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Prestigious award for support of IMCOM, Army missions goes to Lee employee for fifth time in six years SEE PAGE 3

Fort Lee

SERVING THE COMMUNITY OF FORT LEE, VIRGINIA, SINCE 1941

January 3, 2019 | Vol. 79, No. 1

More than 550 military families benefit from gift-giving program SEE PAGE 8

MLK JR. OBSERVANCE SET FOR JAN. 17 AT LEE THEATER All community members are invited to the installation’s annual program that typically features music, poetry and dramatic readings of historic speeches SEE PAGE 5

INSPECT SO IT WILL DETECT Smoke alarm cleaning, battery replacement a good practice to protect the ones you love

PARATROOPERS DELIVER GIFTS U.S. and allied troops bring holiday cheer to children during QM Company Toy Drop

WREATH-LAYING HONORS FALLEN Lee troops, garrison commander support holiday ceremony at Sunset Memorial site

SEE PAGE 2

SEE PAGE 10

SEE PAGE 11


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CoMMAnD SPotLiGHt | Fire Prevention

Don’t overlook alarms, detectors during home maintenance duties As a potentially lifesaving measure, Fort Lee Fire and Emergency Services encourages all Team Lee members to regularly clean, replace batteries and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors in their homes. Non-operational, dirty and out-of-date alarms result in more than 500 structure fire deaths per year, according to a recent report from the National Fire Protection Agency. Far too many Americans overlook the routine maintenance required to keep detectors operational, the 2015 study also found. Another statistic shows that 72 percent of U.S. citizens are unaware that smoke alarms need to be replaced every 10 years (and 5-7 years for CO detectors). “Warning devices have become such a common feature in U.S. homes that it is easy to take them for granted,” Fort Lee FES officials noted. “Unlike other appliances like toasters and televisions, the equipment functions quietly in the background, which contributes to the ‘out-of-sight, out-ofmind’ dilemma. Unless someone pushes a test-button or sets if off with something burning on the stove, many homeowners

have no idea if the equipment will work when it’s needed.” According to the NFPA, the peak time for home fire fatalities is between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m., when most families are sleeping. Ever wonder why individuals don’t wake up immediately when they begin to smell smoke? Well, according to scientific studies, most lose their sense of smell during a deep sleep stage, which explains why alarms are a vital early warning tool. Looking at it another way, the death rate per 100 reported fires is twice as high in homes without a working smoke alarm as it is in structures with this protection. Missing or non-working smoke alarms rob residents of valuable seconds that could allow them to safely escape. Young children, older adults and people with disabilities are most at risk and working smoke alarms may provide these residents the necessary time to safely evacuate. Keep in mind also that a smoke alarm’s sole function is to sound the warning. People need to develop and practice escape plans so that if the alarm sounds, they can get out quickly. It’s imperative that emergency evacuation plans include

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two exits from each room and a designated meeting place outside. Once you’re outside, stay away from the building and be sure to let firefighters know if everyone has made it out safely. These simple steps will help ensure that you and your family will have the best chance of surviving if fire should strike. Remind your friends, family, neighbors and fellow community members to do the same. Fort Lee Fire and Emergency Services actively promotes fire safety to all who work, live and visit Fort Lee. For any questions or assistance, contact the Fire Prevention Office at (804) 734-6597. – Directorate of Emergency Services and Staff Reports

Did you know, photocopying a government ID is illegal?

Fort Lee

Commanding General ................... Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg Garrison Commander ....................... Col. Hollie J. Martin Public Affairs Officer ............................. Stephen J. Baker Command Information/Managing Editor ...Patrick Buffett Senior Writer/Special Assignments .......... T. Anthony Bell Production/News Assistant Editor .................. Amy Perry Production Assistant............................... Ray Kozakewicz To reach the Traveller Staff, call (804) 734-7147.

The Fort Lee Traveller is an authorized publication for members of the DOD, printed by Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc., a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee, Virginia. Contents of the Fort Lee Traveller are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Lee Public Affairs Office. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement of the products or services advertised by the U.S. Army or Gatehouse Media Virginia Holdings, Inc. Everything advertised in this publication will be made available for purchase, use, or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user, or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher will refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation has been corrected.

prescribed by the head of any department or agency of the United States for use by any officer or employee thereof, or any colorable imitation thereof, or photographs, prints, or in any other manner makes or executes any engraving, photograph, print or impression in the likeness of any such SEE GOVERNMENT I.D. LAW, page 13

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Have you ever been asked by a business if they could photocopy your government identification card for security or financial reasons? The answer is likely yes for those who have stayed at certain hotels or rented a car

or apartment. What many in the military community don’t always remember is that photocopying such documents, with only a few exceptions, is against the law. Title 18 of U.S. Code Part I, Chapter 33, Section 701, reads: “Whoever manufactures, sells or possesses any badge, identification card or other insignia of the design

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Katie Lange

Contributed Photo Staff Sgt. Norris Stevens from the Quartermaster School holds one of the gifts he picked up for his daughter during the Holiday Helper “shopping days” here Dec. 1314. Thanks to another year of generous donations from community supporters, over 550 military personnel were able to take home free toys, hats, mittens and other items for their children. See more photos, Page 8.


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Carrie E. Meinzer, director of Human Resources, receives the Stalwart Award from Lt. Gen. Bradley Becker, commanding general of Installation Management Command, at a Nov. 28 senior leader’s conference in San Antonio, Texas. She is the fifth Fort Lee employee in six years to earn the award.

IMCOM honors Fort Lee employee; fifth win for installation in six years

t y y , rT. Anthony Bell tSenior Writer/Special Projects h For the fifth time in six years, a Fort Lee employee has brought home a major award recognizing superior support of the Installation Management Command and Army missions. Carrie E. Meinzer, director of the garrison’s Human Resources department, graciously accepted the 2018 Stalwart Award at the IMCOM Commander’s Conference in San Antonio Nov. 28. The hardware was presented by Lt. Gen. Bradley A. Becker o land Command Sgt. Maj. Melissa Judkins, rIMCOM commander and CSM, respectively. mOthers present included Col. Hollie Martin, eFort Lee garrison commander, and CSM s Vittorio DeSouza, garrison CSM.

Stalwart honors those executing their duties and responsibilities at levels far above their peers. More than 30,000 IMCOM employees are eligible for the award earned by 14 this year. Previous Fort Lee award winners are Debra Bingham, the former Garrison Public Affairs Office director who passed away in 2013; Melissa Magowan, the former deputy to the garrison commander; Scott Brown, who heads up the Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security; and Stephen Baker, garrison Public Affairs officer. Meinzer, DHR director since 2015, said she is wowed by the accolade and feels “proud, excited and honored” to have earned it. Furthermore, the award struck a chord with her because it speaks not only of

her professional accomplishments but her personal endeavors as well. “I think it’s emblematic of people who truly care about what they do and who they do it for; and in a more holistic way, it recognizes the broader effort of the team to make a difference,” she said. “That’s the state of mind I promote in my directorate. Positive attitudes and proactivity are important to me.” Further hinting at feelings of awkwardness when she learned she had been selected for the Stalwart Award, Meinzer said that reaction was due to a belief her performance was “just part of the job.” In her assessment, there are many coworkers and co-managers who do equally awesome work. “From that standpoint, you tend to wonder

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what it was you did that was so special to qualify for the recognition,” she observed. Meinzer’s personal stamp of awesomeness was detailed in a three-page letter of nomination, excerpts of which were extracted for presentation purposes at the commander’s conference. Glowing in tone and quantified with various examples, the reading recapped her most noteworthy achievements and explained why the work stood out. “Carrie has consistently shown herself to be an outstanding mentor and workplace leader, demonstrating a great capacity to teach, motivate and lead her teams,” a portion of the write-up read. “Her coaching skills built an exceptionally loyal and competent Human Resources staff that is attuned to the needs of their constituency, forging a great ‘sense of community’ in the environment in which they serve. The focus on a cohesive team sets her organization apart from others as consistently ‘high performing,’ and her employees are recognized throughout the installation as an exceptional cohort.” The nomination also brought attention to Meinzer’s “demonstrated care” for the 19 civil service and 62 contract workers in her directorate that’s responsible for various administrative functions – among them the annual maintenance and upkeep of more than 70,000 military personnel records. Also noteworthy, according to her superiors, is Meinzer’s effort to improve the DHR’s operational efficiency. “Driving change, and not fearing it, Carrie made tough decisions this year to underwrite key future requirements by eliminating several postal, passport agent and casualty (assistance) positions in her organization,” according to the nomination letter. “In order to mitigate these loses, Carrie developed cross-training programs to ensure continuity, and then seized on installation assets that had the tools and personnel to provide many of these services.” Meinzer’s feats were such they were recognized by senior leaders outside the garrison chain of command. They included retired Admiral John C. Harvey Jr., Virginia’s former Secretary of Veterans Affairs and Homeland Security, who praised HR’s

SEE 2018 STALWART AWARD, page 13


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Virginia REAL ID program compliant with federal rules RICHMOND – According to a Dec. 20 announcement by the commonwealth’s licensing bureau, the Department of Homeland Security has determined that Virginia’s REAL ID program is fully compliant with federal requirements. Three months ago, the Department of Motor Vehicles began issuing driver’s licenses and identification cards in accordance with new federal standards. Certification of that program from the DHS is good news for Old Dominion residents because REAL ID Act compliance must be achieved by Oct. 1, 2020 – the date when agencies will require a REAL ID-compliant form of identification to board a domestic flight or enter a secure federal facility or military base. DMV’s proactive roll-out and early certification will facilitate a “seamless transition” to the new standards, noted DMV Commissioner Richard D. Holcomb. The state has a window of nearly two years to get all residents compliant, which will hopefully translate to a routineversus-rushed atmosphere. “We are proud that DHS has lauded our program with its certification,” Holcomb said, “but our work is not yet done. We estimate that 2.6 million Virginians will visit us in the next two years to obtain a REAL ID. We will be working hard to serve you, but we need your help. Visit our website, and come prepared with the documents you’ll need to have a successful visit. You also may want to plan your visit in January, April or May, and avoid February and March – two of our busiest months of the year.” The documents needed to apply for a REAL ID are readily accessible to Virginians and are similar to those needed when individuals applied for their original driver’s license or state ID. They include the following: • U.S. birth certificate or unexpired U.S. Passport • Social Security Card or W-2 form • Utility bill (not more than two months old) and a Virginia driver’s license, commercial driver’s license, learner’s permit, or DMV-issued ID card. Documents must display the applicant’s

Kenner Announces MLK Weekend Hours Over the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend, Kenner Army Health Clinic and Troop Medical Clinic 1 will be open with normal operations on Jan. 18 for patient care. Mosier Troop Medical Clinic 2 will be closed that day. All Kenner clinics and services will be closed Jan. 21, a federal holiday. To schedule appointments, call the Kenner appointment line at 1-866-533-5242. To request an authorization to visit an urgent care center, call the nurse advice line at 1-800-TRICARE and choose option 1. For medical emergencies, dial 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.

Exchange Offers Store Pickup Option Authorized Army and Air Force Exchange Service shoppers can now buy items at shopmyexchange.com and opt for free in-store pickup rather than paying for shipping to their home. In some cases, same-day receipt of merchandise is possible. Shoppers will be notified by email when their order is ready. In the U.S., there is an option to receive notifications via text message as well. In-store signage indicates where customers can pick up purchases. Exchange online shopping is open to all military veterans. File Photo

Department of the Army Civilian Policeman Michael Wilson checks an identification card at Fort Lee’s Mahone Gate.

name and current Virginia residential street address. If the name listed on the proof of identity document does not match the full legal name, individuals must present documents such as a marriage certificate or divorce decree that connect the names. There are a variety of acceptable supporting documents – the complete list is available at dmvNOW.com/REALID. Since REAL ID is optional, Virginians can “opt out” and continue to use their driver’s license or ID, however, the next time they renew those credentials, it will include the disclaimer “Federal Limits Apply.” Should they need to board a domestic flight or enter a secure government facility after October 2020, they will have to use another federally approved form of ID. Also, keep in mind that Fort Lee community members have a DMV branch of their own on Battle Drive. Its staff touts great customer service with less wait time in comparison to offpost customer service locations. This branch can complete most DMV transactions including license renewals/replacements, vehicle registration and plating, written tests, title transfers and much more. The facility is located in building 9024, Battle Drive. It is open 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call 804-497-7100. – DMV and Staff Reports

MacLaughlin to Close for JCTE, Renovation Family and MWR’s MacLaughlin Fitness Center will be closed Feb. 26 - June 15 to accommodate the annual Joint Culinary Training Exercise (Feb. 26 - March 15), followed by an interior renovation project. Those needing additional details can contact FMWR Director Darrell Clay at darrell.w.clay.naf@mail.mil or 804-734-7199.

Some PNB Facilities Closed Through March 1 The visitor centers and contact stations at Petersburg Battlefield are operating on winter hours through March 1. Grant’s Headquarters at City Point is closed; however, tours can be arranged for groups of five or more. The Five Forks Contact Stations are closed through March 1. Visitors can still do driving tours and access the park trails. The Eastern Front Visitor Center is open seven days a week, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. The battlefield grounds will continue to open daily at sunrise and close at sunset. For details, call 804-732-3531 ext. 200.

Essay Contest Open to Military Youths The Armed Services YMCA is accepting submissions for its 2019 Art and Essay Contest through March 15. Co-sponsored by GEICO Military, the competition is open to youths, grades 1-12, of active duty or retired members of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, Coast Guard and National Guard/Reserves. Winners will be announced in April. The art contest is geared toward children in grades 1-6, and the essay contest is open to all grade-school levels. For details, visit www.asymca.org/art-and-essay-contest.

Army Digital Photo Contest Continues Entries for the 2018 Army Digital Photography Contest are being accepted until Jan. 20. There are two divisions – active duty military and other. Participants can enter their work in one-of-seven categories including animals, design elements, digital darkroom, military life, nature/landscapes, people and still life. Monetary prizes are awarded to first, second and third place winners in each category. For submission details, email the IMCOM G-9 Arts and Crafts program at usarmy.jbsa.imcom-hq.mbx.army-arts-auto-crafts@mail.mil.


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MLK Jr. Observance set for January 17

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The Virginia State University Gospel Chorale performs during the installation’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. birthday observance last January. The Fort Lee community is invited to this year’s celebration set for Jan. 17, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., in the post theater. The program will be hosted by the Army Logistics University Support Battalion. The long-running theme for the observance is “Remember! Celebrate! Act! A day on, not a day off.” Traditionally, the Lee event includes performances by a 392nd Army Band ensemble, poetry readings, recitations of historic speeches and other musical entertainment. King, credited with helping to spearhead the modern Civil Rights Movement, led non-violent protests all over the country against racism, segregation and discrimination while championing civil and human rights for all people. The Baptist preacher was assassinated in 1968 and is considered by many a martyr. The guest speaker for the Jan. 17 observance will be announced in the Jan. 10 issue of the Traveller with other details.

Providers spread cheer in Hopewell

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Contests promote holiday spirit Contributed Photo

Soldiers from the 266th Quartermaster Battalion pose with military veteran residents of the Hopewell Healthcare Center during a Dec. 17 community outreach visit. The Fort Lee representatives took time to shake hands, present gifts and socialize with the men and women who previously served and, in many cases, fought in past wars. The “Provider Battalion” troops also helped deliver a donation from the veterans to the Hopewell Humane Society. The participating Soldiers pictured are Lt. Col. Clarise Scott, battalion commander; Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Lambert, battalion CSM; and battalion staffers Sgt. 1st Class Eric Daniels, Staff Sgt. Anne Winter, Staff Sgt. Emigdia Penafiel and Sgt. Ana Tineo.

The winners of the 244th Quartermaster Battalion Holiday Door Decor Competition pose by their festive and colorful “Candy Wonderland” entry on Dec. 14. Staff Sgt. Mayra Andrade, the Papa Pirate drill sergeant pictured, was the project lead. She was assisted by fellow noncommissioned officers and advanced individual training students. The company command team – Capt. Danielle Maki and 1st Sgt. Antwan Walker – also are pictured. Over on the Ordnance Campus, Delta Company, 832nd Ord. Battalion, placed first in a similar 59th Ord. Brigade competition. Second place went to the brigade’s S-2 shop, and 3rd place was awarded to the 16th Ord. Bn.’s S-1 office.


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Team Ordnance bids farewell to respected commandant’s deputy T. Anthony Bell

Senior Writer/Special Projects

The Ordnance School’s top civilian leader – an individual who helped shepherd the organization through the turmoil of Base Realignment and Closure nearly a decade ago – is set to conclude a 36-year career in a couple of weeks. Dr. Richard B. Armstrong, deputy to the commandant since 2012, will end his duties on Jan. 3, and his replacement, W. Joe Kirby, will pick up the reigns the following Monday. “Doc” has devoted his entire civil service career to military training. It started with a 24-year hitch at the Armor School, Fort Knox, Ky., followed by a 4-year stint at the Ordnance Munitions and Electronic Maintenance School, Redstone Arsenal, Ala. His first Ord. School gig here was director of training (starting in 2010), and he was dual-hatted as the DOT and deputy to the commandant two years later. Summing up Armstrong’s list of achievements as the deputy isn’t easy. Many have remained conspicuous, like continuing the school’s unblemished accreditation record and the loads of technology that have been integrated into classrooms. There are hard to categorize, big picture bullets on the list as well. He contributed the navigational skills needed to help steer the schoolhouse through a multitude of issues surrounding the relocation and merger between the Redstone OMEMS and its sister institution, the Ord. Mechanical Maintenance School at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., under the 2005 edition of BRAC. “It was hard in large part because a lot of our employees didn’t move to Fort Lee from Redstone,” said Armstrong, noting the loss of institutional knowledge. “We did a lot of hiring actions. It was a period of transition for about two years. Looking back at where we’ve come, I think we’ve done really well. We’ve got a great team in place, and everybody who goes on a tour of the Ordnance Campus walks away commenting on our state-of-the-art facilities. We probably have the best in TRADOC, and we have the best people to run them.” Armstrong, who often defers to the contributions of others, could not jog his memory to reflect on any single, outstanding achievement during his tenure. He readily conveyed, however, the daily toil of administrators, instructors and other staff in every corner of the

T. Anthony Bell

schoolhouse to graduate the best-prepared troops. “I think our most significant accomplishment is what we do every day, and that’s training Soldiers,” he said. “I can’t put anything above that, and I think that would be true if you asked anyone at the Ordnance School.” Referring to the thousands of Soldiers who graduate annually from its 25 military occupational specialty courses, Armstrong said it’s easy to focus on the big numbers and overlook the human capital expended to achieve such an output. The people – Soldiers, instructors, administrators and other staff – is what he will miss the most, he emphasized. “I will miss training Soldiers, and the people I work with. …” he said. “I’ve had great bosses. (Brig.) Gen. (Heidi J.) Hoyle is the sixth

Chief of Ordnance I’ve worked for, and I can honestly say I’ve enjoyed my time with every one of them. The subordinate supervisors I have are just an amazing bunch of civilian and military leaders, and I think we have the best instructors in TRADOC. I know we have the best training support personnel because people keep hiring them away from us.” Retirement is not exactly being hired away, but Armstrong’s departure will deprive the schoolhouse of an innovative, pragmatic thinker and Soldiers’ advocate. Command Sgt. Maj. Terry D. Burton, the Ordnance Corps CSM who has worked closely with him over the past two years, ran out of attributes he could pin on the deputy and settled on the confirmation that his accomplishments can never be understated. “For someone who never wore the uniform, he is as much of a military professional as anyone I’ve met in my 29 years of service,” Burton said. “He is devoted, patriotic, understands the culture, and above all else, he cares for Soldiers.” Armstrong received a career’s worth of accolades dur-T ing two retirement events in early December. He wasl presented with – among several awards and mementoesb – the Gen. Brehon B. Somvervell Award and Depart-b ment of the Army Decoration for Exceptional Civiliani Service, the highest award that can be bestowed or pre-t sented on behalf of the Secretary of the Army. The next episode in Armstrong’s life will be void of training techniques, programs of instruction and learning theories. He and his wife Mary Willems Armstrong will direct their attention away from the science of training Soldiers to the art of cinema on the big and small screens. The couple has authored two books on classic movies and television shows and continue to share their thoughts in cyberspace via a blog. “I’ve been interested in movies for as long as I can remember,” he said. “My dad was a movie fan. I picked up on that and started watching the old classics and actors like Errol Flynn, Ronald Coleman and Kim Novak.” Looking toward retirement, Armstrong’s movie interest is bound to burgeon. It becomes evident when the subject arises in conversation, causing him to shed a professorial persona for an almost boyish enthusiasm. It is also apparent in his blog that can be described as a haven for those hovering at a hyper level of enthusiasm. “When I went to college, I had the opportunity to take a lot of film classes,” he said. “After writing the books – which is really time consuming – I thought it would be interesting to keep the conversation going. … My retirement will allow more time to get involved in that.” And many other things. The Armstrong’s cinema blog can be found at www.classicfilmtvcafe.com.


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23 pin badges at QMS ceremony

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Twenty-three honorees from six Quartermaster School training departments pose with their award certificates during the closing moments of an Army Instructor Badging Ceremony Dec. 13 in the Petrosleum and Water Department’s Guest Auditorium. Under the Instructor Development and Recognition Program, three badge levels – basic, senior and master – are available to credentialed trainers. Basic sbadge requirements include completion of TRADOC instructor certification, at least 80 hours of platform time and two exceptional classroom evaluations by a senior course leader. In total, these basic badge recipients have contributed more than 2,800 hours of instructional time. The badging program promotes personal and professional growth, and the resulting medallion serves as an emblem of ninitiative and top-quality instruction for those attending training courses across the Army. Senior leader participants of the badging ceremony also are pictured. They include Command Sgt. Maj. Sean Rice, the QM Corps’ senior enlisted leader; CSM Lisa Haney, 23rd QM Brigade CSM; Sgt. Maj. Eric Cantrell, PWD SGM; and SGM Darrick Brown, Joint Mortuary Affairs Center SGM.

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A gift-giving phenomenon that’s ‘all about the children’ All Photos Are Contributed

Holiday Helper volunteer Tim Lawrence assists with the delivery of toys to the Fisher House in Richmond. The facility provides lodging to the families of military veterans receiving in-patient care at the McGuire Veterans Hospital.

Holiday Helper provided gifts to more than 550 military families in December. It also delivered hundreds of treat-filled goodie bags to the service members who did not take leave over the holiday break. All of this was the result of countless volunteer hours and community and individual donations. The collection of photos on this page offer a small taste of what has become a phenomenal non-profit endeavor that drew involvement by notables like Virginia Governor Ralph Northam and Maj. Gen. Rodney Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, as well as other community leaders. For more, check out the organization’s social media page at www.facebook.com/ holidayhelperassociation.

Maj. Gen. Rodney Fogg, CASCOM and Fort Lee commanding general, shares a humorous moment with a junior Soldier shopping for gifts during the Dec. 6 Holiday Helper Open House, an annual event that showcases the non-profit program’s purpose and community-donated resources. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam also was among the guests of honor at the event, and he too served as a “helper elf” to a military member shopping for toys for her children.

This little guy was among the community volunteers who assembled 430 goodie bags for junior-enlisted military members staying on post over the holiday break. Other contributors to the project included the Ordnance School; Destination Church, Hopewell; Marine Corps Detachment Fort Lee (20 enthusiastic sack-stuffers); and many others.

Wayne Covil, a WTVR Channel 6 news reporter, presents gift cards to the family of Sgt. Dax Hill, Fort Lee Dental Clinic, at the Holiday Helper Toy Store Dec. 13. Hill was selected for the news station’s annual presentation as a way to recognize his dedicated service. He has completed several deployments and an unaccompanied assignment to South Korea over the past few years. The Hill’s serve as foster parents and have five children including one who was recently adopted.

A Fort Soldier selects items from the “stocking-stuffer bin” during the Holiday Helper shopping days in mid-December. Thanks to another year of generous donations from community supporters, over 550 military personnel were able to take home free toys, hats, mittens and other items for their children.

An airman from Fort Lee’s 345th Training Squadron happily poses with his family while shopping for gifts at the Holiday Helper toy store in mid-December. Service members are nominated by their organization leaders to participate in the program that “strives to ensure the holiday season for wounded warriors and individuals facing difficult times is a memorable one by allowing them to select gifts free of charge.”


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Sustainers supply airdrop skills needed to support war-fighters 1st Lt. Verniccia Ford

101st Resolute Support Sustainment Brigade

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan – In combat, logistics is arguably the most important element of large-scale military operations. “Beans and Bullets” is a common Army phrase utilized for decades that puts special emphasis behind the importance of what sustainers bring to the fight. Since arriving in theater, Soldiers of the 824th Rigger Detachment, North Carolina National Guard, and the 101st Resolute Support Sustainment Brigade out of Fort Campbell, Ky., have teamed up to tackle the demanding requirements of rigging equipment and air dropping resources to sustain the warfighter. Aerial resupply is a valuable asset to U.S. and NATO Coalition Forces in Afghanistan. It is the most reliable method of distribution when ground transportation and alternate means have been exhausted. Aerial resupply enables war-fighters in austere locations to efficiently accomplish their mission and other objectives. “Aerial delivery is extremely vital and essential to mission success,” said Chief Warrant Officer 2 Freddy Reza, senior airdrop systems technician with the 101st RSSB. “Soldiers in austere environments depend on us to get them food, water and other resources they need to stay in the fight.” All airdrop missions require approval authority through an operation order. Once approved, parachute riggers from both units work diligently to get the classes of supplies bundled and rigged on pallets for aerial delivery within 24 hours. Since arriving in Afghanistan, this team has delivered more than 150,000 pounds of supplies varying from food and water to construction material. Mission dependent, sometimes the rigger support team is responsible for filling the request of more than three dozen bundles, carefully packing the loads and cautiously inspecting the pallets before pushing

Photos by 1st Lt. Verniccia Ford

(ABOVE) Chief Warrant Officer 2 Freddy Reza, senior airdrop technician for the 101st Resolute Support Sustainment Brigade, demonstrates several variations on how to properly rig cases of water and a 110-pound bag of rice during training for the Afghan National Army Logistics Cell in Kandahar, Afghanistan. (BELOW) Soldiers of the 824th Quartermaster Company and 101st Resolute Support Sustainment Brigade inspect rigged pallets of supplies aboard a C-130 aircraft at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, in December. The final inspection is conducted with Air Force loadmasters before the plane takes off for delivery.

them out for delivery. tially contributed to the success of enduring Aerial delivery operations have substan- expeditionary advisory packages and aiding

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the 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade while they train, advise and assist Afghan counterparts. “This deployment has helped me to expand my knowledge as a parachute rigger,” said Spc. Kiera Butler, a Parachute Rigger with the 824th QM Co. “This job has a profound impact on military personnel regardless of the branch. I take pride in knowing I’m helping them carry out their mission.” Item preservation is important. Depending on the classes of supply, some items are rigged and prepared in non-conventional locations, but regardless of that factor, the rigger support team does everything in their power to ensure recipients receive grade “A” quality. “During the summer months, it would sometimes be 107 degrees – so hot we didn’t want the food to spoil so we rigged in a refrigerator. This allowed the supplies to stay cold until it was time to be delivered,” said Butler. “It was a fun experience, and we want to do whatever we can to preserve the supplies for the Soldiers receiving them.” The rigger support team continuously strives for efficiency. Through meticulous training, they have been able to execute emergency resupply missions utilizing Information Surveillance Reconnaissance feed. This capability allows the rigger support team to observe the loads being delivered, ensuring it lands in the correct location. When they are not supplying warfighters, Reza and his team conduct rodeos to train, advise and assist members of the Afghan National Army logistical cell and NATO counterparts on how to properly rig and inspect loads for aerial resupply. “During training, we express how important attention to detail is. Being meticulous is the best way to ensure the load won’t be compromised when landing,” said Reza. “Overall, it has been a great opportunity to train and educate our Afghan National Army counterparts on aerial delivery operations. “This training will enable the ANA logistics cell to provide LCLA (low-cost, low-altitude) loads to their counterparts on the ground, utilizing C-208 aircraft,” he further explained. “This training is vital to the progress of the ANA logistics cell as they continue to grow and become more efficient.”


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Photos by Staff Sgt. Sinthia Rosario

(LEFT) Capt. Rizzoli Elias, commander of the 5th Quartermaster Theater Aerial Delivery Company, 16th Special Troops Battalion, 16th Sustainment Brigade, gives a German child a stuffed animal during Operation Toy Drop at Alzey, Germany, Dec. 13. The training exercise is an annual multi-national event designed to strengthen relations with the local community and develop interoperability. (RIGHT) U.S. and allied partner paratroopers exchange “high fives” with local children during Operation Toy Drop at Alzey, Germany, Dec. 13. During this event, U.S. and German children receive toys from the participating troops, adding a community outreach element that strengthens the bonds between military forces and their host country.

Sustainers show holiday spirit during toy-drop training jump Staff Sgt. Sinthia Rosario 16th Sustainment Brigade

ALZEY, Germany – U.S. and allied partner paratroopers participated in the 5th Quartermaster Theater Aerial Delivery Company’s Operation Toy Drop here Dec. 11-14. The annual multi-national training event is an opportunity to share the tactics, techniques and procedures of airborne operations while strengthening relationships with local communities and NATO allies and partners. Outcomes include improved interoperability and communication within the global paratrooper community. “It’s so much fun seeing other nations get in on our training and us learning more about how they operate with these airborne operations,” said Sgt. Kyle D. Shields, a

parachute rigger with the 5th QM Company – an element of the 16th Special Troops Battalion, 16th Sustainment Brigade. “All of us use different parachute systems across the different militaries,” he noted, “so (this exercise) is an opportunity to get everybody synced up in a training event with one parachute system and a common operating picture that focuses on risk factors and different ways you have to steer it, fly it and turn it,” Shields said. As its name implies, Operation Toy Drop also serves as an opportunity to spread some holiday cheer. Among the airdrop participants were Santa, Mrs. Claus and several elf helpers who sailed into the dropzone and began handing out toys to children from the Kaiserslautern area. Both U.S. and German youngsters smiled and laughed with excitement as they

received presents from the QM Soldiers. The distributed toys were donated by the paratroopers participating in this event. “It’s a huge honor for us to give back, especially to the local German community; and it’s heartwarming to know what it means to these kids who may not get as many presents as we do on Christmas,” said Sgt. Joshua A. Parkinson, an aerial delivery supervisor. “For us to be able to do something for them while enjoying it together; then to get to watch their faces at the drop zone as Santa comes around and hands them toys from a bundle that dropped down from the sky ... it’s really an indescribable feeling, but it’s something that every single jumper out here, whether they’re American or not, absolutely loves.” Operation Toy Drop concluded with a wing exchange ceremony in which paratroopers

that jumped with a foreign nation would get a certificate with that country’s wings. “For us to be able to give them American jump wings and us receiving any number of the same from the many other countries that are here – even the British are giving out jump wings for the first time in years – for me, that is absolutely huge,” Parkinson said. “It builds a real sense of who the people are to my left and right that I can count on. If we go downrange and get into a firefight, these are the people we’ll be working with, and this moment of camaraderie means absolutely everything to me.” According to Shields, one of the biggest takeaways is looking forward to future operations with the NATO allies. “We established a lot of good connections and contacts here while we were doing Operation Toy Drop,” Shields said. “That allows us to communicate with the other armies that are around us so we can plan additional training exercises and other joint learning events.” Army parachute riggers are trained at the QM School’s Aerial Delivery and Field Services Department on Fort Lee.


Lee troops support Pet of the Week wreath-laying www.fortleetraveller.com

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Amy Perry

Simone, a tan and white tabby, is available for adoption at the Fort Lee Stray Animal Facility on 38th Street, near the Defense Commissary Agency Headquarters. A very loving cat, according to her caretakers, she is about 1.5 years old and is not fixed. There also are other cats, kittens and a dog available. There are no adoption fees for any animals at the facility. For other details, contact Officer Rob Moore, PMO animal control officer, at 804-721-9291.

Contributed Photo

Sergeant 1st Class Scott Helm, an 832nd Ordnance Battalion drill sergeant, presents the Army’s tribute to fallen service members during the Dec. 15 Wreaths Across America ceremony at Sunset Memorial Park, Chester. This annual observance traces its origins back to 1992 when a private citizen received permission to place wreaths on the most infrequently visited gravesites at Arlington National Cemetery. It started a movement that spread nationwide, with ceremonies at over 1,600 sites this year. Fort Lee participation at the Chester Memorial Park event included a joint service color guard and military personnel serving as Gold Star Family escorts or holding fallen warrior banners outside the entrance to the ceremony site. Col. Hollie Martin, garrison commander, was among the featured speakers. Post troops also supported the event held at City Point National Cemetery, Hopewell.


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Kenner Connection | Diabetes Awareness

and

Prevention

Knowledge key to combating disease that affects over 30 million Americans Health experts encourage Americans to learn more about diabetes as a first step to combating its dangerous effects. According to the American Diabetes Association, every 21 seconds someone is diagnosed with the disease, making the person more likely to develop health complications in the heart, nerves, kidneys or eyes. In 1958, there were 1.5 million people with diabetes compared to 30.3 million in 2015. About 7.2 million are undiagnosed. Additionally, an estimated 86 million Americans age 20 and older have pre-diabetes, a condition that may, with time, develop into full diabetes. The Mayo Clinic lists the following as increasing one’s risk to developing pre-diabetes: being overweight, physical inactivity, family history of type 2 diabetes, advancing age, race and history of gestational diabetes. The commitment of the staff at Kenner Army Health Clinic to improving the health of the Fort Lee community places emphasis on beneficiaries taking an active role in their own medical care. Diabetes prevention is proven, possible and powerful. There are many resources here for patients to achieve good health and prevent illness.

Stock Photo

The ADA states that, often, there are no clear symptoms during the initial stages of diabetes (pre-diabetes), so people may have it and not be aware of it. During the later stages, some may experience extreme thirst, frequent urination, fatigue, cuts that are slow to heal, tingling in the hands or feet, and/or blurred vision. Often there are no symptoms at all and one must be diagnosed by a health care professional.

According to research, damage to one’s body may already be occurring during prediabetes. Consider pre-diabetes as a warning sign. Making small changes early in the course of the disease may delay or even halt some of the damaging effects. Suggestions such as those discussed below, when added to the daily routine, may help. Talk with a primary care provider about diet and exercise. Changes to eating habits or

beginning or intensifying a fitness program should be undertaken as a shared plan between you and a medical expert. A key factor that needs to be taken into consideration is overall health, including the condition of the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, feet and nervous system. Talk with providers about joint or bone problems that make it difficult to exercise. There are a wide variety of optional fitness routines that will decrease impact to sensitive joints. Read more at www.mayoclinic. com/health/exercise-and-chronic-disease/ MY02165. Ask providers about how increasing activity levels might impact any medications taken for chronic conditions like blood pressure and heart problems. Check feet daily for red spots, cuts, swelling and blisters. Those who cannot see the bottoms of their feet should use a mirror or ask someone for help. Go to the following website for more information on self-exams and care: www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/foot-complications/foot-care.html. Suggestions for meals can be found by visiting www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/nutrition-exercise/meal-planning/holiday-mealsurvival-guide. Tricare-enrolled beneficiaries with diabetes or pre-diabetes should work with their Kenner primary care team to reduce the risk of complications. To make an appointment, call 1-866-533-5242. – Kenner Army Health Clinic

Transportation Artifact of the Month

Contributed Photo

The pictured M923 5-ton cargo truck – dubbed the “Ace of Spades” by its previous crew – is on display at the Army Transportation Museum, Joint Base Langley-Eustis. It was brought into service in 1983 and primarily used to transport personnel and supplies over all kinds of terrain, in all kinds of weather. When necessary, the bed could be fitted for special missions, such as the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories gun box seen in the photo.The gun box was developed to help provide better convoy security during operations in hostile areas. The laboratories sent technicians to the Transportation Museum to study the only gun truck to return from Vietnam. It was dubbed the “Eve of Destruction.” The technicians and museum leaders brought in Vietnam veterans who had served aboard gun trucks. This information was critical in the development of the Livermore gun truck. After withstanding the rigors of Army testing, the first LLNL armored truck was delivered to the 7th Transportation Battalion in Iraq on July 14, 2004. Those interested in learning more about Transportation Corps history can visit the museum during its regular operating hours, Tuesday-Saturday, 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.


GOVernment I.D. Law, continued from page 2

badge, identification card or other insignia, or any colorable imitation thereof, except as authorized under regulations made pursuant to law, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned (for up to six months), or both.” Commercial establishments can ask to see your government ID card to verify military affiliation or authorize discounted rates for services, but they can’t photocopy it. So, if they ask to do so, tell them no. Give them a state driver’s license or other form of photo identification instead. Photocopied cards might be used for counterfeiting purposes, with no real

2018 Stalwart award, continued from page 3

military Transition Assistance Program for its effectiveness and wanted to expand its access, according to the nomination letter. The document also lauded Meinzer for her support of programs for the garrison’s 350 employees. They include those involving transition, hiring actions and workforce development. A native of Colorado Springs, Colo., Meinzer spent four years on active duty as an Army officer. She transitioned to the Army

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safeguards against it. Since criminals and terrorists value government IDs when they’re trying to plan acts against the U.S. military, it’s best to not give them that chance. This law does NOT apply to medical establishments like hospitals and doctor’s offices, which are allowed to make a copy for filing insurance claims. It also doesn’t apply to other government agencies that are using the copied ID to perform official business functions. When in doubt, it’s wise to contact a legal advisor. The phone number for the legal assistance office at Fort Lee is 804-7651500. The Client Services Division is located in building 8135, 27th Street. Reserve afterward and was medically retired this year after four years of service. Meinzer’s pastimes include caring for her cats; volunteering for Richardson’s Rescue, a pet adoption organization; and being a foster pet owner. “I’m not talking crazy cat lady status,” she jokingly interjected. “I only have two family cats, and I foster two others at a time.” Volunteering as an English as a Second Language instructor and adult literacy tutor are her other community service endeavors.

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LNCOA captures flag football crown

Contributed Photo

Members of the Logistics Noncommissioned Officer Academy flag football team proudly pose with their championship awards following an 18-6 win over the 262nd Quartermaster Battalion in the final game of the installation’s intramural competition. The playoffs took place Nov. 20 at Williams Stadium. The LNCOA, which finished second in the regular season, went undefeated during the double-elimination playoffs, beating the 262nd QM Bn., twice. Individuals or units wishing to participate in Fort Lee’s intramural sports program can contact the Family and MWR Sports Office at 804-765-3896. Its hours of operation are 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.


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Author Talk at Pamplin | Jan. 3

John J. Hennessy, Civil War author and scholar, will speak at the Petersburg Civil War Roundtable Jan. 3, 7 p.m., Pamplin Historical Park & The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier, 6125 Boydton Plank Road, Petersburg. The presentation is titled “Return to Bull Run” and is based on Hennessy’s recently revised book “The First Battle of Manassas: An End to Innocence, July 18-21, 1861.” The fee to attend for non-members of the roundtable group is $5. Also, the park is observing weekend-only hours (9 a.m. - 5 p.m.) for regular visitors through Feb. 17. For further details, call 804861-2408.

Swift Creek Holiday Performance | Jan. 3-5

The final performances of the Swift Creek Mill Theatre holiday show “A 1940s Radio Christmas Carol” are set for Jan. 3 and 4, 8 p.m., and Jan. 5, 2:30 and 8 p.m. The theatre is located at 17401 Jefferson Davis Highway, Colonial Heights. The production is a long-awaited sequel to the popular musical “The 1940s Radio Hour, It’s Christmas Eve, 1943.” This time, the Feddington Players are broadcasting from a hole-in-the-wall studio in Newark, N.J. The company’s take on Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” descends into all the comedic mayhem and madness of a live radio show, resulting in a heart-warming and dramatic climax. For ticket prices and other details, visit www.swiftcreekmill.com.

Chesterfield Lecture Series Kick Off | Jan. 11

L ocal A ctivities

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F ort L ee C ommunity

NFL at Sustainers’ Pub | Every Sunday

Fans of professional football can watch some of their favorite teams play on big screen TVs every Sunday, noon - 8 p.m., at the Sustainers’ Pub in the lobby area of Fort Lee Army Lodging, 2301 Mahone Ave. Admission is free. The event includes manager’s specials. The NFL wild-card matchups are being played this weekend. For details, call 804-734-7541.

Centennial Celebration | Jan. 6

The Science Museum of Virginia will hold a Centennial Celebration Jan. 6, 9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., at 2500 West Broad St., Richmond. The first train left the Broad Street Station at 1:07 p.m., Jan. 6, 1919. The event will include guided walking tours, special art workshops, free rides on the Teddy Bear Express, a Cosmic Expedition, a confetti-laden celebration and more. For details, call 804-864-1400 or visit www. smv.org/.

Read-2-Rover at Library | Jan. 8

ACS ‘Baby Basics’ | Jan. 9

The Chesterfield Historical Society will kick off its 11th Annual Lecture Series Jan. 11, 7 p.m., at Lucy Corr Village Community Hall, 6800 Lucy Corr Blvd. Dick Cheatham, a living history interpreter and founder of the Living History Associates in Richmond, will portray Meriweather Lewis, one half of the Lewis and Clark expedition of 1804-1806. For details, call Karen Sadler at 804-7967156.

A free class – “Baby Basics,” presented by the Army Community Service Family Advocacy Program – is set for Jan. 9, 1 p.m., at ACS, building 1231, Mahone Avenue. The session will cover bathing, diapering, soothing, breastfeeding and other newborn care. This also is an ideal opportunity to learn more about the support services available to PMOC Breakfast, Bowling first-time parents. Registration is requested. Event | Jan. 12 For details, call 804-734-6381. The Fort Lee Protestant Men of the Chapel group invites all males in the community to 555th PIA Meeting | attend its Breakfast and Bowling Fellowship Jan. 9 event Jan 12, 9-11 a.m., at the TenStrike The Jessie J. Mayes Tri-Cities Chapter of Bowling Entertainment Center, 2403 C Ave. the 555th Parachute Infantry Association, The event is free. Reservations are requested. Inc. will hold its monthly meeting Jan. 9, For details, email fortleepmomc@gmail. 6 p.m., at the Petersburg Public Library, com or call 804-586-2435. 201 West Washington St., Petersburg. Prior airborne experience is not a prerequisite for FMWR Right Arm Night | membership or attending. Jan. 16 For details, call 804-733-2177. Family and MWR’s Right Arm Night takes place every third Wednesday of the month, starting at 5 p.m. in the Overtime Sports Bar, PWOC Kickoff Event | downstairs level of the Lee Club. The next Jan. 10 date is Jan. 16. The Fort Lee Protestant Women of the The social event is a chance for bosses to Chapel group will hold its Spring Semester bring their “right arm” out to relax and build Kick-off meeting Jan. 10., 9:15 a.m. - noon, at camaraderie off duty. Drink specials, free Liberty Chapel, 3101 C Avenue. snacks and pool will be available. Child care will be provided for ages 1-5 on It is open to all ranks and services – military a first-come basis. or civilian. For details, visit www.facebook.com/pg/ For details, call 804-734-7547 pwocfortlee or email ftleepwoc@gmail.com.

The Family and MWR Fort Lee Community Library will offer a Read-2-Rover activity Jan. 8, 5:30-6:30 p.m., on the 2nd floor of the Army Logistics University, 34th Street. The free program includes reading for, or showing picture books to, certified therapy dogs. Registration is requested but not required. The activity is held the second Tuesday of each month, and it is open to all El Juguetazo Celebration | ages. ACS Lunch and Learn | Jan. 5 For details, call 804-765-8095. El Juguetazo – the Three Kings event – is Jan. 10 celebrating its 15th year Jan. 5, 1-4 p.m., at A free lunch and learn session – Talk About L.C. Bird High School, 10301 Courthouse Free Lewis Ginter Admission | It Thursdays, hosted by the Army Community Road, Chesterfield. Service Family Advocacy Program – is set for Jan. 8-13 At the event, organizers will contribute gifts Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden will offer Jan. 10, noon. - 1 p.m., at ACS, building 1231, to hundreds of families in need. The gathering free admission Jan. 8-13, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., at Mahone Avenue. also will include family friendly activities and 1800 Lakeside Ave., Richmond. The session will be an open-discussion provide valuable information from private Visitors can view orchids, passion flowers forum in which participants can share ideas businesses, nonprofit organizations and and other tropical plants in the indoor and develop strategies to promote happier service providers. No registration is required. conservatory and other areas outside. marriages and families. Registration is For details, call Juan Santacoloma at 804For details, visit www.lewisginter.org or call required. 804-262-9887. 796-7085. For details and sign-up, call 804-734-6381.

FMWR Snow Xperience Trip | Jan. 19

Registration is open for the Family and MWR Outdoor Recreation Center discounted Snow Xperience Trip to the Wintergreen Resort Jan. 19. The reduced-rate cost varies for skiing, snowboarding or tubing rentals and lift ticket packages. Transportation leaves for the resort at 7:30 a.m. Additional outings are scheduled for Feb. 9 and March 9. For registration and details, visit Outdoor Recreation, building 15014 on 5th Street, or call 804-765-2212.

For more installation and outside the gate events and activities, visit our online calendar at www.fortleetraveller.com/calendar


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‘Stay-behind’ Soldiers enjoy action-packed holiday break

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Fort Lee

Classifieds Reach more than 10,000 active duty military, civil service employees, retirees, their spouses and the civilian community.

Contributed Photo

Contributed Photo

Fort Lee Soldiers indicate they’re ready to roll out onto the race track during a Dec.24 excursion to G-Force Karts in Richmond. The facility offers “Bazooka Ball,” tactical laser tag, the Redemption Arcade and even an axe-throwing area. It was one of the many activities offered to the troops who chose not to take leave during the holiday break. In total, just over 220 advanced individual training students remained at Lee, with consolidated room accommodations at Whiskey Company, 244th Quartermaster Battalion. The long list of recreational events made available to them included a Family and MWR “Jurassic Park Fallen Kingdom” movie night with free drinks and snacks at the Lee Theater; a pizza and game party at the Warrior Zone; a TenStrike Bowling Center night; an outing to Swader’s Sports Park in Prince George; holiday gifts from the USO and cookies from the Religious Support Office; and much more. The consolidated no-block-leave company was led by Capt. Charles Richard and 1st Sgt. Lamakius Gardner.

DEADLINE Reader & Display: Thursday 4:00pm (week prior)

CONTACT: Susan Irgens

susanlou.irgens@gmail.com

757-477-7104


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Profile for The Progress-Index

Fort Lee Traveller | Jan. 3, 2019  

Fort Lee Traveller | Jan. 3, 2019