of a young Soldier or lieutenant, they can increase the possibility of a longterm commitment to the Army. Showcasing the diversity of career fields in the Army can be crucial to retaining women and men, she said. In recent years, the number of careers for female Soldiers has increased, as the Defense Department opened combat-related jobs to

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women in 2015, including combat engineers and Army Rangers. “That only makes us better as a nation – as a military,” Bingham said. An educational campaign to better inform female recruits about jobs could also be key in retaining female service members, the general said. A mentoring program that addresses issues and challenges of each career field could provide assistance. Safety and well-being could also be a concern of potential female recruits, West said. She said the Army remains dedicated to ending sexual harassment in the service. While sexual harassment in the workplace remains an ongoing battle, Army leaders continue to strengthen prevention efforts. “Our senior leaders take this extremely seriously at the highest levels,” West said. Among the strategies: the service has stressed Army values early in Soldiers’ careers. Soldiers are given lessons on acceptable behavior, and Army values are established as a foundation for professional conduct. Each unit has been assigned an advocate and educator trained on sexual harassment and sexual assault issues. Victims can seek counsel from these individuals and provide assistance. They also create a welcome, safe environment for victims who may be afraid to seek help. “If anyone is a victim of any of those types of behaviors, they have someone to go to directly that knows how to get them help if they need it,” West said. “Just to make sure that there is a culture that the victims – no matter if they’re males or females – can go somewhere to get assistance. There’s no tolerance for (sexual harassment and sexual assault).”


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Thrift Shop Story Time | Thursdays

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A story time activity for children is offered L ocal A ctivities for the F ort L ee C ommunity each Thursday, 6-6:45 p.m., at the Fort Lee Thrift Shop, building 5105, Lee and B AvThe guest speaker will be Joseph V. Micallef, Feb. 23, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., at Historic Tredegar, enue. The next event is Feb. 21. a historian, author, syndicated columnist and 500 Tredegar St., Richmond. Parents can enjoy leisurely shopping at the war correspondent. The event begins with a cleanup along the facility while their children are entertained A reception and tasting will follow the talk. banks of the James River as groups mobilize with a story. For additional details, email to fill bags of trash and recyclables. A 5K ftleethriftshop@gmail.com or visit the facil- Richmond Kids Expo | Feb. 23 Walk/Run is set for noon, and the James River ity’s Facebook page. The 16th Annual Richmond Kids Expo is Jump will be held at 1:30 p.m. Participants set for Feb. 23, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., at Richmond must be 13 years of age or older to take part AABHM Observance | Feb. 22 Raceway Complex Indoors, 600 E. Laburnum in the jump and are encouraged to wear cosDr. Gina Paige, co-founder and president Ave. tumes. The festival continues until 4 p.m. with of African Ancestry, Inc., will be the guest The event will include more than 100 entertainment, food and more in heated tents. speaker for the installation’s annual African- exhibitors, live entertainment, games, prizes For registration, visit shiverintheriver.com. American/Black History Month Observance and many activities for children. For questions, contact Michael Baum at set for Feb. 22, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., in the For details, visit www.richmondkidsexpo. 804-562-8283 or mbaum@keepvirginiabeauLee Theater. Admission is free and all com- com/. tiful.org. munity members are invited. Paige’s organization pioneered a new way Jamestown ‘After Angelo’ Day | Resume Writing Workshop | of tracing African lineages using genetics. The Feb. 23 Feb. 26 observance theme is “Black Migrations.” The “After Angelo: Celebrating Black Women The Soldier for Life Transition Assistance program will include musical performances in America” is a day-long event featuring Program will host a free resume-writing workfrom the 392nd Army Band and the Virginia music, dramatic performances, discussions, shop Feb. 26, 9 a.m. - noon, at the Soldier SupState University Gospel Chorale, entertain- historical presentations and more. It will be port Center, Room 126, building 3400, 1401 ment from Ordnance Soldiers, informational held Feb. 23, 10 a.m. - 10 p.m., at Jamestown B Ave. displays and more. Settlement, 2110 Jamestown Road, WilliamsParticipants will receive tips on fine-tuning For further information, contact Capt. Jelesa burg. objectives, crafting work history, showcasing Anthony-Hall, Battalion S3/S2, 832nd Ord. The event focuses on the legacy of Angelo, skills and more. Bn., at 804-734-8780. the first African woman mentioned by name in For registration, call 804-734-6612 or email the historical record at Jamestown. army.lee.sfltap@mail.mil. Library MakerSpace Activity | For additional details, call 888-593-4682 or Feb. 22 visit historyisfun.org/jamestown-settlement/ AFTB Leadership Training | The Fort Lee Community Library has after-angelo. Feb. 27-28 scheduled its next MakerSpace program for A two-day Army Family Team Building Feb. 22, 5 p.m., in Bunker Hall Cafe, Army Vet Clinic Wellness Day | Leadership Development and Mentoring class Logistics University campus. Those interested Feb. 23 – titled “To Lead or Not to Lead” – is set for should arrive as close to the starting time as The Fort Lee Veterinary Treatment Facility Feb. 27-28, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., at the Army Logispossible in order to complete the project will host a walk-in Wellness Day Feb. 23, 8 tics University, 34th Street. The course is free. before the event is over. a.m. - noon, in building 11025, 38th Street. The workshop will examine leadership MakerSpace is free and open to all ages. Services will include wellness exams, styles and qualities. Registration is required Participants can use tools, techniques and vaccines, microchips, and heartworm and fecal by Feb. 26. AFTB offers other ongoing classes hands-on learning with the goal of inspiring tests. Those not registered in the system will throughout the year. and nurturing their interest in science, need to bring vaccination documents and other For further details, call 804-734-7979. technology, engineering, art and math. pertinent medical records. In addition, the For other details, call 804-765-8095. clinic will hold a free pet weight management AER Kickoff Event | Feb. 28 seminar 1-3 p.m. This event is for active duty Fort Lee community members are invited to History of Whisky Presentation | military members, retirees and spouses. the annual Army Emergency Relief Campaign Feb. 23 For more information, call 804-734-2446 Kickoff set for Feb. 28, 1-2 p.m., at the Lee A presentation on the origins of scotch Theater, Mahone Ave. whisky is set for Feb. 23, 5 p.m., at the U.S. Shiver in the River | Feb. 23 A guest speaker will discuss how AER benArmy Transportation Museum, Joint-Base Keep Virginia Beautiful has scheduled its efits Soldiers and their families, and program Langley-Eustis. annual Shiver in the River Winter Festival coordinators will share details on how com-

munity members can make donations through payroll deduction or one-time contributions. The program point of contact is Patsy Piggott at 804-734-7952 or patsy.m.piggott.civ@ mail.mil.

‘Birth and Mortality’ Workshop | Feb. 28

Adult participants will learn about the religious, governmental and social concepts and activities that were involved in the life cycle of people in 17th century Virginia Feb. 28, 2-4 p.m., at Henricus Historical Park, 251 Henricus Park Road. Chester. Adult groups, clubs, college classes and individuals are welcome. Registration is required by Feb. 26. For additional details, call 804-318-8797.

Wheelhouse Wednesday at TenStrike | March 6

The Transportation Corps hosts a social event on the first Wednesday of each month. The next one will take place at Fort Lee’s TenStrike Bowling and Entertainment Center, 2403 C Ave., on March 6, 5 p.m. Wheelhouse Wednesdays connect students, senior leaders and friends of the Transportation Corps in a relaxed atmosphere. For other details, call 804-765-7447.

‘Fiddler on the Roof Jr.’ Opens | March 8

The Theater Company at Fort Lee opens its second KidKapers production of the season, “Fiddler on the Roof Jr,” on March 8, 7 p.m., at the Lee Theater, 4300 Mahone Ave. This timeless play tells the story of Tevye and his daughters as they navigate the crossroads between tradition and a rapidly changing world in Anatevka, a small Jewish village in Russia. The play features memorable songs such as “Matchmaker, Matchmaker,” “If I Were a Rich Man,” “Sunrise, Sunset,” and “Far From the Home I Love.” Director Caroline Mincks and choreographer Suzi Redling present a cast of over 40 of the best young actors who bring to life a play the whole family will love. Additional performances are March 9 and 15 at 7 p.m. and March 10, 16, and 17 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $7 for general admission seating and may be purchased at the door. For reservations or more information, call the box office 804-734-6629.

For more installation and outside the gate events and activities, visit our online calendar at www.fortleetraveller.com/calendar


SIMCOX, continued from page 6 unpacked and brought down to a humanist level, it means that you and I are supposed to work together, and do so with the interest if bringing about the best in each other.” Role model: “Saint Mother Therese for the depth of humanity she had shown toward the poor and marginalized.” What is it that you most dislike? “Taking the long walk when a short one would suffice.” What is something people would be surprised to know about you? “In eighth

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grade, I had the lead role in a play called ‘Beauty Queen of Cabbage Corners.’ I had to dress the part as a ‘beauty queen’… high heels, make-up, the whole works.” What are your future aspirations? “I am pursuing a Marriage and Family Counseling Degree at Capella University, and my hope is to be a licensed marriage and family therapist with the VA hospital, particularly working with vets who have suffered from PTSDrelated injuries and their families.” – Compiled by Amy Perry

ARMY FITNESS, continued from page 11 station unit training, or OSUT, from 14 to 22 weeks. Esper visited Benning to observe the extended OSUT training and said the results were dramatic. “You’re seeing Soldiers with much higher physical fitness scores,” he said, adding that the infantry graduates were “much more competent, tactically and technically.” The Army has also developed a new fitness test that Esper said better prepares Soldiers for the rigors they will face in combat. The six events in the Army Combat Fitness Test “for the first time really links physical fitness with the demands and rigors of the battlefield,” he said. In October, the Army selected 63 battalion-sized units to try out the ACFT as part of

a pilot program. Mobile training teams went to the battalions to train NCOs how to conduct the tests. Now these 63 units will begin “field-testing” the ACFT. Each of the battalions will need to conduct two ACFTs before October and space them about six months apart, according to the Center for Initial Military Training. The field tests will provide data to possibly adjust the ACFT grading standards before the test is adopted throughout the Army. In October 2020, when the ACFT is implemented across the Army, officials expect it to further decrease injuries, improve personnel readiness and combat effectiveness. “At the end of the day, the Army is a people business,” Esper said, “and people are our most important asset.”

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Fort Lee Traveller | Feb. 21, 2019  

Fort Lee Traveller | Feb. 21, 2019