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Major refurb project at Mac Fitness Center includes more training space, floor upgrades, improved ventilation SEE PAGE 5

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

January 17, 2019 | Vol. 79, No. 3

Tax Time

Assistance Center opens Jan. 28; ready to help military members, families with forms and e-filing

SEE PAGE 3

POST FACILITY ADDS POLISH TO HIGH-PROFILE PIECES LRC’s maintenance department here has been entrusted with the task of servicing and repainting equipment belonging to the Army’s Old Guard ceremonial unit

LIFE LESSONS FROM HEALING JOURNEY While traveling road to recovery from a stroke, a post employee learns trust, patience, gratitude

CLINIC WELCOMES ENLISTED LEADER New Kenner command team member will be responsible for training, implementing policies

DMV RELOCATION BEGINS FRIDAY Fort Lee service center move to Soldier support facility will take about three weeks to complete

SEE PAGE 8

SEE PAGE 2

SEE PAGE 4

SEE PAGE 10


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commAnD sPotliGHt | holiDaY SaFetY MeSSage

Adverse winter weather among recreational risks

U.S. Army Photo

It’s fitting that we begin a new year by celebrating the spiritually uplifting memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., our nation’s most influential civil rights leader and Nobel Peace Prize winner. Dr. King dedicated his life to obtaining equality for all Americans and believed peace for all people was the way toward a better world. This Monday is set aside to commemorate those civil liberties that his grand vision and hard work brought forth to profoundly change our country. As we share in this holiday, I ask each of you to commemorate Dr. King’s sacrifices, achievements and vision in a safe and

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responsible manner. Commanders and supervisors must ensure all personnel are briefed on the potential risks associated with long holiday weekends. At a minimum, discuss defensive driving, individual responsibilities and safe alcohol consumption. Anticipate the bouts of adverse winter weather that will continue into the new year. I encourage all leaders to talk and listen to their personnel to ensure a safe holiday. Remember, good leaders do not expose those under their command to unnecessary risk. As individuals, I want each member of Team Lee to use common sense and forethought as you plan out your activities so that you, and

those around you, enjoy a risk free season. Prior planning and awareness of potential hazards are the keys to accident prevention. Our goal during this time of year is to celebrate without accident, injury or fatality. Whatever your plans, manage your risks to make this a safe and enjoyable holiday weekend. Thank you for your dedication, commitment and support to our organization. Support Starts Here! – Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general

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Employee shares lessons learned while traveling road to recovery

Fort Lee

Commanding General ................... Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Hollie J. Martin Public Affairs Officer ............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor ...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments .......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor .................. Amy Perry Production Assistant............................... Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

The Fort Lee Traveller is an authorized publication for members of the DOD, printed by Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee, Virginia. Contents of the Fort Lee Traveller are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee Public Affairs Office. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services advertised by the U.S. Army or Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc. Everything advertised in this publication will be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher will refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation has been corrected.

got back to my desk I started to feel another episode come on. I asked my co-worker to call an ambulance. When the paramedics arrived, I was on the floor and they had to carry me out from behind the desk to put me on the stretcher. Turns out those episodes were TIAs (transient ischemic attacks) or mini-strokes. All I knew is I had no control over my right side, I was in the hospital for the first time since I was born, I was scared and wanted my mom. I spent four days in the hospital, then transferred to inpatient rehabilitation for six weeks. I needed some speech therapy, but for the most part, my language wasn’t affected. I could not move my right arm and leg, so I needed a lot SEE ROAD TO RECOVERY, page 7

coVer

The ability to grow and thrive in the face of challenges, and to bounce back from adversity, is the Army’s definition of resilience. I see myself as a resilient individual. I was born premature by a month, and the doctor told my parents I wouldn’t mentally go past 10 years old; however, I went on to earn a master’s degree. As a teen, I went to seven different high schools, so I was always the new kid who struggled to gain acceptance. After attending an out-of-state college, I was commissioned as an Air Force officer and completed nine assignments, seven deployments and numerous temporary

duty missions over a 20-year career. My command staff position at CASCOM is the second assignment I’ve held as an Army Civilian. Anyway, you get the point, I have demonstrated resilience. A recent incident in my life, though, seriously tested my inner-strength. On a Sunday in June, I experienced four episodes of disorientation over nine hours that concerned me to the point I called an ambulance and went to the hospital. Because I had no preexisting conditions, they told me it was allergies and sent me home. I had two more episodes that night, woke up, made an afternoon doctor’s appointment and went to work. I attended an installation event that morning and when I

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Dani Johnson

Metro Creative Fort Lee’s Tax Assistance Center offers free services to military members and their families. Its staff of volunteers is comprised of military and civilian preparers who have received extensive IRS training, which could prove very helpful with the new tax laws in effect this year. For more, see Page 3.


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Lee Tax Center to open Jan. 28; ready to assist troops, families T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

Fort Lee’s longstanding, no-cost service entity – the Tax Assistance Center – is scheduled to open its doors Jan. 28. The TAC is located in building 5209, 910 20th Street, just off Shop Road and adjacent to the Army Women’s Museum. This marks the 31st year community members have benefited from the free tax preparation service staffed by military and civilian volunteers, including many veterans. Capt. Jaron Janson, the officer in charge of this year’s program, said he’s enthusiastic about this tax season and again providing the popular service for active duty military members, retirees and their family members. “I’m excited,” said the Judge Advocate General officer. “There’s a lot of changes (in the tax law) this year, so it’s going to be a little different. Many people will be pleasantly surprised they will get back a little more.” Last tax season, the TAC prepared 2,696 returns and saved community members more than $303,000 in estimated preparation fees had those customers used a commercial service. This year, the TAC has made some changes with a goal to better serve clients and increase its efficiency, said Janson. One is the addition of more preparers, which provides the capacity to serve more people. “We have at least one or two more military staffers and probably two or three more volunteers,” he said. In addition to an increased staff, Janson said the walk-in hours have been expanded. “Last year, our walk-in hours on Tuesdays and Thursdays were in the afternoon,” he esaid. “This year, it will be all day.” o s Janson said the change was made to ealleviate overcrowding in the building’s yconfined spaces, an issue affecting last year’s , operation.

File Photo

(ABOVE) A Fort Lee Soldier receives form preparation and filing help from aTax Assistance Center volunteer during a previous tax season. The preparers at the facility receive extensive training in tax laws to ensure they are ready to handle most returns, including those reporting mortgage payments, investment income, child care expenses, and much more. (RIGHT) Capt. Jaron Janson, a Staff Judge Advocate officer, is heading up this year’s program at the Fort Lee Tax Assistance Center.

T. Anthony Bell

“(Last year), it was jam-packed with people walking in,” he said. “The changes will mean a decrease in the appointments we schedule, and I think it will better accommodate people.” Flyers have been distributed indicating walk-in hours are 1-5 p.m. on Tuesdays and

Thursdays. Janson said those specific times should be ignored. The facility’s regular hours are 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday on normal duty days. The last clients will be seen at 4 p.m. Would-be tax filers are reminded to bring with them all pertinent documents and

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information relating to their returns. These include: military, retiree or family member identification cards; Social Security cards for all family members; W2, W2G, Form 1099R, 1099-INT, and other statements of income and interest; bank account and routing numbers; and a power of attorney if a spouse is not present. Other documents needed include: prior year tax returns; home mortgage interest statement; tuition statements (Form 1098-T); student loan interest statements (Form 1098E); healthcare statements (Form 1095-A, B and C) or exemption number; Veteran Affairs disability letter; and supporting documents relating to alimony payments and stocks or mutual fund sales. The VA disability letter, said Janson, deserves special mention because many veterans are uninformed about its impact on taxes due to the Strickland Decision. “Basically it dictates whatever percentage of disability you are (according to one’s disability letter) that is the percentage of your retirement income you do not have to claim on your taxes,” he said. “Most people don’t know that, and it’s a big deal.” Another potentially big deal is the government shutdown (which may be resolved by the Traveller’s Jan. 17 publication date). Janson said to his knowledge it will not affect the TAC operation or return times. “What the IRS has said on its website is the shutdown is not going to slow down the processing of returns,” he said. “So, per the IRS, it (the shutdown) should not affect how fast you get your return.” Community members needing assistance from the agency, however, may run into obstacles, considering the IRS was staffed at only 12 percent during the first week of the shutdown, according to a Jan. 7 CBS News report. “Those who have questions, issues or concerns about specific (tax) situations will have a more difficult time reaching anyone at the IRS,” he said. The Internal Revenue Service opens its 2018 filing season on Jan. 28, said Janson. The tax filing deadline remains April 15. For more information and to make appointments, call the TAC at 804-734-5732.


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New Hours for Skeet, Trap Range

The new hours for the Fort Lee Skeet and Trap Range are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Thursday Saturday. Shooters of all skill levels are welcome to use the facility that offers two skeet, two trap and one 5-stand range. The fee is $3.50 for each 25 targets shot plus the cost of ammunition if purchased from the range. Active duty and retired military, DOD employees and civilians are welcome to use the area. Range Operations reminds community members who enter the training complex for any reason must stop at building 17170 in order to be checked in and to provide details of their visit. For more information, call 804-765-2212.

Clinic Adjusts Hours for MLK Weekend

Lesley Atkinson

Lt. Col. Paul J. Kassebaum, Kenner Army Health Clinic commander, passes his organization’s command flag to Sgt. Maj. Joanne S. Rollocks during an assumption of responsibility ceremony Friday in Wylie Hall auditorium. The passing of the flag signifies the commander’s trust in the incoming clinic CSM’s ability to carry out his policies and set and maintain high quality standards for the organization.

SGM Rollocks assumes role as Kenner’s enlisted leader Lesley Atkinson

KAHC Public Affairs Officer

Sgt. Maj. Joanne S. Rollocks became Kenner Army Health Clinic’s senior enlisted leader at an assumption of responsibility ceremony Friday in Wylie Hall auditorium. In her role as Kenner’s CSM, Rollocks will be responsible for all enlisted training activities at the facility, carrying out the commander’s policies, and setting and maintaining high quality standards for the organization. The position had been vacant for five months after Sgt. Maj. George T. Harwick assumed the command sergeant major position at 188th Medical Battalion, San Antonio, Texas. In the interim, the Medical Company’s senior noncommissioned officer, 1st Sgt. Susana Kitchen, served as acting sergeant major. Lt. Col. Paul J. Kassebaum, KAHC commander, thanked Kitchen and Sgt. 1st

Class James Daigle for providing quality leadership within the Kenner community during the transition period. In his remarks, he also noted how Rollocks has already made an impression on him. “I like leaders who are fully committed to their unit,” said Kassebaum. “I was happy when she told me one of her top priorities is taking care of the people.” Kassebaum also said that he plans to work closely with Rollocks to make sure Kenner Soldiers are trained on their warrior tasks and battle drills, and other technical skills, so they are ready to deploy if necessary. In addition, the team will continue to push patient satisfaction and access to higher care. “Your combination of experience, values and people-first attitude make you a great fit for Kenner,” he told Rollocks at the event. “I welcome you with open arms as we strive toward our vision of exceeding expectations as the DOD’s premier system for health and readiness.”

Over the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend, Kenner Army Health Clinic and Troop Medical Clinic 1 will be open with normal operations on Jan. 18 for patient care. Mosier Troop Medical Clinic 2 will be closed that day. All Kenner clinics and services will be closed Jan. 21, a federal holiday. To schedule appointments, call the Kenner appointment line at 1-866-533-5242. To request an authorization to visit an urgent care center, call the nurse advice line at 1-800-TRICARE and choose option 1. For medical emergencies, dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

Family Child Care Training Available

Fort Lee Child and Youth Services is offering free training to individuals interested in becoming a Family Child Care Provider. Applicants must be 18 years of age or older and reside in government housing. A background check is part of the qualification process. Applications are available at the Family Child Care Office, building 10612, Yorktown Drive. Child care will be provided on a first-come basis for FCC-certification classes. For other details, call 804-765-3787 or 765-3850.

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Petersburg Schools Seek Lunch Buddies

Community members are invited to make a difference by volunteering as a lunch buddy in one of Petersburg’s elementary schools – Cool Spring, Lakemont, Pleasants Lane and Walnut Hill. Lunch buddies can participate once a week or once a month; whichever fits their schedule. Volunteers are there to talk with students, listen to their stories and generally build community spirit. Training will be provided. For more information, visit https://bit.ly/2TWjcQn.

Artifacts Roadshow at VWM

Military collectable experts will evaluate and offer opinions on personally owned military items during the Artifacts Roadshow Jan. 26, 10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., at the Virginia War Memorial, 621 South Belvidere St., Richmond. No cash appraisals or monetary estimates can be offered at the free event. Small arms, weapons and ordnance items brought to the venue must be inspected by trained representatives to ensure safety. Vendors or dealers are prohibited. For additional details, call 804-786-2060 or visit www.vawarmemorial.org/upcoming events.

MacLaughlin to Close for JCTE, Renovation

Family and MWR’s MacLaughlin Fitness Center will be closed Feb. 26 - June 15 to accommodate the annual Joint Culinary Training Exercise (Feb. 26 - March 15), followed by an interior renovation project. T Those needing additional details can contact FMWR Director Darrell Clay at darrell.w.clay. p naf@mail.mil or 804-734-7199. An article about the MacLaughlin project is on Page 5. a


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Mac Fitness Center to close for needed renovations, upgrades Amy Perry

Production/News Assistant Editor

More instructional space, upgraded fixtures and floor refurbishments are among the many quality of life improvements set to happen at MacLaughlin Fitness Center during an upcoming renovation project. The facility will close its doors for the Joint Culinary Training Event Feb. 25 - March 15, and upgrade work will begin immediately afterward. The fitness center is expected to reopen in mid-to-late summer. Dan Gauvin, the facility manager, said regular customers will notice big changes, starting with the entry and lobby area, and continuing to the new fitness room located where the administrative offices are located now. The latter

is one of space improvements that will allow additional classes to be held in the facility. All hardwood flooring will be refurbished, Gauvin said. This includes the basketball and racquetball courts, as well as the current aerobics room. “Another update to the basketball court will be the refinishing and re-marking to official NCAA standards,” he continued. “We also are going to place a court divider in there to increase our ability to do several events at once.” Gauvin is part of the team who started up the Strength Performance Center on Fort Lee. With the help of other garrison directorates, he will lead the effort to bring the MFC into updated standards seen in many off-post fit-

ness facilities. “Our goal is to compete with the outside fitness centers to the best of our capabilities,” Gauvin said. “We want it to be appealing for Soldiers to stay on post. We want to be able to provide them the services that fit their needs and their schedule.” Other planned changes to the facility include the installation of eco-friendly bottle-fill water fountains and a smoothie bar. The team is currently exploring additional upgrades they can accomplish during MacLaughlin’s closure. Considering the center was built in the 1980s, Gauvin said the renovation project has been long anticipated and is greatly needed. “Some of the work is stuff we do every six years as funds are available – like refurbishing

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the floors – but facility redesign and functionality improvements are the part that’s much needed,” he said. “There are a lot of events held in the gym and the floors are becoming worn out.” Additional fans are also being added to the weight room to help regulate the temperature better, as it can get very hot during the summer months, Gauvin noted. The other fitness centers on post are increasing their hours to help patrons keep up their fitness regime while MFC is out of commission. The SPC will remain open until 9:30 p.m. on weekdays starting Feb. 25. On March 11, Clark Fitness Center will start opening nights and weekends to match MFC’s current schedule. Its hours are set for 5 a.m. - 9:30 p.m., Monday - Friday; and 8 a.m. - 4 p.m., Saturday - Sunday. More information will be released about class locations during the closure on the Family and MWR website at lee.armymwr.com.

Army sends surveys to assess family housing satisfaction

WASHINGTON – Residents of military family housing have another chance to rate the quality of their homes, neighborhoods and services provided. This week, an online survey of about 10,000 occupants of Army-owned and Army-leased housing worldwide is being sent out via email. Residents of privatized Residential Communities Initiative neighborhoods, such as those at Fort Lee, will receive survey invites in March. The latter assessment is separate from the Hunt Military Communities survey that is set to be launched during the latter half of April. CEL & Associates Inc. will administer the Army’s survey. The email will be from ArmyHousingSurvey@celassociates. com. The submission deadline for the first round of surveys is Feb. 14. The no-later-than due date for the privatized housing assessment will be announced when it launches in approximately two months. The Army is particularly interested in receiving firsthand accounts of what Soldiers and families find important when living in military-provided housing. The assessment is used to identify areas in housing operations that are successful or Contributed Photo need improvement; where funding could have the most effect The December Yard of the Month winners for Washington Grove to change those things that are top priorities to residents; and pose outside their Fort Lee home with the sign highlighting their to ascertain areas of success for the garrison housing offices. achievement. “Feedback about your experiences while residing in

military housing is critical to shaping future projects and services provided by the Army and its RCI partners,” confirmed Lt. Gen. Gwen Bingham, Army Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management. CEL & Associates’ first round of surveys in 2018 went out to 9,957 residents, and 2,025 responses were received – a 20.3 percent return rate. Service leaders are teaming up with housing managers this year to boost participation in the 2019 assessment. A higher response rate will give Army officials a more accurate depiction of community needs and areas of concern that detract from desired quality of life standards. “All surveys are confidential,” emphasized Lt. Gen. Bradley A. Becker, IMCOM commander. “Your frank feedback about experiences in Army Family Housing may help to shape future programs and services and guide future decisions that could impact generations of Soldiers and families to come.” Residents of Army-owned or leased housing who have not received an email with the survey link by Jan. 18 should contact their local housing offices. Additional details about the RCI survey will be provided when that assessment gets underway. - Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management


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Americas Military | Spotlight

Pfc. Ricquan Morris

Unit: 217th Military Police Detachment MOS: 56M – religious affairs specialist Age: 20 Time in service: two months Hometown: Milledgeville, Ga. Place of duty: Memorial Chapel How you spend free time: “I talk on the phone and try to stay connected with everybody from my home state; making sure everything is going well with my mom and sister.” Describe yourself: “I’m fairly quiet and laid back. I also think I’m easy to talk to and can offer a lot of advice for people if they decide to listen.” What people don’t know about you: “I’m very, very cautious. I try hard not to make mistakes, and I almost do it to a fault, making mistakes anyway.” What you are doing to address this problem? “I’m trying to work through it. I try to talk to people and get their opinions on some of the things I do.” Worst fear: “Not knowing. If I have to make a decision, I might fear that decision because I don’t know what the outcome will be.” Speaking of not knowing, the biggest unknown was joining the Army … “I knew (that to be true). That’s why I joined.” The person you most admire: “My mom. She sacrificed a lot for me and my sister. There were a lot of late nights (during his childhood because his single mom had to work). Right now, she’s in school, works and has to take care of my sister.” The celebrity or historical figure you desire to meet: “J. Cole (the hip hop artist). I feel like he is on the same mental level as I am. He produces the only (hip hop) music that speaks to me.” Talk about your hometown: “It’s fairly small, and a lot of people don’t know it exists. Many people there don’t have the same mindset I have. A lot of them don’t focus on being successful and get lost in having fun and trying to fit in. I

T. Anthony Bell

surrounded myself with a lot of successful and supportive people.” Your motivation to leave Milledgeville: “There wasn’t enough there; not enough opportunities. It felt like I was running in place. A lot of people wanted to be rappers, singers or musicians. I didn’t see myself following the crowd.” Why you joined the Army: “To take care of my mom and sister; to build a better future for my family.” In making that decision, did the war on terrorism have any influence? “It did, but it didn’t. I mean, I hate conflict. I hate fighting, but I also want to travel the world and see new places, meet new people and learn different languages.” Talk about one life-changing event: “Graduating from basic (combat training). During basic, my mom would always write me letters. My dad and I never really had a stable relationship; I knew where he lived, but I didn’t know his whereabouts. My mom told me she gave my mailing address

to dad, and throughout basic, he never wrote me. At my graduation, my mom, aunt and sister were there. Everyone else explained why they couldn’t make it, and I understood. My dad never called, wrote or texted. There was some resentment toward him. I called him at a later date, and we had a long discussion. It was one we needed to have. Our relationship has improved since then.” What it means to serve your country: “It means I’m successful, and it means I’m honoring my last name. I have a lot of family members in the Army. Just being able to follow in their footsteps and seeing how proud my mom, my dad, my girlfriend and everyone else is knowing I’m doing something with my life. That makes me feel successful.” Why you chose your current MOS: “I love the Lord. I feel like I have a calling for this job. If I had joined any other branch of the military, I would’ve still chose this job.” Talk about your day-to-day duties: “It’s different. I’m used to coming to church and having everything done. This business makes you appreciate the people who have to do the work to make church possible. It takes a lot of time and effort.” What makes a good Soldier: “Following orders the right way. You can’t do your own thing. You have to be a good leader, and you have to know when to follow.” If you were Army Chief of Staff, what would you change? “I would change the hair regulations for males. I would allow them to express themselves with their hair the way females are allowed to. If you carry yourself like a Soldier, it shouldn’t matter what your hairstyle is. It’s about how you present yourself.” Best thing about the Army: “It helps pay for college and helps you take care of your family. It provides you the comfort of not worrying.” Worst thing about the Army: “Early mornings and late nights (laugh).” Future plans: “I want to serve 20 years. After that, I want to go to college for mechanical engineering and psychology, then start a business. – Compiled by T. Anthony Bell


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ROAD TO RECOVERY,

ycontinued from page 2 e of occupational and physical therapy to restore use of those eappendages. e When I reached the point where I could walk with a fourrpoint cane and take care of myself, I was sent home. A friend picked me up, got me into my house and spent the weekend mmaking sure I had everything I needed. After that, I was abasically alone but able to call people if I needed help. After wanother two weeks of home-health rehab, I felt I would go ycrazy if I didn’t find something that would get me out of the ghouse and decided to return to work for my sanity. I resumed full-time hours in September and started driving Iin October. My outpatient rehabilitation continues twice a rweek. As I look back on the past seven months, the following is mwhat I’ve learned: s • You are not alone; more people care than you realize. o I had been at Fort Lee for just six months, but the support dfrom the CASCOM staff was overwhelming. I never felt like I had a deadline for returning to work and had no concerns tabout my position. They supported me without question and dtold me to come back when I was ready. • My military family stepped up. ? I had visitors, calls, flowers and overall support from wfriends going back to ROTC. They took time off work to svisit and make sure I knew I was important to them. I always tknew I was liked, but I never knew how loved I was. t • Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Physically or emotionally, we all need help at one point or danother. It isn’t anything to be ashamed about. A debilitating tillness makes the strongest person emotional. I cried over everything at first until my doctor noticed and gave me esomething to even me out. I didn’t want it, but at the urging of my mother, I took it because she reminded me what I was tgoing through wasn’t normal. , Find someone to talk to who is trained to help and someone who has gone through what you have. Both are key lto recovery. If it wasn’t for my therapists the first few weeks,

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I can’t imagine what I would have done. I talked and cried through my fears with them. I’m in a stroke support group that helps me know they’ve been where I am at. People want to help, but you have to ask. This is a weakness of mine I had to get over. I feel I’m imposing if I ask for help. Trust me, it is better to put your pride aside and have someone at your side than hurting yourself because you’re stubborn. • You will have bad days. It’s only normal. There will be days where you don’t think you are improving and all you want to do is cry. That’s fine – embrace it, acknowledge it and get over it. I never allowed myself to wallow more than half a day. Get involved and try to get back to normal activities. After the first day of inpatient care, I never ate in my bed. From the beginning, I went to the dining room for meals and the gym on weekends. Staying in a room and hiding is not good for your psyche. • You will fall and fail; continue to push on. I fell twice - the first day I was home and the first day I showered with no one in the house. The first one I was trying to do something I shouldn’t and the second I was doing everything right but still fell. Stay calm and figure out how to get back up. It is fine and expected. I fail every day. It doesn’t keep me from trying. Over time,

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my “can’ts” became “I cans.” Suppress the frustration and go at your own pace – you know your body. Also, be honest with yourself. You may try something your body isn’t ready for, so acknowledge it and don’t push too far. A common mantra for me is “I’m not there yet, but I will be.” • Don’t compare the new you with the old you or anyone else. You aren’t the same person so you’ll only get frustrated if you continually dwell on what it used to be like. Also, don’t get frustrated because someone who had the same thing you had seems to be farther along. We all heal differently. Remember, someone is looking at you, thinking you’re so far ahead of them. • Positive attitude is worth more than anything and vital to recovery. I fought every day to be positive because I knew the more I accepted what had happened and worked hard, the faster I would be on my feet. It takes time, but in the big scheme of things, what is a month, 6 months or even a year in comparison to a lifetime? I had two inspirational individuals who kept me going. The first was a good friend, Air Force Col. Aaron Burgstein, who passed away in 2015 after battling a brain tumor for 5 years. The whole time during his fight to live, he said “PMA” - positive mental attitude. I know he had his bad days, but he never took it outside of his home. He always had humor about his situation and talked openly and honestly about it. I tried to emulate that in my recovery. The second is someone I had the great fortune to work with at Fort Carson, Colo. Staff Sgt. Elizabeth Marks is an Army World Class Athlete and a wounded warrior. Injured in Iraq, she didn’t let it define her. She found swimming and became a gold medal paralympian. While that is impressive, the thing that affected me the most is her positive attitude. I know she had her struggles, but she didn’t let the world see them and didn’t let them define her. I’m not 100 percent yet, but I will be. The individual I was before my stroke may be gone, but I’m going to make the most of whatever becomes my new normal.


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T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

Several artillery pieces and vintage rifles used by the Army’s famed Old Guard ceremonial unit recently made their way to a maintenance shop here for a little TLC. The weapons – 106 Brown Bess replica small arms and five M101A1 howitzers, thus far – were refurbished and painted at the Logistics Readiness Center-Lee Maintenance Division on Front Access Road. The facility is operated by The Logistics Company, an installation contractor. The Old Guard, also known by its official designation as the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, is the oldest active unit in the Army. Its worldrenowned ceremonial element is responsible for everything from White House state visits to Fourth of July parades to dignified transfers for the fallen. The weapons are both uniform-item and salute-gun showpieces at those events. Brian Minix, LRC logistics management specialist, said the Old Guard came to them in October 2017 looking for a cost-effective way to complete the refurbishment work requirements as an alternative to outsourcing. The first job took about nine months and involved staining and replacing parts as well other upgrades to the small arms pieces. Minix said the customers lauded the finished products. “We’ve had nothing but praise from the Old Guard about the craftsmanship and workmanship,” he said. Following completion of the Brown Bess work, Old Guard personnel inquired about painting the howitzers. One was completed as a test and the unit contracted for nine more. Just over half of that project has been completed. Tim Jones, a retired sailor and master painter, is performing the howitzer work. He said the pieces required preparation, painting and laying on a protective finish. All of the sanding was done by hand. “I’m old-school,” Jones said, “so I like to feel what I’m working on rather than using the pneumatic machine because it can take more material off of the equipment than I want. Plus, it leaves swirl marks.” According to Jones, it takes roughly two, eight-hour days to sand the artillery pieces. “The work is intricate, and you need to be

Fort Lee maintenance division keeps Old Guard equipment looking good

Photos by T. Anthony Bell

(LEFT) Painter Tim Jones proudly poses with one of the M101A1 howitzers he has been working on at the Logistics Readiness Center-Lee maintenance facility here. The howitzer belongs to the Old Guard, the Army’s famed ceremonial unit that supports everything from presidential inaugurations to parades and celebratory events in the nation’s capital. It is one of nine that will be serviced at the facility when the project is completed. (BELOW LEFT) Jones talks to Logistics Specialist Brian Minx, sharing details on the completed work for an M101A1 howitzer refurbishment project in support of the Army’s Old Guard ceremonial unit. (BELOW RIGHT) With meticulous attention to detail, Jones cleans every nook and cranny of a ceremonial cannon so it can be returned to its owning organization in immaculate shape. The LRC employee said it takes roughly two, eight-hour days to prepare each artillery piece for painting, and anyone doing the work needs to know “all of the little ins and outs” of the equipment.

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familiar with the little ins and outs,” he said, referring to all the corners and crevices on the howitzers. Each step in the process is delicate but painting requires a lot of attention to detail, he further noted. “You don’t want runs in your base coat or clear coat. You just want that smooth, satin finish all over.” The paint used on the pieces is heat-resistant because fired projectiles in rapid succession generate high temperatures. Each howitzer takes roughly two-and-a-half weeks to complete. Jones said he likes to add a bit of a personal touch for the customer such as

“shinning the brass and metal so when they come to inspect it, they’ll be satisfied with the finished product.” Jones concluded that each finished piece is a culmination of his experience and expertise. “It makes me proud because I’m a 20-year veteran, and I was always told to do the best job you can do, regardless of what you’re working on,” he said. “To me, when I look at the work I do, I still feel like I’m doing something for the country; still doing my part.” The Maintenance Division performs a wide range of support – such as painting, small arms repair, automotive repair and night vision gog-

gles repair – for customers located in the central and north part of the state. 1 The LRC is overseen by the U.S. Army Sustainment Command, based at Rock Is-t land Arsenal, Ill. It is part of an organization1 that integrates installation logistical functionsf including food service, ammunition supply,M clothing issue, hazardous material handling,a bulk fuel and more. The LRC concept, according to a command fact sheet, has reducedl redundancy, standardized processes and im-w proved contract management, among otherG benefits. Read more at www.aschq.army.mil/N home/default.aspx. w


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Eric Durr

The MGRS-Mapper computer application developed by New York Army National Guard 1st lt. James Pistell allows users to overlay the military grid reference system on a Google maps image and then create and place tactical and warfighting graphics and symbols on it to be used as an overlay and shared via email.

Guard lieutenant develops map app to create, share operations graphics

Sgt. Andrew Valenza

New York National Guard

ROCHESTER, N.Y. – Need an easy and quick way to turn your operations plan into map graphics? Thanks to New York Army National Guard 1st Lt. James Pistell, there’s an app for that! Pistell, executive officer for Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2nd Battalion, 101st Cavalry Regiment, has put together a free computer application dubbed MGRSMapper that makes it easy for leaders to create and share operations graphics. A web developer in the civilian world, the lieutenant said he got the idea for the app while deployed to the Joint Military Training Group-Ukraine in 2018. He and his fellow New York National Guard Soldiers worked with other NATO nation forces to help train

Ukrainian troops and battle staffs. His unit had been using a website to make operations graphics as they planned contingency operations, or CONOPS, but the website didn’t work effectively enough, Pistell said. “It was really outdated, and even if it could work, the symbols didn’t,” he said. “I knew I could make a much better version. What made me want to create it was from my experience overseas, and I wanted to help leaders make CONOPS.” The app combines Google Maps with a tool to overlay the map with a Military Grid Reference System, and a symbol select graphic tool. App users can select their operations area on Google Maps and overlay the region with a standard MGRS overlay. The app allows the user to build the proper NATO standard

graphic symbol, for example a friendly infantry platoon, label it, and then place it on the map. Users also have the ability to place command and control, maneuver, fire support and other graphics on the overlay. The overlay can be downloaded and emailed to another user, printed out as a handout, or embedded in slides. Currently users cannot upload previously created maps into the system, but he is working to change that. Nonetheless, Pistell said he thinks the app is easy and accessible for any Soldier to be able to use. “I’ve made the application as intuitive as possible,” he emphasized. “If you’re looking for infantry, you can choose an infantry symbol; then choose the size, and click and drag it on the map. You can update the map, you can put the overlay on, you can take it off,

and you can have a terrain view or satellite.” Pistell, who majored in history at the State University of New York at Brockport, is a self-taught web designer and tech geek. Already, with little promotion other than a few Facebook posts, Pistell’s app has gotten attention from around the country. “I got an email from someone working search and rescue in California who asked if I could add more symbols, and an email from a guy in (the Basic Officer Leader Course) who said their entire class was using it,” Pistell said. At the moment, the lieutenant does not have any other products in development, but plans to keep expanding on and improving his app. “There’s a lot more I want to do with it like implementing more symbols and creating tools to share the data. I’d like to make it an app that anyone can have on their iPad. I have a lot planned for it, but that’s only a side gig,” he said. The app is free for anyone to use, and contains no advertisements on the website.


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File Photo

Susan Young, a senior program support technician at the Fort Lee Department of Motor Vehicles, assists a contractor with a transaction several years ago. The Lee DMV office will close Jan. 17, 4:30 p.m., and reopen Feb. 11, 9 a.m., at the Soldier Support Center, room 118, building 3400, 1401 B. Ave.

Fort Lee DMV office closes Jan. 17, relocating to Soldier Support Center

The Department of Motor Vehicles Fort Monday, Feb. 11, at its new location in the The new location is “more convenient Lee Customer Service Center will close at Soldier Support Center, room 118, building for military members and families, 4:30 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 17, and reopen 3400, 1401 B Ave. especially those new to Fort Lee,” read a

DMV announcement about the move. The organization made note of the SSC’s integral role in helping new Team Lee members who are familiarizing themselves with the area. While taking care of other business like ID card renewals, customers can easily visit the DMV office to obtain Virginia driver’s licenses and vehicle registrations, as well as apply to register to vote in the commonwealth. During the closure, customers are encouraged to conduct transactions online at dmvNOW.com or visit the Hopewell Customer Service Center at 4401 Crossings Blvd., Prince George, or the Petersburg Customer Service Center at 120 Wagner Road, Petersburg. Customers conducting only vehicle-related transactions such as registration renewals, titles and license plates can visit the Hopewell DMV Select Office at 300 North Main St., room 109, Hopewell. When it reopens, the hours of the new Fort Lee Customer Service Center will be Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. As a reminder, Virginia DMV now offers REAL ID-compliant driver’s licenses and identification cards. For details about driver’s license and vehicle registration requirements, and the background and importance of REAL ID-compliance, visit dmvNOW.com. – DMV

Transportation Artifact of the Month

Contributed Photo

The pictured Cybernetic Walking Machine is on display at the Transportation Museum, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. The machine was one of many experimental Army projects. Its four legs were able to move up to 500 pounds of cargo over extremely difficult terrain, inaccessible to any other surface-traveling vehicle. General Electric was commissioned to design the vehicle in 1966, and delivered the walking machine in August 1970. Standing 11 feet tall, it moved at a speed of 5 mph, and was powerful enough to haul a jeep out of a mud hole. It also could climb over large obstacles, balance on its diagonal legs and push 1000 pounds across a concrete floor. In theory, it should have been a great tool, but it never made it out of the testing phase. It had one major flaw - it used 50 gallons of oil a minute, requiring it to be attached to hydraulic power lines at all times. Army funding was cut and the system was never fielded. The Transportation Museum is located at 300 Washington Blvd., and its hours of operation are Tuesday-Saturday, 9 a.m. 1 4:30 p.m.


Pet of the Week

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Contributed Photo

USO receives spouse club donation Ray Kozakewicz

Zion, a domestic short-haired male cat, is available for adoption at the Fort Lee Stray Animal Facility on 38th Street, near the Defense Commissary Agency Headquarters. He is between 1-2 years old, very loving and somewhat timid, according to his caretakers. There also are four other cats available. There are no adoption fees for any animals at the facility. The shelter also is seeking new volunteers and donations of cat food. For details, contact Officer Rob Moore, PMO animal control officer, at 804-721-9291.

Representatives of the Fort Lee Area Spouses’ Club present a donation to KasindaThomas, director of the USO Center here, just before Christmas. The FLASC members acknowledged the important role of the center, which opened in January 2011. The Fort Lee location sees 35-45 visiting service members during the week and 78-93 on weekends, with many military students coming through the doors. The center offers recreational lounges, gaming equipment and an array of moraleboosting programs. The USO staff facilitates holiday activities and the Adopt-A-Soldier program, in addition to supporting deployment/redeployment ceremonies and other community events to remind troops they’re admired and appreciated by the American public. The FLASC members pictured are Teresa Rogers, welfare chair; Melissa Thompson, treasurer; and Michelle Daniels, club president.

Merry moment at Mifflin Hall John Hall, deputy to the CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, provides remarks prior to a Jan. 9 cake-cutting ceremony marking the 10-year anniversary of the Sustainment Center of Excellence headquarters building. Construction of the facility began June 25, 2007, and required more than 140,000 manhours and over 1,420 tons of steel. The four-story building occupies 11 acres and furnishes over 218,000 square feet of office space, which accommodates a population of more than 1,100 service members, Army Civilians and contract workers.The building’s official opening in 2009 was followed by its rededication as Mifflin Hall on July 30, 2010, in honor of Maj. Gen Thomas Mifflin, the first Quartermaster General. Hall was joined by Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Perry, Dani Johnson, CASCOM Public Affairs Officer

CASCOM CSM, for the cake-cutting.


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Kenner Connection | Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

Pap test essential for women January is a perfect time to review steps toward having a healthier year. This includes a reminder for women to consider age-appropriate health care screenings. Since January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month, the staff at Kenner Army Health Clinic wants to increase awareness about how women can protect themselves from the Human Papillomavirus and cervical cancer. The KAHC staff also wants to remind women of all ages about the importance of completing their annual Pap test screening. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that average-risk women between the ages of 21-65 get a Pap test (cervical cancer screening) per national guidelines or if recommended by their health care provider. Cervical cancer can be prevented with regular screenings to discover pre-cancerous cells. The CDC and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists provide basic

screening guidelines for the majority of the population. There are exceptions that can be discussed with health care providers. A Pap test is one of the primary ways a woman can be screened for cervical cancer. This procedure finds changes in the cervix before cancer develops. It also can find cervical cancer early − in its most curable stage. Cervical cancer has no early signs or symptoms. Unfortunately, signs usually appear when the cancer is in the later stages. This cancer was once one of the most common causes of death for American women. Over the last 30 years, the death rate has gone down by more than 50 percent mainly due to the increase in Pap tests. If you have had a hysterectomy, you may still need cervical cancer screenings. There are many reasons depending on the circumstances and whether your cervix was removed. Providers can help determine how often you need to be screened. National guidelines recom-

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mend every three years for this testing. Great strides have been made in the treatment of cervical cancer and one of the greatest advancements has been the creation of vaccines that effectively block the transmission of the Human Papilloma Virus. This virus is estimated to be responsible for about 50 percent of all cervical cancers and about 80 percent of all mouth, throat and colon cancers. The

good news is that patients who have received the vaccine have successfully decreased their chances of getting multiple forms of cancer. The HPV virus is very common, with 80 million people, including teens, becoming infected with HPV each year. For more information, visit the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/ hpv/parents/vaccine.html. – KAHC

555th installs new leadership

T. Anthony Bell

Contributed Photo

The 2019 officers of the Jessie J. Mayes TriCities Chapter of the 555th Parachute Infantry Association, Inc., pose for a photo after taking office at their January meeting at the Petersburg Public Library Jan. 9. Pictured, seated from left, are: Ernest Shaw, secretary; Clarence Scott, chaplain; Gloria Brown, vice president; John Boyd, president; Winfred Baldwin, treasurer; Sylvester White, sergeant at arms; and, standing, Dale Tharpe, quartermaster; David Sharp, membership; Herman Anderson, special projects; Gregory Duncan, social action coordinator; Godfrey Garrett, JROTC Awards Committee; and Sterling Hunt.

Team sorts drug test samples

Sgt. 1st Class Raymond Patterson, assigned to the Transportation School, inspects bottles and checks information at one of several stations set up Jan. 9 in the Army Substance Abuse Program office to ensure drug test samples are properly labeled, collected and packaged. Patterson was one of several permanent party personnel assigned to support post-holiday drug testing for advanced individual training personnel and cadre. ASAP administers the testing that is a Training and Doctrine Command requirement for training units.


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Army releases graphic novellas focused on future cyber threats Gary Sheftick Army News Service

FORT MEADE, Md. – Since World War II, the Army has been using comic books to train Soldiers on specific duties and reduce casualties through improved situational awareness. The trend continued through the Vietnam War. At that time, the Army discovered a training deficiency and produced a comic book to educate Soldiers about proper equipment upkeep. Fast forward to today, and a new set of information security challenges. Advancements in cyber and smart technologies dhave the potential to alter the landscape of future military roperations, according to Lt. Col. Robert Ross, threat-casting project lead at the Army Cyber Institute, West Point, N.Y. 0 The U.S. military, allied partners, and their adversaries -are finding new ways to leverage networked devices on the -battlefield, Ross said. / “The use of networked technology is ubiquitous throughout society, and the leveraging of these devices on future battlefields will become more prevalent; there is just no escape from this trend. Technology is integrated at every level of our Army,” he emphasized. Keeping with the Army’s legacy of producing visual literature to improve readiness, the ACI has partnered with the Arizona State University Threat-casting Lab to produce a series of graphic novellas.

The lab brings together military, government, industry and academia experts to envision possible future threats. Through their research, the workshop develops potential cyber threat scenarios, and then explores options to disrupt, mitigate, and recover from these future threats. Each graphic novella considers what cyber threats are plausible in the next 10 years – based on a combination of scientific fact and the imagination of those involved, Ross explained. “This project is designed to deliver that understanding through visual narrative,” he said. “Technical reports and research papers do not translate as well to the audiences we are looking to influence. Graphic novellas are more influential of a medium for conveying future threats to not only Army organizations at large, but down to the Soldier level.” The novella titled “1000 Cuts” depicts the psychological impact that a cyber-attack could have on Soldiers and their families. In the story, these attacks were enough to disrupt a deployed unit, leaving them open to an organized attack, Ross elaborated. “Given the exponential growth in Soldiers’ use of (networked) devices … 1000 Cuts presents an extremely plausible threat. It demonstrates how non-state actors can leverage technical vulnerabilities within the cyber domain to their advantage in the land domain,” he said. “The visual conveyance of a graphic novella enables leaders to not only

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U.S. Army Photo

The Army Cyber Institute at West Point, N.Y., has partnered with Arizona State University Threat-casting Lab to produce a series of graphic novellas such as “1000 Cuts.”

envision these scenarios but retain the lessons that can be drawn from them as well.” Details about the release of “1000 Cuts” to Army communities will be announced soon.

America needs to pick up pace in space race, DOD official says C. Todd Lopez Defense.gov

Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Stoltz

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket lifts off from sLaunch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., April 14. The Evolved Expendable lLaunch Vehicle Secondary Payload Adapter Auglmented Geosynchronous Laboratory Experiments dsystem was onboard and is one of the 3rd Space Experimentation Squadron’s primary missions.

WASHINGTON – The United States isn’t out of the game when it comes to space travel, but if it wants to remain on top, according to a senior Defense Department official, it will need to do more and do it faster. “China is integrating certain new technologies and fielding those capabilities faster than the U.S.,” said Chris Shank, director of DOD’s Strategic Capabilities Office. “That means we have to be more responsive.” Shank spoke during a Jan. 8 presentation in San Diego hosted by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, where he

pointed out some statistics regarding space launches last year. “China had 39 launches, the U.S. had 31, Russia had 20, (and) Europe had eight,” Shank said. “And (China) landed a robotic mission on the dark side of the moon – a first.” Shank said that while he doesn’t think the U.S. has lost leadership in space, it is losing ground. After all, he noted, the United States isn’t without its own recent achievements in space. “In the same week they land on the moon, we are at the furthest reaches of the solar system at Ultima Thule,” he said. NASA’s New Horizons probe flew by and observed

the trans-Neptunian object about 4 billion miles from the sun recently. It’s the farthest object ever explored in space. Shank said to stay relevant in space, the United States will need to speed up its development cycle for space-based technologies significantly. “The DOD is committed to creating a Space Development Agency,” Shank said. “That would be a joint organization ... to rapidly develop and field the next generation of space capabilities. I think that a Space Development Agency will represent a real investment in experimenting and prototyping of the rapid field of capabilities. ... So buckle up — 2019 is going to be busy.”


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Science on Tap - 1919 | Jan. 17

Adult visitors will be transported to the year 1919 during a science-filled speakeasy event Jan. 17, 6-9 p.m., at the Science Museum of Virginia, 2500 W. Broad St., Richmond. Guests are encouraged to break out their flapper dress, fedora, Homberg or suspenders for this special celebration that will include throw-back science, cocktails, jazz music, dancing and more. All participants must be age 21 or older. For further details, call 804-864-1400.

Volunteer Fair at Pamplin Park | Jan. 22

Pamplin Historical Park and The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier will hold a Volunteer Fair Jan. 22, 1-4 p.m., at 6125 Boydton Plank Road, Petersburg. Park staff will share information on how individuals can assist in a variety of areas around the historic venue. On-the-spot volunteer interviews also will be conducted. Additional events will be held Jan. 26, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., and Jan. 31, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Volunteers of all ages are welcome. For additional information, call 804-8612408 or email cwuebker@pamplinpark.org.

Dinner, Discipleship at Chapel | Jan. 23

The Religious Support Office invites community members to its midweek Dinner and Discipleship program featuring small group studies every Wednesday, 5:30-7 p.m., at Memorial Chapel, 1901 Sisisky Blvd. The next night is Jan. 23. The family event includes a free dinner followed by a selection of special classes beginning at 6 p.m. No registration is required. For more details, email jonathan.w.yost@ mail.mil.

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Family Yoga for Housing Residents | Jan. 24

and Entertainment Center, 2403 C Ave. The cost is $35 per person. Hosted by the Picture Perfect Frame Shop, the workshop includes wine tastings, light hors d’oeuvres and guidance from trained artists. To register, visit lee.armymwr.com/calendar/event/canvascork/2862589/35223. For more information, call 804-734-6137.

A Family Flow Yoga session for housing residents is set for Jan. 24, 6-7:30 p.m., at the Fort Lee Family Housing Welcome Center, 1510 Sisisky Blvd. The activity is free. Complimentary yoga mats will be given to each participant. Light refreshments also will be served. For additional information, call 804-733VWM Book Sale | Jan. 26 1558. The Virginia War Memorial will hold its annual military history book sale Jan. 26, Library MakerSpace Activity | 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., at 621 South Belvidere St. Jan. 25 Admission is free. The Fort Lee Community Library has Hundreds of slightly used hardback and scheduled its next MakerSpace program for paperback books, DVDs, VHS tapes and other Jan. 25, 5 p.m., in Bunker Hall Cafeteria, items will be offered at bargain prices. In Army Logistics University. Those interested addition, the memorial’s Artifacts Roadshow should arrive as close to the starting time will take place that day, 10 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. as possible in order to complete the project For other details, call 804-786-2060 or visit before the event is over. vawarmemorial.org. MakerSpace is free and open to all ages. Participants can use tools, techniques and hands-on learning with the goal of inspiring Resume Writing Workshop | and nurturing their interest in science, Jan. 29 technology, engineering, art and math. The Soldier for Life Transition Assistance For more information, call 804-765-8095. Program will host a free resume-writing

Federal Hiring Workshop | Jan. 25

A free Federal Hiring Workshop is set for Jan. 25, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., in Room 126 of the Soldier Support Center, building 3400, B Avenue. Subject matter experts will provide information and resources for participants to understand the federal application hiring process, the development of the federal resume and other requirements. It is open PWOC Kickoff Event | Jan. 24 to all community members. Registration is The Fort Lee Protestant Women of the requested. For further details, call 804-734-6612 or Chapel group will hold its Spring Semester Kick-off meeting Jan. 24., 9:15 a.m. - noon, at email army.lee.sfltap@mail.mil. Liberty Chapel, 3101 C Avenue. Child care will be provided for ages 1-5 on FMWR Canvas, Cork Event | a first-come basis. Jan. 26 For further details, visit www.facebook.com/ Community members can create a work of pg/pwocfortlee or email ftleepwoc@gmail. art at a Canvas and Cork painting workshop com. Jan. 26, 2-5 p.m., in the TenStrike Bowling

times and comfort each other through the worst. Tickets are $15 for adults and $7 for youths. For additional information, contact the box office at 804-734-6629.

FMWR Snow Xperience Trip | Feb. 9

Registration is open for the Family and MWR Outdoor Recreation Center discounted Snow Xperience Trip to Wintergreen Resort Feb. 9. The reduced-rate cost varies for skiing, snowboarding or tubing rentals and lift ticket packages. Transportation leaves for the resort at 7:30 a.m., so guests should meet at 7:15 a.m. An additional outing is scheduled for March 9. For registration and details, visit Outdoor Recreation, building 15014 on 5th Street, or call 804-765-2212.

Myths and Folktales of Africa | Feb. 9

Storyteller Justin Leak will present an interactive engaging experience titled “The Magic of the Motherland: Myths and Folktakes of Africa” Feb. 9, 11 a.m. - noon, at the Enon Library, 1801 Enon Church Road. The Chesterfield County Black History Month event is free. The program will feature an ancient art form that has highlighted the diversity of cultures in Africa for centuries. Registration is requested. The event is for children, age 6 and older. For further details, call 804-751-CCPL or visit library.chesterfield.gov.

workshop Jan. 29, 9 a.m. - noon, at the Soldier Support Center, Room 126, building 3400, 1401 B Ave. Participants will receive tips on fine-tuning objectives, crafting work history, showcasing skills and more. For registration, call 804-734-6612 or email Congo Mask Exhibit | Though Feb. 24 army.lee.sfltap@mail.mil. “Congo Masks: Masterpieces from Central Africa,” an exhibit featuring more than 130 ‘Steel Magnolias’ Play Opening | rare masks from the Congo Basin of Africa, Feb. 1. is on display through Feb. 24 at the Virginia “Steel Magnolias,” the third installment of Museum of Fine Arts, 200 North Boulevard, the Lee Playhouse Theater Group platinum Richmond. The museum offers free admission season, opens Feb. 1, 8 p.m., at the Lee into special exhibits for military members. Theater, Mahone Avenue. Dating from the 17th to the 20th centuries, Additional performances are set for Feb. 2, the masks represent the creative expression of 8, 9, 15 and 16 at 8 p.m., and Feb. 3, 10 and 17 more than 40 difference Congolese cultural at 3 p.m. All shows are open to the public. The groups. Museum hours are 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., dramatic comedy focuses on the friendship of Monday-Wednesday and Saturday-Sunday; six southern women who talk, gossip, needle and 10 a.m. - 9 p.m., Thursday-Friday. and harangue each other through the best of For details, visit www.vmfa.museum.

For more installation and outside the gate events and activities, visit our online calendar at www.fortleetraveller.com/calendar

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Fort Lee Traveller | Jan. 17, 2019