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Community invited to 2019 Prayer Breakfast event featuring music, Lee Club munchies, meaningful messages SEE PaGe 4

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

January 24, 2019 | Vol. 79, No. 4

Installation Adjusts Access Procedures Improved security, greater efficiency among card-scanning system benefits SEE PAGE 3

2018 ACCIDENT STUDY REVEALS HORRIBLE HIGHWAY HABITS Human error caused about 94 percent of vehicular incidents last year, according to an automobile association report focused on distracted, wreckless, impaired driving SEE PaGe 5

AABHM EVENT SET FOR FEB. 22 Lee Theater observance a chance to reflect on contributions, struggles of Black Americans

LAUDING A CIVIL RIGHTS LEADER Guest speaker discusses career-shaping impact of MLK Jr. at annual post event held in his honor

WALKER SECURES SEAT AT CSA TABLE 30-year Soldier vows to do his best while serving on Army Chief of Staff’s Retired Soldier Council

SEE PaGe 7

SEE PaGe 8

SEE PaGe 9


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Necessity reveals strength when spouses parent alone

Fort Lee

Commanding General ................... Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Hollie J. Martin Public Affairs Officer ............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor ...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments .......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor .................. Amy Perry Production Assistant............................... Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

U.S. Army Photo

I scooped Anna up, and as she held her deformed arm tightly to her chest, I put her in our minivan along with the other children. I called the bushy-haired kids’ parents and asked if I could drop Hayden and Lilly off with their children while I took Anna to the emergency room. They hesitated, still bitter about an incident the week prior when Anna spilled a bottle of hot pink nail polish on their white carpeting. I knew they couldn’t say no. They owed me for watching their kids all afternoon, and besides, I had no other options. At the emergency room, I called Francis but got his

The Fort Lee Traveller is an authorized publication for members of the DOD, printed by Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee, Virginia. Contents of the Fort Lee Traveller are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee Public Affairs Office. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services advertised by the U.S. Army or Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc. Everything advertised in this publication will be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher will refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation has been corrected.

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Everyone knows Murphy’s Law – “Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong” – but few are aware of the fine print of this famous decree ... a military spouse clause that reads, “And when it does go wrong, it will happen during deployment.” As a military spouse, I’ve seen my share of car breakdowns, hot water heater leaks and computer “blue screens of death” while my active duty husband was away. Such homefront mishaps are annoying, but they pale in comparison to an injured or sick child. About 14 years ago, my husband Francis was away on temporary duty. I was at home with our three children in the suburbs of Virginia Beach. Hayden, Anna and Lilly were playing on our backyard swingset with two other neighborhood kids. I was doing yard work nearby, then took Lilly into the kitchen to get something out for dinner. “Mrs. Molinari!” the bushy-haired neighbor boy and his little sister shouted, startling me out of the pantry. “Something’s wrong with Anna’s arm!” I ran outside expecting to hear some cockamamie story how she scraped an elbow going down the slide backward. But instead, Hayden was crouched beside Anna, who sat on the ground, holding her arm. “What’s the mat…” I stopped cold. Anna’s tiny forearm was markedly bent at an unnatural angle. Her big brown eyes were wild, but she whispered to me, eerily calm, through gritted five-year-old jack-o-lantern teeth. “I fell.” I could see that survival instinct had taken over my fun-loving daredevil daughter.

voicemail. “Honey, Anna broke her forearm, both bones. I’m at the hospital. The doctor said he has to move the bones back into place … They’ll give Anna morphine, but she might be awake. She is … we are … so scared. Call me.” I made the second call an hour later. “Francis, are you there? The nurse gave Anna morphine so she wouldn’t feel the pain, but she just got agitated. They said she is one of a few people who react adversely to morphine. They have to set her arm without it …” I said, my voice cracking with fear. Another hour later, I called a third time. “Honey, I don’t know where you are, but the doctor set Anna’s arm. She’s better now, but it was really scary. They asked me to leave the room, but I stayed with Anna. They made me sit in a chair because some parents faint. When they pulled on her broken arm, I held her face in front of mine and she screamed like I’ve never heard before. But it worked, and now she’s in a splint. Please call.” By the time Francis called the next day, Anna had the first of three casts she would wear during childhood. Over the years, our children racked up the typical childhood injuries, stitches, colds and flu. In fact, in the last month, Lilly sprained her knee snowboarding, then sprained her ankle and got a concussion while sledding. As a military spouse and mom, I learned I was much stronger than I ever knew. When forced to manage crises alone, something primal kicked in. A strong, calm, nurturing, unshakable force I didn’t know I had deep within me, waiting to be tapped. If I could, I’d add an addendum to Murphy’s military spouse clause that reads, “Don’t worry, you’ve got this.”

THe

Contributing Writer

on

Lisa smith Molinari

Amy Perry Officer Samuel Randolph checks the readout on a security scanner before allowing an Airport Taxi driver to enter the installation Tuesday at the Mahone Avenue gate. Under a new procedure implemented last week, all individuals age 18 and older will need to present a state or government picture ID for screening in order to access post. Read more, Page 3.


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Fort Lee begins 100-percent ID scans in lieu of post visitor pass requirements New access control measures at Fort Lee are proving to be more secure and less inconvenient for installation visitors. “We’re transitioning to a 100-percent ID scan system at every access control point,” elaborated Lt. Col. Joe Ward, Provost Marshal and director of Emergency Services here. “Through the effective application of technology, we are able to conduct on-thespot background checks on individuals by simply scanning their military IDs, drivers’ licenses or other accepted forms of state- or government-issued identification.” Ward said this will streamline the entry process for visitors without military or federal credentials by removing the need for an access pass. Wait times for those passes at the Visitor Control Center sometimes exceed an hour – particularly on graduation days, which draw larger numbers of visitors to one or more of the military training schools here. The VCC served those customers from practically dawn-to-dusk seven days a week with more than 95,000 passes issued last year, so eliminating the requirement for access passes freed up staffing to be allocated

elsewhere. the gates during morning commuting hours, “It’s also beneficial from a security stand- but that is mainly due to individuals not havpoint because a background check is being ing an accepted form of identification ready conducted every time an individual access- for presentation, according to the PMO team. es the post,” Ward Initial ID card scans “It’s important to note that said. “The previous may take up to five system operated on seconds to process nothing has changed as far the assumption that and a matter of oneas the requirement for military ID holdor-two seconds after all individuals 18 years of ers, including family that. At this time, the age or older to present one members, were insecurity team is askof the accepted forms of herently good-to-go ing first-time visitors identification to gain access and, therefore, alwho will use a drivto the installation. This includes lowed immediate acer’s license to access cess. The same could the installation to go people traveling together be said for those who to the VCC for the in the same vehicle.” had a valid post pass. initial scan in order “The new procedure ensures all individu- to “get them in the system” and avoid the als are checked every time they access post,” potential hassle of denied access. This rehe continued. “We can immediately deter- quirement is expected to be short term. mine if access privileges have been suspend“It’s important to also note that nothing ed as a result of a recent criminal offense or has changed as far as the requirement for a change in status that invalidates the indi- all individuals 18 years of age or older to vidual’s government credentials.” present one of the accepted forms of idenImplementation of the new procedure is tification to gain access to the installation,” resulting in short-duration traffic backups at Ward said. “This includes people traveling

together in the same vehicle. All must present an ID for scanning if they’re 18 or older.” As noted on the “Installation Access” page of the Fort Lee website, the garrison commander will deny entry to the installation if the National Crime Information Center background check results in credible derogatory information indicating the individual may present a threat to good order, discipline, or the health and safety of the community. Anyone who is denied access at the gate will be directed to the Visitor Control Center for instructions on how to complete a waiver, which must be submitted for processing and approved by a command representative before access is granted. For a listing of the types of offenses that might result in a denial of access, click on the tab labeled “About the NCIC Background Check” at home.army. mil/lee/index.php/access. The webpage also includes instructions for submitting a waiver in advance prior to coming to Fort Lee, as well as a listing of accepted forms of identification. – PMO and Staff Reports

ACS party promotes resiliency Fort Lee family members Rebecca Ward, Tabitha Floyd and Hiwot Geleta assemble their projects during the 3rd annual ACS Army Family Team Building and Master Resiliency Training New You Vision Board party Jan. 16 at the TenStrike Bowling Center. Vision boards are a collage of photos, words and affirmations that represent a person’s goals, wishes or dreams. The end product serves as a motivational and inspirational tool for the designing individual. Prior to sitting down to create their vision boards, the attendees participated in an AFTB Time Management Class and a Master Resiliency Training session on Thinking Traps and Icebergs. More than 36 Team Lee members attended the classes. AFTB training sessions are conducted throughout the year. Details are available at lee. Contributed Photo

armymwr.com/programs/army-family-team-building. For signup, call 804-734-7979.


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Community prayer breakfast set for Feb. 22 at Lee Club

File Photo

Chaplain (Col.) Terry W. Austin, the Military District of Washington command chaplain, engages the audience during remarks at the 2018 National Prayer Breakfast observance here. Plans are underway for the 2019 installment of the event, scheduled for Feb. 22, 7:30 a.m., at the Lee Club. The committee organizing the breakfast is still working on a program theme and the identification of a guest speaker. The significance of this particular community gathering, according to the Religious Support Office here, is that it serves as a “big-picture reminder of what we should hold in highest regard within our hearts and why, as a result of that sense of honor and commitment, we can overcome any adversity through our faith and unified strength.” Additional details about the breakfast will be announced soon through the installation’s varied command information venues. Those wishing to participate in the event can make arrangements through any chaplain on post.

Army amends PT Belt rules

AUSA Breakfast Set for Jan. 29

Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, will be the featured speaker at the Robert E. Lee Chapter, Association of United States Army, professional development series breakfast Jan. 29, 7:30-8:30 a.m., at the Lee Club, Battle Drive. The title of the series is “Perspectives on Leadership.” Tickets are $14 and can be purchased from unit representatives. For additional details, email mike.flanagan.usma86@gmail.com.

p a Tax Center Opens Jan. 28 The Fort Lee Tax Assistance Center is scheduled to open Jan. 28. It is located in building A 5209, 20th Street, adjacent to the Army Women’s Museum. The facility hours will be 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday – Friday, on normal duty days. The last clients will be seen at 4 p.m. s a This year’s expanded walk-in hours are 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays. Would-be tax filers are reminded to bring with them all pertinent documents and d information relating to their returns. These include: military, retiree or family member g identification cards; Social Security cards for all family members; W2, W2G, Form 1099-R, 1099-INT, and other statements of income and interest; bank account and routing numbers; v and a power of attorney if a spouse is not present. s For more information and to make appointments, call the TAC at 804-734-5732. T r Exchange Offers BE FIT Options d The Army and Air Force Exchange Service is supporting BE FIT resolutions with health a and wellness offerings for military members, retirees and their families. f Authorized shoppers can find a variety of fitness products and apparel at the Exchange and on shopmyexchange.com and healthy food options at the food court and Express. The a Exchange also offers GNC, Optical and Optometry Services and more. For details, visit publicaffairs-sme.com/Community/befit or www.facebook.com/shopmyex- s b change. w l Yarn Brigade Meets 1st and 3rd Fridays Community members who like to knit or crochet are invited to join the Yarn Brigade on a the 1st or 3rd Friday of each month, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m., at Army Community Service, Mahone A Avenue. The next two dates are Feb. 1 and 15. The group creates handmade scarves, shawls and lap robes for donation to service member c support programs and chemotherapy and dialysis facilities in the area. Supplies are provided. a Participants who are interested can learn at the sessions too. a For further details, call 804-734-7965 or 734-6393. o t Patrons Can Win Carpet Cleaner Prize “ Authorized Army and Air Force Exchange Service shoppers can enter to win one of 30 w Bissell SpotBot Pet Robotic Portable Carpet Cleaner prizes through Jan. 31. b The cleaner is valued at $149. To enter, visit shopmyexchange.com/sweepstakes. No a purchase is necessary. Participants must 18 years of age or older. h Winners will be selected on or about Feb. 8. s

Family Child Care Training Available

File Photo

Recent guidance issued by Secretary of the Army Mark Esper on Jan. 4 states that reflective belts are no longer required during daylight hours, as the Soldiers pictured are displaying while on a formation run in 2018. Additionally, the belts are not required “while conducting physical training on closed roads or dedicated physical training routes.” The guidance also makes clear that belts are not needed while working out indoors while in physical training uniforms.

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Fort Lee Child and Youth Services is offering free training to individuals interested in becoming a Family Child Care Provider. Applicants must be 18 years of age or older and reside in government housing. A background check is part of the qualification process. Applications are available at the Family Child Care Office, building 10612, Yorktown Drive. Child care will be provided on a first-come basis for FCC-certification classes. For other details, call 804-765-3787 or 765-3850.

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2018 Traffic Safety Review indicates Virginia drivers are overlooking safety The worst driving habits imaginable were prevalent on Virginia roadways in 2018, according to a recent American Automobile Association report. Distracted, impaired and drowsy drivers; school bus crashes; first responders struck and killed by passing vehicles; children dying in hot cars … the list of infractions goes on and on. Human error caused about 94 percent of vehicular incidents last year, according to statistics tracked by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The AAA report called that “a painful reminder” that deaths resulting from crashes on roadways across the country and in Virginia are frequently preventable. Every year, AAA and traffic safety advocates nationwide send out warnings, safety tips, and pleas for drivers to eliminate bad habits, attitudes and behaviors behind the wheel; yet each year, more precious lives are lost, observed Martha Mitchell Meade, the auto association’s Public and Government Affairs manager. “While impaired driving may top the causation list for roadway fatalities one year, and distracted the next, the fact is that drivers are responsible for their lives and the lives of every single person on the roads with them at any given moment in time,” she said. “Something has to give. Each year is filled with tragedy after tragedy that could have been avoided. Not only must drivers pay attention to safety first, but passengers must help by speaking up when there is an unsafe situation.” The findings of the AAA report speak for themselves: • More than 37,000 people die on American roadways each year. That means, sadly, someone is involved in a fatal collision every 15 minutes of every day. • In Virginia, 843 people died in traffic crashes last year. Between Jan. 1, 2018,

U.S. Marine Corps Photo

A Marine demonstrates the distracted driving habits that have become a major hazard on American highways. Accidents statistics still being gathered from 2018 are already showing 22,612 distractioninvolved crashes, which resulted in 12,780 injuries and 133 deaths in the commonwealth.

and the end of December, another 791 lives had been lost, and the New Year’s weekend numbers had yet to be counted. First responders being killed while rendering aid to motorists has become an alltoo-frequent occurrence, asserted the AAA analysis. In a matter of five months (Aug. - Dec.), there were six major-news-headline crashes involving first responders in the Richmond area, one of which took the life of Lt. Brad Clark, a firefighter for Hanover Fire and EMS (see story at wtvr.com/2018/10/12/ltbrad-clark-with-hanover-county-fire-emsobit). “When there has already been a crash or incident that requires emergency response, and those coming to assist are then injured or killed, it is doubly tragic and heartbreaking,” Meade said. Other listed incidents in the AAA report include: Dec. 17, “Fleeing driver hits Virginia

State Police cruisers on I-95;” Nov. 5, “Hanover - Virginia State Trooper involved in a crash;” Nov. 25, “Chesterfield fire engine rear-ended;” Oct. 12, “Hanover County firefighter killed;” and Oct. 2, “Powhatan fire and rescue vehicle struck.” Virginia experienced a 3 percent increase in school bus crashes, according to the report. The AAA again listed some of the latest headlines to prove the point motorists are putting not only their lives but those of children at risk by driving distracted, speeding and/or disregarding the law against passing a school bus that is picking up or discharging passengers. Meade suggested that drivers only need to read any of the following news reports to understand the extent of this problem: Nov. 13, “Newport News school bus involved in crash,” www.wavy.com/ news/local-news/newport-news/schoolbus-involved-in-crash-at-newport-news-

intersection/1593497552; Nov. 13, “Lunenburg County school bus flips,” www. wric.com/news/virginia-news/1-studentremains-hospitalized-after-school-buscrash-in-lunenburg-county/1594697143; Nov. 12, “Dinwiddie County driver crashes into school bus,” wtkr.com/2018/11/12/ driver-crashes-into-school-bus-thatstopped-to-pick-up-children; and Oct. 29, “Chesterfield County school bus crash hurts two,” www.richmond.com/news/ local/crime/chesterfield-school-bus-crashhurts-students-henrico-wreck-involveshanover/article_49a59389-f1fd-549f-8945954dac60b5e5.html. The AAA report also cited several local incidents of children dying from vehicular heat stroke, adding to a national total of 49 youngsters becoming casualties after being left in hot cars last year. That is higher, according to the informational website noheatstroke.org, than the per-year average of 38 from 1998-2017. Again, the AAA cited recent headlines: Aug. 11, “Emporia baby found in hot car dies,” wtvr.com/2018/08/11/baby-dead-incar-dominos-pizza-emporia-virginia; Aug. 8, “Goochland child dies after being left in hot car,” www.nbc12.com/story/38843268/ virginia-child-dies-after-being-left-in-hotcar; and May 11, “Twins left in hot car,” wtvr. com/2018/05/11/five-month-old-twins-dieafter-being-left-in-vehicle-in-chesterfield.” General inattentiveness behind the wheel also has resulted in an alarming number of deaths, Meade emphasized. In 2017, 208 people died and more than 14,600 incurred injury in crashes that were a direct result of distracted driving in Virginia. Statistics still being gathered from last year were already showing 22,612 distraction-involved crashes, which resulted in 12,780 injuries and 133 deaths in the commonwealth. “Distracted driving is undeniably one of the

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Recognizing Civilians | Spotlight

Janice Bishop

Hometown: Parrott, Georgia Length of federal service: 20 years Job title: Executive Assistant Job duties: “My job duties encompass many things but my main job is to support the Agency Director in such a way that it contributes to making his job easier and allowing him to be successful in his job.” What do you love the most about your job? “What I love most about my job is how it is always changing, always evolving, and I get a front row seat watching the process. Every day is different and it is a constant adventure. I love my job!” What do you expect from your leaders? “The things that I expect from leadership are consistency, clarity, respect, honesty and someone who stands up for the team.” Where would you most like to live? “I would most like to live in North Carolina.”

When and where were you happiest? “My happiest moment was when my daughter was born.” Pet peeves: “My pet peeves are poor time management and dishonesty. My belief is poor time management among team members can result in resentment – especially if someone feels like they are pulling the weight for someone else who wastes time frequently. Dishonesty negatively impacts others on the team by harboring resentment and does not cultivate collaborative and effective working relationships.” What is your marked characteristic? “I think my smile.” Which talent would you most like to have? “I would love to be able to sing.” What’s your motto? “Treat others the way I want to be treated.” Role model: “My role model is my mother. She is the most soft-spoken and gentle spirit than anyone I know.” - Compiled by Amy Perry

Amy Perry


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File Photo

A member of the Virginia State University Gospel Chorale sings “Wade in the Water” during Fort Lee’s African-American/Black History Month Observance in 2017 at the Lee Theater. This year’s event is set for Feb. 22, 11:30 a.m., at the same location.

Post organizers plan event to honor achievements of African-Americans

The installation’s annual African-American/Black History Month Observance is set for Feb. 22, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., at the Lee Theater. Admission is free and all community members are invited. Guests can expect music, informational displays and remarks from a featured speaker who has yet to be identified. The event is being hosted by the 832nd Ordnance Battalion, CASCOM and the Fort Lee Equal Opportunity Office. The theme for the 2019 observance, as provided by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, is “Black Migrations” – an expression that emphasizes the movement of people of African descent to new destinations and subsequently to new social realities. While inclusive of earlier times, this theme focuses especially on the 20th century through today, according to ASALH. Promoters of National African-American/ Black History Month herald its diversity-enhancing merits. It is a time to recognize the central role people of color have played in

United States history and to discuss the societal changes that are needed to discourage discrimination and unfair treatment because of one’s race. Our country’s first Black History observance occurred in February 1926 during the week that encompasses the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. ThenPresident Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of Black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” Since then, each American president has issued African-American/Black History Month proclamations. The ASALH continues to promote the study of Black history all year. Look for additional information about Fort Lee’s upcoming observance of AABHM in future editions of the Traveller and on social media at www.facebook.com/armyfortlee. – Staff Reports

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“A day on,

Photos by Amy Perry

not a day off ”

(CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT) • Michael Williams, ALU president, and Command Sgt. Maj. Jerome Smalls, LNCOA commandant, pose with retired Air Force Capt. Howard L. Baugh Jr., and the certification of appreciation he was presented for serving as the guest speaker at the installation’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., observance Jan. 17 in the Lee Theater. • Baugh – the eldest son of Tuskegee Airman and retired Lt. Col. Howard L. Baugh Sr. – talks about the different models of aircraft he flew during his military and civilian career. Baugh also recounted a story of a sixth grade teacher who discouraged him from his dream of being a pilot because she didn’t see him being able to do it as a black man. Baugh’s father knew otherwise and accompanied his son to the next career day. Minds were changed and the younger of the two went on to achieve a successful piloting career marked by over 23,000 flight hours. • Williams, Baugh and Smalls participate in a ceremonial cake cutting at the event.

Dr. King’s teachings inspire general to be a stronger leader, better person Sean Kimmons Army News Service

Sean Kimmons, Army News Service

Lt. Gen. Aundre Piggee, deputy chief of staff for Army Logistics, speaks during a ceremony in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Jan. 10, at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall. Piggee shared his experiences with racism while growing up in the segregated south and related how his parents taught him to live by King’s example.

JOINT BASE MYER-HENDERSON HALL – Growing up in the segregated south, Lt. Gen. Aundre Piggee can easily recall the experiences with racism many African-Americans faced during the era of his childhood. Of the many incidents he witnessed, he said there was one that hurt the most. He grew up in Stamps, a small town in southern Arkansas with a population of about 1,200. His father was principal of the local school, which had previously been an all-black institution, and his mother worked at the Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant in nearby Texarkana. Piggee was the first African-American child integrated into the town’s little league baseball team. “Things went well the whole season,” he said Jan. 10 after

he spoke at an installation ceremony in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “We integrated well and had no issues.” When the baseball season ended, the team held a celebration at a local Boy Scout hut. Piggee convinced his parents to let him go so he could party with his friends. When he arrived at the front door, however, he was denied entry. A group of parents, some of whom even worked as teachers under his father, would not accept the idea of him being part of the celebration. “They didn’t let me come to the party because I was black,” he recalled. While racism had likely been around him before, he said it was the first time he personally noticed it. The incident also made him think deeply about his own character. “It was a humbling experience,” he said, “but what it taught

SEE DR. KING’S TEACHINGS, page 10


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Fort Lee employee named to Army Retired Soldier Council T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

A member of Team Lee was recently appointed to the Chief of Staff of the Army’s Retired Soldier Council. Retired Sgt. Maj. Michael A. Walker, who now serves as a training specialist at ALU’s Logistics Noncommissioned Officer Academy, is one of four new individuals named to the 14-member body headed by retired Lt. Gen. David D. Halverson and retired SMA Raymond F. Chandler III. Walker said CSARSC membership allows him to advocate for the Army retiree community on a larger stage. “They’ve provided me with an opportunity to impact – through compassion and drive – Army retirees and their families all over the world,” he said. The CSARSC, established in 1960, operates under the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel headquartered at the Pentagon. Its primary mission is to provide the Army Chief of Staff with advice and recommendations about vital issues affecting the retired military community. It represents more than 1 million individuals and surviving spouses. Walker, who retired here in 2010 after a 30-year career, has served as a member of the Fort Lee Retiree Council since 2014. The Southampton County native is co-chair of the 18-member volunteer body along with retired Col. Gregory A. Mason. The council serves to voice the concerns and issues impacting the 40,000 retirees living in the central Virginia region. The FLRC’s most recent achievements include helping to bolster attendance at the annual Retiree Appreciation Day that provides information updates, health screenings and other services for local retirees; and playing a pivotal role in establishing the Military Retiree Appreciation Ball in 2015. “It has been a great success,” Walker said

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Office serves as FLRC’s administrator. Its chief, Cassandra Rawls, said an interview with Walker prior to his council appointment left no doubt he possesses the attributes necessary to advocate for the retiree community. “He has a real concern and compassion,” she confirmed. “His persona exhibits an understanding of how to take care of Soldiers after their service, and he puts forth an effort to make sure everyone he works with understands the role of taking care of retired Soldiers and service members. I think that’s a good asset and a good addition to the team.” Since his appointment, Rawls said Walker has been complementary in every way. “He – if I could use an old cliché – brought a boots-on-the-ground attitude to do whatever work that needed to be done, absent of a title,” she said. “He really ran with the concept ‘I do the same work as everyone else’ and never came off as dictatorial. He worked hard to make sure retirees understood we were there for them.” Walker, a Greenville County church pastor, said he joined the Army to make a difference. As a retiree, he has fully embraced the idea of giving back. “When we realize our life has changed for the better, we are required to give back to those who paved the way to help us get where we are today,” he said. The CSARSC is scheduled to meet sometime during April, said Walker. He added his first priority is to put himself in an observation mode. “I’ve always been taught to be quick to listen and slow to speak,” he said. Among his long-term goals are to be a voice for the central region retirees and continue to improve the means of communication with that population. “I believe if we fail to inform our retiree family, we’re failing our communities,” he said. Walker emphasized he is grateful for the T. Anthony Bell support he has received from the Retiree Services Office; the FLRC; the U.S. Army of the latter, noting attendance has grown Florida to attend the event. We’re the only Garrison, Fort Lee; CASCOM; and the many over the years. “We’ve had people fly in from installation that hosts a ball for our retirees.” other organizations and individuals he has places as near as West Virginia and as far as The Soldier for Life Retirement Services worked with over the past five years.


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me is that I didn’t ever want to treat anybody else the way I had been treated.” The young Piggee was held to a higher standard by his parents. The general’s biography reveals that whenever he got into trouble during school, he would get lectured and punished by his father twice – in the principal’s office and at home. “It was a lesson that served him well in life,” the bio confirms. On April 3, 1968, King traveled to Memphis, Tenn., to deliver a speech in support of black workers being paid significantly lower wages than white workers. His flight to Memphis was initially delayed due to a bomb threat, but he made it to the city in time for his speech. The next day, while outside his motel, King was assassinated. On Jan. 15, the civil rights leader would have turned 90 years old. King’s leadership values were passed down to Piggee by his parents who strove to live by the message he left behind. “My parents gave us examples of King’s life and what right looked like,” he said. “And I still remember those to this day.” In almost 40 years of service, Piggee has held the title of commander five times. Presently, he oversees policies and procedures used by all Army logisticians and manages an $11 billion portfolio. Last October, he was inducted into the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame for his dedication. Fellow Stamps native Maya Angelou, a

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poet laureate, was among the first inductees in 1993. Piggee’s childhood home was a block from a general store, which was owned by Angelou’s grandmother. “I used to walk there almost every day,” he recalled. “For a nickel, I could get two cookies and some candy.” Angelou worked for King as a civil rights activist and later wrote a poem for the dedication of his monument on the National Mall. Also inspired by King, the general often shares with Soldiers his three leadership traits – competence, commitment and high character. In his remarks at the observance, the general noted that King had a strong vision to change the country. “Competence is what we need of our Soldiers,” he said. “Any time I can challenge Soldiers to improve on a daily basis – to be more competent, to be readier to do the mission our nation asks of us – I have had a good day.” King, he observed, also was committed to his cause. “That should be a model for our professional Soldiers,” Piggee said. “Putting on this uniform is a noble cause because doing the missions the Army asks of you is not always easy.” The most important trait, he said, is high character – a tough lesson he once learned as a child. “Dr. King’s dream was to judge people by the content of their character, not the color of their skin,” Piggee concluded.

US Army Photo

Pet of the Week

Ray Kozakewicz

TK, a domestic short-haired male cat, is available for adoption at the Fort Lee Stray Animal Facility on 38th Street, near the Defense Commissary Agency Headquarters. He is between 1-3 years old, very loving and quiet, according to his caretakers. There also are four other cats available. There are no adoption fees for any animals at the facility. Additionally, the shelter is seeking new volunteers and donations of cat food. For details, contact Officer Rob Moore, PMO animal control officer, at 804-721-9291.


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Exercise builds operational skills

Contributed Photo

Troops rehearse repair skills

With procedural tips from course instructor Fabian Ernest, a group of Bravo Company, 832nd Ordnance Battalion Soldiers remove the barrel from an M777 Lightweight Towed 155mm Howitzer during Phase 2 of the 91F Small Arms and Towed Artillery Repairer training course last week. Ernest is among the team of professionals who staff the Ordnance School’s Conventional Weapons Department and spend each duty day shaping the skills and professionalism of aspiring Ordnance Professional Soldiers.

Contributed Photo

Two 8th Platoon “Black Sheep” Soldiers from Victor Company, 262nd Quartermaster Battalion, assemble a fuel hose during a Quartermaster Situational Training Exercise earlier this month. The three-day, end-of-course STXs are an opportunity for advanced individual training troops to perform military occupational specialty skills taught in the classroom in conjunction with warrior tasks and battle drills they have learned and rehearsed since basic combat training. This training is key to producing “Ready Day One” Soldiers who will arrive at their first duty station fully prepared to support the operational Army. Similar exercises are conducted by the Ordnance and Transportation Schools.


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Soldier Center partners with industry to advance exoskeleton technologies NATICK, Mass. – David Audet, chief of the Mission Equipment and Systems Branch in the Soldier Performance Optimization Directorate, at the Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Soldier Center, is gearing up his team for the next User Touch Point activities to explore exoskeleton options later this month. “As we look at the maturing exoskeleton options available to us and engage users, we are learning way more about where the possible value of these systems is to Army operations,” said Audet. “Before the Army can consider investing in any development above what industry has done on its own, we need to make sure users are on board with human augmentation concepts and that the systems are worth investing in. The Army is not ready yet to commit. NSRDEC (RDECOM Soldier Center) has a lead role in working with PEO-Soldier and the Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning, to determine whether or not a longerterm investment in fielding new technologies is justifiable. But this is what we do best. We find the options and create the partnerships to help us figure it out.” Recent media has brought a lot of attention to the Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control’s ONYX system, a Popular Science award recipient for 2018. As innovative as it is, and with all the attention on the Soldier Center’s $6.9 million Other Transaction Agreement award, it’s easy to get

RDECOM Soldier Center Photo

Soldiers from the Army’s 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum, N.Y., were recently given a closer look at two of the human augmentation technologies pictured in the photo. The exoskeleton devices are being pursued by the RDECOM Soldier Center for possible implementation among U.S. combat forces. The Soldier on the left is wearing the ONYX, and the one on the right is wearing the ExoBoot.

caught up in the moment and lose perspective of the overall work the Soldier Center is actually doing, Audet noted. Out of the 48-month phased effort, roughly $680,000 has been put on the LMMFC OTA – currently focused on having enough systems to take to the field for operational evaluation. Although performing, the technology has yet to prove itself in a full operational exercise before moving forward. And while LMMFC is highly confident in its product and continues to invest funding on further developing the system for commercial use, the Soldier Center also is looking at other technologies.

Located in Maynard, Mass., Dephy Inc.’s ExoBoot is another entrant in the program. That device is an autonomous foot ankle exoskeleton inspired by research done at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under collaboration with the Army. It is currently under consideration for evaluation during the third and fourth quarter of 2019. Brig. Gen. David M. Hodne, 4th Infantry Division deputy commander, has worn the ExoBoot during Soldier Center program updates and is quite intrigued by the capability. User feedback will determine if both systems move forward and under which

considerations. “Under ideal conditions, we would favor a full development effort,” said Audet. “However, given the push for rapid transition and innovation, we can save the Army a lot of time and money by identifying and vetting mature technologies, consistent with the vision of the Army Futures Command. “In order to achieve the goal of vetting and providing recommendations, NSRDEC and PEO-Soldier are strong partners, teamed up to work with third party independent engineering firms such as Boston Engineering out of Waltham, Mass,” he continued. “The engineering analysis of systems will provide an unbiased system-level analysis of any of the technologies under consideration, following rigorous analysis of the capabilities as they exist, the operational parameters provided by users and assessment of how humans will use and interact with the systems. “We are confident products will succeed or - at a minimum - fill a gap we have not been able to address by any other materiel or training means,” he concluded. “We will be prepared to transition, but we know there is a road ahead before we get there. We aren’t committing to anything more than to bring the systems to a demonstration and educate the community at large on what these preliminary technologies can offer. In the meantime, we add a layer of third party independent analysis as a reassurance policy that we are mitigating bias and staying laser focused on user needs and meeting the demands of the future warfighting landscape.”

– RDECOM Soldier Center, Public Affairs Office


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KenneR connecTion | CERViCAl CANCER AWARENESS MoNth

HPV is more common than you think You can get HPV by having vaginal, anal, or oral sex with someone who has the virus. It is most commonly spread during vaginal or anal sex. HPV can be passed even when an infected person has no signs or symptoms. Anyone who is sexually active can get HPV, even if you have had sex with only one person. You also can develop symptoms years after you have sex with someone who is infected. This makes it hard to know when you first became infected.

HPV affects both genders Both males and females are affected by HPV. Exposure to the virus can happen with any kind of adolscent experimentation that involves genital contact with someone who has HPV – intercourse isn’t necessary, but it is the most common way to get the virus.

It’s important to help protect children before they are at risk.

In most cases, HPV goes away on its own and does not cause any health problems. But when HPV does not go away, it can cause health problems like genital warts and cancer.

It is estimated that Most people with HPV do not know they are infected and never develop symptoms or health over 20 million problems from it. Some people find out they have HPV Americans are when they get genital warts. Women may find out they have HPV when they get an abnormal Pap test infected with HPV, result (during cervical cancer screening). Others may making it the single only find out once they’ve developed more serious problems from HPV, such as cancers. most common sexually transmitted There Is a Vaccine... disease in the U.S.

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Get vaccinated. The HPV vaccine is safe and effective. It can protect against diseases (including cancers) caused by HPV when given in the recommended age groups.

All boys and girls ages 11 or 12 years should get vaccinated.

Whats next? There is no treatment for the virus itself. However, there are treatments for the health problems that HPV can cause: 1. Genital warts can be treated by your healthcare provider or with prescription medication. If left untreated, genital warts may go away, stay the same, or grow in size or number. 2. Cervical precancer can be treated. Women who get routine Pap tests and follow up as needed can identify problems before cancer develops. Prevention is always better than treatment.

HPV can cause cervical and other cancers including cancer of the vulva, vagina, penis, or anus. It can also 3. Other HPV-related cancers are also more cause cancer in the back of the throat, including the base treatable when diagnosed and treated early. of the tongue and tonsils.

Information provided by CDC.gov and National Cervical Cancer Coalition Illustrated by Lesley Atkinson, KAHC PAO

It can be upsetting when HPV is first diagnosed, but remember that having HPV is normal. It doesn’t mean than anyone did something wrong, just that like most others they were exposed to a common infection. To read more on HPV go to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at https://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv. To get the vaccine for your child please schedule with the primary health care team through the clinic’s appointment line, 804-7349449.


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Science on Tap - 1919 | Jan. 17

Library MakerSpace Activity | Jan. 25 The Fort Lee Community Library has scheduled its next MakerSpace program for Jan. 25, 5 p.m., in Bunker Hall Cafeteria, Army Logistics University. Those interested should arrive as close to the starting time as possible in order to complete the project before the event is over. MakerSpace is free and open to all ages. Participants can use tools, techniques and hands-on learning with the goal of inspiring and nurturing their interest in science, technology, engineering, art and math. For more information, call 804-765-8095.

‘Curious George’ Science After Dark | Jan. 25

Visitors can celebrate the opening of the touring exhibition “Curious George: Let’s Get Curious,” Jan. 25, 5-9 p.m., at the Science Museum of Virginia, 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. The event will include hands-on activities, interactive stations, a visit by Curious George and his friend, the Man with the Yellow Hat, and more. The museum also will show the movie, “Curious George” in its Dome Theater. The exhibit will be on display until Sept. 15. Discounted admission is available for military ID cardholders. For additional details, call 804-864-1400 or visit smv.org.

Federal Hiring Workshop | Jan. 25

A free Federal Hiring Workshop is set for Jan. 25, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., in Room 126 of the Soldier Support Center, building 3400, B Avenue. Subject matter experts will provide information and resources for participants to understand the federal application hiring process, the development of the federal resume and other requirements. It is open to all community members. Registration is requested. For further details, call 804-734-6612 or email army.lee.sfltap@mail.mil.

FMWR Canvas, Cork Event | Jan. 26

Community members can create a work of art at a Canvas and Cork painting workshop Jan. 26, 2-5 p.m., in the TenStrike Bowling and Entertainment Center, 2403 C Ave.

Big Band Hangar Dance | Feb 9

L OCAL A CTIVITIES

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The cost is $35 per person. Hosted by the Picture Perfect Frame Shop, the workshop includes wine tastings, light hors d’oeuvres and guidance from trained artists. To register, visit lee.armymwr.com/calendar/event/canvascork/2862589/3W5223. For more information, call 804-734-6137.

FMWR Big Game Watch Parties | Feb. 3

The Military Aviation Museum will host its annual Big Band Hangar Dance Feb. 9, 6 p.m. - midnight, in the hangars of the museum, 1341 Princess Anne Road, Virginia Beach. The event is a tribute to the veterans and vintage aircraft from the world wars. The social event will include photo opportunities with historical airplanes and automobiles. It will feature music from the roaring ‘20s through the high flying ‘40s. There are three ticket options to choose from – dinner only, dance only or both. For other details, call 757-721-7767 or visit www.bigbandhangardance.com.

Three Big Game Watch Parties are set for Super Bowl Sunday Feb. 3, all starting at 5 p.m. The special events will take place at the TenStrike Bowling and Entertainment Center, 2403 C Ave., 804-734-6860; Overtime Sports Gossip, Grandeur at Maymont | Bar, downstairs level of the Lee Club, Battle Jan. 27 Drive, 734-7541; and Sustainers’ Pub, in the Special guided tours of the “Backstairs” at lobby area of Fort Lee Army Lodging, 2301 Maymont Mansion are set for Jan. 27, noon - 5 Mahone Ave., 765-1449. p.m., at 1700 Hampton St., Richmond. There is no cover charge. All locations will During the half-hour excursions, participants ACS ‘Baby Basics’ | offer drink and food specials. will learn about social rituals, fashions, family Feb. 13 dramas, the tittle-tattle of the “Downton” era 555th PIA Meeting | Feb. 6 A free class – “Baby Basics,” presented in Richmond and more. The cost is $6 per The Jessie J. Mayes Tri-Cities Chapter of by the Army Community Service Family person; $4 for members. the 555th Parachute Infantry Association, Advocacy Program – is set for Feb. 13, 1 p.m., For other details, call 804-358-7166, ext. Inc. will hold its monthly meeting Feb. 6, at ACS, building 1231, Mahone Avenue. 329, or visit maymont.org. 6 p.m., at the Petersburg Public Library, The session will cover bathing, diapering, 201 West Washington St., Petersburg. Prior soothing, breastfeeding and other newborn Resume Writing Workshop | airborne experience is not a prerequisite for care. This also is an ideal opportunity to learn Jan. 29 more about the support services available to The Soldier for Life Transition Assistance membership or attending. For more details, call 804-733-2177. first-time parents. Registration is requested. Program will host a free resume-writing For more information, call 804-734-6381. workshop Jan. 29, 9 a.m. - noon, at the Soldier Pamplin Valentine Tea | Feb. 9 Support Center, Room 126, building 3400, Male and female re-enactors in period dress 1401 B Ave. Murder at the Library | will teach 19th-century etiquette while visitors Participants will receive tips on fine-tuning Feb. 15-16 objectives, crafting work history, showcasing are served gourmet tea and snacks Feb. 9, During an interactive mystery theatre 2-3:30 p.m., at Pamplin Historical Park, 6125 skills and more. performance, audience members will take on For registration, call 804-734-6612 or email Boydton Plank Road, Petersburg. the roles of detectives who work to solve a Reservations are required by Feb. 7. Guests army.lee.sfltap@mail.mil. murder Feb. 15-16, 7-9:30 p.m., at the Clover also will learn about the importance of flowers Hill Library, 6701 Deer Run Dr., Midlothian. ‘Steel Magnolias’ Play and traditions of romantic courtship during the Presented by Sisters in Crime Central Civil War. Opening | Feb. 1. Virginia, the event will include wine, beer and For further details, call 804- 861-2408. “Steel Magnolias,” the third installment of light refreshments. Reservations are required. the Lee Playhouse Theater Group platinum For details, call 804-318-8668 or visit season, opens Feb. 1, 8 p.m., at the Lee Youth Center Valentine Dance | library.chesterfield.gov. Feb. 9 Theater, Mahone Avenue. Youths between the ages of 11-18 are invited Additional performances are set for Feb. 2, 8, 9, 15 and 16 at 8 p.m., and Feb. 3, 10 and 17 to the “Love Ya Lots” Valentine’s Dance Feb. CYS Parents Night Out | at 3 p.m. All shows are open to the public. The 9, 7-10 p.m., at the Youth Center, building Feb. 16 Parents can take a night off while children, dramatic comedy focuses on the friendship of 10619, Yorktown Drive. ages 6 weeks - 12 years old, participate in ageThe event will include refreshments, music six southern women who talk, gossip, needle appropriate development activities Feb 16, and harangue each other through the best of and dancing. The cost is $3 for members 6-10 p.m., at the Battle Child Development times and comfort each other through the and $5 for guests. Attendees must either be Center, building 10622, Sisisky Blvd. worst. Tickets are $15 for adults and $7 for registered with Parent Central Services or be The cost is $25 per child. Registration is a sponsored guest who is registered with PCS. youths. required by Feb. 6. For additional information, call 804-734For additional information, contact the box For details, call 804-734-2933 or 734-2958. 2870 or 734-2871. office at 804-734-6629.

for more installation and outside the gate events and activities, visit our online calendar at www.fortleetraveller.com/calendar

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TRAFFIC SAFETY, continued from page 5

biggest threats to motorists in this country,” Meade said. “The problem is rampant and nothing seems to be getting through to drivers who continually report they believe that distracted driving is a huge problem, but then admit they drive distracted on a regular basis.” According to the AAA report, the top three distractions leading to accidents are: eyes not on road; looking at a roadside incident and using a cell phone/texting. Fort Lee Garrison Safety Manager Tim Lawrence weighed in on that particular aspect of the report. “This has been a key

focus area of our motor vehicle safety awareness and education campaign for quite a few years,” he said, “and I have little doubt any experienced driver on our installation would be able to cite from memory why staying off the phone and focusing on the road is essential to preventing accidents. “Unfortunately, knowledge tends to be overcome by the need to be connected – that call or text message that can’t wait because it involves work, an upcoming appointment, or keeping in touch with a spouse, family member or friend,” Lawrence continued. “We also tend to have this mentality that we’re such awesome drivers, it doesn’t apply to us. We get in a hurry and think the crisis

of the moment entitles us to skirt the rules of the road. “What’s made evident by this conversation, though,” he observed, “is that risk-taking is costing lives and serious injury. It’s putting people in jeopardy, and the only way to decrease the trend in accidents is for every motorist to take responsibility for his or her actions.” Other statistics cited in the AAA report included Virginia pedestrian fatalities – 110 people killed – and deaths from not wearing seatbelts – 345 casualties in 2018. Meade confirmed seatbelt usage in the commonwealth is consistently lower than the national average. It was determined that only

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85.3 percent of drivers wore seat restraints last year, meaning 1.2 million individuals were not buckling up. Meade said her organization hopes awareness of what’s happening as a result of poor driving habits, backed up by the newspaper reports and numbers, will influence change among those behind the wheel. “Something has got to give,” she again restated in reference to drivers taking more responsibility for accident prevention. “Passenger and drivers alike have a choice each and every time they are in a car,” she said. “AAA urges everyone in the vehicle to make the right choices.” – AAA and Staff Reports

DEADLINE Reader & Display: thursday 4:00pm (week prior)

CONTACT: Susan Irgens

susanlou.irgens@gmail.com

757-477-7104


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Profile for The Progress-Index

Fort Lee Traveller | Jan. 24, 2019  

Fort Lee Traveller | Jan. 24, 2019