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CSM Scarborough, the new Trans. Corps senior enlisted leader, ‘anxious to work with team of professionals’

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

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January 31, 2019 | Vol. 79, No. 5

Quality Care CDC administrators emphasize value of program on eve of rate increase taking effect Feb. 1

SEE PAGE 4

RETIREE REFUSES TO TRAVEL ROAD TO IRRELEVANCE Driven by the same sense of engagement he held in high regard during his time in service, Milton Hazzard Jr., age 76, says he has no interest in slowing down soon SEE PAGES 8-9

SMART SUPER BOWL SHOPPING Good home preparation, grocery store strategies are key to achieving the perfect big-game party SEE PAGE 2

LEE TAX CENTER OPEN FOR BUSINESS Leaders emphasize value of program, expert help available, during grand opening celebration SEE PAGE 7

CLOSER LOOK AT CLINIC PHARMACY With various ways to fill prescriptions, the Kenner department does its best to meet expectations SEE PAGE 10


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Expect frantic food-foraging weekend as football fans prepare for festivities

Fort Lee

Commanding General ................... Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Hollie J. Martin Public Affairs Officer ............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor ...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments .......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor .................. Amy Perry Production Assistant............................... Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

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There is only one thing that can clear supermarket shelves faster than a forecast of ferocious weather. Super Bowl Sunday. Statisticians say it’s the second largest day for food consumption in the U.S., edged out of the top spot only by Thanksgiving. What that translates to in stores is a bonanza for game-grub manufacturers and retailers who erected their “be prepared for the big day” and buy-one-get-one-free sales displays weeks ago; placing them in a manner that makes it easy to overlook the heartsmart options patrons began buying in early January to meet their weight-loss resolutions. Be forewarned, consumers – the panic of Super Bowl party shopping over the next few days may lead to episodes of unruly chip grabbing and racing ahead of old ladies to secure the last jar of queso dip. As the mother of an Eagle Scout, I feel obligated to render assistance in this area. No, that doesn’t mean helping senior citizens and bystanders survive. I believe I have a foolproof system for achieving game-day glory in the shopping department. Before you take on the pre-bowl crowds at the grocery stores, be sure to ready the home front. Clear the refrigerator of useless items such as milk, eggs, fruits and vegetables. Other than a few sticks of celery to accompany the wings, toss any unprocessed foodstuffs that are taking up precious space needed for Bowl Day essentials.

Once the kitchen has been purged of all healthy, vitaminfortified, unprocessed, fiber-rich foods, it’s time to mentally prepare for what you might encounter at the grocery stores. Like a Roman Gladiator ascending the catacombs of the Coliseum; like Muhammed Ali entering the ring to take on Joe Frazier; like the Greek soldiers climbing out of the wooden horse inside the gates of Troy; like the Duke of Wellington about to face Napoleon’s army at Waterloo; like The Real Housewives of New Jersey sitting down to dinner – you must be ready to wage a battle of epic proportions. As you jot down the arsenal of foods needed for football fan sustenance, breathe deeply and meditate on the past. Gone are the archaic days of yesteryear when bowl-watchers survived on outdated canned meat party sandwiches, pimento cheese spreads and gelatin salads. Thanks to modern advances in processed cheese technology, the invention of Buffalo wings (the origins of which are “hotly” debated, yuck-yuck), and the mass-production of tortilla chips in 1994, we are fortunate to have a proliferation of delicious modern game day snack foods at our disposal. Presuming you can find an available shopping cart without committing aggravated assault, enter the grocery store with a strategy. Don’t just join the stream shoppers like some kind of amusement park pony, strike out on your own and hunt down your targets. Unlike every other grocery store trip, it is actually a tro

Contributing Writer

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Lisa Smith Molinari

Considered the nation’s “unofficial

12th federal holiday,” Super Bowl Sunday is a time to gather with family and friends to socialize and watch what is arguably the most popular sports championship game in America. Unfortunately, the dark side to this festive event is its reputation as one of the most hazardous days on our highways due to impaired, fatigued and inattentive driving. Those planning to drink should hand over their keys to a designated driver or make plans to stay overnight. Remember to buckle up, keeping in mind that other impaired drivers may be on the road or weather conditions may result in slippery road conditions. Lower speeds during periods of limited visibility. If you’re hosting a party, be aware that you can be held liable if someone served alcohol causes an impaireddriving accident. Party hosts should have food and non-alcoholic beverage options available, as well as taxi company phone numbers to get intoxicated individuals safely home.

SEE SUPERBOWL WEEKEND, page 15

The Fort Lee Traveller is an authorized publication for members of the DOD, printed by Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee, Virginia. Contents of the Fort Lee Traveller are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee Public Affairs Office. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services advertised by the U.S. Army or Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc. Everything advertised in this publication will be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher will refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation has been corrected.

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Amy Perry Daisy Nelson, an associate youth development specialist for the Strong Beginnings program at Yorktown Child Development Center, reviews a spelling lesson with enrolled children Wednesday. Strong Beginnings is one of the many learning activities offered by Child and Youth Services at a cost that’s “a great value for patrons” compared to off-post programs. For more, see Page 4.

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Photos by T. Anthony Bell

(LEFT) Command Sgt. Maj. Terrence T. Scarborough accepts the Transportation Corps colors from Col. Jered P. Helwig, Chief of Transportation, during a change of responsibility ceremony Jan. 25 in Wylie Hall auditorium. Scarborough replaced CSM Vickie G. Culp, who began her tenure July 29, 2016. He comes to Fort Lee from the 598th Trans. Brigade located in Sembach, Germany. Scarborough has 26 years of service. (RIGHT) Culp, the outgoing Transportation Corps senior enlisted leader, embraces CSM Roslyn M. Floyd, Army Logistics University Support Battalion CSM, following the change of responsibility ceremony. Culp will be retiring in the near future.

TC welcomes Scarborough as new senior enlisted leader T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

“It’s an honor to lead and continue the legacy of the 13th Transportation Corps Command Sergeant Major who has paved the way through modernization, talent management, and more importantly, in caring for our Soldiers, civilians and their families.” Those were the thankful acknowledgements of Command Sgt. Maj. Terrence T. Scarborough as he recognized the work of his predecessor following the traditional passing of the branch colors during the Transportation Corps Change of Responsibility ceremony Jan. 25 in Wylie Hall auditorium. Scarborough replaced CSM Vickie G. Culp at the event that was officiated by Col. Jered P. Helwig, Chief of Transportation, and attended by roughly 200 community members, including many senior military and civilian leaders.

In his welcoming remarks, Helwig lauded both of the top enlisted Soldiers, saying each are expert trainers; experienced technical and tactical advisors; and mission monitors who constantly work to improve operations. “By all accounts,” he said, “those sergeants major on the stage exemplify the characteristics and embody the standards that are the hallmarks of the U.S. Army.” During his time at the lectern, Scarborough, a native of Hartford, Conn., thanked his family, friends and supporters as well as all who worked on staging the event. He went on to say he looks forward to continuing the work of his predecessor through constant engagement. “By way of professional dialogue and continued adaptation, the Transportation Corps can continue to align with the Army’s vision and operating concept to prepare for large-scale, ground combat operations,” said

the motor transport operator-trained Soldier. “Therefore, I vow to work in close association with the teams of talented professionals in order to set conditions while supporting the commander’s priorities so we can deliver the best logistician and/or capability to the Army.” Scarborough comes to Fort Lee from the 598th Trans. Brigade at Sembach, Germany. Command Sgt. Maj. Culp, who always speaks with a high level of vivaciousness, started her remarks with a stroke of comedy. “Can y’all see me?” she asked a laughing audience while making adjustments to a lectern about as tall as her. Culp went on to pay her respects to a long list of people and organizations who she said made a difference during her tenure. “I just want to say thank you,” she acknowledged. “This is truly a Team Lee story. We communicated and collaborated (to

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get the job) done.” Not least, Culp thanked Helwig, the third COT she has served under. “Sir, I know our time seemed short, but in my mind it wasn’t,” she said. “From day one, you trusted in me and our relationship developed. I will be forever grateful knowing that for my last division (level-position) I had an awesome battle buddy, which makes leaving bittersweet.” During his speech, Helwig said Culp was the “complete package.” “I’ve rarely seen someone – officer or NCO – who was able to work off of commander’s intent and communicate the commander’s vision like Command Sergeant Major Culp,” he said. “She easily transitioned from tactical to strategic. She connects the dots, and she articulates the finer points in a masterful way.” Among Culp’s accomplishments, listed by Helwig, is the transformation of advanced individual training for transportation students with several tactical enhancements; working to craft a cooperative degree program for trans. Soldiers with Kaplan University; and writing a new professional development efficiency code for transportation sergeants major. Those accomplishments, he continued, “pale in significance to the impact you’ve had on hundreds of Soldiers in your distinguished career.” Though a better part of Culp’s speech was spent in gratitude, the remainder focused on various tidbits of advice. Among them – work as a team, lead a balanced life, ask for help when it is needed and set the example. Perhaps, the most meaningful was this piece on impacting young Soldiers: “We have to respond properly to the challenges these fine young Soldiers are confronted with,” she said. “We have to hand them a better Army. “If we do, they will not let us or themselves down,” Culp said. “I know they will build upon what they were given, and the future of this great country is safe in their strong, resolute young hands.” Culp assumed duties as the Trans. Corps senior enlisted leader in July 2016. She did not indicate what her near-future retirement plans are.


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Slight child care fee increase starts Feb. 1

Most Family and MWR Child and Youth Services patrons will see a slight increase in their monthly rates at installation CDC’s and the before-and-after-school program that’s open to youngsters in kindergarten through fifth grade. The added cost will be up to $24 per month per child, starting Feb. 1. Those in hourly care will see a slight increase from existing fees, ranging upward to $5 per hour. The adjusted total family income ranges have been increased to reflect a weighted average of proposed military and civilian pay increases. Additionally, all Department of Defense contractors and specified space available patrons will pay the un-subsidized Category IX (A) child care fees. Specified space available patrons are employed by nonDOD agencies, retirees and other non-eligible users. These changes occurred with the release of the DOD Child Development Program Fees for School Year 2018-2019/2019-2020. Adjustments continue to happen throughout the military in an effort to provide consistent child care costs across all military services and installations, according to Tamara Johnson, chief, Child and Youth Services. “The Military Child Care Act of 1989 requires the Department of Defense to establish annual Child Development Center and School Age Care fee guidance to all services, which included adjustments to Total Family Income category ranges, as well as adjustments to actual patron fees within those categories,” she said. “The intent was for families to pay a share of their work-related child care expenses and DOD to provide fee assistance to lower the cost of care for all families.” Each registered patron has received guidance from their individual programs and via email on their fee increases and any questions

should be directed to the center directors or program managers. “The DOD reviews military child care fees and total costs of care every year in considering adjustments in fee policy for the following year,” Johnson said. “Sometimes there are adjustments to the TFI category income ranges, sometimes slight fee increases, sometimes both, but DOD and the Army continue their commitment to affordable child care and youth programs by keeping fees low and by paying a portion of the cost of care for all families using Child and Youth programs. The Army continues to ensure outstanding child Metro Creative and youth programs that are DOD certified, continuously inspected, and NAEYC-accredited.” Despite the minor fee increase, Johnson said there is great value to the CYS program here. “Since CDC’s are funded, they are able to stay below the market rate of a comparable child care program,” she said. “Our level of quality is held high through monthly inspections completed by local proponents, four large unannounced inspections covering pertinent areas such as Health and Sanitation, Fire/Facility/Safety, Background Checks, Programming, Child Abuse, Nutrition etc. “CYS is required to maintain a current accreditation status in all Child Development Centers and School Age Care programs,” Johnson continued. “Staff are kept current on their training as this is a condition of employment. All facilities are also equipped with state-of-the-art camera system providing the needed protection for the children and visibility for the patrons. All this is offered at a price below market rate. For further questions about child and youth program fees, contact Parent Central Services at 804-734-3852 or Johnson at 804-765-3849. -Staff Reports

Temple Ave. Gate Hours to Change Feb. 4 In conjunction with the recent changes to Fort Lee access procedures, new hours of operation at the Temple Avenue Gate will go into effect Feb. 4. The access control point will be open from 4:30-8 a.m. weekdays and will be closed weekends and holidays. Use of the gate is limited to official personnel working on or visiting the Ordnance Campus. As a reminder, the installation’s 100-percent ID scan system requires all individuals, age 18 and older, to present a valid government- or state-issued identification card to gain entry onto post. The full list of gate hours and details about identification card screening requirements are available at home.army.mil/lee/index.php/visitors.

Kenner Announces Holiday Weekend Hours Kenner Army Health Clinic and Mosier Consolidated Troop Medical Clinic 2 will be open with normal business hours Feb. 15 for the President’s Day weekend training holiday. Troop Medical Clinic 1 will be closed that day. Trainees needing medical care will be seen at TMC 2. All clinics and ancillary services will be closed in observance of President’s Day on Feb. 18. Normal operating hours and services will resume Feb. 19. To schedule appointments, call the Kenner appointment line at 1-866-533-5242. Active duty family members and retirees no longer require pre-authorization to visit an urgent care center. Active duty service members must request an authorization to visit an urgent care center after-hours or when the clinic is closed by calling the nurse advice line at 1-800-TRICARE and choosing option 1. For an emergency, dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

Post Facility Stocks Valentine Gifts A wide variety of fresh flowers, including roses, are scheduled to arrive Feb. 12 for Valentine’s Day weekend at the Fort Lee Army and Air Force Exchange Main Store, Express and PXtra Troop Store. Single roses will be $5.99; the medium bouquet, $9.99; the half-dozen rose bouquet, $16.99; and the dozen rose bouquet, $29.99. In addition, patrons including veterans can send Designers Choice Bouquets if orders are placed by Feb. 8 at shopmyexchange.com. The three post locations also will have candy and other gifts available.

WOA Scholarship Window is Open The U.S. Army Warrant Officer Association, Crater Chapter, awards at least two $1,000 scholarships annually, and the deadline for submissions is April 1. The scholarship program is open to all dependents of Crater Chapter WOA members or spouses of chapter members employed or residing in the Fort Lee area. Applications also will be accepted from local Tri-Cities children, age 23 and younger, going to college or other higher education institution in Virginia. All applicants must be in their senior year of high school or higher and plan to attend or continue their education in an accredited American college, university, vocational or technical institution on a full-time basis. To apply, visit https://woaonline.org/crater/. Award winners will be announced in May. For details, email ftleewoa1@gmail.com.

Prince George Holds Job Fair for Teachers Prince George County Public Schools will host a Job Fair for individuals seeking employment as substitute teachers and substitute paraprofessionals Feb. 19, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m., at the PGCS Board Office, 6410 Courts Drive. Applicants should bring a valid ID and Social Security Card. For details, 804-733-2700.


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Maj. Gen. Fogg speaks at AUSA-sponsored breakfast Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, discusses Army and Sustainment community efforts to train and equip Soldiers who are ready to fight and win on future battlefields during remarks at the Robert E. Lee Chapter, Association of the U.S. Army, Professional Development Series Breakfast Jan. 29 at the Lee Club. A “window of opportunity” has been opened by service leaders who have vowed to increase Army readiness, lethality and modernization, Fogg noted. Citing examples like the extended field training exercises happening at Fort Lee and other CASCOM-affiliated schools, he described how initial entry Soldiers are performing overnight operations, extended ruck marches and hand-to-hand combat. He referenced the new Army Combat Fitness Test scheduled for full implementation by October 2020, and emphasized how it will be a “total culture change in fitness.” He highlighted the creation of a new four-star Futures Command focused on modernization. “As you can see, we are not shying away from these challenges,” Fogg emphasized as he concluded his talk. “At any given time, we are routinely training over 20,000 Soldiers at Fort Lee and other places around the country, and we do that together. We do it as a workforce and with our industry partners, and we do it with you who are sitting in this room today. I recognize your commitment and thank you for serving with us on this team.”

Patrick Buffett

CASCOM hosts community reception

Dani Johnson, CASCOM Public Affairs Officer

Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, welcomes a guest to the Fort Lee Community New Year’s reception Jan. 27 at the Lee Club. The annual event is an opportunity to build new friendships and express appreciation to offpost community leaders in business and government who eagerly support military members and their families throughout the year. Also pictured is Janie Fogg, the general’s spouse, and Capt. Lydia Koh, aide-de-camp.


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Americas Military | Spotlight

Spc. Joshua Jimenez

Unit: Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 23rd Quartermaster Brigade MOS: 92W – water treatment specialist Duty position: driver for 23rd Quartermaster Brigade commander Age: 23 Time in service: two years Hometown: Orlando, Fla. Describe yourself: “A lot of people tell me I’m an ‘old soul.’ I’m kind of simple, easygoing and a go-with-the-flow kind of person. It’s really hard to get on my bad side. I get along with everyone.” Pastimes: “I’ve been involved with martial arts since I was 14. I’m a big fan of muay thai and boxed for several years. It’s something I look forward to in keeping myself fit. Besides that, I’m a huge nerd. I love gaming, computers, etc.” Worst fear: “What I fear the most is leaving this world without making an impact (either personally or professionally).” Favorite quote: “It’s from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He said, ‘The time is always right to do what is right.’ People often procrastinate when and where to apply themselves to make an impact. That quote speaks to me on so many levels. The time is always right to do something. If you have the burning desire to take action, do it. Don’t wait.” The person you most admire: “Growing up, I really admired Michael Jackson (the recording artist). My family would tease me about it, but he was inspirational and always wanted to help.” The celebrity or historical figure you desire to meet: “I’d like to meet (Latino pop star) Marc Anthony. My parents are big fans of his music, and he is my culture and heritage.” If you won the lottery … “The first thing I would want to do is to make sure my immediate family gets a cut; make sure everyone is well off … whatever is left would go to never having the fear of struggling ever again.” What no one would guess about you: “The fact I’m well-skilled in hand-to-hand combat.” When have you been most satisfied: “The

T. Anthony Bell

time I signed on the dotted line to join the Army. It was a big change and something I went into blindly. After going through training, however, it opened my eyes to the world and allowed me to see just how trial and different experiences can build character.” Talk about your upbringing: “I grew up in Orlando with a family of four brothers and one sister. I was the fourth out of five. I kind of suffered the middle-child syndrome because my sister was the oldest and the youngest was babied. During my teenage years, my parents hit a very low financial state in our lives. We were house-hopping; I fell out of a traditional high school and attended an alternative one; and I picked up a job to help out with finances. I wouldn’t trade it for the world, but I didn’t have the traditional upbringing of being surrounded with friends, being able to go to a prom or graduation. Everything was always diverted into a different direction. Some way, somehow I found my own path to achieve what everyone else was getting with regular support.” Why you joined the Army: “I never wanted to have the financial struggle of my youth again. I saw what happened with my parents and how it affected my family – because some of my siblings always had everything laid out for them. Then, when the economy struck us down to the lowest part of our lives, my sister and my little brother were infected with always wanting and wanting. I saw how my parents’ sacrificed to manage their demands, but I never want to go through that or to

subject my kids to that kind of experience.” Talk about your duties as a driver: “Work ethic will disqualify some Soldiers for consideration in this kind of job. It’s easy to get complacent. I can see how this work can drive someone to slack off. I see my position as an opportunity for self-development. When the colonel and sergeant major are in meetings, it gives me time to work on things like correspondence and college courses. In terms of holding the title of ‘driver,’ I don’t see myself just as a driver. I see myself as someone responsible for the safety of my occupants as well. In terms of what I’ve learned, it’s to not fear rank. I’ve seen all walks of life and all ranks – from general to private – and I’ve learned to talk to them with confidence, to be myself and be proud of who I am. I’ve also learned from how the colonel and the sergeant major carry themselves, and how you can influence people through demeanor, appearance and manner of speaking.” What it means to wear the uniform: “It’s empowering at times; it makes me feel proud.

I’ve surprised my family with it once or twice, and it makes me feel like I can be someone’s example. I know how I carry myself in this uniform will influence others.” Best thing about the Army: “The diversity; the many walks of life you come to know. I’ve met so many different types of people – different cultures with different beliefs. It generates conversation and opens minds. It’s a blessing because you don’t know this when you’re home in a state you’ve never left.” Worst thing about the Army: “How some people minimize rank. In the Army, it’s such that it shapes expectations. If I’m a private, no one expects anything of me, but’s that’s without consideration of who I am as a person, my experiences or my skills.” Future plans: “I’ve helped my father establish a trucking business, and I can see myself doing that in the future. I plan to end my active duty time and switch to the Army Reserve because I want to keep my connection to the uniform.” – Compiled by T. Anthony Bell


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Tax Center opens 31st filing season with ribbon cutting

Ray Kozakewicz

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Col. Hollie J. Martin, Fort Lee garrison commander, joins Capt. Jaron R. Janson, Staff Judge Advocate officer in charge of the Fort Lee Tax Assistance Center; Walter Stith, senior volunteer; and Sgt. 1st Class Aurelio Jimenez, TAC NCOIC; for a ribbon-cutting ceremony to start the 2019 tax season at the TAC Jan. 28. The TAC, an installation institution offering free tax preparation and advice to community members, celebrates its 31st year. In remarks, Martin thanked the volunteers and Soldiers who will staff the center. “This is a signature commitment on your part, and you are making a great impact. This is not an easy task but you will be serving so many this year.” Stith was recognized for serving 26 years as a volunteer. Would-be tax filers are reminded to bring with them all pertinent documents and information relating to their returns. The TAC is located in building 5209, 20th Street, adjacent to the Army Women’s Museum. It is open 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday - Friday, on normal duty days. The last clients will be seen at 4 p.m. This year’s expanded walk-in hours are 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays. For more information and to make appointments, call the TAC at 804-734-5732.


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Retired CSM Milton Hazzard wages war against irrelevance T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

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ny notion of kicking back and enjoying life without the rat-race of responsibility is clearly repugnant to retired Command Sgt. Maj. Milton B. Hazzard Jr. When he concluded his military service in 1995, “The Duke” continued to march forward in full, muscle-rippling stride. He has since achieved success in business as a chief executive officer, and his personal pursuits include service as a church deacon, a sustainment community stalwart, and a mentor of up-and-coming logistics professionals. Now 76 years old and a great-grandfather, the former Quartermaster Corps CSM continues to demonstrate the same driving intensity, resolve and competiveness that defined his three-and-ahalf decade military career. Unwavering is his determination to wage a silent but deliberate battle against the notion of fading away into what others label as the “golden years.” Hazzard tersely responded, “Not at this minute,” when asked if he planned to curb his CEO and community responsibilities anytime soon. He defiantly added, “I determine when I’m going to work and when I’m not,” afterward. “Work” is a powerful, stimulating force for the seasoned veteran – something that is interwoven into his substance and being. It was birthed under the roof of a fiercely independent father in a 1950s’ working class Philadelphia neighborhood. Hard lessons from dad laid the foundation upon which the son stands today. “I had a very stable family life,” he said, acknowledging the efforts of the late Milton Hazzard Sr., and Ophelia, his 98-year-old mother. “My father was from the old school, so he

dominated the family, and he was certainly a no-nonsense guy. I think I adopted some of his habits in that regard.” Hazzard’s father, nicknamed M.B., was a proud World War II veteran and certified welder while in uniform. He also was a classic man-ofthe-house provider who encouraged his six kids to work hard, respect elders, shun assistance programs and embrace the concept of personal responsibility. “He just demanded everybody to pull their own,” recalled Hazzard. “I remember one day I was complaining about something, and he said I could ‘change it by getting a job.’ I got work as a newspaper delivery person, and was able to make a bit of money. I found out years later he had arranged it but never let me know.” Hazzard said it was part of his father’s plan to help him decipher the laws of action; that doing something about something is likely to move the needle in a positive direction – in theory at least. However, when the young Hazzard was exposed to the real world, he came to comprehend sometimes shadowy institutional practices stood between effort and fair benefit. “In the ‘50s, Jim Crow in the civilian world was a thorn in the side of black people,” he said. “Opportunities for well-credentialed black professionals – from my standpoint – were lacking. There seemed to be a glass ceiling. I knew people who had (college) degrees who thought they were doing well if they were able to get on the police force or be a mail-delivery person.” Hazzard’s sense of equity, self-esteem and intellect worked as deterrents against finding civilian employment as a young man. He became interested in military service after hearing his active-duty uncles speak favorably about the Army’s merits in regard to race and equal opportunity.

T. Anthony Bell

Retired Command Sgt. Maj. Milton B. Hazzard presents a framed memento – highlighting the service of Gen. Bruce C. Clarke, a veteran of both world wars and a former commander of the Continental Army Command – to CSM Sean Rice, Quartermaster Corps CSM, during an informal ceremony March 15 in the Hazzard Conference Room, Mifflin Hall. Hazzard, the room’s namesake, served as the QM Corps CSM from 1989-1994 and implemented changes within the noncommissioned officer corps and training environment here that continue to impact Soldiers today. He served a total of 35 years in the Army; 17 as a CSM. Clarke was commander of U.S. Army Europe from 1960-62 and was instrumental in developing educational programs for Soldiers.

“The Army, from their perspective, seemed to measure people based on their abilities, performance and success, and I bought in to that,” he said. “It led me to enlist as early as I could.” The 17-year-old signed up for combat engineer. The first mentors he encountered – mostly veterans of WWII and the Korean War – en-

couraged him to seek higher opportunities in the practice and science of influence. “They said, ‘You need to focus on leadership,’ and I should make it a priority rather than trying to concentrate on some specific MOS,” remembered Hazzard, who was later awarded quartermaster military occupational specialties

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through on-the-job training. “They would guide me into units where I could get leadership jobs.” Hazzard bolted through the ranks fairly early in his career, earning corporal in 1961, sergeant first class seven years and a tour in Vietnam later, and CSM in 1977. The growing list of those who further shaped him into an enlisted leader included Cpl. Hobby – the first name alluded him – a basic training assistant platoon sergeant (there were no drill sergeants in those days), who was inclined to call on a green but eager Hazzard to take on duties such as marching troops to and from training facilities. “I learned how to maneuver the Soldiers as a platoon and how to call ‘Jodie,’” said Hazzard, referring to what is now known as singing cadence. “He then spent time teaching me basic leadership skills – counseling, etc. I knew I was sort of doing his job, but I was learning. We kept in touch until he died.” The influences of Hobby and others helped Hazzard formulate his own equation for leadership. His was structured around the pillars of competence, discipline, compassion, and most importantly, loyalty. “I found if you had a devoted personal connection with the people you’re working with, they will react to that,” he said of the latter. “I’ve heard people say behind my back and to my face I was demanding, particularly in the area of discipline; but I was fair. Hearing that, I began practicing that trait, and it eventually became a part of me.” Hazzard noted how the concept of leading and shaping Soldiers was far different in his formative Army years than what it is today. The sphere of influence was far more authoritarian and regimented, and there were hardened expectations of compliance. “‘Right’ really didn’t apply,” he said of the Army of the ‘60s “because they could get a little rough with you at times. It was effective. They had a saying that if you grabbed them by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow.” Some effective and accepted leadership techniques from the old Army would raise eyebrows and probably generate formal complaints today. Nonetheless, they are “teaching points,” in Hazzard’s opinion, that show what the Army’s mindset was in the male-dominated ‘60s era

and how much the professionalism has evolved vividly recalled the haunting image of the since then. Soldier after the verdict, his chains and shackles Hazzard was a part of that evolution. His clanking as military police escorted him from a career straddled the pre- and post-Vietnam building. military mentalities, and he inevitably carried Superficially, the story illustrates the limits of baggage from each. Through it all, he relied on influence; that Soldiers are ultimately responsitime-honored principles. ble for their actions and behaviors. Hazzard’s “I always tried to lead by example,” he said, wife has reiterated that point to her husband noting how he religiously ran with units during more than once, and he agrees with her, but physical training he said “it doesn’t and visited with ease the thorn in my Soldiers at their flesh.” places of duty. “I How Hazzard tried not to ask anythinks about the Solbody to do anything dier profession has I wouldn’t.” made an impression Clearly, the Army on retired CSM Don liked what they Wells, deputy to saw in Hazzard. He the Logistics NCO earned CSM in 17 Academy commanyears and was onedant. Though he of-five finalists for never served with the Sergeant Major Hazzard in uniform, of the Army posihe said he knew tion in 1990. He also him to be a sharp, counts his five-year straight-shooting, stint as QM RCSM lead-from-the-front US Army Photo as a time-in-service standard-bearer who Command Sgt. Maj. Milton B. Hazzard is pictured in highlight. left no doubts he his Army uniform while serving as the Quartermaster Hazzard, howwas in charge. Corps Regimental CSM from 1989-1995. His “equation” ever, is hesitant to Wells recalled for leadership at that point in his career was to show a call his career suchow Hazzard would “demonstrated personal connection with the people cessful, pointing out meet with quaryou’re working with.” He also described himself as there were painful termaster Soldiers demanding, particularly in the area of discipline, but fair shortcomings and attending the Serin his judgement against individuals who broke any rules. failures that make geants Major Acadfor a powerful dissenting argument. emy, and in retirement, how he frequently re“There is so much more I should’ve contrib- turns to Fort Lee to share his insights. uted to the mission,” said Hazzard, a QM Foun“I always cherished (his advice),” he said, redation Hall of Fame inductee. “I loved what I calling Hazzard’s visits when he was the 23rd was doing. Over the years, however, I’ve had QM Brigade CSM and QM NCOA commanSoldiers get into some ‘life’ trouble, did not get dant. “He kind of laid the foundation for guys promoted or they were having some other prob- like me, and I will always respect that.” lems. I’ve always kind of took that personal as a A 1988 encounter with Hazzard in the freezfailure on my part. What was it that I didn’t do?” ing cold at a field site in South Korea made an Hazzard recounted how he mentored a impression on then-Pfc. Sean J. Rice, who repromising senior noncom who decided to risk cently relinquished his duties as the QM Corps’ everything for a few dollars in a black market top enlisted Soldier, the same position Hazzard scam. He was subsequently accused and held at the end of his career. convicted of a crime and sent to the military “He came out in full kit and literally said ‘I prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. Hazzard just want to talk to Soldiers,’” said Rice, not-

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ing how distinguished visitors typically came out in dress uniforms. “That stayed on my mind throughout the many years, so anytime I go to the field to visit Soldiers, I’m in full kit.” In addition to the way Hazzard presented himself, Rice observed, it was how he related to Soldiers, generating camaraderie and a sense of shared experience amid the hardest conditions, that impressed. “I thought that was great,” he said, “because I was a young Soldier looking for aspiring African-American role models. It was powerful. I was like, ‘OK, I want to be like that.” It was my first impression of a CSM.” Undoubtedly, Hazzard’s legacy is robust and intact. The QM NCOA auditorium bore his name until the building was turned over to the Transportation School eight years ago. The QM Corps headquarters located in Mifflin Hall continues to evoke his memory with a conference room named in his honor. Although Hazzard still holds a job, he continues to support the installation as a member of the Quartermaster Foundation and other organizations. On top of that, he recently completed his first book, “Secret of the Buffalo Soldiers,” a work inspired by an interest in history and an early assignment to Fort Huachuca, Ariz., where the famed warriors were once headquartered and are now celebrated. “Here were these people paying homage to my race that I didn’t know anything about,” said Hazzard, referring to his time in Arizona. “That sort of piqued my interest. I began to buy books, participate in trail walks and do research. It was just interesting in what I was finding.” The Buffalo Soldiers, formed following the Civil War, were noted for their fighting prowess during the country’s western expansion. Much of their story has been omitted from history books, thus it was a “secret” exposed to Hazzard and increasing numbers of others. “I didn’t know the role Buffalo Soldiers played in the development of the United States of America,” he said, “and that’s what I want readers to get out of it.” “Secret of the Buffalo Soldiers” is available online. Hazzard resides in northern Virginia with his wife of 34 years, Carrie. He has six children and 19 grandchildren.


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Kenner pharmacy offers easy drop-off services, much more

Lesley Atkinson

Kenner Army Health Clinic PAO

It is well known that the Kenner Army Health Clinic pharmacy gives beneficiaries the lowest cost because any prescriptions filled don’t require a copay from one’s own pocket. The KAHC pharmacy also wants to promote its drop-off service to improve convenience for beneficiaries. This is just one of many ways KAHC Pharmacy seeks to meet the needs of the Fort Lee community. “We are committed to providing the most cost effective and efficient pharmaceutical care available to our Fort Lee community,” said Maj. Edward Osei, pharmacy chief. “Our dedicated group of pharmacy staff are equipped with the latest medical information to serve medication related needs through education and counseling.” The pharmacy is a full service operation for prescriptions from military or civilian providers. Services are available for active duty service members and their families, as well as retirees and their family members. The pharmacy requires for all beneficiaries to have the patient’s military ID card available. Children 10 and older also will need a military ID card. To have a prescription filled, head directly to the kiosk machines located in the center of the pharmacy lobby. The military ID is scanned at kiosk and the user will make a selection to drop-off or wait for their prescription. The quickest way to avoid waiting, especially during peak times, is the Drop-Off service. The drop-off ticket gives the patient priority for being called to the window, where they verify their information and are given the time when the prescription will be available for pick-up at the refill window. There is no ticket required to pick up the prescription at the refill window. “Prescriptions with the drop off services before 1 p.m. can be picked up 2 hours later,”

Photos by Lesley Atkinson, Kenner Public Affairs Officer

(ABOVE) Richard Morris, a Kenner Army Health Clinic pharmacist technician, reviews the procedure for taking a prescribed medication while serving clinic patient 2nd Lt. Jessica Kammen, an Army Logistics University student, on Jan. 24. (BELOW) Pharmacist Joel Hess discusses a medication with Maj. Edward Osei, pharmacy chief at Kenner Army Health Clinic, on Jan. 24.

hit the gym or visit a museum on Fort Lee. Once the patient returns to pharmacy, the medication will be waiting at the refill windows 8, 9 or 10. However, If one decides not to opt for the drop-off service, the average pharmacy wait times may vary from a few minutes up to an hour or more based on staffing, how many are waiting and prescription volume. “The best time to visit the pharmacy is between 8 -10 a.m. when it is less busy,” said Osei. “We are always looking at innovative ways to make our operations safer while enhancing the overall quality of our services.” Off-post physician offices also can send a prescription electronically to Kenner instead of paper prescriptions. This ensures the prescription is not lost and eliminates the hassle of hard to read handwriting. The provider can send prescription to DoD Fort Lee e-Pharmacy in their electronic pharmacy database. The pharmacy has a mandatory callin refill process where refills must be requested 3 days prior to pick-up. To refill a prescription at Kenner, call 804-734-9535, which is a fully automated refill system available 24/7 or request a refill through Tricare Online at www.tricareonline.com. Refilled prescriptions are to be picked up at windows 8, 9, or 10 and require a patient ID card for pick up. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery offers the additional convenience of mailing prescriptions directly to patients’ homes. All medications now have a copay for this service. For more information call 1-800-2386095 or visit https://www.express-scripts. com/TRICARE/benefits/homedelivery.shtml. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery may also be an option if a medication is not available on Kenner’s formulary. Check with TRICARE Formulary website for medication availability at https://www.expressscripts.com/static/formularySearch/2.8/#/ formularySearch/drugSearch. To get additional information on the KAHCI pharmacy go to website at https://kenner.u nrmc.amedd.army.mil/HealthcareServices/J SitePages/Pharmacy.aspx. t

C

said Osei. “While prescriptions dropped off If a patient doesn’t want to leave the area, after 1 p.m. will be available for pick-up the Osei suggests patients take the opportunity following business day after 10 a.m.” to go shopping, run errands, hike on a trail,

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Ord. student shows ‘can-do’ spirit

Contributed Photo

Pfc. Micailah Albertson from Bravo Company, 832nd Ordnance Battalion, proudly poses with the trio of Army Achievement Medal certificates she received upon graduation last week from the 91F Small Arms/Artillery Repairer Course at the Army Ordnance School, Fort Lee. The Soldier hailing from Maine set herself apart from peers by earning the Distinguished Honor Graduate title for her class, scoring 300 on the Army Physical Fitness Test, and winning her battalion’s Soldier of the Month Board. Unit leaders describe her as the type of individual who always set the example among her fellow “Bulldog” company battle buddies. Albertson shared the photo on her Facebook page with a simple message, “Can’t wait to accomplish more!”

Bulldogs show creativity during visit

Contributed Photo

Contributed Photo

Company leadership change

Incoming 1st Sgt. Curtis G. Dickens, Victor Company, 262nd Quartermaster Battalion, accepts the unit guidon from Capt. Carmen Lockett during a company change of responsibility ceremony Jan. 29 at the battalion headquarters. Dickens replaced 1st Sgt. Carlandra T. Moss, who is slated to become first sergeant for Headquarters and Headquarters Company, CASCOM. Dickens’ last assignment was lead sexual assault coordinator for CASCOM.

Soldiers from Bravo Company, 16th Ordnance Battalion, help with a sign-making project during a Jan. 12 community-outreach visit to the Virginia Commonwealth University Children’s Hospital, Richmond. Eight personnel – including Capt. Brent Vibbert, “Bulldog Company” commander and Sgt. 1st Class Sergio Vieira, one of the unit’s platoon sergeants – spent the morning at the facility where they visited with patients and handed out gifts, generously donated by the family of Pfc. Karimar Millan. They also jumped at the opportunity to help the hospital’s Girl Scout troop create signs for their upcoming cookie sale. The eagerness of the volunteer Soldiers to give back to the community is one reason why “Bulldogs lead the way,” boasted the unit leaders.


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Kenner invites patients to attend Patient, Family Advisory forum Lesley Atkinson

Kenner Army Health Clinic PAO

Kenner Army Health Clinic is inviting its beneficiaries to assist with providing guidance on how to improve patient care and satisfaction with a new Patient and Family Advisory Council forum on Feb. 13 at 4 p.m. in Kenner’s first floor break room. Refreshments will be available. The PFAC’s mission is to integrate the patient’s perspective into the Kenner problem resolution process, said Matthew Dias, deputy to the commander for quality and safety at Kenner. “We are searching for current or past patients and family members to provide us with their perspective along with assisting Kenner staff with incorporating process improvement initiatives.” Dias explained the purpose of the forum is to

get everyone together to discuss roles of the advisory council. Interested attendees will be able to fill out an application there. Once approved, the selected council members will establish meeting timelines and methods for providing input and recommendations. As an advisor, the PFAC will be presented with patient submitted concerns, suggestions and complaints. The respective department or clinic will discuss the issue and limitations with the PFAC to solicit recommendations for improvement or means to prevent future issues by: • Identify patient and family needs and concerns, • Provide feedback on current systems and processes in the clinic, • Provide feedback on improvement initiatives and even generate new ideas, and • Serve as advocates to integrate patient-cen-

Training develops power professionals

Contributed Photo

Staff Sgt. Stephan Rudd from Delta Company, 832nd Ordnance Battalion, mentors aspiring Ordnance professionals on the use of schematics while troubleshooting military generators during 91D Tactical Power Generation Specialist Course training here Jan 24. Proper troubleshooting helps Soldiers quickly identify and repair faults, which is an essential asset to the Army’s operational forces. The 10-week initial entry course at the Ordnance School is under the purview of the Tactical Support Equipment Department.

tered care across the institution. The benefits of the joining the PFAC is to opportunity to become advocates for patientcentered healthcare at Fort Lee and to get a better understanding of the healthcare system. This also will help develop relationships with other members on the council. “The end goal of the committee is to recommend solution to known issues and provide a patients’ point of view to improving initiatives,” added Dias. “Patients and their families are often the most knowledgeable members of the care team, which can offer unique perspectives and valuable feedback regarding the standard of care

they received. Although Kenner staff are focused on providing high quality and safe care, we feel it is essential to gain the patient advisory group’s insight to our business.” For additional details, contact Trudy Corbett, patient advocate, at 804-734-9512.


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Badge Recognition

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Contributed Photo

Fourteen Soldiers of the 266th Quartermaster Battalion proudly pose with their German Armed Forces Badge for Military Proficiency certificates at the conclusion of a Jan. 25 presentation ceremony in the battalion headquarters. The badge is awarded to those who fulfill the standards of seven test events focusing on Soldiering tasks such as first aid, a fitness test, a ruck march, pistol marksmanship and a 100-meter swim in military uniform. CASCOM’s German Liaison Office administers the program and certifies the results. Posing with the awardees are Lt. Col. Stephan J. Euler, far left, and Sgt. Maj. Ronald Schiller, far right, of the German Armed Forces. Also pictured are Col. Gregory Townsend, 23rd Quartermaster Brigade commander; Lt. Col. Clarisse Scott, 266th QM Bn. commander; Command Sgt. Maj. Lisa Haney, 23rd QM Bde. CSM; and CSM Micheal Lambert, 266th QM Bn. CSM.

QM troops rehearse combat skills

Contributed Photos

(LEFT) Sgt. Darius Denson-Holmes moves a test dummy after performing the control bleeding medical task during the 111th Quartermaster Company’s Reaper Challenge Jan. 23 at the Fort Lee range complex. The tactical combat casualty care station required Soldiers to ensure the area was clear from enemy fire and stop a life-threatening hemorrhage before moving the causality to a safe area for medical evacuation. (RIGHT) To call for help, the troops had to set up a radio and correctly communicate the situation to a headquarters element. That task is being performed by Pvt. Johnathan Ostria in the accompanying photo. Reaper Challenge is a two-day situational training exercise that reinforces key warrior tasks and battle drills.


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‘Steel Magnolias’ Play Opening | Feb. 1.

“Steel Magnolias,” the third installment of the Lee Playhouse Theater Group platinum season, opens Feb. 1, 8 p.m., at the Lee Theater, Mahone Avenue. Additional performances are set for Feb. 2, 8, 9, 15 and 16 at 8 p.m., and Feb. 3, 10 and 17 at 3 p.m. All shows are open to the public. The dramatic comedy focuses on the friendship of six southern women who talk, gossip, needle and harangue each other through the best of times and comfort each other through the worst. Tickets are $15 for adults and $7 for youths. For additional information, contact the box office at 804-734-6629.

Classical Music Event | Feb. 16

L ocal A ctivities

for the

F ort L ee C ommunity

AFTB White Gloves and Combat Boots Class | Feb. 21

‘Waters of Hope and Despair’ Performance | Feb. 2

Pamplin Historical Park & The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier will present a performance of “Waters of Hope and Despair” Feb. 2, 1 p.m., at 6125 Boydton Plank Road, Petersburg. The Black History Month special program will feature Wisteria Perry, manager of interpretation and community outreach at the Mariners’ Museum and Park, Newport News. Contributed Photo She will share a story of African-Americans Cast members Haley Mizell, Abbey Webb, Ann Easterling, Bethany Seay, Anne Regan and Deand the Chesapeake Bay. nise Blake pose for publicity photo highlighting the Lee Playhouse theater company’s upcomFor details, call 804-861-2408 or visit www. ing production of “Steele Magnolias,” opening Feb. 1, 8 p.m., at the Lee Theater. Weekend pamplinpark.org. shows will continue through Feb. 17. All performances are open to the public.

FMWR Big Game Watch Parties | Feb. 3

Soprano singer Dr. Lisa Edwards-Burrs will perform at a Chesterfield Central Library Black History Month program set for Feb. 15, 1-2 p.m. Admission is free and all ages are welcome. The library is located at 7051 Lucy Corr Blvd., Chesterfield. For further details, call 804-751-2275.

airborne experience is not a prerequisite for by the Army Community Service Family Advocacy Program – is set for Feb. 13, 1 p.m., membership or attending. Three Big Game Watch Parties are set for at ACS, building 1231, Mahone Avenue. For more details, call 804-733-2177. Super Bowl Sunday Feb. 3, all starting at 5 The session will cover bathing, diapering, p.m. soothing, breastfeeding and other newborn Youth Center Valentine Dance | The special events will take place at the care. This also is an ideal opportunity to learn Feb. 9 TenStrike Bowling and Entertainment Center, more about the support services available to Youths between the ages of 11-18 are invited 2403 C Ave., 804-734-6860; Overtime Sports first-time parents. Registration is requested. to the “Love Ya Lots” Valentine’s Dance Feb. Bar, downstairs level of the Lee Club, Battle For more information, call 804-734-6381. 9, 7-10 p.m., at the Youth Center, building Drive, 734-7541; and Sustainers’ Pub, in the 10619, Yorktown Drive. lobby area of Fort Lee Army Lodging, 2301 The event will include refreshments, music CYS Parents Night Out | Mahone Ave., 765-1449. and dancing. The cost is $3 for members Feb. 16 There is no cover charge. All locations will and $5 for guests. Attendees must either be Parents can take a night off while children, offer drink and food specials. registered with Parent Central Services or be ages 6 weeks - 12 years old, participate in agea sponsored guest who is registered with PCS. appropriate development activities Feb 16, 555th PIA Meeting | Feb. 6 For additional information, call 804-734- 6-10 p.m., at the Battle Child Development The Jessie J. Mayes Tri-Cities Chapter of Center, building 10622, Sisisky Blvd. the 555th Parachute Infantry Association, 2870 or 734-2871. The cost is $25 per child. Registration is Inc. will hold its monthly meeting Feb. 6, required by Feb. 6. 6 p.m., at the Petersburg Public Library, ACS ‘Baby Basics’ | Feb. 13 For details, call 804-734-2933 or 734-2958. 201 West Washington St., Petersburg. Prior A free class – “Baby Basics,” presented

Service members, family members and civilians are invited to the Army Community Service Army Family Team Building White Gloves and Company Boots Class Feb. 21, 5-8 p.m., at ACS, building 9023, 1231 Mahone Ave. The event is free. AFTB will provide practical and experiential learning activities on customs, courtesies, and protocols that take place at military social functions and events. There will be special emphasis on holiday ball attire and receiving lines. Registration is required by Feb. 19 For details, call 804-734-7979.

Fort Lee Prayer Breakfast | Feb. 22

Community members who would like to participate in Fort Lee’s National Prayer Breakfast observance – set for Feb. 22, 7:309 a.m., at the Lee Club – are asked to sign up through any unit or garrison chaplain. The Religious Support team is accepting $5 donations toward the event. The guest speaker is Chaplain (Col.) Greg Walker, 3rd Infantry Division and garrison chaplain at Fort Stewart, Ga. Those requiring additional information can contact the 266th S Quartermaster Battalion Unit Ministry Team c at 804-734-6751.

AFTB Leadership Training | Feb. 27-28

g w c “ A y t i

A two-day Army Family Team Building Leadership Development and Mentoring Training class – titled “To Lead or Not to Lead” – is set for Feb. 27-28, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., at the Army Logistics University, 34th Street The course is free. The workshop will examine leadership styles and qualities. Registration is required by Feb. 26. AFTB offers other ongoing classes throughout the year. w For details, call 804-734-7979. m w

For more installation and outside the gate events and activities, visit our online calendar at www.fortleetraveller.com/calendar


Pet of the Week

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Fort Lee

Classifieds Reach more than 10,000 active duty military, civil service employees, retirees, their spouses and the civilian community.

DEADLINE Reader & Display: Thursday 4:00pm (week prior)

Ray Kozakewicz

Tuxedo, a domestic short-haired black and white male cat, is available for adoption at the Fort Lee Stray Animal Facility on 38th Street, near the Defense Commissary Agency Headquarters. He is between 2-4 years old, microchipped and friendly but shy, according to his caretakers. They recommend adoption by an experienced cat owner. He has been neutered. There also are three other cats available. There are no adoption fees for any animals at the facility. Additionally, the shelter is seeking new volunteers and donations of cat food. For other details, contact Officer Rob Moore, PMO animal control officer, at 804-721-9291.

SUPERBOWL WEEKEND,

continued from page 2

good idea to bring the kids. As your secret weapons, they will enable you to divide and conquer. Send each child on a mission, e.g., “Lilly, you’re going in for three jars of salsa. Anna, you’re in charge of peanuts. Hayden, you’re a young man now, so I’m trusting you to find those little smoked sausages for pigs in a blanket. Can you do it?!” “Yes, ma’am!” “Now, GO, GO, GO!!” With your grocery cart filled to the brim with every snack food known to modern man, head to the checkout lanes, but do not waste precious time standing in line. Simply

feign some kind of cardiac episode a la Fred Sanford’s “It’s the big one, Elizabeth!” – and fellow shoppers will surely let you cut in line so you can get to the glycerin pills you “left in the car.” Initially, your display might appear to be far-fetched, but when the other shoppers see all the pork products and processed cheeses in your shopping cart, they’ll be convinced that your arteries are harder than a coffin nail and guide you straight to the head of the line. Finally, at home with your football snack foods stockpiled and beverages chilling, you can breathe easy, knowing that you’re Super Bowl party on Sunday will be a smashing success … or you can save yourself all of that trouble and order pizza.

CONTACT: Susan Irgens

susanlou.irgens@gmail.com

757-477-7104


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Profile for The Progress-Index

Fort Lee Traveller | Jan. 31, 2019  

Fort Lee Traveller | Jan. 31, 2019