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SIXTH FORM PROSPECTUS AND COURSE GUIDE 2021 WWW.PGS.ORG.UK


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3 CONTENTS

CONTENTS

CONTENTS Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Academic Enrichment Curriculum . . 8

French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Personal Enrichment Curriculum . . 10

Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Beyond the Classroom . . . . . . . . . . 12

Geology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Support Every Step of the Way . . . 14

German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Next Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Greek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

A Rough Guide to Sensible Subject Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . 18

History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

COURSES

Mathematics & Further Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . 56

Art & Design/Visual Arts . . . . . . . . . 20 Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Classical Civilisation . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Design & Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Drama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Latin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Philosophy & Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Politics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Spanish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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How to Apply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

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5 WELCOME

WELCOME

INTRODUCTION

A LEVEL CURRICULUM

We are so excited to be introducing our new Sixth Form Curriculum to you. It is designed with your future in mind: we want you to be happy and successful during your Sixth Form years, but above all, we want you to lead a fulfilled, purposeful, and enriching life when you embark on the adventures that lie beyond school – whatever direction you choose to take. We focus on life at 25, and our new curriculum has been designed to help you thrive at school, in higher education and at 25, whatever life brings. During your Sixth Form years at PGS, you are based in our stunning Sixth Form Centre, with its café and independent learning centre, supported by a dedicated, expert, and well-resourced team. During your A Level studies there are five core elements to the PGS Sixth Form experience. • Your Principal Academic Subjects. You can choose either three or four A Level subjects, to study in depth. • Academic Enrichment Curriculum. This is about offering you academic breadth beyond your core subjects, as well as enabling you to drill down deeper into the topics you really love. The thinking skills you learn will enrich your work in all your subjects, and the research skills you learn will set you up for study beyond school. • Personal Enrichment Curriculum. This is about educating you as a whole person. It involves developing your skills of leadership, your understanding of yourself and the world around you, and bringing you into purposeful contact with our wider communities. This is a pioneering part of our curriculum offer, and we believe it is a very special part of what PGS can offer the future you. • Beyond The Classroom. Our co-curriculum – the clubs, activities, societies and trips that take place in lunchtimes, after school, at the weekend and in the holidays – are a hugely important part of developing your skills, of bringing balance and variety to your week, and above all, allowing you to pursue the activities you love. There is an astonishing array of activities to choose from.

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ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT CURRICULUM

•S  upport Every Step of the Way. We set great store by caring for our pupils, and offering the support you need at every step of the way. We want you to be independent and resourceful; at the same time we realise that navigating your way through higher education pathways requires considerable investment of time and expertise. We are always here to help. We hope that you will be as excited as we are at the prospect of developing as a whole person during your time with us in the Sixth Form. Your core subjects are important, of course: they help open doors and are central to your future success. But we believe it is the broader aspects of your development which will enable you to thrive when you get to the destination you are keen to reach, help you create opportunities for yourself, and have the skills and confidence to take control of your future. The developments we have made to our Sixth Form programme, through designing the Academic Enrichment Curriculum and the Personal Enrichment Curriculum, are designed to do exactly that. We look forward to telling you more about life at PGS in the Sixth Form.

Dr Anne Cotton Head of The Portsmouth Grammar School

EXTEND

EPQ

IGNITE

PERSONAL ENRICHMENT CURRICULUM COMMUNITY, ACTION, WORKPLACE

LEADERSHIP

WELFARE EDUCATION

BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

UCAS SUPPORT

SUPPORT EVERY STEP OF THE WAY

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7 THE SIXTH FORM CENTRE

THE SIXTH FORM CENTRE

PGS EXTEND CASE STUDIES ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT CURRICULUM: DEEPENING THINKING AND EXTENDING LEARNING Our academic enrichment programme has been designed to allow you to become a deep-thinker, critical enquirer and intellectual risk-taker, who will excel in higher education. The programme will assist you in securing places at the most competitive universities in this country or abroad and reach the future you aspire to. PGS is dedicated to providing you with a dynamic and future-proof approach to academic enrichment that will give you the knowledge, skills and experience necessary to become innovators, leaders and stewards of the next generation.

Extend and EPQ Everyone takes part in Extend, our flagship extended project programme. This involves a taught skills programme which will equip you with the skills required to complete an extended project on a topic of your choosing – which may be an essay, a creative or practical project, or an entrepreneurial challenge. The taught skills will also be applicable to your wider Sixth Form studies, university and beyond. You will choose to complete one of two types of extended project; the ‘in-house’ PGS Extend, or the externallyassessed Extended Project Qualification, worth half an A Level. Whichever route you choose, the ultimate aim of the programme is to foster your independent learning. It encourages you to explore your passions beyond the curriculum, to engage in research at a deeper level, and to develop the skills needed to plan, develop and follow through a project over an extended period.

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Ignite! Programme Alongside this, our Ignite! programme offers a diverse range of short courses, catering for the breadth of interests and talents of all our pupils, taught by our highly qualified staff. There are currently 15 short-courses to choose from including Media in the Modern World, Art History, Creative Directions, Russian Language and Literature, Mandarin, Coding School and Medical Chemistry. These courses allow you to pursue interests beyond your principal subjects, to broaden your intellectual horizons, and to prepare for specific directions in the world of work.

Critical Thinking and Study Skills Critical Thinking is the ability to analyse the way you think and present evidence for your ideas, rather than simply accepting your personal reasoning as sufficient proof. You can gain numerous benefits from mastering critical thinking skills, such as better control of your own learning, improved language and presentation skills, increased ability to self-reflect and enhanced creativity. In addition, study skills are the skills you need to enable you to study and learn efficiently – they are an important set of transferable life skills and will become increasing important as you move through your academic career. Courses in both critical thinking and study skills form an important part of our academic enrichment offering.

The Art of Medicine – A study in both two and three-dimensional art

Is it possible to send water bottle rockets into space?

The Hour Record, An Engineer’s View

By Ollie Nash

By Matt Bryan

By Imogen Ashby

Ithaka Prize Winner, 2019

Ithaka Prize Winner, 2020

Ithaka Prize Winner, 2018

Almost fifty years on since man first ventured to the moon, we are still living in an age obsessed with space travel, with an increasing number of companies joining this ever-expanding market. It seems there is an endless list of engineering feats which still need to be achieved, including the aim of becoming an interplanetary species. Inspired by years of research, I set out to strip all the rocket science back to its core and ask a question about one of the most fundamental models created: is it possible to send water bottle rockets into space? This question took me on a journey through complex concepts usually only introduced at university, different mathematical methods, and the process of modelling in physics, which resulted in the formulation of my own, unique rocket equation. In fact, this model was so complex, it required the use of a computer to solve it, which gave me a very basic introduction to coding and iteration formulae. My PGS Extend not only confirmed the decision that physics is a study I would like to take further, but also prepared me for the mathematical rigours and independent research skills that I will need to undertake my physics degree. The project took me back to my childhood, and so could a younger version of me, with enough determination, be able to compete with the likes of NASA?

I spend a good deal of time on my bike, and a good deal of that time thinking about how to go faster with minimal effort. Many have had the same idea over the last century and a half, leading to the birth of the ‘Hour Record’. To ride as far as possible on a track in an hour has been described as ‘cycling’s purest race’, and a feat that requires a symbiosis between rider and bicycle - that is what fascinated me as an engineer.

Initially, I chose this topic because it would increase my chances of getting into medical school with a subject that everyone thought had no academic value. To be honest, I wanted to prove them wrong, gain more knowledge into an area of interest and, throughout the year, this choice of topic became more and more relevant. For my PGS Extend I chose to combine two distinctive areas, Medicine and Art, which I would not have had the opportunity to do otherwise. I was intrigued about where, and if, these fields both overlapped, and came to the conclusion that there could be neither without the other. I created my own psychological tests, and I also researched lots of information about different types of Art therapies. Art therapy is a unique field that combines artistic and scientific components yet does not fit one single mould as its identity is continually evolving to help each individual’s unique way of thinking and learning. For the PGS Extend, the sketch book became my art therapy, and I became my own case study.

To fully understand the record, I compiled a thorough history before assembling a mathematical model incorporating a number of real-world factors; aerodynamic effects, tyre friction, altitude and weather, and inefficiencies are all taken into account, resulting in a tool that can predict real results from known data to within half a percent. As effective as models are, I wanted to quantify mine against practical data. So I fabricated a set of aerodynamic disc wheel covers to validate their claimed advantages. In collecting data from a number of timed flat sections, they proved faster, but not by enough of a margin to be truly statistically significant. I learned a great deal about industrystandard technology, utilising a range of scientific techniques that I hope to develop during my engineering degree.

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PERSONAL ENRICHMENT CURRICULUM: LIFE AT 25 As a school we look towards life at 25, and we want to prepare you to have an enriching and productive career, and to lead a fulfilled, purposeful life when you leave us. We value this so highly that we have decided to dedicate specific timetabled space within the week to doing this. Our Personal Enrichment Curriculum is about offering you the resources, the opportunities and the coaching to develop as a whole person. We want you to go beyond the subjects that make up your curriculum and to extend your thinking. To develop

your personal qualities, your personal perspective and ideas. To build your confidence and your ability to take control of your life, and above all your understanding of what you enjoy and what offers you fulfillment as an individual. The Enrichment Curriculum is about your personal development, and we believe that the opportunities we offer are exciting, rewarding and hugely enjoyable. Above all, they will provide you with an inspiring and enabling platform for the future.

“I talked to people that I wouldn’t usually have spoken to and it helped me to become more integrated.” Year 12 pupil Elke Edwards, Managing Director and Founder of Ivy House who will be offering the Ivy House Award to Sixth Form pupils

Community, Action, Workplace We believe that pupils are enriched by engaging with the local community, and our extensive outreach programme reflects this. On a weekly basis, you will work with peers to support a wide range of charities or social enterprises, from schools to care homes. Aside from being hugely rewarding and a recognised contributor to holistic wellbeing, serving our wider communities will help you to build your understanding of the world which you will join after school, to develop your personal skills and resilience and to appreciate your responsibilities to the world around them.

Leadership – leading yourself and your future A startling 86% of respondents to the survey on the Global Agenda agree that we have a leadership crisis in the world today (World Economic Forum). At PGS we are committed to giving our Sixth Form pupils the skills and opportunity to lead, thus setting them on their way to be effective leaders in years to come. We firmly believe that to be an effective leader you must first learn to lead yourself and that is why we have teamed up with London-based leadership experts, Ivy House, to offer the Ivy House Award to pupils in Year 12. The Award will help you to gain clarity on who you are and what you want, and arms you with the skills you

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PERSONALISED LEARNING

PERSONALISED LEARNING

“I volunteer at 1851 (the Charity branch of Land Rover BAR), which focuses on Sustainability and Education in STEM. In my role, I work on the ‘Tech Deck’, running groups for younger students to encourage them to get involved in Engineering. I also research and create classroom resources that can be used in the Tech Deck, including case studies of renewable sources of energy and Invasive Species Top Trumps.” Year 12 pupil

will need to make conscious, informed choices about the direction you want your life to take, whatever the world throws at you. Around this, we offer a leadership programme comprising workshops, talks by inspiring leaders at different stages in their careers, and forwardlooking mentoring to support you to take control of your destiny and have the confidence to craft extraordinary lives when you leave us. All Sixth Formers are invited to become part of our Leadership and Mentoring programme. You will work with a lead staff member, and receive training on your role, and on how you can make a positive impact within the community. Whether you are directing the Sixth Form play, a member of the school council, an editor for the Sixth Form blog, leading one of our subject based societies, mentoring younger pupils or a school prefect, we are confident that you will have the opportunity to develop your skills as a confident and self-assured leader and have fun along the way.

vital element of education through structured timetabled lessons. The courses are delivered by specialists from our comprehensive and coherent curriculum which focuses on the challenges and opportunities you face now and in the future. Groups are small and the sessions focus on sharing important guidance and a healthy measure of peer discussion and debate. Sixth Form pupils often take up leadership responsibilities in this area, for instance you may decide to become a Peer Mentor, an AntiBullying Ambassador or member of the PGS Diversity & Inclusion. Ignite! Personal Enrichment Offerings include: Songwriting Academy, Dance, Photography, Gold Duke of Edinburgh Award, Food for Thought, Climbing, Strategy Games and British Sign Language.

Welfare Education – the tools to support wellbeing At PGS we are very proud of the reputation we have as a centre of excellence for pastoral care. We are particularly proactive in this area of education and aim to ensure that our pupils are equipped to be happy and fulfilled both now and in the future. At PGS, pupils receive this

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11 SUPPORT AND FACILITIES

SUPPORT AND FACILITIES

BEYOND THE CLASSROOM We firmly believe that our pupils achieve what they do inside the classroom because of – and not in spite of – everything they do outside the classroom. Taking part in clubs and activities outside the classroom is important in so many ways. It is an outlet to develop your interests and passion, which may help shape your future pathway. They help you develop as a whole person. And they help hone skills of team work, organisation, leadership, independence and perseverance. Co-curricular activities play a key role in a Sixth Former’s life at PGS and this is reflected in our excellent music, sport and drama facilities. The emphasis is very much on variety and inclusion and encourages you to explore new activities, cultivate interests and develop a breadth of skills. There are over 60 clubs and societies. As a city-centre school, we are fortunate to benefit from the city’s excellent facilities. Our pupils perform at the King’s Theatre and at the

Guildhall; they are able to visit Team INEOS to discover the latest in sailing technology and Portsmouth Historic Dockyard to enrich their learning and can have their art displayed in local galleries.

Pupils performing in the School Production of ‘Bring It On’ at The King’s Theatre

Pupils performing with at the Portsmouth Festivities 2019 Concert with The Cardinall’s Musik

Performing Arts

Outdoor Pursuits

Sport

We founded and lead the Portsmouth Festivities, a 10-day celebration of culture and the arts, now in its 21st year, which attracts thousands of visitors to over 100 events each year. For pupils to be at the heart of this and take centre stage alongside international artists is an astonishing opportunity. Year-round participatory possibilities for pupils with a love of drama or music at PGS are likewise outstanding. As a choir school, the city Cathedral provides the setting for any pupils wishing to join the choir team, and we work with a Director in Residence, a Composer in Residence, and collaborate with the London Mozart Players as our associate orchestra.

While benefiting from the cosmopolitan opportunities offered by Portsmouth, we are a stone’s throw from the sea and in touching distance of the South Downs.

All Sixth Form pupils take part in Sport for one afternoon each week and options range from the traditional school sports such as rugby, hockey, netball to more contemporary activities including triathlon club, pilates and yoga.

In all aspects of school life we aim for pupils to take responsibility for their own progress. Outdoor Pursuits provide unique opportunities for this and we believe that these activities will foster an innate sense of leadership in you while giving you a true sense of working as an individual and in a team.

The Portsmouth Grammar School has once again been included in the Schools Sports Magazine Top 100 Sport Schools 2019. PGS Sport was

placed 70th on the list. Reaching the top 100 puts PGS in the top 3-10% of the country’s state or independent sporting schools. PGS have been included due to our success in reaching the last 16 of the NatWest Rugby U18s Cup and our third place in the National Hockey Championships. This is a brilliant reward for the hard work and commitment that our pupils, and of course our staff, dedicate every week to PGS Sport.

The Outdoor Pursuits Centre provides a focal point for the pupils taking part in highly popular activities such as the Combined Cadet Force and The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, as well as a variety of other adventurous pursuits in the UK and abroad. Other opportunities for outdoor experience include rock climbing trips to the Brecon Beacons, the Charlton Chase night navigation exercise and canoeing and kayaking expeditions. We are also pleased to support the initiatives of pupils which often involve fundraising for charity. Sixth Form pupils have completed the Three Peaks Challenge, Cross-Solent Swim and an expedition to Mt. Kilimanjaro.

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CCF Adventure Training Expedition to the Picos, Spain 2019

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13 SUPPORT AND FACILITIES

UNIVERSITY AND BEYOND

SUPPORT EVERY STEP OF THE WAY The high staff to pupil ratio at PGS means that we are able to provide a high level of individual support. We are a large enough school that we can offer exciting, ambitious programmes; yet small enough that each pupil is known and cared for and offered a high degree of individual support. Every Sixth Former at PGS is a member of a tutor group of up to fifteen pupils. Our specialist Sixth Form tutors provide a daily point of contact, not just for registration, but for advice, planning and mutual support – where targets are set and guidance is offered at the various stages of your Sixth Form career. Your tutor will become a prominent member of your experience at PGS; someone who will take a particular interest in your academic progress and wellbeing. Providing a point of contact between school and home and offering support and encouragement should you experience difficulties along the way. What you can expect from your Tutor • To be in touch with you on a daily basis at registration and in Tutor Group sessions • To be available to help with any problems as they arise

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•T  o give advice on study skills as needed •T  o monitor and help with your planning and time management •T  o help you set academic and personal targets and to help you achieve these, liaising closely with your subject teachers •T  o help you complete your UCAS form, to offering advice and guidance through the draft stages, working closely with the UCAS team and specialist subject advisers •T  o take an interest in and to support your co-curricular activities wherever possible •T  o maintain contact with your parents as appropriate •T  o listen and to provide encouragement and support at every stage of your Sixth Form career •T  o be your advocate in case of difficulties You will become a member of one of the school’s four Houses where a genuine sense of community and healthy competition is fostered. Our Health and Wellbeing Centre is a dedicated point for specialist health matters and the school counsellors are available to all pupils.

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NEXT STEPS Sixth Form pupils at PGS are given outstanding support and advice to help them achieve their aspirations. Almost 90% of pupils win a place at their first or insurance choice university and we have frequent success in helping our pupils secure offers for prestigious degree apprenticeship schemes with organisations such as Dyson, Rolls Royce and Unilever. Each pupil is assigned a Specialist Subject Advisor who will advise and guide you comprehensively through the application process. Our dedicated Careers and Universities Department coordinate the process and organise hugely valuable events such as our annual universities fair where over forty institutions and training providers are represented. We run a Year 12 UCAS Day in July, which is dedicated to ensuring that your university applications are as strong as they can be. With so many pathways on offer we fully understand that decision making in this area is complex. We therefore organise a well-attended programme of working lunches with industry professionals who can advise you on what a career in their respective sector involves and possible entry pathways. At the end of Year 12 you are invited to interview with an appropriate professional including medics, lawyers and financial experts in order to refine interview technique and experience expertise from their chosen field.

Medical, Veterinary and Dentistry Applications For pupils wishing to apply to study medicine, veterinary science or dentistry we have a comprehensive and bespoke programme of preparation in place. In Year 12 pupils are able to join the Medics Club which meets weekly to discuss current medical issues in the news. In addition, they will be enrolled onto our Medical Chemistry academic enrichment programme, receive specialist UCat and BMAT preparation sessions and additional support with choosing institutions and writing personal statements. At the beginning of Year 13 pupils receive a whole days training on BMAT technique and interview practice. Then in October they will receive interviews and feedback from medical professionals and engage in a number of practice Multi-Mini Interviews.

Oxbridge Applications At PGS we have vast experience and expertise in supporting pupils with applications to highly competitive universities. The guidance and support that you will be given is comprehensive and includes: subject specific subject discussion groups, academic extension activities, bespoke admissions test lessons, talks from Oxford and Cambridge graduates, visits from Oxbridge teaching staff and extensive interview preparation and practice.

During my Sixth Form years at PGS, I chose Art as one of my A Level subjects. The facilities and individual studio spaces were fantastic for developing my art practice during class and free time. I was able to experiment with different mediums, including drawing, painting and photography. Tutors and technicians are on hand to help you make your creative ideas a reality, the opportunities are endless. As a class we had the opportunity to create a collaborative installation at Fort Nelson in response to Aldous Huxley’s “Brave New World” and I was also honoured to be asked to create the Smith Christmas card in 2012. These experiences encouraged my choice to go on to study Fine Art at University. My PGS experience helped improve my self-confidence and I was able to excel in my chosen subjects as well as extra activities such as sport and music. This was enhanced by the incredible support of my Head of House and tutors. They were extremely welcoming and were there when I needed help or guidance.

JESSICA MILLER

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PERSONALISED LEARNING

ALUMNI

14

Age: 25 University: Loughborough - Fine Art

Now: Studying an MA in Museums, Galleries and Contemporary Culture at the University of Westminster

2012 Leavers at 25: what are they doing now?

Teacher Banking/Finance Engineer Marketing/Advertising PR Doctor Accountancy Charity/Not For Profit Recruitment/Sales Research Pharmacist Retail Armed Forces Design Insurance IT Law Music/Theatre Publishing Vet Estate Agent Journalism/Media Travel/Tourism 0 3 6 9 12 15

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University Subjects by PGS 2017-19 Leavers - Boys : Girls

I have no doubt that I would not now be anticipating an exciting career in medicine if I hadn’t had the pleasure of attending PGS for five years.

American Studies

PGS did so much more for me than ensure I secured the marks in public exams that I needed for medicine. I have never felt so inspired by what I was learning, nor by those teaching it to me, whose boundless enthusiasm rubbed off on me. This undoubtedly excited me about my future, both academically and professionally.

Architecture Art/Design Biology/Biochem/Biomed Sciences Business/Econ/Finance/Mgt Chemistry

I was encouraged to get stuck in to all aspects of extra-curricular life, and ended up experimenting with everything from singing in the Chamber Choir to acting on board HMS Warrior, to teaching French to 6-year olds!

Classics Computer Science Dentistry/Medicine/Veterinary Drama

In short, PGS taught me to lead a life maximally-enriched academically, professionally and recreationally; to strive to better my future, as well as to squeeze everything I can out of today.

Engineering English

GEORGE CHAPMAN

17 UNIVERSITY AND BEYOND

UNIVERSITY AND BEYOND

ALUMNI

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Age: 25 University: Medicine at the University of Birmingham

Current occupation: Clinical Psychiatry

Enquine Science/Equine Management Flexible Combined Honours

There’s no doubt that my time at PGS helped me achieve what I wanted to do academically. Both in terms of attaining the grades I needed at school, but also once I got to university I felt I already had the experience of independent learning and thinking about subjects critically and analytically, which helped me succeed. But what I found most of all after leaving PGS, was the other ways PGS had set me up. It wasn’t until after I left PGS that I realised how well rounded my time had been. Having the opportunity to take part in a variety of sports and drama; to have positions of responsibility and having access to career advice and practice interviews gave me confidence, ambition and a sense of pro-activity after I left school. Those qualities have helped me through university and now into legal profession.

Law Mathematics Media Modern Languages Music Natural Sciences PPE/Philosophy Physics Physiotherapy Product Design Psychology/Criminology

Girls

Boys

Sports and Exercise Science 0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Cambridge Christ’s, Churchill, Corpus Christi, Downing, Fitzwilliam, Girton, Homerton, Jesus, Magdalene, Queens’ Emmanuel, Peterhouse. Oxford Corpus Christi, Keble, Lincoln, Mansfeild, Oriel.

Russell GroupPlus – 326 (67%)

PHILIPPA ABERNETHY Age: 25 University: Law - University of Glasgow

Destinations of 2019 Leavers Oxbridge – 19 (4%)

100

ALUMNI

Geography/Geology History/Politics/Int Relations

Current occupation: Other – 132 (27%)

Aberdeen, Aberystwyth, Anglia Ruskin, Bournemouth, Brighton, Brunel, Central Lancaster, Chichester, City, Coverntry, Essex, Falmouth, Goldsmith’s, Greenwhich, Hartpury, Herfordshire, Keele, Kent, Kingston, Leicester, Lincoln, London, London Metropolitan, London South Bank, Oxford Brookes, Pearson College, Plymouth, Portsmouth, Reading, Ravensbourne, Royal Agricultural University, Royal Holloway, Sheffield Hallam, Strathclyde.

Overseas – 4 (1%)

Law, Scotland

South California University, USA Universidad de Navarra, Spain Brock University, Canada South Florida University, USA Stanford, USA Northeastern, USA New Zealand.

Bath, Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Durham, East Anglia, Edinburgh, Exeter, Imperial College London, King’s College London, Lancaster, Leeds, Liverpool, Loughborough, LSE, Manchester, Newcastle, Nottingham, Queen’s,Belfast Queen Mary, London, Royal Veterinary College, Shefeild, Southampton, St Andrews.

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This rough guide is for general advice only and does not replace specific research and/or consultation with the universities for the courses in which you are interested. It is also essential that you choose subjects which you enjoy and which interest you.

Geography, History Economics, Business Studies, English, Languages, Art, one Science.

Slightly higher entry standards for Geography BA than for Geography BSc degree courses.

Geography (science emphasis)

Geography, Maths or Physics, Biology or Chemistry.

A wide variety of careers available with a Geography degree.

Geology

Two sciences and/or Maths.

History

History, Languages, English or Economics.

History of Art

Art, History, English; a modern and/or classical language.

Journalism

English and a Foreign language, but any combination of subjects will do.

There are degree courses in Journalism, but entry to them is very competitive and work experience is almost a pre-condition of admission.

Law

Any combination, though History, Maths, Latin, English, Government and Politics and/or Economics are useful. For Patent Law add a Science. (Art is not recognised as an entry qualification for Law School).

At Cambridge, Law (part 2) via Modern Languages or Classics (part 1) is popular. Law graduates need one year postgraduate study; non-law graduates, two years.

Leisure Industry, Sports Studies, Sports Science

Business Studies or Economics and either Chemistry or Biology or both.

Competitive entry to university. Record of commitment and success in sport very important.

Management Studies, Management Science

Maths, Economics or Business Studies.

Courses at university may overlap greatly in content with Business Studies courses.

Materials Science, Metallurgy

Chemistry, Physics and Maths. Design is useful.

Maths, Maths with Physics, Theoretical Physics

Maths, Physics and a third.

Maths at A Level or Further Maths, especially for Oxbridge.

A Level Language is not essential to read History but is helpful, especially for Oxford. A wide variety of careers is available with a History degree.

University Course or Career

Few of these combinations are mandatory, but those highlighted are.

Notes

Accountancy

Maths, Business Studies or Economics with one other, but any combination is permitted.

Accountancy degree course provides exemption from “foundation” accountancy exams, but is not necessary to enter the profession.

Administration, the Civil Service etc

Almost any combination but subjects include Latin, Greek, English, History, Economics, Geography, Government and Politics and a Foreign Language, or two languages for EU work and some diplomatic work; but Sciences for Scientific Branch careers.

Good class of degree needed to enter Diplomatic Service, which has a very competitive entry.

Agriculture, Agricultural Research, Land Surveyor

Biology, Chemistry and/or Physics, Geography.

Architecture

Art usually recommended, though not always vital, but drawing experience and skills necessary. Maths very useful, English or Modern Languages and Physics all valuable. Also Design, History and Business Studies.

Must have GCSE Maths. Compilation of a portfolio is essential for entrance to most Architecture courses.

Media and Communication Studies

English, a modern language.

Successful entry into the very competitive job market of journalism and broadcasting cannot be guaranteed with this qualification. Work experience in this area absolutely essential.

Banking, Finance, Insurance

Business Studies or Economics, Maths and a language is very useful.

Finance and Banking degree courses available, but not mandatory for careers in this area.

Medicine, Veterinary Science, Dentistry

Biochemistry, Zoology, Botany, Marine Biology, Micro-Biology, Biology

Chemistry, Maths and Biology desirable. Some courses emphasise Biology, some Chemistry. The most competitive demand strong mathematics.

Some of the most competitive courses welcome Mathematics at A Level.

Chemistry and Biology. Some medical schools like a nonscience subject at A Level. A good level of Maths is also important.

The minimum standard entry for Medicine depends on the university but is usually AAA* points or more; the same for Dentistry. For Veterinary Science work experience is essential. Interview most important!

Business Studies

GCSE Maths is essential and A Level Maths would be an advantage. Languages strongly recommended.

More and more universities are offering combined courses in Business Studies and Languages; in some cases the language at A Level is a condition of entry.

Modern Languages (degree) including Oriental Language

French, German, Spanish (any two) and English, History, Geography, Business, Art. Latin or Greek also provides strong support for a Modern Languages application to university, especially at Oxbridge.

Chartered Surveyor

Geography, Maths, Economics, Geography, Maths, History of Art or Design.

One Modern Language may be enough for a language degree and a single language is often combined with other subjects at university. Business Studies with a language is one of the fastest growing courses at universities. But two languages at A Level widens the choice.

Music

Chemistry

Chemistry, Maths, Physics or Biology.

Oxbridge applicants should have Maths at A Level.

Music A Level and /or practical music skills (grade 8 on more than one instruments).

Practical music through Academies; Musicology at universities. Many combined courses, e.g. Music with German available.

Classics, Archaeology, Oriental Languages

Latin, Greek, English. Latin, Greek, History or Classical Civilisation, Latin, Greek, a Modern Language.

It is possible to read Classics at Cambridge and Oxford having studied only one classical language (Latin) A Level.

Natural Sciences

Maths and two of Chemistry, Physics and Biology.

Computer Science, Statistics, Numerical Analysis

Maths or Further Maths A Level is expected for Oxbridge entry. (Physics and Chemistry routes). For the Biological route A Level is recommended.

Maths, Physics and a third science.

Good A Level grades required for entry to popular degree course.

Pharmacy

Chemistry, another Science.

Pharmacists must have a degree in Pharmacy from an approved School of Pharmacy.

Design

Design Technology, plus Maths, Physics (engineering side) or Maths, Business Studies (commercial management side). Art if committed to a career in “artistic” Design.

Drawing skills should be developed in the Sixth Form, especially if considering graphic/fashion/interior design.

Physics, Applied Physics, Mathematical Physics

Physics and Maths plus one other (Economics, Business Studies, Chemistry, Biology, Further Maths). Any combination of social science, humanities or science subjects. Politics at A Level not a requirement.

Economics

Maths, Economics or Business Studies, indeed any combination of Art or science subjects. It is not always essential to have A Level Economics (many universities now offer introductory courses). Most demand A Level Math others require evidence of a strong GCSE performance.

Politics and International Relations

For Oxbridge and other leading Economics courses, Maths at A Level is needed and for PPE at Oxford Math A Level can be advantageous.

Psychology

No particular subjects required though the inclusion of a science Approved Psychology degree recognised by BPS necessary, subject or Maths is advantageous if wanting a career in Psychology. Competitive entry. Work experience very useful.

Physics and Maths essential for the vast majority of universities. Design is useful, so is Economics, Electronics, Business Studies and a language.

Maths or Further Maths A Level is expected for Oxbridge entry.

Teaching

Engineering

English, a science, Maths i.e. a National Curriculum subject if interested in primary school teaching).

English, Drama, English and Drama

English and a Foreign or Classical Language or Classical Civilisation or History.

Single Honours English is always more competitive for entry to university than English combined with one or more other subjects. Drama or English and Drama can be very competitive.

Theology and Religious Studies

Preferably an Arts course including English or History or both. Latin and /or Greek are useful subjects too.

Fine Art

Art, English or any combination.

Completion of Foundation Course needed as precondition of entry to degree course.

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A ROUGH GUIDE TO SENSIBLE SUBJECT COMBINATIONS

A ROUGH GUIDE TO SENSIBLE SUBJECT COMBINATIONS

A ROUGH GUIDE TO SENSIBLE SUBJECT COMBINATIONS

Geography (art emphasis)

Universities often offer joint honours courses including Politics (such as Politics & Law or Politics & Sociology) that sometimes have a slightly lower grade requirement.

For Secondary teaching a degree the same as or at least containing the teaching subject is necessary, i.e. choose a degree at least some of the content of which is directly relevant to secondary education.

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A LEVEL Course Outline

A Level Assessment

Art and Design is a particularly rewarding subject for the motivated pupil; it extends across a very broad range of disciplines, both theoretical and practical, which are aimed at developing a visually and culturally aware person. Pupils will develop their ability to express their own ideas in a creative manner and make informed connections with a range of contextual references.

Like your GCSE work, the Edexcel A Level Art and Design course is assessed against four Assessment Objectives and marked against the national standard.

Although many seek a career in the creative and design industries, in areas as diverse as architecture, advertising, medical illustration, textiles or fashion design, an interest in Art as a vocation is not the only reason for the subject’s value. Many pupils study Art as a complementary subject to their main academic focus, and gain a great deal of enjoyment and benefit from Art’s pupil-centred approach. Art is a multi-faceted and involving subject in which pupils are encouraged to develop their own approaches within close staff guidance.

Throughout the two-year course, your teachers will internally assess all your studies and a representative from the examination board moderates these marks. Everything you create in the two-year course is included as 60% of the final grade. At the end of the course, you will have time respond to an exam theme before undertaking a 15 hour terminal test. This work is worth 40% of your final grade. To fulfil the assessment requirements you must provide evidence of three major elements: supporting studies, practical work, and a personal study. Your supporting studies and practical work will comprise a portfolio of development work with outcomes based upon themes and ideas developed from personal starting points. The personal study will be evidenced through critical written communication showing critical and contextual research and understanding in a minimum 2000 words of continuous prose, which may contain integrated images.

A LEVEL Entry Requirements Along with standard PGS entry requirements, you should be able to show a passion for this subject before embarking upon the A Level course. You will be expected to have attained a Grade 6 or above in Art and Design at GCSE. Pupils who did not take GCSE or who attained Grade 5 may still be able to embark upon an Art course but this will be dependent upon the standards found within a portfolio of the PGS summer vacation research and a short interview with the Head of Department.

Skills Required and Developed Pupils wishing to pursue A Level Art must already have an established technical ability in any of the art fields. These will be promoted and encouraged during the course, allowing you to prove a sense of growing confidence and independence of ideas. You will be challenged to think critically about your work and about the contexts you use as your influences, discussing and proving how you have resolved the complex issues that connect to your art practice. Both courses require pupils to be self-directed, independent learners and therefore suit individuals who are mature, organised and self-motivated. The emphasis on reflective writing alongside art practice means you will be expected to make links between your contextual research about art and offer critical analysis of your own

investigations through the use of specialist terms and vocabulary.

Beyond the Classroom During the course, you might work closely with any, or all of our resident artists to help support your visual enquiries. It is anticipated that you will attend as many exhibitions at local, national and international level as you are able, as you can bring this research into your studies.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject

SAMMIE MATERNA

21 ART & DESIGN/VISUAL ARTS

ART & DESIGN/VISUAL ARTS

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Course: A Level Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Art, Business Studies, Philosophy & Ethics

Destination: Reading to read Art & Psychology

Increasingly, businesses are employing Arts graduates so that alreadyestablished ideas and working practices are challenged. Because this subject promotes critical and creative thinking, it is important to remember that Art is not just for those students who wish to pursue a career in the Visual Arts or who want to be artists. However, if you take a look at any film, theatre production, TV show or advertisement, play, web page or video game; chances are the people involved in these took Art as a subject. Clothes, books, furniture, architecture, ceramics, packages; these are things that you handle everyday and were created by people with an Art background. It is normal for Art students to attend a Foundation course as a pre-university requirement. Increasingly however, students with strong portfolios of work have been able to gain access to undergraduate studies directly from Sixth Form.

MORE INFO

Mr R Peebles, Head of Art and Design T: 023 9268 1316 E: j.peebles@pgs.org.uk Exam board:  www.edexcel.org.uk

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BIOLOGY

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BIOLOGY

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HARDY BLAKE Course: A LEVEL

A LEVEL Course Outline The A Level Biology course carries pupils far beyond GCSE and introduces them to the exciting world of modern Biology. With many new concepts and ideas, this A Level can lead into many different university courses and careers. There are four topic areas covered in each year. In the first year pupils study: 1. Biological molecules: All life on Earth shares a common chemistry including: proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and water. 2. Cells: All living organisms are made from cells. This unit looks at different types of cells and the membranes that surround them. 3. Organisms exchange substances with their environment: How cells maintain an internal environment different to the external one.

A LEVEL Skills Required and Developed at A Level A Level Biology builds on the ideas and skills that you have developed at GCSE and leads to an understanding of the way in which nature works. It also helps you to understand how scientists work, improves your practical skills and helps you to develop your careers ideas.

A Level External Assessment You will carry out 12 core practicals which are recorded and assessed in class and knowledge of these is then formally tested in the final exams. Assessment is based on three written exams in the final term. Paper 1, 35% covers topics 1-4 Paper 2, 35%, covers topics 5-8 and Paper 3: 30%, is a synoptic paper and covers topics 1-8

In the second year pupils study: 5. Energy transfers in and between organisms: Life depends on the continuous transfer of energy and this unit looks at the processes of photosynthesis and respiration.

7. Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems. 8. The control of gene expression. How are genes controlled and switched on and off.

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Entry Requirements

Biology, Chemistry, Politics

The minimum entry requirement is a GCSE Grade 7 or above in single subject Biology or Grade 7-7 or above in Combined Science or an equivalent grade.

Destination: Exeter to read Neuroscience

Beyond the Classroom There are several opportunities for stretch and challenge and recent examples have included the Experimental Biology Club and Biology Olympiad sessions. There are a variety of trips every year including Biology lectures in London. There is an annual Biology field trip to sand dune and saltmarsh.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject Biology A Level can act as a gateway to many university course and careers. Examples include: anatomy, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, parasitology, agriculture, virology and natural sciences.

4. Genetic Information: DNA, genes, gene expression and how differences between species are controlled by the DNA they contain.

6. Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments: How organisms detect and respond to the environment.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form:

MORE INFO

Miss R Poole, Head of Biology T: 023 9236 4225 E: r.poole@pgs.org.uk Exam board: www.aqa.org.uk

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BUSINESS

25 BUSINESS

BUSINESS

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JOSEPH CROSBY Course: A Level

A LEVEL

Year 1 Topics What is business?

Course Outline

Managers, leadership and decision making

In most walks of life citizens will be part of, or interact with, organisations. This is a subject that explores how such organisations function: how they choose objectives; how they deal with a changing environment; how they find the right people and get the best out of them; how they use marketing and guide operations to ensure that objectives are achieved; how they use financial accounts to review performance and help with decision-making; ultimately, how they succeed. We explore the interrelated nature of Business using business models, theories and techniques to support analysis of contemporary business issues and situations. The syllabus is broad, highly relevant to the world outside the classroom, and focuses strongly on problem-solving, and on the development of analytical and evaluative skills. Part of the course involves the use of numerical and statistical work, though the emphasis is not upon number-crunching as such, but rather upon the interpretation and application of the numbers.

A Level External Assessment

Decision making to improve marketing performance Decision making to improve operational performance

At least a Grade 7 or equivalent in GCSE Business or, alternatively, the equivalent of a Grade 7 or above in GCSE Mathematics. Pupils wishing to take both Business and Economics should speak to Mrs Worley.

Decision making to improve financial performance

Skills Required and Developed at A Level

Decision making to improve human resource performance

Business encourages pupils to acquire a range of important and transferable skills. Pupils are expected to manipulate data in a variety of forms and to interpret their results. They present arguments and make judgments and justify recommendations on the basis of the available evidence. They are challenged to recognise the nature of problems, solve problems and make decisions using appropriate business tools and methods. The subject suits the sort of pupil who has strong viewpoints and likes to argue their case. It is not a subject of “right answers” but of the right way of thinking. Business is a course from which all lively, independently-minded pupils will benefit.

Year 2 Topics What is business? Managers, leadership and decision making Decision making to improve marketing performance Decision making to improve operational performance Decision making to improve financial performance Decision making to improve human resource performance Analysing the strategic position of a business

Unit 1 – Business 1

120 minutes 33.3% of A Level

Choosing strategic direction

Unit 2 – Business 2

120 minutes 33.3% of A Level

Strategic methods: how to pursue strategies

Unit 3 – Business 3

120 minutes 33.3% of A Level

Managing strategic change

All exams will be synoptic in nature

Entry Requirements

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Business, French, Maths

Destination: Bath to read International Management & French

Beyond the Classroom Pupils can enhance their learning by reading the business and economics news pages. Additionally they will have the opportunity to enter a range of national essay competitions and will enjoy lectures from visiting speakers. The department offers exciting trips that bring the course to life. Pupils can gain first-hand experience on how financial industries and real businesses operate; recent trips include Vietnam, New York, China and Budapest. Planned trips for the future include Cuba and the Silicon Valley.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject

MORE INFO

Business will prove particularly advantageous to those planning to enter Law, Accountancy, industry or commerce.

Mrs M Worley, Head of Economics and Business T: 023 9236 4287 E: m.worley@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: www.aqa.org.uk

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CHEMISTRY

27 CHEMISTRY

CHEMISTRY

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LAUREN JOHNSTONE Course: A Level

A LEVEL

A LEVEL

Course Outline

Entry Requirements

Biology, Chemistry, History

Chemistry is concerned with the science of matter, particularly its structure, properties and reactions. It is of central importance to science as chemical interactions are essential to all of the sciences. The first year explores the fundamental principles that form the basis of Chemistry and includes atomic theory, bonding, energetics, kinetics and organic chemistry. This is followed by units that develop the concepts of physical chemistry and introduce a quantitative treatment of kinetics and equilibria. The study of organic chemistry is extended to include compounds containing the carbonyl group, aromatic compounds, amines, amino acids and polymers. There is also a section on spectroscopic techniques and how they are used to determine the molecular formulae and structures of organic compounds. The emphasis here is on problem solving rather than on spectroscopic theory. Finally, inorganic chemistry is extended and developed.

You will normally have taken either GCSE Chemistry or GCSE Combined Science and have attained at least a Grade 7 or 7-7, respectively. In addition, a Grade 7 or equivalent at Mathematics is a good indication that you have a suitable level of mathematical proficiency.

Destination:

A Level External Assessment During the course you will do lots of experimental work. Twelve practicals will be formally recorded and assessed. At the end you will be awarded either a “Pass” or a “Fail” for this aspect of the course. Although, this will be recorded on your A Level certificate it does not contribute to your final score or grade. However, a pass in nearly always stipulated as part of any university offer requiring Chemistry A Level. The written examinations take the form of three papers each of two hours in duration. The first two papers contribute 70% to the A Level and test the Chemistry content. They contain a mixture of short and longer answer questions. The required practicals are tested in all three papers. However, in Paper 3, which is synoptic, you are likely to see less familiar examples of experiment work. This paper focuses on a deeper understanding of the work you have done so here you may be asked to develop and refine practical design and procedures as well as to analyse, interpret and evaluate scientific information, ideas and evidence.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form:

Birmingham to read Medicine

Skills Required and Developed In this course you will develop your skills in experimental practical work. You will also become more fluent in the use of Mathematics. Your ICT skills will also play an important part in doing research, processing data as well as presenting your work. Lastly, we will also help you to develop a number of transferable skills including how to put over your point of view fluently and how to work in a team.

Beyond the Classroom You are encouraged to become members of Chemnet, which is part of the Royal Society of Chemistry. We also arrange two visits. The first is to the “Chemistry in Action“ conference at UCL in London. The second is to the Chemistry department at Southampton University where we have the opportunity to use the undergraduate laboratories. You also have the chance to undertake project work either to explore your own interests or as part of your extended essay. At the end of Year 12 you are encouraged to take the Cambridge Chemistry Challenge and, midway through Year 13, the Chemistry Olympiad.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject Chemistry is a compulsory requirement for dentistry, medicine, veterinary science and all the chemical-based degrees such as chemistry and pharmacy. It is also a preferred course for many biological-based degrees and for Natural Science.

MORE INFO

Dr M Howson, Head of Science & Chemistry T: 023 9236 4230 E: m.howson@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: www.aqa.org.uk

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CORIN NELSON-SMITH

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CLASSICAL CIVILISATION

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Course: A Level

A LEVEL

Entry Requirements

Course Outline In Year 12 you will begin the compulsory component of The World of the Hero, studying key books from Homer’s Odyssey. You will also be studying an additional topic on the Greek Theatre. In Year 13 you will conclude The World of the Hero component by studying Virgil’s Aeneid, as well as gaining an overview of heroic epic. In addition you will study a topic related to social or political history in the Classical period.

A Level External Assessment Component 1

The World of the Hero (40%)

one 2 1/2 hour paper

Component 2

The Greek Theatre (30%)

one 1 3/4 hour paper

Component 3

Social / Political History (30%)

one 1 3/4 hour paper

Each examination paper consists of context questions (short answers based on a text or picture) and an essay.

There are no special entry requirements for this subject but an interest in literature and history as well as the ability to write essays would be advantageous.

Skills Required and Developed at A Level Classical subjects tend to be taught in relatively small sets. You will be expected to contribute actively to discussions and prepare thoroughly for lessons. Essays will play an increasingly important role in your work and there will be much seminar work on literary appreciation and essay technique. We try to generate a positive and cheerful atmosphere but we also have high expectations. Those studying Classical subjects are generally very committed to their studies.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Classical Civilisation, Latin, Music

Destination: Royal Holloway, University of London to read Music

Beyond the Classroom The Classics department organises study days, visits to Classical Plays and Museums, as well as a biennial trip to Greece or Italy. Pupils are encouraged to help out at Fishbourne Roman Palace to gain some practical experience.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject Pupils may wish to continue the study of Classical Civilisation at university or it may provide a useful context for the study of other subjects such as English, History or the History of Art. Because of the multidisciplined nature of the study of Classical Civilisation, particularly at university, the analytical and practical skills it develops are highly regarded by employers.

MORE INFO

Mr M Murray, Head of Classics T: 023 9268 1326 E: m.murray@pgs.org.uk Exam board: ocr.org.uk

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

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RYAN ZHOU Course: A Level

A LEVEL Course Outline The A Level Computer Science course aims to develop your computational thinking skills in solving a variety of coding problems and scenarios. Your ability to program in Python will be enhanced and developed far beyond the GCSE level, including writing code that reads from and writes to a database. While the A Level course focuses on the data structures and algorithms that are the foundations for most modern applications, there will also be time to explore other areas of programming that interest you. Different types of programming languages and their uses are explored. The course also covers many aspects of Computer Science theory at various levels of abstraction, from the understanding of computer components and systems, to a more detailed analysis of communication, security and the functionality of computer networks. There is a stronger mathematical focus, for example learning how binary is used to perform calculations and how we can store floating point numbers efficiently for these calculations.

Entry Requirements A Level External Assessment Paper 1 – T  heory Fundamentals

90 minutes 25% of A Level

Paper 2 – F  undamental Problem-solving and Programming Skills

120 minutes 25% of A Level

Paper 3 – A  dvanced Theory

90 minutes 25% of A Level

Paper 4 – Practical*

240 minutes 25% of A Level

*Candidates will submit complete program code and evidence of testing. Candidates will be required to use Python programming language. Candidates will answer all questions on a computer without internet or email facility.

You do not have to have studied Computer Science before taking A Level however it would be a significant advantage if you have done so. Mathematics GCSE at Grade 7 or above is required as well as an interest and experience in coding.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Computer Science, Economics, Maths and Further Maths

Destination: Warwick to read Economics

Skills Required and Developed at A Level • Computational thinking and problem solving • Programming • Computer architecture and hardware • Data representation and structures

Beyond the Classroom While studying A Level Computer Science pupils are encouraged to take part in the annual competitions for coding and computational thinking. Every year we enter pupils into Bebras Computational Thinking competition which acts as a qualifying round for entry to the TCS Oxford Computational Challenge. The department also enters the most able pupils into the annual British Informatics Olympiad, which is designed to find the very best computer programmers in this age group.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject The Russell Group Universities have identified Computer Science A Level as being a useful course to have taken for the following university courses: Geology/Earth Sciences, Material Science (including Biomedical Material Science), Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Medicine, Optometry (Opthalmic Optics), Orthoptics, Physics, Psychology, Sociology, Aeronautical Engineering, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Science, Economics, Electrical/Electronic Engineering, Engineering (General). Professions that require the subject include: Computer Hardware Engineer, Computer Network Architect, Computer Programmer / Software Engineer, Cyber Security Analyst, Data Analyst, Forensic Computer Analyst, Software/Games Developer and Web Developer.

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MORE INFO

Mr H Stayte, Head of Digital Learning T: 023 9268 1399 E: h.stayte@pgs.org.uk Exam board: www.cambridgeinternational.org

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DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY A Level Product Design is a linear qualification; students will undertake one terminal examination along with an assessed design and make coursework project consisting of a portfolio of work leading to the production of a final product. A Level Product Design helps students take a broad view of Design and Technology, developing a capacity to design and make products and appreciate the complex relations between design, materials, manufacture and marketing.

Product Design The contents of the course will be split into two main areas which relate directly to the final assessments. 1. Design and Technology in the 21st century (3h written paper) 50%

• Explore product design and its place in the market, for example how a design idea may be transformed into a marketable product. It seeks to examine the many factors influencing product design, market research techniques and their influence on producing innovative products. You will develop an appreciation of the effects of social, economic, cultural and ethical issues in addition to material and manufacturing technologies. 2. Applying specialist knowledge – Design and Make Project (coursework) 50% Students will be required to demonstrate the practical application of technical principles, designing and making principles and specialist knowledge through a substantial design and make project. During the course of the design and make project you: • Develop and sustain your creativity and innovative practice.

For this paper a wide range of product design skills and technical knowledge will be assessed along with relevant mathematic and scientific principles. Over the two years you will be learning to;

• Use Iterative designing principals to develop and improve prototypes.

• Develop your ability to design and enhance your basic design skills in order to solve problems. You will also develop an understanding of a range of external influences and demands which affect the work of product designers.

• Develop a critical understanding of the influences of the processes and products of design and technological activities from a contemporary and historical perspective.

• Acquire the knowledge and understanding needed to support design activities through an increased awareness of the designer’s social, moral, ethical and legal responsibilities. It also allows students to explore the environmental and consumer factors which impact on designers and which might affect the final nature of a product.

• Recognise and overcome challenges and constraints when working towards the production of high-quality products.

• Draw on a range of skills and knowledge from other subject areas. • Draw on and apply knowledge, understanding and skills of production processes to a range of design and technology activities. • Develop an understanding of contemporary design and technology practices.

• Develop a general appreciation of the wide range of materials and components available to designers and manufacturers, along with core technical principals. This general appreciation will be supported by a more detailed knowledge of a range of materials and processes used in industry. You will gain an in-depth understanding of various methods of production and be able to apply appropriate commercial practices in practical projects.

• Use digital technologies and information handling skills to enhance their design and technological capability.

• Gain the knowledge and understanding of the requirements a product must satisfy to be successful, along with the ability to critically assess existing products and visualising new products in a context of past, present and future possibilities.

Pupils who study A Level Product Design will be taking the Educas Product Design course. The Product Design assessment will be by one examination which will last for 3 hours and is worth 50% of the course. The other 50% is assessed through the design and make project. This project will last for approximately one year of the course.

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ALICE ACKLAM Course: A Level

A LEVEL Course Outline

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• Recognise the values inherent in design and technological activities, and develop critical evaluation skills in technical, aesthetic, ethical, economic, environmental, sustainable, social, cultural and entrepreneurial contexts.

A Level External Assessment

Entry Requirements A grade 7 or above in Design and Technology is required for further study at A Level. Your Maths skills will be tested in the final examination and so it is also desirable for pupils to have a grade 6 or above in Maths too.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Design Technology, French, Maths

Destination: Oxford Brookes to read Architecture

Skills Required and Developed To follow this course you should not only have good engineering, design and maths skills but also be able to think creatively about the world around you and see opportunity in failures of design. Designers can often be described as anthropologists, observing others using and working with the made world and finding new ways to improve objects and systems.

Beyond the Classroom The department holds trips to a variety of design studios, museums and local industry. The department has also included pupils in the Engineering in Education scheme which enables pupils to solve problems set by industry and gives pupils the chance to earn 40 UCAS points.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject All universities will accept Product Design as an A Level for entry for Degree courses. We see increasing numbers of pupils going on to study a wide range of engineering and design related courses, including Architecture, Engineering with Product Design, Industrial Design, Industrial Design and Manufacture, Product Design and Interior design to name a few.

MORE INFO

Miss M Flack, Head of Design and Technology T: 023 9236 4227 E: m.flack@pgs.org.uk Exam board: www.educas.co.uk

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A LEVEL

DRAMA

Entry Requirements It is not essential to have studied Drama at GCSE, or equivalent, to take this course, although it is desirable. A good standard of written English is important, as is a real interest in theatre and live performance. Pupils will be expected to have achieved at least a Grade 7 in GCSE English Language or Literature, or equivalent.

Beyond the Classroom There are many opportunities for Sixth Formers to participate in high-quality Drama activities, including the whole school musical, staged at a local theatre every November. At the end of the Summer Term the Sixth Form stage a production which is directed by a pupil and, in recent years, PGS has sent productions to the Edinburgh Fringe and the Avignon OFF Festival in Provence during the summer holidays. House Drama is a successful annual event, and we also offer Arts Award for those pupils looking to explore their passion for theatre via a range of independent and collaborative projects.

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SACHA HEMINGWAY Course: A Level Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Drama, English, Maths and Further Maths

Destination: Gap Year and applying to Cambridge to read English

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject

A LEVEL Course Outline Drama A Level is an academic course which includes assessment of practical performance or technical skills. During the course pupils study the work of key directors and playwrights and learn about a range of important performance styles. Written work is a crucial aspect of the course and pupils write about their ideas for performing roles, how they would direct a scene from a play, and their design ideas. Theatre trips are an essential part of the course and at least two or three are arranged to theatres both locally and to London.

Skills Required and Developed at A Level Good acting skills, or alternatively good technical skills, are important to success at A Level Drama. Much time is spent on practical work in Drama lessons so the willingness to work constructively with others and to share ideas is essential. Essay writing technique about set playscripts and live performance is also a necessity, and time will be given to the progression of this. Consistent note-taking is a key skill that pupils need to develop during the course.

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A Level External Assessment The subject content is divided into three components: 1. Drama and Theatre (an open book examination worth 40% of the A Level) 2. Creating Original Drama (coursework and practical performance worth 30% of the A Level. Design and Directing are also options here.)

Drama is a practical subject and a small number of universities, including Cambridge, prefer candidates to offer only one practical subject at A Level. Drama is not a “soft subject” and it is no barrier to Oxbridge or Russell Group universities. Drama is not a requirement for any university course but is of value in the study of literature, history and law. Drama pupils from PGS have gone on to read Law at Oxford, History at Durham, and Drama at a wide range of universities and drama schools including Birmingham and Bristol universities, Central School of Drama and LAMDA.

3. Making Theatre coursework and practical performance or design of three scripted extracts, worth 30% of the A Level.

MORE INFO

Mr J Robinson, Director of Drama T: 023 9268 1358 E: j.robinson@pgs.org.uk Exam board: www.aqa.org.uk

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ECONOMICS

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AMANDA REES-FROMETA Course: A Level

A LEVEL Course Outline The most commonly held misconception surrounding the study of Economics is that it is all about ‘money’. In fact, it is not; the study of money is actually a relatively minor issue. Economics is about how a society decides to divide up its scarce resources and therefore determines who gets what and why. All concepts and theories are illustrated with real world data and case studies, and pupils enjoy being able to apply their knowledge and understanding to issues which arise daily in the news. Some typical questions give a sample of what is in store. Why do governments impose taxes on alcohol but not children’s clothes? Why have oil prices increased, and fallen, so rapidly recently? Should we pay to use a motorway? What has been the effect of granting the Bank of England independence? What are the long-term prospects for the European Union, and to what extent will the UK be involved? What rules must a firm apply to maximise its profits? Has the introduction of the National Minimum Wage resulted in more unemployment? How can small airlines such as Ryanair and Easyjet afford to charge passengers so little? Why is there a gender pay gap?

Skills Required and Developed at A Level Economics encourages pupils to acquire a range of important and transferable skills. Pupils are expected to manipulate data in a variety of forms and to interpret their results. They will present arguments and make judgments and justify recommendations on the basis of the available evidence. They are challenged to recognise the nature of problems, solve problems and make decisions using appropriate economic theories and concepts.

A Level External Assessment Unit 1 – Markets and Market Failure

120 minutes 33.3% of A Level

Unit 2 – The National and International Economy

120 minutes 33.3% of A Level

Unit 3 – Economic Principles and Issues

120 minutes 33.3% of A Level

SIXTH FORM PROSPECTUS | COURSE GUIDE

Year 1 Topics

Year 2 Topics

Economic methodology and the economic problem

Economic methodology and the economic problem

Price determination in a competitive market

Individual economic decision making

Production, costs and revenue

Price determination in a competitive market

Competitive and concentrated markets

Production, costs and revenue

The market mechanism, market failure and government intervention in markets

Perfect competition, imperfectly competitive markets and monopoly

The measurement of macroeconomic performance

The labour market

How the macroeconomy works: the circular flow of income, AD/AS analysis, and related concepts

The distribution of income and wealth: poverty and inequality

Economic performance

The market mechanism, market failure and government intervention in markets

Macroeconomic policy

The measurement of macroeconomic performance

A LEVEL Entry Requirements Pupils are expected to have achieved a Grade 7 at GCSE Mathematics or History. Pupils wishing to take Economics without also taking Mathematics and pupils wishing to take Economics and Business together should consult Mrs Worley.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Economics, History, Mathematics

Destination: Exeter to read History

Beyond the Classroom Pupils can enhance their learning by reading the business and economics news pages. Pupils can gain first-hand experience on how the financial industry and real businesses operate through the co-curricular activities on offer in the department such as Stock Market Club and the Fiscal Policy Challenge. Additionally, they will have the opportunity to enter a range of national essay competitions and will enjoy lectures from visiting speakers.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject Economics will prove particularly advantageous to those planning to enter Politics, Law, Accountancy, industry or commerce.

How the macroeconomy work: the circular flow of income, AD/AS analysis, and related concepts Economic performance Financial markets and monetary policy Fiscal policy and supplyside policies The international economy

MORE INFO

Mrs M Worley, Head of Economics and Business T: 023 9236 4287  E: m.worley@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: www.aqa.org.uk

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ELECTRONICS

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GEORGE DOWNING Course: A Level

A LEVEL Course Outline Electronics is responsible for what is perhaps the most rapid period of change in human history. The world is becoming increasingly dependent upon Electronics and it underpins the Information Technology, Engineering and Computing industries. In the first year of the A Level course pupils will study Basic Principles of Electronics, logic gates, simple digital circuits, Boolean Algebra, Circuits used to store digital information, Op Amps as comparators and amplifiers, DC Electrical circuits, Energy and Power, Mains power and supply systems. In the second year of the course pupils will look in more detail at the application of Electronics such as Communication systems using both digital and analogue information, transmission of information, including optical communication and wireless transmissions and Audio systems for amplifying Audio signals and the microcontroller as a programmable device. Two coursework projects will be undertaken by pupils, the first will be to design and create a microcontroller system, programmed in assembler language, to solve an identified problem eg controlling an incubator to keep it within a suitable temperature range. The second gives the pupils the opportunity to focus on something that has interested them throughout the course. The emphasis is on the content, not the quality of the finished product. Recent projects have included a guitar tuner, a light display linked to the frequency and amplitude of music played on an MP3 player and a digital signal, sent in code, down an optical fibre.

A Level External Assessment Pupils will take WJEC educas Electronics with two written exams at the end of the course. Each exam will be a mix of short answer and extended answer questions with some set in a practical context and be worth 40% of the A Level. The coursework module will be worth 20%.

Entry Requirements You do not need to know any Electronics before you start but you do need at least the equivalent of a Grade 7 in GCSE Mathematics and at least the equivalent of a Grade 7 in either GCSE Physics or Grade 7-7 in Combined Science.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Electronics, Mathematics, Physics

Destination: Nottingham to read Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Skills Required and Developed at A Level This is an academic course with the emphasis on understanding. Students start by revising Year 10 and 11 Electricity and progress through learning about basic electronics and how these principles are applied to more everyday devices such as a guitar amplifier, digital radio and computers. The students will complete the course by producing a project based on topics they have found the most interesting over the previous eighteen months. This subject is best studied in combination with Mathematics, Physics and Computing.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject Most university Engineering faculties require three A Level passes including Mathematics and Physics. A Level Electronics is a very suitable second or third A Level for degrees in Engineering, Physics, Computer Science and Music Technology, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence. “In my first year studying Engineering I had to take a module on Electronics (like all the engineering students whether mechanical, civil or electrical). Other students found this difficult… but I found it easy as I had been taught a lot of it at school. Even in the second year I still found my notes useful as… I had a good overview and sound understanding of the circuits covered.” Employers report a shortage of well-qualified graduates in Engineering and Electronics.

MORE INFO

Mrs M Fake, Head of Physics T: 023 9236 4292 E: m.fake@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: www.eduqas.co.uk

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ENGLISH

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SOPHIE MITCHELL Course: A Level

A LEVEL

A LEVEL

Course Outline

Skills Required and Developed at A Level

Entry Requirements

A Level English Literature (exam board: Eduqas) is a linear qualification, and, as well as completing a lengthy coursework essay (20%), pupils will take three terminal examinations (80%) in Year 13.

A Level English Literature enables you to explore a wide range and variety of books, experience all three major genres: poetry, prose and drama, and to investigate historical, biographical and cultural contexts.

During Year 12, pupils will be taught the Poetry unit. One teacher will lead the class through the work of a poet writing before 1900, such as John Donne, John Milton or Geoffrey Chaucer. With the other teacher, the class will study two modern poets. Authors include T.S. Eliot, Thomas Hardy, Owen Sheers, Seamus Heaney, Gillian Clarke, Carol Ann Duffy and Philip Larkin.

You will immerse yourself in history, philosophy, politics, music, drama and art, as well as literature. You will develop your creative and critical writing. The teaching style of A Level is very different from I/GCSE. Classes are smaller (averaging 10 pupils), are taught for seven periods per week and shared between two teachers. There will be many opportunities to express your views in class and to explore your own interests during independent study; the best students take advantage of these opportunities.

The equivalent of a Grade 7 or higher in English at GCSE for A Level. The equivalent of at least a Grade 6 in English GCSE is required for Standard Level study.

Throughout the course, pupils will work towards the Unseen paper, exploring a range of poems and prose extracts, as well as literary and critical theory. Pupils are encouraged to read widely, so that they are equipped to tackle texts they have not studied from a range of historical periods. In Year 13, we will deliver the Drama unit. One teacher will focus on a Shakespeare play, such as Hamlet or King Lear. The other teacher will focus upon a pair of plays, one written before 1900, and one after. One example of such a pairing would be to compare A Streetcar Named Desire with The Duchess of Malfi. The coursework essay demands a comparison of two prose texts. Pupils are encouraged to select their own titles, which must be prose but not necessarily fiction – for example, letters, memoirs and travel writing would be admissible. One of the texts should have been published after 2000. Again, pupils will be encouraged to read widely throughout the course to help them formulate ideas on text pairings and titles.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Biology, Chemistry, English, Maths

Destination: Manchester to read Medicine

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject Many of our pupils go on to read English at university, either as a single honours subject or in combination with Modern Languages, Communication and Media, History and Classical Studies. The subject opens up a wide array of possible careers: television, law, radio, theatre, journalism, creative arts, teaching, marketing, public relations and any form of business career. The English Department equips pupils for success in their university applications, helping to develop confident, articulate, intellectually independent and interesting individuals.

MORE INFO

Miss L Burden, Head of English, T: 023 9268 1374 E: l.burden@pgs.org.uk Exam board: www.eduqas.co.uk

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WWW.PGS.ORG.UK


FRENCH

SASKIA EGELAND-JENSEN Course: A Level

A LEVEL Course Outline

A Level External Assessment

The Pearson Edexcel A Level French course has four themes, which reflect the global reach of French language and culture. The themes are: the evolution of French society; the political and artistic culture of the French-speaking world; immigration and multicultural France; Occupation and Resistance in France in World War Two. In addition, pupils study one work of literature and one film, both in the target language. In preparation for the oral exam, pupils complete an independent research project on a topic of their choice, relating to the French-speaking world.

There are three papers: Paper 1 – Listening, reading and translation into English (40%); Paper 2 – Written response to works and translation into French (30%); Paper 3 – Speaking (30%).

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form:

A LEVEL Entry Requirements It is preferable to gain at least a Grade 7 at GCSE or equivalent but a pupil who has not done so may take A Level with an additional programme of support in the early weeks of the course.

Skills Required and Developed During the two-year course you will further develop your language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. You will be able to read increasingly longer texts and will be encouraged to read for pleasure in French. By the end of the course you will be able to hold a conversation at normal pace, be able to write analytical essays in French and have sound translation skills. You can expect to be taught in small groups and your relationship with your teachers - two teachers will normally be allocated to each group - should be quite different from your previous experience. You will have much more opportunity to contribute in lessons and you will play a more active role in discussion. We aim to use French in class as much as practicable and you have a weekly session in the language laboratory for independent listening. In addition to the 11 periods a fortnight with your teachers, you will have a weekly period with our French Assistant, in pairs or individually.

Beyond the classroom Study trips are regularly organised and in recent years there have been

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trips to Paris, Montpellier and Nice. There are also several enrichment opportunities throughout the two years, including an Able Linguists Day at the University of Southampton and a French film club. Year 12 pupils can choose to help in our own Junior School French lessons as well as supporting the teaching of French in local primary schools. Finally, many A Level pupils choose to write a PGS Extend research essay in French. Recent essay topics have been as varied as secularism in France, French choral music, post-war economic growth in France and multiculturalism in French sport.

French, Maths, Philosophy & Ethics

Destination: Royal Holloway, University of London to read Modern Languages

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject French, as with any modern language, is an essential skill to have in a globalised world. The language is spoken by over 300 million people and is an official language in 30 countries across five continents. French is a popular subject choice amongst leavers and provides excellent preparation for a wide number of careers including, but not exclusively, in translation, journalism, law and the diplomatic service. Each year pupils make successful applications to study French at a range of top universities, including Oxford and Cambridge. In recent years, pupils have gone to study French at university in combination with a number of other subjects, including Italian, Spanish, Law, Philosophy and History.

MORE INFO

Mr P Gamble, Head of French T: 023 9268 1307 E: p.gamble@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: Pearson / Edexcel

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GEOGRAPHY

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JOHN TAYLOR Course: A Level

A LEVEL

A LEVEL

Course Outline “Where we come from, what we do, what we eat, how we move about and how we shape our future are all directly the province of the geographer. More than ever we need the geographer’s skills and foresight to help us learn about the planet – how we use it and how we abuse it.” – Michael Palin The OCR A Level in Geography has been designed to give pupils the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to become engaged global citizens. Through the study of dynamic and contemporary content, pupils can understand and interact with issues which affect peoples and places at a range of scales from local to global – and all that is inbetween. Geography is a multi-disciplinary subject, ranging from the physics of weather, to the biology of the spread of disease, the environmental aspects of population growth and climate change, the art of field sketching and the chemistry of soil. Geography graduates remain some of the most employable. The skills, knowledge and understanding gained during the study of geography are held in high regard by businesses.

Skills Required and Developed at A Level Pupils will consider their own roles, values and attitudes, as well as those of others, including decision-makers, in relation to themes and issues being studied. Pupils are required to develop a sense of place, ranging from local to international scales, and be able to evaluate and critically analyse spatial and temporal change. Skills such as mapping, graphicacy and quantitative techniques are developed.

Components The Physical Systems component considers the interrelationships between the land, oceans and atmosphere to help pupils understand the processes, characteristics and impact on these landscapes and cycles which shape them over time and create a number of issues when attempting to manage them. The Human Interactions component investigates the actions, interactions and spatial patterns of people and places. Through examples and case studies pupils will explore a variety of contrasting places, unpicking the flows and connections that have made them what they are and the way in which global systems and governance have local consequences. Geographical Debates takes some of the most dynamic issues the planet faces and encourages

SIXTH FORM PROSPECTUS | COURSE GUIDE

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Geography, Geology, Maths

Entry Requirements

Destination:

It is preferable to have gained at least a Grade 7, or equivalent, in GCSE Geography but a pupil who has not done so may take A Level by catching up with the base level of knowledge over the summer before Year 12. It is really important that you want to do Geography for its own sake.

Bath to read Civil Engineering

Beyond the Classroom pupils to engage with, reflect on and think critically about them. The concepts of inequality, mitigation and adaptation, sustainability, risk resilience and threshold underpin this component. Investigative Geography is an independent investigation consisting of a written report, recommended to be between 3000 and 4000 words in length. It can be related to any area of the specification.

Fieldwork There will be a 3-4 day residential trip to the Lake District in March and two other day trips, visiting sites in Portsmouth and London. The aim of these trips is to provide pupils with a range of fieldwork opportunities in a variety of settings, carrying out a number of data collection activities in order to inform them about possibilities for their own independent investigations. We also run optional overseas trips every other year to Iceland and other possible destinations like Tenerife in March 2019.

Geology A Level Geology is a practical science A Level covering foundation geological knowledge, the development of practical skills and the more in-depth study of global tectonics, geohazards and petrology and economic geology amongst other modules. At least a Grade 7, or equivalent, in Science and Mathematics GCSE is strongly advised if you are considering studying this particular earth science and the course, if it can be offered, can accompany the A level Geography field trip to the Lake District where they would follow their own bespoke Geology programme of activities. There are no specific courses or professions which require Geology A Level and many of those who study Geography at A Level also go on to very successfully read Geology, Marine or Earth Science at university.

All A Level pupils are required to carry out fieldwork throughout the Geography course, either for examination or as a piece of coursework. The majority of the fieldwork takes place during Year 12. There are five fieldwork days during the course of the year when Geography pupils travel to a variety of locations to collect data for further investigation on their return to school. Year 12 fieldwork trips include a residential to the Lake District where pupils carry out river, glacial and settlement studies, and a further day trip to the London Olympic site, Queen Elizabeth Park, to study microclimates and the rebranding of a settlement site. They will use these experiences to assist in developing their own coursework study. In addition to these essential days the department offers optional overseas trips to Iceland and other destinations, the most recent of which saw 12 pupils visiting Tenerife in March 2019.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject There are no courses or professions which specifically require Geography at A Level, although many recognise the subjects development of transferable skills.

MORE INFO

Miss S Stewart, Head of Geography & Geology T: 023 9236 4206 E: s.stewart@pgs.org.uk Exam board: www.ocr.org.uk

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GERMAN

JOHANNES LUCKMANN

A LEVEL

A LEVEL

Course Outline

Entry Requirements

Pupils study four broad topics that comprise: the evolution of German society; the political and artistic culture of the German-speaking world; immigration and multicultural Germany; the reunification of Germany. In addition, pupils will undertake a study of at least one work of literature and one film, both in the target language. Ahead of the oral exam, pupils complete an independent research project on a topic of their choice, relating to the Germanspeaking world.

Ideally you should gain at least a Grade 7, or equivalent, at GCSE, and you should be keen to communicate in the foreign language and want to learn more about the culture of Germany and German speaking countries. Pupils who gain a Grade 6 are also able to study German successfully at SL, although a programme of additional support may be provided in the early weeks of the course.

Skills Required and Developed at A Level During the two year course you will further develop your language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. You will be able to read increasingly longer texts and will be encouraged to read for pleasure in German. By the end of the course you will be able to hold a conversation at normal pace, be able write analytical essays in German and have sound translation skills. You can expect to be taught in small groups and your relationship with your teachers – two teachers will normally be allocated to each group – should be quite different from your previous experience. You will have much more opportunity to contribute in lessons and you will play a more active role in discussion. We aim to use German in class as much as practicable and you have a session in the language laboratory for independent listening. In addition to the 11 periods a fortnight with your teachers, you will have a weekly period with our German Assistant, in pairs or individually.

A Level External Assessment Pupils take the Pearson Edexcel A Level Examination. This consists of 3 papers: Paper 1 – Listening, reading and translation (40%); Paper 2 – Written response to works and translation (30%); Paper 3 – Speaking (30%).

MORE INFO

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Course: A Level Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Biology, Chemistry, German, Maths

Destination: Exeter to read Medicine

Beyond the Classroom Sixth Form pupils are regularly invited to take part in study trips to Berlin or Munich. There are opportunities to publish work in Portsmouth Point and compete in national essay competitions. Pupils are also encouraged to apply for courses and bursaries to travel to Germany through the UK-German Connection and Geothe Institut. Regular cinema and theatre visits are also organised throughout the two years.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject The A Level course prepares you for degree level study of German, whether as a single honours subject, a dual honours subject with another language or a totally unrelated subject, or a subsidiary subject. Studying German develops analytical skills in both English and German and builds a unique insight in to the cultures of more than 100 million people who speak German as their mother tongue across Central Europe. The range of university courses offering a language as one element is extremely broad, encompassing law, business, management, finance, computing and engineering, to name but a few. Combining a language with another subject is often an excellent way to gain a place at a top university.

Mr J H Murphy, Head of German T: 023 9268 1319 E: j.murphy@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: https://qualifications.pearson.com/ en/qualifications/edexcel-a-levels/german2016.html

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GREEK

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REBECCA STONE Course: A Level

A LEVEL

A LEVEL

Course Outline

Entry Requirements

Greek, Latin, Music

Those studying A Level Greek build their knowledge of vocabulary and linguistic structures through reading and studying prose and verse texts in Classical Greek. There is no prescribed vocabulary as such at this level, although an AS prescribed vocabulary will provide an essential framework. Two Prose and two Verse Set Texts will be studied although the two texts may be different parts of a work by the same author. It is anticipated that the prescribed texts will be Euripedes ‘Medea’ and Herodotus ‘Histories’. As part of the preparation for the unseen paper, selections from other authors, particularly Xenophon and Euripides will also be studied.

Pupils should normally have already gained a GCSE, or equivalent, at Grade 7 or above in the language they wish to study.

Destination:

Skills Required and Developed at a level Good translation skills and the ability to show appreciation of the literary features of a particular author are essential. Those studying the subject will be expected to write coherent and well-planned essays on the literary topics. A good memory for vocabulary and grammar and the ability to learn material efficiently are also vital. Teaching groups tend to be small, allowing pupils to develop their own ideas through discussion and mutual evaluation.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form:

Durham to read Classics

Beyond the Classroom The Classics department organises study days, visits to Classical Plays and museums, as well as a biennial trip to Greece or Italy. Pupils are encouraged to take part in the Classical Association, Latin Reading Competition and help out at Fishbourne Roman Palace.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject The study of Latin and Greek are very highly regarded by universities as disciplines requiring high analytical skills. Well-trained classicists are in great demand at the top universities and those continuing to study at University are well-placed to find good jobs in a whole range of disciplines.

A Level External Assessment At the end of Year 13 candidates take four papers: an unseen translation paper (33%); a comprehension paper (17%); a prose literature paper (25%); a verse literature paper (25%).

Beyond the Classroom The Classics Department organises study-day visits to Classical Plays, museums and lectures relevant to the syllabus. There are also biennial trips to Greece or Italy. Pupils are encouraged to take part in the Classical Association Reading Competition. Those considering studying Classical subjects at university are strongly encouraged to do an extended essay on a Classical theme.

MORE INFO

Mr M Murray, Head of Classics T: 023 9236 0036 E: m.murray@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: www.ocr.org.uk

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A LEVEL

HISTORY

Entry Requirements

A LEVEL Course Outline

Skills Required and Developed at A Level

The PGS History course is based on modules offered by OCR. All examinations are taken at the end of Year 13. The A Level History course comprises a range of topics, some but not all sets will study one unit of Medieval or Early Modern History. All sets will study at least two topics of Late Modern History, including the coursework on the Vietnam War. At least 20% of each course covers an aspect of British History. Given the current subject interests and specialisms of the members of the History Department, the topics that could feature on the course include:

You need to be interested in the past; to see value in studying it, whether in terms of how it explains the present, or for its own sake. You must also be prepared to read a lot, and to learn from and digest what you have read. History is a literary subject, so there is also a need for you to be able to write literate and logical essays which analyse and explain. It also helps if you enjoy arguing and debating. Historians should have naturally inquiring minds, so a sense of curiosity is helpful.

Early Modern: the Crusades and the Early Modern European witchcraze. Late Modern: aspects of Britain 1900 - 1951, The changing nature of warfare, Russian history from 1855 - 1964, the Vietnam War and the US War of Independence. The exact selection of topics could vary slightly between sets based on the specialisms and interests of your teachers, you will have two teachers throughout the A Level course.

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A Level External Assessment There will be a coursework element to the course involving an independently researched project, based around a taught topic, normally the Vietnam War, of around 3000-4000 words which will account for 20% of the final mark.

At least a Grade 7 in GCSE/IGCSE History, or equivalent, is preferable, or a similar grade in GCSE English if History has not been studied. Last year the A*-B pass rate was over 90%, with around 60% of results at A* or A. Over 30 pupils normally study History to A Level each year and many in recent years have read History at Oxford and Cambridge.

FELIX JOHNSON

Beyond the Classroom

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form:

The Senior History Society has talks on a wide range of topics by outside guest speakers. The annual dinner is always well subscribed and enjoyable. We organise an annual overseas trip and have recently visited: Berlin, Vietnam, the USA, Budapest, Latvia, Lithuania and Belarus. In Easter 2020, we ran a very successful trip to Russia, and an 8 day trip is planned for the US in October 2020.

Course: A Level

Economics, History, Maths and Further Maths, Politics

Destination: Oxford to read Philosophy, Politics and Economics

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject The skills required for History are much prized by both universities and future employers. Careers for which History is a good grounding include the legal professions, journalism and the Civil Service. Business and industry also value the skills of an historian; the comedians Sacha Baron-Cohen and Al Murray are History graduates, so too are a fair number of our politicians! Some may even want to teach.

This will be excellent preparation for university style research and will be marked internally by teachers and moderated by the exam board. We follow the OCR syllabus which comprises four modules. The course is also examined by three external examinations with the European/US paper accounting for 15% of the final work. The British paper accounts for 25% and the thematic paper making up the remaining 40%. At least a Grade 7 in GCSE/ IGCSE History, or equivalent, is preferable, or a similar grade in GCSE English if History has not been studied. Last year the A*-B pass rate was over 90%, with around 60% of results at A* or A. Over 30 pupils normally study History to A Level each year and many in recent years have read History at Oxford and Cambridge.

MORE INFO

Mr S Lemieux, Head of History & Politics T: 023 9268 1322 E: s.lemieux@pgs.org.uk Exam board: www.ocr.org.uk

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LATIN

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CHARLIE CONWAY Course: A Level

A LEVEL

A LEVEL

Course Outline

Entry Requirements

French, Latin, Maths

Most of the essential grammar and syntax should have been covered at GCSE but this will be consolidated and new constructions and grammatical forms added. The AS vocabulary list will provide the foundation for A2 unseen work, although additional vocabulary, particularly of poetic words, will need to be learnt. Two Prose and two Verse Set Texts will be studied although the two texts maybe different parts of a work by the same author. It is anticipated that the prescribed texts will be Tacitus ‘Histories’ and Virgil ‘Aeneid XI’. As part of the preparation for the unseen paper, selections from other authors, particularly Livy and Ovid will also be studied.

Pupils should normally have already gained a GCSE, or equivalent, at Grade 7 or above in the language they wish to study.

Destination:

Skills Required and Developed at A Level Good translation skills and the ability to show appreciation of the literary features of a particular author are essential. A good memory for vocabulary and grammar and the ability to learn material efficiently are also vital. Teaching groups tend to be small, allowing pupils to develop their own ideas through discussion and mutual evaluation.

A Level External Assessment

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form:

Bristol to read Classics

Beyond the Classroom The Classics Department organises study-day visits to Classical Plays, museums and lectures relevant to the syllabus. There are also biennial trips to Greece or Italy. Pupils are encouraged to take part in the Classical Association Reading Competition. Those considering studying Classical subjects at university are strongly encouraged to do an extended essay on a Classical theme.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject The study of Latin and Greek are very highly regarded by universities as disciplines requiring high analytical skills. Well-trained classicists are in great demand at the top universities and those continuing to study at University are well-placed to find good jobs in a whole range of disciplines.

At the end of Year 13 candidates take four papers: an unseen translation paper (33%); a comprehension paper (17%); a prose literature paper (25%); a verse literature paper (25%).

MORE INFO

Mr M Murray, Head of Classics T: 023 9236 0036 E: m.murray@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: www.ocr.org.uk

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MATHEMATICS & FURTHER MATHEMATICS

MATT BRYAN Course: A Level

A LEVEL Course Outline A Level Mathematics and Further Mathematics are both linear qualifications; pupils undertake terminal examinations in Year 13 which will cover all topics studied throughout the whole two year course:

Mathematics The content of the course can be listed in different areas but These should not be regarded as separate teaching modules and links will be made across the content areas encouraging mathematical thinking, analysis, understanding and problemsolving. Elements will include: Pure Mathematics – mathematical argument, problem solving, proof, algebra, graphs, sequences, logarithms,trigonometry, calculus, functions, numerical methods, vectors and differential equations. Statistics – working with a large, pre-release data set and samples of the data set to make inferences about the underlying population, probability calculations, using the Binomial Distribution, Normal Distribution and statistical hypothesis testing. It is expected that much of the statistical study will be enhanced by appropriate use of technology (Casio CG50 Graphical Calculator).

A LEVEL Core Pure – A Level Mathematics Pure topics are taught in greater depth whilst also introducing new topics such as matrices, complex numbers, polar coordinates and hyperbolic functions. Statistics – the A Level Statistics ideas are further developed exploring the theories underlying the statistical content and expanding ideas to include working with discrete and continuous random variables, bivariate data, regression and correlation, hypothesis tests and tests for association. Mechanics – extending the knowledge of kinematics and forces using the extended pure mathematical understanding to explore physical systems and dimensional analysis including areas such as work, energy, power, impulse, momentum and centres of mass. Assessment will be in the form of four written papers. Each 90 minutes long with a weighting of 25% of overall marks.

A Level External Assessment All examinations will be at the end of Year 13. A graphical calculator Casio CG50 [or fx 991 EX (Classwiz)] calculator is a requirement for mathematics at A Level and at IB.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form:

Entry Requirements

Chemistry, Maths and Further Maths, Physics

Further Maths AS and A Level Grade 8, or equivalent, in IGCSE/GCSE Mathematics

Destination:

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Cambridge to read Engineering

Single Maths A Level Grade 7, or equivalent, in IGCSE/GCSE Mathematics

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject Mathematics A Level is a likely requisite for most Mathematics, Economics, Engineering and Science courses. Further Mathematics is a great asset to applicants for all of these subjects, and certain universities make consistently lower offers to Further Mathematicians.

Mechanics – kinematics, working with forces and Newton’s laws, motion under gravity, friction, projectiles and simple moments. Many of these topics will be introduced in Year 12 and then studied in greater depth in Year 13 alongside the more thought-provoking, higher level ideas. Assessment will be in the form of three written papers covering the Pure Mathematics, Pure Mathematics with Statistics and Pure Mathematics with Mechanics. Each paper is 2 hours long with a weighting of 1/3 of overall marks at A Level.

Further Mathematics The major elements of this course will focus on the Pure Core, Mechanics and Statistics in greater depth expanding and developing pupils, knowledge, mathematical thinking and argument skills beyond that expected in the Mathematics core. It will also introduce new elements of mathematical understanding and exploration throughout the two years. In Further Mathematics elements will include:

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MORE INFO

Miss R Blewett, Head of Mathematics T: 023 9268 1309 E: r.blewett@pgs.org.uk Exam board: www.ocr.org.uk

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MUSIC A LEVEL Course Outline The course is demanding and rigorous for the more advanced musician and offers pupils a broad and varied curriculum, allowing musical development in the three core areas: performing, composing and listening/appreciation. We teach the Edexcel composition and history / analysis. We teach the Eduqas specification as it provides a broad foundation in the Western Classical Tradition, Music in the early twentieth century as well as more contemporary styles such as Rock and Pop, Musical Theatre or Jazz.

A Level External Assessment In addition to the appraising examination (40%), all pupils will be assessed in both performing and composing (60%). However the specification allows learners to specialise in either performance (to a visiting examiner) or composition (a portfolio). Option A allows learners to specialise in Performance: 35% performing (10-12 recital) and 25% composing (a portfolio of two compositions). Option B allows learners to specialise in Composition: 35% composing (a portfolio of three compostions) and 25% performing (6-8 minute recital). Sixth Form Instrumental Music Scholarships and Choral Scholarships, linked with Portsmouth Cathedral, are offered each year. Further details from the Admissions Office.

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A LEVEL Entry Requirements Pupils normally have a Grade 7 or above in GCSE Music (or equivalent) and will need to be performing at Grade 7 Standard or above for their recital at A Level. If this is not the case, an audition or performing exam certificates are required to ascertain suitability for the course. You must have a keen interest in listening to and reading about a wide range of styles and genres. We do expect all our A Level musicians to be part of the Chamber Choir and another instrumental ensemble as appropriate.

JONATHAN YANG

Beyond the Classroom

Southampton to read Acoustical Engineering

Course: A Level Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Chemistry, Maths, Music, Physics

Destination:

Pupils are expected to take an active part in the musical life of the school. With a team of 30 teachers, there are many rehearsals that take place each week at lunchtime, before and after school. A large number of Sixth Form pupils participate in these activities, including the Chamber Choir, Symphony Orchestra, Concert Band, Big Band and Sinfonia. Pupils perform regularly in concerts and recitals in Portsmouth and further afield, and in the annual school musical at the Kings Theatre. Many also enter national and local music competitions. Music tours are taken regularly, with recent tours including trips to Spain, Venice and Prague. The London Mozart Players are the school’s Associate Musicians and perform annually alongside pupils in the Remembrance Concert. There is a strong tradition of commissioning new works and, during an average year, pupils can expect to perform one or more newly commissioned works and have the opportunity to develop their own compositional skills alongside some of the world’s greatest composers. These activities in school are complemented by a thriving series of concert trips and regular workshops led by some of the country’s finest professional musicians and ensembles.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject

MORE INFO

Miss S Heath, Head of Academic Music E: s.heath@pgs.org.uk T: 023 9236 4257 Mr G Hemmings, Director of Music E: g.hemmings@pgs.org.uk T: 023 9236 4226 Exam boards: www.edexcel.com

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Many of our pupils have gone on to study Music at universities such as Cambridge, Oxford, King’s College London, Manchester, Cardiff and Leeds. Others have found Music A Level a useful partner to both Science and Arts subjects and have gone on to study a breadth of degree subjects including Law, Engineering, Biochemistry and Medicine. Additionally pupils have successfully auditioned for Choral and Organ Scholarships with the support of the Music Department.

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PHILOSOPHY & ETHICS

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BEN TURNER Course: A Level

A LEVEL Course Outline The study of Christianity. A comprehensive study of the Christian faith, such as the authority of the Bible, who Jesus was as an historical figure, the nature of the Trinity, the challenges of Christian migration to the UK, feminist theology, challenges to Christianity from science, atheism and other religious faiths. Philosophy of Religion. Pupils begin with the great thinkers who tried to express their beliefs in God in philosophical and logical ways. You also work out how an argument works, how it can be wrong and shown to be wrong. Thinkers such as Richard Dawkins, Peter Atkins and David Hume are used to criticise these philosophical arguments for the existence of God which include Descartes’ Ontological Argument which attempts to prove that God exists through the use of logic only. Other arguments from the standpoint of experience are the First Cause Argument and Religious Experience Argument. Then we study the philosophy of language and examine whether religious language in particular can be verified or falsified; religious experiences and whether, if they can be proven, could point to the existence of a supernatural being; the existence of miracles and the examination of whether they may point to God’s arbitrary nature; and finally whether religious belief is the product of the human mind (Freud) and whether religion can be positive (Jung) or an illusion (Freud).

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Ethics. Ethical theories such as Natural Law, Religious Ethics and Kantianism (absolutist theories) and Utilitarianism and Situation Ethics (relativist theories) are applied to moral issues such as Sexuality (extra-marital issues and theories of gender and sexual orientation), Environmentalism (the link between business and the environment, Buddhist views towards environmental issues, and a Utilitarian view towards the needs of the environment and the needs of humanity) and Business (the work of multi-national corporations, the tension between product value and profit.

A Level External Assessment EDUQAS Religious Studies, AS and A Level on Christianity, Philosophy and Ethics.

A LEVEL Entry Requirements A GCSE in PRS is not required but can be helpful. Pupils will be expected to have performed well in GCSE English Language or Literature achieving at least a Grade 7 or equivalent in either.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: English, History, Philosophy & Ethics

Destination: Durham to read Law

Skills Required and Developed Argumentation, analysis and evaluation are essential and these are developed in class discussion and written work.

Beyond the Classroom The Senior Philosophy Society meets once every half term.

MORE INFO

Dr R J I Richmond, Head of PRS T: 023 9236 4240 E: r.richmond@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: www.eduqas.org.uk

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION

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TOM WALLIS Course: A Level

A LEVEL

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form:

Course Outline

A Level External Assessment

The course is academically demanding with an educationally diverse curriculum. Pupils who have been successful in this course compete or coach regularly in a sport, often to a high standard. The A-level specification in Physical Education should equip pupils with both a depth and breadth of knowledge, understanding and skills relating to scientific and practical aspects of Physical Education.

Pupils will be assessed at the end of two years through two papers and Non-Exam Assessment;

This will require pupils to: • Develop theoretical knowledge and understanding of the factors that underpin physical activity and sport and use this knowledge to improve performance.

Paper 1: Factors affecting participation in physical activity and sport and Paper 2: Factors affecting optimal performance in physical activity and sport. Both are assessed through: • Written exam: 2 hours • 105 marks • 35 % of A-level Non-Exam Assessment: Practical performance, analysis and evaluation in one sport is assessed through:

• Understand how physiological and psychological states affect performance.

• Internal assessment, external moderation

• Understand the key socio-cultural factors that influence people’s involvement in physical activity and sport.

• 30 % of A-level

• Understand the role of technology in physical activity and sport. • Refine their ability to perform effectively in physical activity and sport by developing skills and techniques and selecting and using tactics, strategies and/or compositional ideas. • Develop their ability to analyse and evaluate to improve performance. • Understand the contribution which physical activity makes to health and fitness. • Improve as effective and independent learners and as critical and reflective thinkers with curious and enquiring minds.

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• 90 marks Role requirement for Performance Assessment: Pupils are required to be assessed in one activity from a set list in the role of player/performer or coach. Pupils will be assessed on their ability to execute the core and advanced skills/techniques outlined in the specific activity criteria, in a fully competitive situation. All performers should demonstrate their full range of skills and will be assessed on their execution of recognised techniques, compliance with the official rules and regulations, accuracy, consistency and outcome. The application of skills and techniques will be assessed through the implementation of appropriate strategies and tactics to optimise their performance to create effective

Biology, Physical Education, Psychology

attacking and defensive options/ equivalent situations depending on the requirements of individual activities through the practical performance.

Destination: Cardiff to read Physiotherapy

Performance Analysis Assessment (Analysis and Evaluation) Pupils are required to analyse and evaluate, using appropriate theoretical content included in the specification, a performance as either player/performer or coach, in one activity from the specification. Pupils can analyse and evaluate their own performance or the performance of another, as long as it is in an activity that is from the specification. This can be written or presented.

Entry Requirements

Beyond the Classroom

At least a Grade 7 in a Science, preferably Biology. Commitment to competitive training and performance in one of the sports listed in the specification. For example playing in a school 1st Team or club 1st Team level or above. Candidates must be regularly competing throughout the Sixth Form.

Pupils are expected to take an active part in the sporting life of the school. There are many clubs available before and after school and during lunchtimes, particularly the athletic development programme, for pupils to attend and improve their performance in their chosen sport.

Skills Required and Developed at A Level Practical skills of performing or coaching are essential, this element of the course is independent and requires pupils to develop their own performance over the first five terms and submit video evidence for their practical assessment. The performance analysis assessment involves a comprehensive written analysis and evaluation which requires good understanding of technical and tactical performance in a chosen sport. A range of academic skills are important, especially in the synoptic element of the course which requires pupils to draw together different areas of knowledge, skills and understanding from across the full course of study in order to demonstrate how they interrelate.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject Many of our pupils have gone on to study Sport Science at universities such as Loughborough, Bath, Exeter. Others have found A Level Physical Education a useful partner to the sciences, particularly Biology and Psychology. Professions that this A Level would support: Physiotherapist, Exercise Physiologist, Sport Psychologist, Nutritionist, Sports Marketing, Performance Analyst, Data Scientist, Designer for Sports Technology, Strength and Conditioning Coach, Personal Training, PE Teacher/Lecturer

MORE INFO

Mrs J Tweddle, Head of PE T: 023 9268 1388 E: j.tweddle@pgs.org.uk Exam board: www.aqa.org.uk

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PHYSICS A LEVEL Course Outline Physics is about trying to answer big questions, in fact the biggest questions in the universe. Physicists need curiosity, resourcefulness and common sense. If you look through our syllabus, many topics will seem familiar: radioactivity and nuclear physics, mechanics and materials, thermal physics, electricity, electromagnetic and gravitational fields, waves. In addition there is a lot of new physics to keep you interested such as Particle Physics, Quantum Physics and Medical Imaging.

A Level External Assessment We follow the OCR Physics A specification. There will be three papers taken at the end of Year 13. Two are of equal weighting and assess everything learned during the full two year course. The third paper is slightly shorter and aims to be more synoptic. Practical skills are embedded in the course, through a programme of 12 required practical groups and a practical skills endorsement alongside the A Level grade. In addition 15% of exam marks will be awarded for practical skills questions.

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A LEVEL Entry Requirements You should have at least a Grade 7 or the equivalent at GCSE or IGCSE, in both Physics and Maths or Grade 7 or the equivalent in both Physics components of Combined Science. If you are planning on using your Physics beyond school you will also need to have studied Maths at A Level. Most science and engineering courses at University will require Maths and ideally Further Maths as well. If you are not studying A Level Maths, because you are planning to go in to medicine for example, we would expect you to have at least a Grade 7 in Mathematics at GCSE or IGCSE.

VISHVESH MEHTA Course: A Level Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Maths, Further Maths, Physics

Destination: Warwick to read Physics

Skills Required and Developed As with any Sixth Form course you should be organised and efficient. The skills that you can expect to develop are: analytical, mathematical, practical, social and ethical, all of which are increasingly sought after and will make you an attractive proposition for both universities and employers. Physics trains you to understand and interpret scientific information, to process data and solve problems. It develops your practical skills and encourages imagination and also common sense. You learn to analyse, to build mental pictures, to propose theories and to be critical. This we call ‘scientific thinking’.

Beyond the Classroom There are cross-curricular links with Maths, Chemistry and Design. The department organises a number of lectures including the annual Brunel Science Lecture and the ICG Cosmology masterclass. We have run trips to RAL, local industries and even CERN. For those who wish to take their studies further there are usually longer projects on offer such as the Engineering Education Scheme.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject Many PGS pupils go on to read Engineering or Science at University. Physics is key for most such courses. All university courses from Architecture to Medicine regard an A Level in Physics as a secure qualification on which to base an offer.

MORE INFO

Mrs M Fake, Head of Physics T: 023 9236 4292 E: m.fake@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: www.ocr.co.uk

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POLITICS

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RORY GILLIES Course: A Level

A LEVEL Course Outline The AQA Politics course is followed which consists of three units all examined externally at the end of Year 13. The course begins with British politics covering areas such as the Prime Minister, Parliament, civil rights and pressure groups. Towards the end of Year 12 we then move on to American and comparative politics where there is a chance to learn how the American political system functions - indeed some might say aspects of it are deeply dysfunctional! Among the topics studied are the US Constitution, the presidency and Congress and the Supreme Court. There is also a strong comparative element too, comparing British and American political systems and how they are divided by a common system. The last third of the course is an excursion into political ideas with a focus on the ideologies of liberalism, socialism, conservatism and anarchism. The latter part links in nicely with some aspects of PRS, while the first two papers tie in especially well with History among other subjects.

External Assessment At A Level All three exams follow exactly the same format and structure. Each is worth one third of the total marks, last two hours, and covers respectively, government and politics of the UK, government and politics of the US and comparative politics and political ideas. There is no coursework involved.

MORE INFO

Mr S Lemieux, Head of History and Politics, T: 023 9268 1322 E: s.lemieux@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: www.aqa.org.uk

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A LEVEL

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: English, History, Politics

Entry Requirements

Destination:

You do not need to have studied Government and Politics previously and there are no prescribed entry requirements. The course involves some essay writing though and some comprehension of passages explaining ideas and arguments so a GCSE Grade 7 in English and/or History is highly preferred.

Durham to read History

Skills Required and Developed at A Level You should have a lively and enquiring mind, an interest in politics and current affairs, a desire to explore new ideas and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively, both verbally and on paper. If you have no interest in power, politics, current debates and consider Hello to be the epitome of your magazine or newspaper reading, look elsewhere! It is not a soft A Level option, but it is a lively and interesting one. It is also an increasingly popular one at PGS with normally around 15-20 pupils in each year group opting for the subject.

Beyond the Classroom In Year 12 we visit Parliament and the Supreme Court, as well as occasional conferences and debates. Politics students are automatically eligible for the annual History trips to places as diverse as Vietnam, Germany, the USA and Latvia/Lithuania. There is also an active Politics Society which meets twice termly, featuring talks by a range of academics and politicians, including local MPs. We also ran mock school elections for the EU Referendum in 2014 and the General Elections in 2017 and 2019. The latter was followed up by an election night sleepover in the Sixth Form Centre, sustained by pizza and a walk to the Guildhall to witness the live count and declaration of results for the two Portsmouth constituencies

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject Politics can be a useful choice for a wide range of careers including journalism, law, the Civil Service and business. You may even want to climb the greasy pole yourself! It combines well with a wide range of courses, most especially History, but also English, Economics and the creative/expressive subjects.

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PSYCHOLOGY A LEVEL Course Outline Psychologists seek to reveal underlying laws to explain behaviour and experience, and employ rigorous research methods to gather evidence to support their theories. First year A Level pupils will study Social Psychology including topics such as prejudice and obedience and Cognitive Psychology which primarily examines the processes of remembering and forgetting. Pupils will also study Biological Psychology which examines areas such as brain structure and neurochemical transmission, evolution and genetics to explore topics such as aggression, criminality and the effects of recreational drugs. The final first year topic is the Learning Approach which covers three explanations of how people learn and change their behaviour dependent upon experiences within the environment. In this final topic we use these explanations to comment upon clinical conditions such as anorexia nervosa and phobias and the impact of social media and violent computer games. The second year allows

us the chance to focus on two applications of psychology: clinical psychology where we examine how mental disorders are classified, diagnosed and treated focusing on schizophrenia and OCD and criminal psychology including biological and social causes of criminality, understanding and treating offenders, eyewitnesses testimony and jury decision making.

A LEVEL Entry Requirements At least a Grade 6 in GCSE Maths and a 7 in at least one of the following subjects GCSE English and/or one of the Sciences (Biology, Physics, Chemistry or Dual or Single Award).

GEORGINA LEWIS Course: A Level Subjects Studied at Sixth Form:

Skills Required and Developed

Biology, Chemistry, Maths

Destination:

Paper 1: Foundations in Psychology: Social, Cognitive, Biological and Learning

Pupils likely to excel in Psychology have a relatively strong scientific background, competence in Maths but specifically, statistics, the ability to explain complex concepts clearly and concisely in writing, to think logically and critically to piece together an argument based on a range of often apparently conflicting research evidence, to listen and then question concepts and evidence carefully. They have open minds and an inherent respect for the human condition. You will develop skills in experimental design and quantitative data analysis, including descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. You will gain a toolkit of concepts and skills and an objective yet empathic outlook, which will enhance your self-knowledge, relationships, study skills and employability.

Paper 2: Applications: Clinical Psychology and Criminal Psychology.

Beyond the Classroom

A Level External Assessment A Level Psychology will be assessed through three exam papers each two hours in length. These papers are completed at the end of the two year course.

Paper 3: Psychological Skills: psychological research methods and statistics and the synoptic elements of the course including issues and debates which cut across all six topic areas assessed in papers 1 and 2.

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Kings College London to read Medicine

We run a variety of enrichment events throughout the year, including visiting speakers, notably our neuroscience and criminal psychology days.

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject The skills developed through A Level Psychology are widely appreciated and transferable across a broad range of degree subjects and professions. Psychologists work in numerous fields including research and teaching, clinical practice, education, sport and exercise, health, business and organisations, counselling and neuropsychology. Psychological knowledge and skills may be utilised in any profession involving people, for example the police, social work, health and care, probation services, sales, marketing. Where there are people, there is psychology!

MORE INFO

Mrs S Pye, Head of Psychology T: 023 9236 0036 E: s.pye@pgs.org.uk Exam board:  www.edexcel.org.uk

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SPANISH

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LOUISE SHANNON Course: A Level

A LEVEL

A LEVEL

Course Outline

Entry Requirements

Pupils study four broad topics that comprise: the evolution of Spanish society; the political and artistic culture of the Hispanic world; immigration and multicultural Spain; the transition to democracy following the dictatorship of Franco. In addition, all pupils will undertake a study of at least one work of literature and one film, both in the target language. Ahead of the oral exam, pupils complete an independent research project on a topic of their choice.

For A Level study a Grade 7 at GCSE or equivalent is required. You should be keen to communicate in Spanish and want to learn more about the culture of Spain and Spanish speaking countries. The course will equip you with the necessary skills to discuss, debate and give justified view points on a whole range of topic areas. They will, above all, allow you an in depth knowledge of the cultures of the Hispanic world.

Skills Required and Developed at A Level

Beyond the Classroom

During the two year course you will further develop your language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. You will be able to read increasingly longer texts and will be encouraged to read for pleasure in Spanish. By the end of the course you will be able to hold a conversation at normal pace, be able to write analytical essays in Spanish and have sound translation skills. You can expect to be taught in small groups and your relationship with your teachers - two teachers will normally be allocated to each group - should be quite different from your previous experience. You will have much more opportunity to contribute in lessons and you will play a more active role in discussion. We aim to use Spanish in class as much as practicable and you have a weekly session in the language laboratory for independent listening. In addition to the 11 periods a fortnight with your teachers, you will have a weekly period with our Spanish Assistant, in pairs or individually.

Pupils of Spanish will have weekly class time with the native speaker assistant and will build confidence through use of the language for genuine communication. There is an opportunity to participate in a visit to Spain to immerse yourself in Spanish life.

Subjects Studied at Sixth Form: Biology, History, Psychology, Spanish

Destination: Aberdeen to read Psychology

University Courses and Professions that Require the Subject All top UK universities offer Spanish as a full or joint honours degree course. Spanish, as with any modern language, is an essential skill to have in the modern, globalised world. Spanish is spoken globally in 20 countries, on 5 continents by over 450 million native speakers!

A Level External Assessment Pupils take the Pearson Edexcel A Level Examination. This consists of three papers: Paper 1 – Listening, reading and translation (40%); Paper 2 – Written response to works and translation (30%); Paper 3 – Speaking (30%).

MORE INFO

Mr O Stone, Head of Spanish T: 023 9268 1307 E: o.stone@pgs.org.uk Exam Board: www.ocr.org.uk

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HOW TO APPLY To find out more, the next step is to come and visit us and see the Sixth Form. There are open events held throughout the year, or we can arrange bespoke tours if required. You can apply easily online, visit our website www.pgs.org.uk to complete the online application form. All applicants will be invited for an interview and to undertake a number of short aptitude tests. Offers then made will be conditional on GCSE performance.

Senior School and Sixth Form Admissions T: 023 9236 4269 E: admissions@pgs.org.uk

INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS

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DESIGN BY TGDH.CO.UK

The Portsmouth Grammar School has been successful in welcoming international pupils in to the Sixth Form over recent years. The School holds a Tier 4 Homestay Licence which enables us to accept a number of international pupils. If you are currently resident outside the UK but would be interested in applying to join us please contact Senior School and Sixth Form Admissions to discuss the application process and visa requirements.


The Portsmouth Grammar School Contact us to learn more.

T: 023 9236 0036 | www.pgs.org.uk

Profile for The Portsmouth Grammar School

Sixth Form Prospectus and Curriculum Information  

Sixth Form Prospectus and Curriculum Information