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WHAT’S INSIDE THE RED CARPET

2018

camp war eagle published by The

Melissa McCarthy, Debby Ryan visit The Plains for world premiere of their new movie

Auburn Plainsman page 54 EXTRAS

Get to know the University and city by winning AU Bingo page 44 SPORTS

How to survive game days in Jordan-Hare

page 36 LIFE

Auburn and its students use a lot of lingo. Don’t worry. We’ve got you covered page 16 CULTURE

AU traditions: From ‘War Eagle’ to Aubie, the stories behind Auburn’s traditions

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ColumbusCVB-43139 CampWE Program Ad 2018-1-FINAL.pdf

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle 4:43 PM

Summer 2018

5/10/18

THRILLS

ZIP

CHILLS

HIP

Just minutes away, one of the most authentic cities in the South has a long list of amazing things to do that will satisfy your need for adventure. So whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast, music lover, art buff or foodie―you can go all out in Columbus.

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GoAllOutColumbusGA.com | 800.999.1613


CAMP WAR EAGLE

CONTENTS CAMPUS

COMMUNITY 21 | WHERE TO EAT

6 | WHAT YOUR PARENTS HEAR AT CAMP Parents can learn, too. Here’s what they’re hearing at Camp War Eagle.

Auburn has great options for a quick meal before you head out of town. Check out these familyfriendly joints.

11 | DINING CHANGES TO COME

40 | BEST SPOTS FOR LIVE MUSIC

Auburn is welcoming new restaurants like Steak ‘n Shake, while shaking up dining all together.

Want to get down a little before you leave? These are the go-to spots.

EXTRAS

14 | MEET SGA EXEC Auburn’s student leaders are here to listen. Hear what they have to say before fall semester starts.

18 | FALL SPORTS RUNDOWN The Plainsman sports staff dished out everything you need to know about fall.

23 | CAMPUS CONSTRUCTION Auburn’s campus is transforming. Here’s what you need to stay safe and aware.

25 | MOVE-IN INFO Ready to take on the dorms? We’ve got the information you need for the big day.

48 | DECIPHERING AU ACRONYMS This University has its own jargon, and we’d hate for you to get lost in it all. Here’s a guide.

27 | THE AUBURN CREED

Dr. Steven Leath greets students at the student celebration for his installation, on the Student Center Greenspace in Auburn, Ala. on Wednesday, March 28, 2018. (File Photo)

President Leath welcomes first-year students home Page 10 | President Steven Leath “Auburn’s goal is to empower and inspire you to be the very best you can be.”

Melissa McCarthy brings Hollywood to Auburn Page 54 | Lily Jackson Auburn won a national contest that brought the premiere of “Life of the Party” to Auburn’s campus. Amid finals week, students took a break to meet a few celebrities.

Front page cover photo: Ingrid Schnader / Photographer

Written by Auburn’s first football coach in 1943, the Auburn Creed serves as guidepost to how live like an Auburn man or woman.

35 | BEST OF AU TWITTER Twitter is a great tool to stay in the know on campus. Here’s a list of important Auburn accounts to follow.

42 | ACADEMIC CALENDARS Deadlines. Drop dates. Holidays. Auburn’s academic calendar can be confusing. We broke it down for you.

44 | AUBURN BINGO Can you complete it? Find some friends and get cracking.

50 | FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 52 | SAFE SEX SCOOP


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Summer 2018

The best student-centered engineering experience in America!


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

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The Auburn Plainsman

Your student-run newspaper, its purpose By CHIP BROWNLEE and LILY JACKSON Editor-in-chief and Managing Editor editor@theplainsman.com

The Auburn Plainsman is more than just a newspaper. Of course, our goal is to report the news and report it well. But we strive to do more than that. We’re a learning lab for budding journalists. We’re an outlet for you to express your frustration or your praise. We hold campus and city leaders accountable. We work for you. Since 1893, The Plainsman has cultivated a rich history of achievement, racking up accolades while serving as a watchdog for the University. The awards are important, but what is more important to us is telling Auburn’s story. Just like every story, Auburn has its ups and downs, albeit the ups far outweigh the downs. Auburn University has been a place of both wonderful events and tragedy, spirit and disappointment. Last year was a ringer, but through it all, we were consistent in providing you with the information we knew students needed to see. We’ll do that again this year. We serve as a sturdy resource for information and analysis. Look to us when you are confused, curious or just

need feel-good feelings. Ask us questions, send us your story ideas or meet us face-to-face. We pledge our time to you. We are here to tell your stories, listen to your ideas and give you an opportunity to share your passions on a platform that reaches thousands of students and community members almost every day. The Plainsman prints weekly and updates its website daily, bringing you all of the news and information you need, and we do it without costing you a dime. We don’t accept money sourced in your student fees, nor do we take any tuition dollars. For those of you who might be curious who is behind the print and online publication: We are students of all majors, identities and viewpoints. We dread exams and Mondays, and we, too, are trying to balance school, work and our social lives. Your trust and readership keep us afloat and drive us to work harder every day. We want to hear from you. We want to know when you are displeased or grateful. Your feedback helps ensure we are moving in a positive direction and working to ensure every reader finds a place in our pages. We pledge to value diversity, ask hard questions, listen

to the whispers and live by ethical boundaries. Alabama is a changing state and we are following every twist and turn. With a transformative University president looking to switch Auburn’s gears, we plan to seek out what our readers need to know. Our upper management is seasoned and ready to try new things while continuing our steadfast commitment to covering our campus and community with bravery and gumption. Our editorial staff will continue to fuel commentary on the issues facing this University and the city surrounding it, and although controversial at times, we hope to be a sounding box for those who feel passionate about their beliefs. Online and in print, we will continue to respect differing views while sticking to our ethics and principles above all else. The Auburn Plainsman has a history of being ahead of the fold. The editors and staffers who have come before us have left us with a continuing directive — a high bar we always strive to reach even though we sometimes fall short. Whether it’s your first time on campus or your last year here, you will see us constantly working toward a bigger, better and more respected presence on campus and in the community.

Camp War Eagle to host 10 sessions from May to July

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

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VIA FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE OFFICE

The 2018 Camp War Eagle parent counselors pose for a picture outside of Cater Hall after callouts.

cwe

what are your parents hearing at camp? By STEPHEN LANZI Staff Writer

For better or for worse, your parents are essentially hearing all of the same information in their sessions that you’re hearing. However, unlike the student experience at Camp War Eagle, the parent orientation is completely optional to parents and guests. So, they can come and go as they please. Of course, a large part of college is being responsible for yourself, but Auburn wants to ensure that any parents or guests accompanying you at CWE have the chance to be a resource to you as well. The information is basically the

same, but the matter in which the information is presented is slightly different than how the students receive it. While student groups learn about most of the information in their small groups and in “Tiger Talks,” parents learn about a lot of the information in informational sessions in various offices across campus. One slight difference in the parent experience and the camper experience at CWE is that the parents hear from Parent and Family Programs on the second day, which focuses on the setting boundaries and expectations for the student and parent. Here, they will talk about the dif-

ferent ways to deal with the sometimes difficult conversations between parent and student, such as deciding whether to give the parents access to see the student’s grades or medical records. The parents also get assigned to smaller groups where they get a parent counselor just like the camper counselor. The parent counselors host two meetings in the morning and two in the afternoon on the first day to provide any clarification or specification on the information learned in the different offices. “They’ll kind of give a take on what Auburn students should expect using these resources, how to use them and what their personal stories were, which I think the par-

ents will find reassuring,” said Mason Sherman, one of the head parent counselors. “A lot of the parents like to hear what it’s like to be an Auburn student, not necessarily how to use a Tiger Card or what to use a Tiger Card for.” The information that the parents will hear will also be focused a little more on the student to institution relationship. So, they might hear more detailed information from Student Financial Services or the Office of the Registrar. “I think it’s an experience meant to welcome them into the Auburn Family,” Sherman said. “Parents and students are both at the pep rally together, so that’s an exciting time.”


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

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cwe

meet cwe counselor chad barfield

By HANNAH LESTER Staff Writer

As the first in his family to attend Auburn University, Chad Barfield is now going to welcome new freshman to Auburn’s campus as a Camp War Eagle counselor. Barfield, junior in public relations, said he connects well with people and has skills in communication, which has prepared him to be a counselor. “I love to talk to people, and I feel I can connect ... with most everyone. I like to just be a connector and be a people person,” Barfield said. Barfield believes this summer will present new challenges as a counselor. “What I’m excited for at Auburn, though,

is to have a personal touch and an intentional and invested relationship with the freshmen,” Barfield said. “Not something that just lasts a summer and ends, but something that, if needed, the freshman can look upon me or lean on me for throughout the year for answers and questions or maybe just advice on how to do life.” Moving in as a freshman from Marietta, Georgia, Barfield took a while to grow accustomed to life at Auburn. Before Barfield found true Auburn friends, some time had passed. “I would just challenge the incoming freshman to, from the start, from the camp war eagle sessions, just be yourself,” Barfield said. “Really be invested, give Auburn a chance for what it is.”

Barfield recalled Callouts when he was accepted as a counselor for Camp War Eagle and the excitement that filled the air. “We went, walked up the stairs, and I knew a few people, but what was cool was they told us to run behind Foy, and we all sang the fight song back there,” Barfield said. “It was something that I’ll always remember.” Barfield is involved with more on Auburn’s campus than just Camp War Eagle. He represents the Auburn as one of the Plainsmen. In addition, Barfield has been a counselor at the Oaks Retreat, which is a Christian program for incoming freshman to get to know one another before they attend Auburn. “I don’t think War Eagle is just a battle cry,” Barfield said. “I think it’s an invitation and a welcoming.”

VIA FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE OFFICE

Chad Barfield is a CWE counselor.

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN WRITING, PHOTOGRAPHY OR VIDEOGRAPHY?

APPLY NOW.

GET YOUR WORK VIEWED BY THOUSANDS OF READERS. APPLY FOR FALL 2018.

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Fresh Money: Managing your finances as a new college student By OLIVIA WILKES Staff Writer

Tracy Richard, finance professor at Auburn, is amazed when students tell her they have no idea how much money is in their bank account. College students, especially freshmen, have a lot of responsibilities they’ve never dealt with before, and budgeting is one they often push to the back burner. But Richard said personal finances should be at top of mind for students. “These years will establish your foundation for responsibly managing your financial situation beyond college,” Richard said. “As you enter college and then independence beyond college, your financial decisions will affect your lifestyle and the quality of your retirement.” Richard, who has been teaching finance at Auburn for eight years and worked in investment banking with Wells Fargo and

SunTrust Robinson Humphrey before that, said students need to be actively aware and intentional when it comes to tracking their finances. “Every student needs to learn the basics of financial literacy, including how credit cards work and how to create a spending plan,” Richard said. Students should always have some emergency cash set aside in the event of an unexpected expense, she said. Debt is a reality for many — if not most — students who must obtain loans to pay for college, but careless credit card use can greatly increase that burden. Richard warns students against spending beyond their means. “Once you get caught in the debt cycle, it’s tough to break out,” she said. “Remember, compound interest is an amazing tool for building an impressive nest-egg.” But that knife cuts both ways – compound interest on a credit card can grow quicker than a student is prepared to handle and can bring on financial distress quickly, Richard said. “If at all possible, use the credit card to build credit, not as a tool to charge beyond your means,” she said. “Try to pay off your balance in full every month.” Richard encourages students to focus not

only on the present but the future, as well. She tells her students all the time to open a Roth IRA. As long as students are earning money at a job, they are eligible to open an account, and invested money grows tax-free until retirement. “The greatest asset these students have is time, and it’s the one that you never get back,” Richard said. “With time on your side, you don’t have to rely on predicting the next ‘home run’ stock like Apple. The earlier you start saving for retirement, the better off you’ll be. And it doesn’t have to be a huge chunk of money – that’s the great thing about starting to save for retirement early on.” When it comes to purchases, college students can struggle with differentiating between necessities and non-essentials and having the self-control to spend prudently in both categories. Richard recommends students embrace owning less during their college years. “College is a great time. Enjoy it, but enjoy the simplicity of it as well,” Richard said. “More does not always result in better. Divide your purchases into ‘needs’ and ‘wants’ and don’t venture into the ‘wants’ category for purchases unless you have the cash to pay for it. Your future you will thank you.”

PHOTO VIA UNSPLASH


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

STUDE NT AFFAIRS

S P OT L I G H T

letter

welcome to auburn By STEVEN LEATH

Auburn University President

Here for Students. Here for Faculty. Here for Staff. Here for the Community.

Academic Advising Academic Support Assessment and Strategic Planning Auburn Cares Auburn Student Media Group Campus Recreation Career Center Cooperative Education Development First Year Experience Greek Life Health Promotion and Wellness Services

Medical Clinic Office of Accessibility Parent and Family Programs Property Management Student Center Student Conduct Student Counseling Services Student Involvement Tiger Dining University Housing Veterans Resource Center

auburn.edu/StudentAffairs

@AuburnStudents

facebook.com/AuburnStudents

@AuburnStudents

Summer 2018

As you begin your academic career at Auburn, we welcome you to the Auburn Family, one that includes many generations united by a unique bond only found here. The Auburn student experience is one of our crown jewels with great traditions like none other, from our magnificent eagles’ pregame flights and the cries of “War Eagle” to celebrations at Toomer’s Corner. Around campus, you’ll find a commitment to student learning that delivers an extraordinary educational experience inside the classroom and beyond. Students are Auburn’s number one priority as we educate and prepare you for life. Being around students is my favorite part of the job, and I particularly enjoy talking with students and learning about their views and aspirations. Auburn’s goal is to empower and inspire you to be the very best you can. Our students engage, influence and lead at extraordinarily high levels as they expand their minds, broaden their experiences and hone their capabilities through both theoretical knowledge and practical skills. We initiated a campaign earlier this year with

the theme, “Inspire. Innovate. Transform.” Please let these words be your guiding principles throughout your time on the Plains (another great name for your new home). While here, you will make lifetime friends, have great faculty mentors and learn of the spirit of the Auburn Creed that emphasizes a strong work ethic, sound character traits and high values. Auburn is steeped in both tradition and forward thinking that dates back to its founding in 1856 and becoming a land-grant institution in 1872. We continue those aspects today with pioneering research, life-changing outreach and innovative teaching programs that could not have been imagined by our predecessors. Our Mell Classroom Building at RBD Library is one of the top Engaged Active Student Learning facilities in the country, and, for physical fitness, our Recreation and Wellness Center provides a remarkable variety of activities. You’ll also want to drop by the Office of Student Involvement in the Student Center and learn about the many student organizations you might wish to join. In four short years, you will walk across the graduation stage prepared to embark upon your career and change the world. Your time here will be special. War Eagle!

ADAM BRASHER / PHOTOGRAPHER

Auburn President Steven Leath greets students at the student celebration for his installation, on the Student Center Greenspace in Auburn, Ala. on Wednesday, March 28, 2018.


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dining

big changes to dining in 2018 By LILY JACKSON Managing Editor

A revamp of dining plans, updated facilities, a Steak ‘n Shake in the Student Center and more are on the horizon for Tiger Dining. With Tiger Dining’s new contract with Aramark, a food service company based in Philidelphia, Tiger Dining plans to shake up the current dining experience over the next year. The new contract will be effective May 7, when planned renovations and additions will begin. Glenn Loughridge, director of campus dining, said the new additions were inspired directly by the Dining Task Force presentation that began under former Student Government President Jessie Westerhouse’s term and concluded during former SGA President Jacqueline Keck’s term.

THE FACILITIES, FOOD

The biggest addition will be a new Steak ‘n Shake in the place of Papa John’s on the second floor of the Student Center. The Student Center’s flagship Chick-fil-A will stay in its current location, Loughridge said. Two healthier options will be coming to the Student Center, too. Salad Works will offer made-to-order salads, wraps and sandwiches. Cat Cora, a Food Network “Iron Chef,” has partnered with Aramark to create a Mediterranean-style restaurant called Wicked Eats. Most of the renovations in the Student Center will begin this summer along with renovations to Foy Dining. Foy will be renovated into a dining hall, where students will find similar options to what is there now, in addition to food stands for those with allergies, special diets and health restrictions. There will be a station dedicated to vegans and vegetarians that will also serve those on the Whole 30 diet. In spring 2020, a brand new dining hall wiincorporated into a rebuild of Parker and Allison halls. The dining hall will offer 800 seats and a space that will house an Au Bon Pain. Along with ABP, Starbucks will be upgraded and relocated to a bigger space in the new building.

“We will have a true coffee shop where you can walk in, hang out, and we think it will be a great space for students,” Loughridge said. “We think it is really needed.” Panda Express will not be leaving campus but will eventually move to the new facility, too. The Village will also be renovated into a dining hall, and Loughridge said the Dining team is working toward having a second campus Chick-fil-A location where the 844 Burger location is currently. Plans for the addition are still up in the air, but hopes are high. All of the convenience stores will be getting a reboot and will resemble a market — rather than an actual convenience store — with more fresh items to choose from. As for the mixup with Panera in the library, Loughridge said the project is finally on its way to completion. “Panera has been tough,” Loughridge said. “I call it ‘Project Infinity,’ and people tease me about it, and I don’t blame them.” He said work on Panera will begin when the Aramark contract begins in May. Panera will be on campus before students return for the fall semester. Prevail Union coffee will be moving to Foy. There are new food venues planned for the Graduate Business Building and Engineering Success Center, both of which are under construction.

THE DINING PLANS

Beginning in the fall, there will be seven new dining plans available to students including some plans with meal swipes and others with a declining balance similar to the current plans required for students. The declining-balance plans allow students to use Tiger Card money just like cash at any Campus Dining location. Loughridge said Tiger Dining will be raising the cost and value for the two default declining-balance plans for the first time in 10 years. The off-campus plan will be $350, up from $300, and $1,100 for on-campus, up from $995. These two plans will be the defaults for undergraduate students starting in the fall. Students will have the choice of opting into five other new color-coded meal plans starting in the fall, which will include meal swipes plus a declining balance.

Students will have a certain number of meal swipes in the color-coded plans, which can be used at dining halls on campus including Village Dining and Foy Dining. A range of declining balances will be coupled with the meal swipes. The color-coded plans will be totally optional. “No one is required to upgrade into these plans,” Loughridge said. “That was something we very clearly heard from students. They didn’t hate the system, they just wanted more choices. That’s what we have built in.” Loughridge said the larger plans will help students who attend the University through grants, financial aid or scholarships. Since some scholarships will only pay for initial costs, rather than allowing a student to go back in and add more funds, the larger packages will help students eat on campus all semester long. The bigger plans will also be good for students who have excess scholarship and financial aid money. Loughridge said the team is looking into a boxed meal service for students who live off campus. Similar to paid-subscription food services, students would pick up a box of pre-measured ingredients to throw together at home with the help of the instructions in the box. Loughridge believes this service will bridge the gap between living on campus and living off campus. The plans are still in the works, but he is hopeful. For those who will stick to eating on campus in the next year, Loughridge said they are currently on the hunt for a vendor for the online ordering system that will allow students to bypass lines and pick up food quickly. There will be changes to the packaging in which students carry their meals, as well. Currently running through a pilot program, Loughridge said, dining is testing out reusable, sustainable containers. The lime green, plastic dishes come with a lid and clip shut and can be returned at the next visit to be washed. Loughridge said this initiative and the expanding partnership with the Auburn Agriculture, Fisheries and Meat Lab fall in line with University President Steven Leath’s commitment to sustainability.


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Join us!

Summer 2018

BODDA GETTA BODDA GETTA BODDA GETTA

Wednesday August 22nd 4:30pm – 6:30pm Davis Arboretum

BAH SIS

!!!

RAH RAH RAH

BOOM

BAH

Weagle Weagle

WAR

DAMN EAGLE

kick ‘em in the butt, Big Blue!

HEY

Summer Staff

The Auburn Plainsman ThePlainsman.com

Winner of 26 Pacemaker Prizes

Editors Editor-in-chief: Chip Brownlee Managing Editor: Lily Jackson Standards Editor: Jessica Ballard Summer Editor: Elizabeth Hurley Summer Managing Editor: Nathan King Photo Editor: Madison Ogletree

FREE FOOD & LIVE MUSIC STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS SPECIAL GUESTS RAFFLES & GAMES

Writers Stephen Lanzi Kailey Beth Smith Zach Tantillo Jack West Samanth Strunk

Carolina Kruza Natalie Beckerink John Koo Paul Brock

Photographers Cameron Brasher Joshua Fisher Adam Brasher

Gary Cauthen Ingrid Schnader

News Desk: 334-844-9108, news@theplainsman.com Advertising Office: 334-844-4130, admanager@theplainsman.com

Advertising Advertising Manager: Melissa Pagoaga Graphic Design Head Designer: Matt Baumgart Editorial Adviser Alec Harvey

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255 Heisman Drive 1111, AU Student Center Auburn, AL 36849


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letter

sga president: a note to the freshman class By DANE BLOCK SGA President

My name is Dane Block, and I have the incredible honor of serving as your 2018-2019 SGA president. My team and I want to welcome you to some of the best years of your life. College will challenge you in ways you never imagined. You will grow and learn more about yourself, those around you and the world we live in. As you will see, Auburn is a very special place, and the more time you spend here, the more special it becomes. It is SGA’s chief responsibility to be the voice that links the student body to Auburn’s administrators, faculty, staff and the Auburn community that surrounds us. With a desire to serve all of Auburn, we accept the opportunity to leave Auburn better than

we found it for generations to come. Our entire SGA team is committed to operating from an environment that challenges tired assumptions, bolsters traditions and seeks new ways to include individuals who have not been included in the past. By only counting on what we earn and a dedication toward hard work, we believe, along with your help, that we can make your first year, the best year yet. We are eager to work on your behalf this year, and we are grateful for the endless opportunities to serve Auburn and to represent and advocate for the community that makes up the Auburn Family. Enjoy every single second of your year … the new friends, experiences and challenges. Please feel free to contact us with any questions, comments or concerns. We are here for you every step of the way! War Eagle! Dane Block celebrates at Callouts after being announced SGA president.

10 TIPS FOR REGISTRATION THAT COULD SAVE YOU 1

LISTEN TO YOUR COUNSELOR

2

KNOW WHAT YOU HAVE TO HAVE

3

KNOW WHAT YOU WANT TO GET

4

MEET WITH AN ADVISOR

5

DON’T NEGLECT ELECTIVES

6

THINK ABOUT THE NEXT YEAR WHILE PLANNING

7

TAKE SOMETHING YOU WILL ENJOY

8

HAVE A BACKUP PLAN BEFORE YOU GO

9

USE DEGREE WORKS AND TIGER SCHEDULER

10

DON’T STRESS IT’LL BE FINE

FILE PHOTO


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Summer 2018

sga

meet your sga executive officers By STEPHEN LANZI Staff Writer

Block’s campaign platform, Build with Block, was more than just a play on words as he focused his campaign on improving the student experience with five components. The five “blocks” of his platform were student safety, access and affordability, dining, transportation and himself. In addition to serving as a Col-

Dane Block

lege of Business senator, Block has served in cabinet. These positions have taught Block many lessons on how to be a leader, he said, and the most important one he has learned is the importance of the relationships you build along the way. “One thing I would like the incoming freshmen to know about me is that I am there for them, and I want them to succeed in all areas

of life as they transition into their freshmen year,” Block said. “When students look at our team, I want them to see students and friends first and foremost.” Block said that when he says, “Build with Block,” he doesn’t want to restructure the entire University, but rather, he wants to build upon what has made Auburn such a great institution.

President

Burney, senior in economics, has traveled all over the state and across the country exploring her newfound interest in politics. After starting out as a physics major, Burney found a home in the College of Liberal Arts following conversations with former SGA President Jacqueline Keck about her experience with physics. Getting to work with Lobby Board, an organization that connects students

to state legislators, allowed Burney to get a taste of real-world politics. She now plans to follow in her father and grandfather’s footsteps and attend law school. This past year, as one of the liberal arts senators, Burney visited Washington D.C. to see the progress of a recent program that places Auburn interns with alumni to help with living expenses. She was able to help develop and ex-

pand the program. Burney’s primary goal as vice president is to help the different colleges’ senators, who represent the students from all the colleges across campus, understand how to best connect with and serve their students. “We have 30 or 40 senators, so one of my main goals this year is to successfully train them to take on the role that they’ve been elected to do,” Burney said.

Schyler Burney Vice President

Dixon Simmons Treasurer

Similar to his major officer counterparts, Simmons is looking to do the most effective job he can while keeping the thoughts and opinions of the student body at the forefront of his mind. A large part of Simmons’ vision for the upcoming year is to reallocate student fees in order to more fully benefit and support student organizations. A portion of each students’ tuition

gets allocated to what are called SAP organizations to promote the student experience. Simmons wants to ensure that organizations can do things like hire more advisors, increase liability spending and increase funds for Organization Board. This doesn’t mean any raise in tuition, just a reallocation of fees already paid. Simmons also wants to be more trans-

parent and resourceful to students. He plans to publish a yearly finance report on the SGA website as well as an office for financial literacy. Simmons believes he is well prepared for the job as he previously served as budget and finance chair. He said he is excited to see what the year brings and how he can help promote the student experience. PICTURES VIA AUBURN SGA


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PA R E N T & FA M I L Y P R OG R A M S

Ally Arthur AU B U R N U N I V E R S I T Y PA R E N T S ’ AS S O C I AT I O N :

Executive Secretary

MacKenzie Yelton

Participating in the Auburn University Parents’

Chief of Staff

Association is an excellent way to stay connected as a part of the Auburn Family and support the education of your student. Membership benefits include: Free to join Access to the Auburn University Family Portal *Please note you cannot connect to your Auburn University Student until they have registered for classes at Camp War Eagle Support from a dedicated AUPA Board member Increased first to second-year student retention and four-year graduation rates

Patrick Starr EVP of Programs

Join today by visiting www.auburn.edu/joinaupa or through the Parent and Family Programs Guide in Auburn Guides.

Jordan Kramer EVP of Outreach

AU B U R N G U I D ES A P P : The Office of Parent and Family Programs has gone mobile! Download the Parent and Family Programs guide within the Auburn Guides app. This free, mobile app is available in the mobile App Store or on Google Play. This guide is your one-stop-shop for frequently asked questions and resources for you and your Auburn student.

PA R E N T R ES O U R C E G U I D E :

Bailey Hand EVP of Communications and Marketing

Austin Chandler EVP of Initiatives

College can be overwhelming—even for parents. The Parent Resource Guide within Tiger Transitions is here to help you. This guide is designed to answer questions that you may have during your student’s time at Auburn. Browse the guide via Tiger Transitions or at www.auburn.edu/aupa.

CO N TACT U S : (334) 844-1493 parent@auburn.edu www.auburn.edu/aupa

SGA EXECUTIVE OFFICERS » From 14

After the major officers were elected, they had a couple weeks to interview and select their executive officers. A laborious selection process left six of the 11 interviewees with a position on the team. Block said they looked at the platforms of candidates, previ-

ous involvement with SGA and across campus and any fresh ideas the candidates had. Many of the executive officers have had previous experience with SGA, including Starr, who was the candidate in the SGA presidential runoff with Block. Starr received 48

percent of the vote in the runoff, and Block thought this connection to the student body was valuable. Starr, Yelton, Chandler and Hand came from assistant vice president roles in SGA last year. Arthur was a student senator for the business college, while Kramer was a senator for the college of liberal arts.


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Summer 2018

learning your auburn lingo

INGRID SCHNADER / PHOTOGRAPHER

Toomer’s Corner in Auburn, Ala., is covered in toilet paper on Sunday morning, Nov. 26, 2017. Auburn fans took part in this tradition Saturday night after Auburn defeated Alabama in the Iron Bowl, 26-14.

By ELIZABETH HURLEY Summer Editor

ROLL TIDE

You’re now a member of the world-wide Auburn Family. With that family comes a whole new lingo.

From sporting events to the “Beat Bama Food Drive,” Auburn University and the University of Alabama compete often. That means you’ll often hear their battle cry “Roll Tide.” The appropriate response to any “Roll Tide” is always a hardy “War Eagle.” Students and other Auburn fans will often refer to the University of Alabama as “that other Alabama school.” While Auburn students respect “Roll Tide” and the University of Alabama, to Auburn students and the rest of the Auburn Family, Auburn is the best school there is.

WAR EAGLE “War Eagle” is a phrase all new Auburn students are familiar with by now. But you may not know of its wide variety of uses. • As a greeting • As a form of congratulations • As a way to say things didn’t go your way • As a celebration • As a battle cry Everyone that wears the orange and blue knows what “War Eagle” means and is sure to give you one back. “War Eagle” can also be used to celebrate, especially at all Auburn sporting events. When the team scores a touch down or the band jogs out of the tunnel, join the rest of the 87,451 Auburn fans in the stadium in the battle cry. Students often use “War Eagle” when things may not go their way. Whether it’s a bad grade on a test or they didn’t get that position they wanted in an organization, “War Eagle” is a way of saying, “That’s okay, I’ll try again next time.”

It is not uncommon for hopefuls to bring along friends to cheer for them when their name is called. During your time at Auburn, you are likely to experience a call out or two, either as a hopeful student waiting to hear your name called from the top of the steps or as a supportive friend. TOOMER’S Toomer’s Corner isn’t just for rolling after an Auburn win, many students will enjoy a relaxing afternoon sipping a Toomer’s lemonade as they stroll downtown or have a picnic on Samford Lawn. Any part of Toomer’s Corner or Toomer’s Drugs is often referred to as just Toomer’s.

CALLOUTS TOILET PAPER One of the most well-known Auburn traditions among students are Callouts on the back steps of Cater Hall. Student organizations will often use Callouts to announce the students selected to participate in an organization. Organizations will line their executives on the top of the steps, and they will read out the names of the students selected to participate in that organization. Those selected will then climb the steps to the top to meet their new executive team and other new members of the organization.

At Auburn, toilet paper isn’t found only in the bathrooms, it is often found thrown over the trees at Toomer’s Corner and littering the ground after every Auburn win. Toilet paper has a special meaning to all Auburn students — it means the Auburn Family has accomplished something. So bring your biggest roll of toilet paper and let out a loud “War Eagle” as you celebrate the Auburn win with every member of your new family.


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SPORTS

ADAM BRASHER / PHOTOGRAPHER

JOSH FISHER / PHOTOGRAPHER

Head Coach Gus Malzahn high-fives Christian Tutt (6) after a play during Auburn’s A-Day game on Saturday, April 7, 2018, in Auburn, Ala.

Silvana Poulter (15) runs the ball upfield during Kentucky vs. Auburn Soccer on Sunday, Sept 24, 2017 in Auburn, Ala.

What you can expect from Auburn sports this fall By ZACH TANTILLO Sports Writer

As you arrive on campus this fall you will soon notice the impact that sports has on the University. Your first semester will be a whirlwind trying to keep up with the different sports in the fall. Here is a sports guide to what is coming up in the fall to bring you up to speed before you arrive for the first day of classes. FOOTBALL The Tigers are coming off a bittersweet season in which they defeated rivals Georgia and Alabama but were left sitting at home while their rivals battled it out in the national championship. Even with the season ending in the strange way it did, Auburn’s 2018 season is looking bright. Auburn is returning its starting quarterback, Jarrett Stidham, who is also the first Auburn quarterback to throw for 3,000 yards in a season since

Dameyune Craig in 1997. Not only is Stidham returning, but Auburn is returning every receiver from last year’s team except for dismissed Kyle Davis. Auburn’s offense is not the only thing fans should focus on, as the defense is returning a big part of its top-15 defense. The defensive line was one of the best units in the country last year. Defensive coordinator Kevin Steele prides himself on stellar defensive line play whether it be getting to the opposing team’s quarterback or stopping the run. With Jeff Holland taking his talents to the NFL, there will be a void the Tigers will have to fill. They should not have any problem as every other impact player on the line is returning and the implementation of Big Kat Bryant into Holland’s old position should make the transition easier than most expect. Overall, the Tigers are expecting another productive year with a good bit of last year’s team returning but with a good foundation of young talent to back up the veterans. Auburn is set to kick off on Sept. 1 in Atlanta against the highly touted Washington Huskies.

SOCCER Auburn’s soccer team is coming off of a program-record fourth straight NCAA tournament appearance in 2017. The Tigers are losing a big chunk of their offensive and defensive talent from last year’s squad with leading scorer Kristen Dodson and defensive MVP Caroline Bado both graduating. Dodson earned SEC first-team honors in back-to-back seasons and was named a United Soccer Coaches All-Southeast Region honoree. Bado joined Dodson as a SEC First Team All-Conference and United Soccer Coaches All-Southeast Region selection. Bado played in every minute of every game and was a constant backbone of the Auburn defense that forced eight shutouts and tied for a program high with five shutouts in SEC play. Auburn is returning star players Sarah Le Beau, Bri Folds and up-and-coming star Alyssa Malonson. Even with those players returning, Auburn will still have huge holes to fill to keep their tournament streak alive.


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SPOTLIGHT

Camp counselor Tyler Jorgensen By STEPHEN LANZI Staff Writer

Since coming to school, all of Tyler Jorgensen’s Instagram captions have ended with the same hashtag: #collegenoparents. “It was just really funny because I would never post like a crazy picture,” Jorgensen said. “I don’t know, it was just like ‘#collegenoparents.’ I did it to kind of just mess with my mom, to be honest with you. Whether we admit it to ourselves, we’re all just excited to be away from our parents and just do us for a little while.” Jorgensen presumed he would follow in his family’s footsteps and spend his college years at LSU. He toured the school and felt comfort-

able following that path, but a tour of Auburn’s campus made him reconsider. After becoming enamored with the campus and everything that is the Auburn Family, Jorgensen decided to pass on his grandparents’ offer to pay his out-of-state tuition at LSU so that he could come to The Plains. He knew he made the right decision at the first home football game against Clemson his freshmen year. “I was looking around me, and I got goosebumps, and I realized I was going to be an Auburn fan,” Jorgensen said. “From that time on, I was all in for Auburn.” Jorgensen, rising junior in marketing, always knew he had an interest in business in some capacity. In high

school, he had tried to run a T-shirt company with some friends. “Not going to lie, it was a failed T-shirt company,” he said with a laugh. The interest in business resurfaced at Auburn when he changed his original major of pre-nursing to marketing. The comfortable environment at Auburn along with supportive faculty and advisors allowed Jorgensen to find and explore his passions, and he said the transition was smooth. Involvement has played a large role in Jorgensen finding his home at Auburn. In addition to being a CWE counselor, he spent the past year serving as an athletic recruiter. He got to spend home football games on the sideline as he helped

host many of the future Auburn Athletics stars. Jorgensen said it was really cool to see some of the players he had gotten to know, such as Asa Martin, play in the A-Day game this spring. Jorgensen is excited to see these players he made a connection with get playing time in the next few years, he said. Jorgensen has gotten involved by being a resident’s assistant in one of the on-campus dorms. He has really enjoyed having to be there for the residents in his building, and he thinks helping so many freshmen with their living situation made him well equipped for his time as a CWE counselor. Jorgensen said whether it’s been

VIA FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE OFFICE

his advisors in a new major or friends he made in different forms of involvement, the overall Auburn community has been the biggest impact on his time in college. He hopes to pass that feeling along to his campers this summer. “There’s a lot of people in the Auburn Family that truly care about you, and they might even not know your name,” Jorgensen said. “But because you’re associated with the institution that is Auburn, they have this care about you.”

CAMPUS

University College to move under College of Liberal Arts

NATIONAL CO-ED SERVICE FRATERNITY Leadership • Friendship • Service

STAFF REPORT The University College will now be under the College of Liberal Arts. The administrative transition will take place on May 14. Faculty, staff and programming will be moved under the leadership of CLA Dean Joseph Aistrup. According to the University’s announcement of the transition, the shift will not affect the day-to-day programs and resources. There will be no changes to the established curriculum requirements. University College houses the Department of Aviation, the Interdisciplinary Studies Program, the Exploratory Advising Center and academic minors that are also managed by University College faculty. “Under CLA, the University College will have the opportunity to grow its faculty by providing opportunities to hire tenure-line faculty, resulting in increased programming to support the growth in enrollment,” read the University website. Students will remain enrolled in the University College but will receive advising from professionals under CLA. Students will still be recognized as students of the University College and will be recognized at graduation with CLA students. The University is hopeful the transition will allow for expansion of programs like the Department of Aviation.

Founded in 1925, Alpha Phi Omega is a co-ed service fraternity based on the principles of the Boy Scouts of America. Here at Auburn, you have the unique opportunity to join the oldest continually active chapter of the service fraternity: Delta Chapter, est. 1927. For over 90 years, Delta Chapter has contributed to the Auburn family in many ways, including caring for the Auburn War Eagles from 1960 to 2000, donating the Auburn site marker in front of Samford Hall, obtaining and upkeeping the lathe in Samford Park, helping maintain the Davis Arboretum, and hosting Merit Badge University every spring. Delta Chapter also provides numerous leadership opportunities and fellowship events, such as formals and retreats.

For more information or if you’re interested in joining, you can contact us on Facebook at Alpha Phi Omega-Delta Chapter or on our AU Involve page.


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black student union president: step outside your comfort zone By JENNIFER EATON

Black Student Union President

Welcome to The Plains! My name is Jennifer Eaton, and I have the privilege of serving as the President of the Black Student Union, better known as BSU, this upcoming school year. We are an all-inclusive, student-run organization. BSU’s motto is “Unity Through Education.” Our motto means far more than words to the diverse members of our organization. We strive to ensure that BSU is a safe space for all students here on Auburn’s campus with an emphasis on black students. As you begin this exciting time in your life, I would like to share an important tip that I have learned along my Auburn journey. Do not be afraid to step outside of your com-

fort zone and see life from a different perspective. Often, the most impactful changes in our lives arise when we place ourselves in the shoes of others. During this transition, make college a time for you to learn and grow. Many of the experiences you will have in the next 4 or 5 years will be life-defining for you. It is important that you surround yourself with those who will support you through this time. BSU’s executive committee, cabinet and I hope you will find BSU to be that extra support, or, better yet, a family for you during your time here on The Plains. Our doors are always open! Welcome to your new home away from home and relish every single moment you have here! War Eagle!

LOREN KIMMEL / STAFF WRITER

On Feb. 16, 2018, Black Student Union hosted the Unity Project with UPC and the Ladies Society for Collegiate Success, inviting students to fill the Green Space in an interactive unifying activity.


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By KAILEY BETH SMITH Staff Writer

THE HOUND

Auburn boasts some of the best restaurants in the country, and with nationally recognized chefs calling Lee County home, it is no wonder why. Here is a list of places that you must try with your family before you leave town.

With American home-style food as rich as the culture around it, The Hound won The Plainsman’s pick for best place to get spoiled by your parents. From their appetizing pepper jelly to the last sumptuous bites of key lime pie, this restaurant has food to satisfy every craving. Their signature Bacon and Bourbon fuels their fans who keep coming back for more.

AMSTERDAM CAFE Located on Gay Street and nestled next to Mama Mochas, this little cafe is bursting with both flavor and character. With a menu as interesting as its paintings displayed on the wall, Amsterdam Cafe is an Auburn Family favorite.

THE DEPOT Housed in an old railway station, The Depot boasts some of the best seafood Auburn has to offer. Along

with a family-friendly atmosphere with great food, The Depot reminds guests of a railway station from years ago with a feeling as elegant as the chandeliers that delicately dangle from the refurbished ceilings. Local foods fill The Depot’s dishes, and every menu item is as appetizing as the last. ACRE At Acre, award-winning chefs serve up farm-fresh foods are sure to please any palate. Acre has been named Southern Living’s 100 Best Restaurants in the South and is undeniably a local favorite. If that isn’t enough to sell you, Acre’s executive chef and own, David Bancroft, recently won Food Network’s “Iron Chef Showdown.”

FOOD AND RESTAURANTS

Where to eat with your parents before you leave


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My money goes where? Breaking down those student fees By ELIZABETH HURLEY Summer Editor Each semester students pay tuition and fees. Those student fees amount to $826 for the 2018-2019 term. Student fees are divided among several categories on campus. The largest amount of your student fees, which is $200, goes to wellness. This helps to pay for the Recreation and Wellness Center and gives students access to the building and all of its equipment, said Mike Reynolds, executive director of Student Financial Services. The next largest category is the Tiger Transit, which takes $158. The fee for the transit raised with tuition. When tuition was raised to $389 per credit hour for in-state students for the 20172018 term, the student fees were $816, meaning the transit fee was $153. For the 2018-2019 term, tuition was raised $12, so the transit fee was raised $5 to $158. “All in all it’s not been a very big jump,” Reynolds said. “For 2016-2017, there was only a $4 increase, and that $4 was coming from the transit fee.” Students can expect to see another small increase in student fees the next time tuition is increased to accommodate the increase in the Tiger Transit fee. Reynolds stressed that this category is the easiest one for students to use every day. Athletics is the next largest category.

Reynolds said this fee allows all students to attend all home athletic events for free, except for football games. Another part of the fees goes to the Student Center. Reynolds said when the Student Center was built, the students voted to incorporate a fee into the student fees to help pay for a new student center. This fee began as an additional $80 in the student fees, today it is an additional $5. This makes the total for this fee currently at $85. It will increase as time goes on because of the way the contract for the new Student Center was created. “Make sure you utilize the Student Center,” Reynolds said. “There’s a lot of things you can benefit from in there, not only the food court but there are palaces you can go and study. And you’re paying for it, so utilize all of that.” The last of the fees, which is $45, goes to the Office of Student Involvement. Reynolds said the Student Government Association Senate then divides among the SAPs. SAPs, or Student Activity Portfolios, are organizations within the Office of Student Involvement that can and do, receive funding from student fees. The Black Student Union, SGA, Beat Bama Food Drive and Involvement Ambassadors are some examples of SAPs. For more information on SAPs, visit the Office of Student Involvement on the third floor of the student center or online at auburn.edu/involve/. “Get involved,” Reynolds said. “Because

you’re paying for all these things. Go to as many athletic events as you can, that you can get in free. That would be my advice because you should try to get as much use of what you’re paying for.” Student fees were created during the 2013-2014 term. Beginning at $728, student fees have increased a total of $28 during those six years. “The board has to give permission for that to occur [an increase in student fees],” Reynolds. “They want to keep costs down as much as possible. It’s always been that way.” That $28 increase has mainly been from the Tiger Transit fee because tuition has increased, and the student center increase from the contract to build the new student center. Student fee increases don’t come at the will of Student Financial Services. “We have to be given direction from the board or the President’s Office,” Reynolds said. A part of student fees cannot be waived because a student does not use it. For example, the $158 for the Tiger Transit fee cannot be waived because a student decided to not use the Tiger Transit that semester. To get the biggest bang for your buck, the Recreation and Wellness Center is the best place to go. “These fees are for every student,” Reynolds said. “Students will call and say ‘I don’t use the transit.’ Well, you should because you’re paying for it and there’s no way for me to monitor that.”


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By ELIZABETH HURLEY Summer Editor

MELL CONCOURSE The Mell Concourse project creates a concourse for pedestrians and bicyclists. The project modifies Mell Street starting at Thach Avenue and ending at the Library Service Drive. Additions include a new seating and gathering space in front of the Mell Classroom Building, relocated accessible parking lot space for Mary Martin Hall and a permanent welcome kiosk at the intersection of College Street and West Thach Avenue. The project has a board approved budget of $4 million and is expected to be completed on June 13, 2018, according to the facilities management website.

& FLEA MALL

Popcorn & Peanut Stand! Look for a new find each week!

334-745-3221 • angelsantiqueandfleamall.com 900 Columbus Pkwy, Opelika 36801 Open Everyday 10-7 • Sun 1-5

GAVIN ENGINEERING LAB The Textile Building is a, now, 60,223-square-foot building originally constructed in 1930. It was renamed as the Gavin Engineering Research Laboratory in 2016. This project is a renovation to the existing building to aid in the relocation and consolidation of research labs for the Polymer Composites Center, Additive Manufacturing, Aero-

space Engineering Wind Tunnels, Nuclear Power Generation Simulation, Pulp and Paper Pilot Machine and general research assets from the Engineering Shops and L-Building. Construction on the project, with a $18 million board-approved budget, began Dec. 5, 2016. It is expected to be completed July 29, 2018.

GOGUE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER The Jay and Susie Gogue Performing Arts Center project is an 85,000-square-foot building that will provide performance venues for musical, theatrical, dance, guest speakers and other events. It has multipurpose venue seating for approximately 1,200 guests, a box office, a catering kitchen, wardrobe and dressing rooms and conference and support office spaces.

PRESS BOX The Press Box Renovation project renovates a 10,800-square-foot area in Jordan-Hare Stadium to convert existing space into premium seating and new club space. The project also updates the coaches’ and television booths. Construction on this $12 million board-approved budget project began Dec. 4, 2017, and is expected to be completed on Aug. 2, 2018. The new Press Box is expected to open on Aug. 24, 2018, according to the facilities management website.

The Performing Arts Center has a board approved budget of $69.6 million. Construction began on the center in August 2017 and is expect to be completed on July 29, 2019. The center is expected to open Aug. 1, 2019, according to the facilities management website. expected to be completed July 29, 2018.

DELTA PROJECT The project creates a 24,00-square-foot, two-story facility of classrooms with a flight simulator laboratory, debriefing rooms and flight dispatch and departmental spaces at the Auburn University Regional Airport. The project with a $8.7 million board-approved budget began construction on June 7, 2017 and is expected to be completed on Oct. 10, 2018. The building is expected to open on Oct. 31, 2018, according to the facilities management website.

» See CONSTRUCTION, 33


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Spacious 2 & 4 Bedroom Apartments · Walk or bike to Auburn University · Fully furnished with leather-style sectional sofa · Hardwood-style flooring · 24-hour Academic Success Center with iMacs & free printing

· 24-hour fitness center with strength equipment, cardio machines & free weights · Swimming pool with hot tub, sun deck & poolside cabanas · All utilities included

160ROSS.COM Amenities & utilities included are subject to change. Electricity included up to a monthly allowance. See office for details.


Summer 2018

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

move-in 2018

s u p am

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Monday, Aug. 6 RETURNING SORORITY MEMBERS (Oak, Magnolia, Willow) PLAINSMAN PREP HONORS COLLEGE WEEK OF SERVICE TIGER EXPERIENCE PROGRAM NEW BAND MEMBERS

Friday, Aug. 10 EARLY MOVE IN SORORITY RECRUITMENT ARMY ROTC RETURNING BAND MEMBERS

Thursday, Aug. 16 NORMAL MOVE-IN Any students moving in early will receive a $90 Early Move-In Fee on their E-Bill.


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services you can and should use By NATHAN KING

AU CAREER CENTER

Summer Managing Editor

Freshman year away from home can be difficult for incoming students. You’re in a new place, you don’t know as many people and you might not even know your way around. Luckily, Auburn provides some of the nation’s top campus services, all in the name of bettering your college experience. Some are more serious than others, but all of them can be accessed quickly for usage throughout the school year. CANVAS This one is more or less required, but “Auburn Instructure” is there to help, despite how nerve wracking it might be for students to open the application. Canvas is a portal to your courses’ grades, files and assignments, straight from your professors. And although it’s frustrating that not all professors know how to use it, Canvas will quickly become one of your most-used tools at Auburn.

From the Career Center: “The Auburn University Career Center delivers comprehensive services for students to explore majors and careers, network with employers and professionals, prepare for advanced education and successfully transition from college to career.” OFFICE OF ACCESSIBILITY “Office of Accessibility works with students with disabilities to eliminate barriers to education and to implement reasonable accommodations.” In addition, students can register with the office when injured to arrange a golf kart pickup on campus to take them to their jobs, classes or dorms.

AUBURN UNIVERSITY PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES CENTER “AUPSC is a training clinic that provides therapy and assessment services for children, adolescents, adults, families and couples in the Auburn-Opelika area. The mission of AUPSC is to provide quality mental health services to the community, train future professionals and further knowledge through research.” PUBLIC SAFETY PROGRAMS

MEDICAL CLINIC

“The safety of all students, employees and visitors is the mission of the Auburn University Department of Campus Safety & Security (formerly Public Safety & Security). Our team works hard every day to support this mission, and we continue to seek out ways to make the Auburn University campus as safe as possible.”

“Our mission is to provide high-quality, efficient and convenient health care with compassion, dedication and professionalism. We strive to provide consistent service to our patients, exceeding their expectations at every encounter by being flexible, remaining competitive and focusing on the holistic needs of every patient.”

FOY INFORMATION DESK “The James E. Foy Information Desk, located on the second floor of the Student Center, provides information and answers to any question from details on Auburn events to the number of bricks in the Haley Center.”

FILE PHOTO

The James E. Foy Information Desk is on the second floor of the Student Center.


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Auburn’s newest student housing opening Fall 2019. Learn more and subscribe at Live191College.com Renderings subject to change. See office for details.

JLM 621 841105

Summer 2018


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style

dressing just right for interviews By EDUARDO MEDINA Staff Writer

Dressing for your first interviews can be like dressing for a high school dance; jittery, stressful yet ultimately insignificant because what matters is not the neckties pattern or the height of high heels — but the brain’s intelligence and your character. Now with that preachy, Pinterest-esque yapping out of the way, here are some tips on how to slay the job-floor because even if attire isn’t everything, it is an essential element for successful interviews. Tip number one is research. Visit the Career Center and ask what they recommend you wear for the particular place you’re applying for.

Research what that company or organization states as a standard dress code for its workplace. If you have to, scope out the workplace like a Fortnite player would their surroundings. See how the workers are dressed and then dress in in accordance for the interview. Research the weather. If it’s going to be hot, as it usually is in Auburn, make sure to dress comfortably, because when the sweat starts dripping and the armpits start pooling, there’s no going back, Seek light fabrics for warm weather and insulated ones for winter. Make sure your shirts are crisp and clean. A shirt more wrinkled than a puppy pug’s cheeks will look unprofessional, and unlike the simile, not cute.

If you are completely lost and not sure what to wear at all, it’s probably best to overdress. A classic suit will never go wrong, but be careful not to go overboard with prices, considering the average household spends $1,700 a year on clothing and footwear, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Keep in mind, these interviews aren’t the Met Gala. Rihanna’s not strutting the hallways in a Pope bedazzled outfit competing for your position. So have fun while selecting suits, and walk into the place as if paparazzi were flashing you with praise. After the interview, in the words of Rihanna, “go on and take a bow, grab your clothes and get gone.”


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aubie, war eagle and the stories behind auburn’s two most well-known traditions By JACK WEST Staff Writer

Auburn University has accumulated a number of traditions in its 162year history, but the most popular and lively traditions are perhaps Auburn’s mascot, Aubie the Tiger and the battle cry of “War Eagle.” Aubie was first created by Phil Neel as a cartoon on a 1959 football program when Auburn played Hardin Simmons. In 1962, he began to stand upright on the programs, and in 1963, he started to wear clothes. He remained on the cover for the next 18 years which saw the Tigers football team go 63-16-2. In 1979, three years after he was retired from the program covers, Aubie first came to life at the SEC men’s basketball tournament. There he helped lead the ninth seed Tigers to the semifinals. Since his creation, Aubie has won a record nine Universal Cheerleaders Association national championships, the first in 1991, and the most recent in 2016. He was also one of the first three mascots inducted into the Mascot Hall of Fame in 2006. Now, Aubie shows up everywhere from football games to RBD and can be seen spinning his tail, wobbling his head and reminding all around him to be full of Auburn spirit. While Aubie is Auburn’s official mascot, the battle cry “War Eagle” is equally ingrained in the University’s history. Legend has it that the first War Eagle was found wounded after the Battle of the Wilderness during the Civil War. After nursing the eagle back to health, the Confederate soldier who found the eagle, eventually became a professor at Auburn. Then, in the 1892 football game against Georgia, the War Eagle broke away from the professor and circled high above the field while the Tigers drove down the field for the winning touchdown. Following the victory, the War Eagle fell to the ground and died, forever immortalizing the story. Auburn’s first document of War Eagle can be found in a copy of The New York Times from November of 1930. This eagle became entangled in a mass of pea vines in Bee Hive, Alabama. The bird was then donated to the Auburn football team and cheerleading squad. This was not the origin of the phrase “War Eagle” though, because the Times reported that it was already in use. The most likely origin story goes like this: During a 1913 pep rally in Langdon Hall, cheerleader Gus Graydon said that to win the upcoming football game against Georgia the team would have to “get out there and fight, because this means war.” At the same time another student, E. T. Enslen, was in his military uniform and noticed something had dropped from his hat. He bent and picked up the small metal emblem of an eagle, held it high and yelled “It’s a War Eagle!” Auburn is a university with lively traditions and even livelier mascots. Tigers, national championships, legends, myths and “War Eagle” cries all weave into the fabric of what Auburn is. They remind the students of the University’s past and keep them excited about its present.

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Spirit the Eagle flies during Auburn Football vs. Alabama on Saturday, Nov. 25, 2017, in Auburn, Ala.


The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

NEW FALL PAYMENT PLANS

TIGER DINING

Summer 2018

$1,100 PLAN $1,100 declining balance Average 5.56 meals per week Cost: $1,100 per semester

$350 PLAN

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BRONZE PLAN 115 swipes + $350 dec. balance Average 6.9 meals per week Cost: $1,449 per semester

BLUE PLAN

$350 declining balance Average 1.82 meals per week Cost: $350 per semester

65 swipes + $250 dec. balance Average 3.9 meals per week Cost: $850 per semester

GOLD PLAN

ORANGE PLAN

225 swipes + $350 dec. balance Average 13.6 meals per week Cost: $2,257 per semester

SILVER PLAN 155 swipes + $350 dec. balance Average 9.4 meals per week Cost: $1,767 per semester

40 swipes + $250 dec. balance Average 2.4 meals per week Cost: $632 per semester

MEAL PLANS AVAILABLE TO ON-CAMPUS STUDENTS MEAL PLANS AVAILABLE TO OFF-CAMPUS STUDENTS SOURCE: TIGER DINING GRAPHIC: CHIP BROWNLEE / EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

TECHNOLOGY

Apps you need at Auburn By JACK WEST Staff Writer

Auburn may be called a cow college, but that doesn’t mean The Plains are void of technology. The following are some apps for iOS and Android that, while not essential, are helpful during your time at Auburn. MICROSOFT OUTLOOK Outlook is the service used by Auburn for all on-campus emails. There are many ways students can access their University email account, but this app is the most convenient. SOBI This is the app used by the University’s bike share program. RIDER The most recognizable way to get around both on and off campus are the Tiger Transit buses.

CANVAS Canvas is the system used by professors to communicate with students. This includes everything from assignments and grades to quizzes and final exams. GROUPME This is the first app on this list most readers are already aware of, but it is as equally important on campus as it is off. SPOTIFY/APPLE MUSIC While the most exciting parts of college may be the wild parties, football games or naps, a lot of time is still spent studying. AUBURN UNIVERSITY This is the most comprehensive and useful app for Auburn students. It can be used to check grades, search for dining options and locate buildings on campus.

Make a difference… Join the AU Red Cross Club this fall. Find us on AU Involve.


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Quiet, please? we’ve got you covered. here’s where you should study. By NATALIE BECKERINK Staff Writer

STUDENT CENTER AFTER 5 P.M.

FOURTH FLOOR OF RBD

COFFEE SHOPS

The Student Center by day can be hectic and crazed, scaring a lot of newcomers off as they only stay long enough to grab some Chick-fil-A and head back to their dorm. But, after around 5 p.m., the Student Center pretty much becomes a ghost town. There are tables and chairs on every floor, perfect for group or individual study. The best part may be the fact that Starbucks is seconds away.

The fourth floor is a quiet floor, which means there’s not really any talking or loud noises allowed. This is the perfect environment for individual study when you really need to buckle down and get some work done. The cubbies around the desks make focusing even easier, and before you know it, you’ve completed your work and can go relax for a while.

COFFEE CAT MAMA MOCHA’S THE BEAN PREVAIL COFFEE IN MELL

THE CLASSIC SAMFORD LAWN

LOWDER STARBUCKS

Sometimes the weather is too perfect in Auburn for you to stay inside and cram for hours, so most Auburn students have learned to take their blankets and towels out to Samford. Though it can get busy at times, it’s never extremely loud, especially in the spring. While you’re studying, you have the magnificent Samford Hall as your view — the best inspiration.

Tucked away just past the engineering buildings, the Starbucks in Lowder is also set up nicely for group or individual study. It doesn’t stay open quite as late as some other coffee shops, but it’s perfect for getting some work done during the afternoon.

For coffee lovers, it’s hard to make it through the year without testing all the coffee shops within walking distance of Auburn’s campus. All of them are so conducive to studying. Each of them have their own aesthetic, which includes delicious drinks and a quiet environment. Of course, the crowning glory of studying in these establishments is the walk to and from the shops, experiencing all the beauty the City of Auburn has to offer.


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CONSTRUCTION » From 23

GRADUATE BUSINESS BUILDING The new 105,000 square foot Graduate Business Building is meant to help the growing graduate needs of the Raymond J. Harbert College of Business and add to the college’s existing graduate structure. The new graduate building will have flat-flexible and case study classrooms, a flexible studio lecture hall, an Innovation Lab, student study pods and team areas, various conference and

reception-style areas and administrative offices for the college’s MBA program. Construction on this project began on Dec. 18, 2017 and is expected to be completed on Feb. 27, 2019. With a board-approved budget of $45 million, the building is expected to open on April 27, 2019, according to the facilities management website.

BROWN-KOPEL ENGINEERING CENTER

FISHERIES BIODIVERSITY LAB

The Brown-Kopel Engineering Student Achievement Center project is a 142,000-square-foot project to create a three-story building with classrooms, student study spaces, maker space, a wind-tunnel laboratory, meeting and departmental spaces for academic advising, tutoring, professional development and industrial relations. A single story courtyard structure at the ground and first floors will connect the center to the Gavin Engineering Research Laboratory building. The center has a board-approved budget of $44 million. Construction began Sept. 6, 2017, and is expected to be completed May 5, 2019. The center is expected to open May 6, 2019, according to the faculties management website.

The Fisheries Biodiversity Laboratory Relocation project constructs a 4,550-square-foot, one-story building with laboratory and support space. The project will relocate the Fisheries Biodiversity Research Program from its current main campus location on Woodfield Drive to the North Auburn Campus to a location off of North College Street next to the Ireland Center. With a board-approved budget of $2.1 million, the project is expected to be completed on July 12, 2018. It is expected to open on Aug. 3, 2018, according to the faculties management website.

POULTRY SCIENCE ED. & RESEARCH CENTER This project constructs a 8,150-square-foot, one-story administration building near the feed mill off of Auburn Lakes Road. The building will include a multi-purpose meeting room, conference, business center, pre-function space and support office spaces.

The project has a $2.95 million board-approved budget and began construction on July 26, 2017. Construction on this project is expected to be completed on May 25, 2018, according to the faculties management website.

LEACH SCIENCE CENTER ADDITION The Leach Science Center Addition is a 62,500-squarefoot building that will consist of instructional laboratories, research laboratories, student success and collaborative study spaces, departmental offices and support facilities for the College of Sciences and Mathematics. The physics department and faculty from Parker Hall and Allison Laboratory will be consolidated and relocated to the Leach Science Center Addition. This consolidation and relocation of the two departments is required for the next phase of construction at Auburn. The next step is to demolish Parker Hall and Allison Laboratory to prepare the site for the new Academic Classroom and Laboratory Complex. Construction began on the center addition on April 24, 2017, and is expected to be completed on Oct. 23, 2018. The center addition has a board-approved budget of $24 million, according to the facilities management website.

JORDAN-HARE STADIUM, LOCKER ROOM RENOVATIONS This project is the construction of a new 44,000-squarefoot, multi-story facility with recruiting space for football and Olympic sports, a new club space for fans and a new press box for the media. With a $28 million board-approved budget, the project also includes a 16,000-square-foot renovation of the existing home football locker room. Construction began on April 24, 2017, and is expect to be completed on July 27, 2018. The new facility is expected to open on Aug. 9, 2018, according to the facilities management website.


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STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION The Student Government Association is the official governing body of Auburn students, serving as the voice for the 29,000+ students on campus. Upon enrollment, every Auburn University student becomes a member of SGA. Visit auburn.edu/sga for more information on how to get involved.

Auburn Answers is SGA’s primary feedback system. Any student, faculty member, or campus administrator can submit a question, comment, or concern and expect a response within 48 hours. Voice your concerns through an Auburn Answers submission at auburnanswers.org.

Freshman Forum is a group of approximately 45 freshmen that will serve as the voice of the freshman class in SGA. In addition to representing the freshman class, members will gain applicable, hands-on experience through working with a mentor currently serving in SGA. The group also seeks to build a community that challenges and encourages one another to explore their leadership potential.

Applications are available May 24th on AU Involve.


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THE PLAINSMAN’S TOP 9 PICKS

BEST OF AU TWITTER The Auburn Plainsman

AU ALERT

AU FAMILY

Auburn University

Auburn UPC

AU Emergency Mgmt

Auburn SGA

Auburn Tigers

Drunk Aubie

@theauplainsman

@AuburnU

@AuburnSGA

@AUALERT

@AuburnUPC

@AuburnTigers

@AUFAMILY

@AuburnU

@DrunkAubie

Selections: The Plainsman Summer Editorial Board

ms progra

students can learn to act through green dot training By CAROLINE KRUZA Staff Writer

Families aim not to hurt each other, and through Auburn University’s Green Dot training program, Auburn is striving to be the healthiest family it can be. Green Dot training was created to educate all parts of the Auburn Family about sexual violence that occurs on college campuses and how students and faculty are all potential bystanders that can make a difference in ending this. There are three main components to the Green Dot training method: the single choice made by a bystander in the moment, a social movement across individuals on campus and a shared vision held by the Auburn Family to keep our campus free of sexual violence. If each act of sexual violence was a red dot on a map of our campus, then a bystander stepping in to help would be a green dot. Auburn wants campus to be covered in green dots, and to accomplish this mission, they seek to “establish a community that does not tolerate violence.” When the Auburn Family completely rejects the con-

cept of power-based violence and sexual violence being tolerated, then sexual violence will be eradicated. To become a “Green Dot,” intervene and be an active bystander that gets involved, not one that sits back and watches. Whether you know the person or do not know the person involved in a situation of power-based violence, Green Dot emphasizes that stepping in can change the outcome of the situation. Becoming an active bystander that saves someone’s life and protects them is part of being protective as part of the Auburn Family. Green Dot training highlights that a campus covered in Green Dots sends the message that power-based violence is not accepted or tolerated at Auburn University. To report your act of being a Green Dot, go to the website WE.auburn and fill out the logistics of how you were a Green Dot, for example, where the incident occurred. If you have ever been a victim of sexual violence or know someone who needs information on how to receive help, please utilize the following sources Auburn University has available to you.

TO REPORT YOUR ACT OF BEING A GREEN DOT Go to the website WE.auburn SAFE HARBOR 334-844-7233 or safeharbor@ auburn.edu for non time-sensitive questions POLICE/EMERGENCY Dial 911


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How to survive game days in Jordan-Hare By JOHN KOO Sports Writer

It’s Sept. 8, and Auburn is louder than usual today. Half an hour before the game starts sounds reasonable, so you get dressed in your Auburn gear and step out toward Jordan-Hare. The streets are blocked off, tents are set up and everyone is smiling. There are a lot more people than you thought there would be, and everything is chaotic. You’re not sure which entrance to go into but manage to find some students and stand in line. You feel so unprepared and wish that you could start the day over. The football season starts less than a month after move-in day, and while you are still trying to settle into campus life, the thought of how to spend your game day may never cross your mind. Auburn game days will be one of the most memorable experiences during your time at Auburn, and you should do everything in your power to make it the best that it can be. Here’s some advice on how to survive game day. Rewind. It’s Sept. 8, the first home game against Alabama State. BEFORE THE GAME This is the hardest part. Take it step by step and have a plan. Trust me, you’re not going to just wing your first

game day. Know when the game starts, and plan to be there early to stand in line or meet friends. Some games have color themes, so make sure you dress in the appropriate Auburn gear. Ignited Card This is essentially your ticket for all sporting events at Auburn, and without it, you will not be allowed into the game. Make sure that you stop by Auburn Arena with your student I.D. and get one a few weeks before the game. STUDENT GATES/POLICIES The student gates are 5,6 and 7. The gates open approximately two hours before kick-off, and it’s best to get there at least an hour before. Jordan-Hare has a clear bag policy, and you should check out all the other rules on Auburn’s website. Tailgate or hangout After you understand exactly what to do in order to get into Jordan-Hare, feel free to go and meet up with your friends. Some games are at night, which means you have the whole day to tailgate or hang out. DURING THE GAME You’re in. Now just find your seat and wait for the game to start. STUDENT SECTION The student section is toward the left when you enter the gates. To give you a general picture, it covers a large part of the seating by the southern end zone, under the videoboard, to the 40-yard line on the East side

of the stadium. Make sure to look this up as well, or follow those in front of you. SCHOOL SPIRIT Once you are seated, grab a shaker. Auburn, like many schools, has chants and songs that are constantly playing with the help of the cheerleaders and band. Hopefully, you learn them at Camp War Eagle, but if not, you will eventually get the hang of it. Watch out for random dancing, swag surfs and any other surprises Jordan-Hare brings. ENJOY IT From player introductions to the last second, Jordan-Hare is as energetic as it gets. Don’t be afraid to cheer and scream every play. Auburn has a reputation for being one of the best student sections — make sure that you are contributing. AFTER THE GAME Auburn football was undefeated at home last year, so hopefully, your adrenaline is pumping after a great performance by our team. Your day is still not over because now it’s time to roll Toomer’s. Everyone has heard about it. It’s just been named the best sports tradition in America. Whether you’re taking toilet paper or not, go and experience it. There’s nothing else like it. Auburn home game days are what you make of them. There are only six of them in a year — soak it all in. See you at Jordan-Hare.

FILE PHOTO


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Imagine a map where each time a red dot appears, it represents a moment when words, choices or behaviors contribute to sexual assault, dating/ domestic violence, stalking, bullying or abuse. Now imagine there are green dots appearing on that map. A green dot appears on our campus every moment when words, choices and behaviors communicate intolerance of violence.

REAL LIFE GREEN DOTS Pulling a friend out of a high risk situation Checking on a colleague you are worried about Displaying an awareness poster in an office Utilizing social media to support WE.auburn

*

ANY INDIVIDUAL CHOICE AT ANY MOMENT TO MAKE YOUR COMMUNITY SAFER

Distract, delegate, direct Consider realistic options if you are a bystander in a situation where something seems “off” to you or that seems to be escalating in severity. Could you be direct with the people involved? Could you delegate to someone else who could help? Could you distract them by asking for directions or to use their phone so the situation is interrupted?

additional opportunities Consider green dot opportunities that we have every day. Consider the question: If a friend, co-worker, or group member were introduced to your social group, workplace, church, organization, how would they know two things: 1. VIOLENCE ISN’T TOLERATED 2. EVERYONE IS EXPECTED TO DO THEIR PART wear a green dot pin or button spread the word through social media learn about local resources share about green dot with friends request a green dot training for your organization or group

for more information please visit https://www.livethegreendot.com /

BE THE DOT, BE THE DIFFERENCE #weDOTauburn @auburnhealth wp.auburn.edu/healthandwellness/

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football

hitting the road for au By NATHAN KING

Auburn turned in losses there. The other three away games — Missouri, Arkansas, Texas A&M — averaged to be 10.7 hour car rides. It’s a miracle both postseason games were played in familiar Atlanta. 2018 knows no such traveling difficulties. Complete with a season opener back at Mercedes-Benz Stadium (eek!), Auburn’s road slate this coming season allows fans the opportunity to say they went to every football game their freshman year, given they’re able.

Summer Managing Editor

For die-hard Auburn football fans who love traveling to every game with the team, last season was a bother. When your closest road games are in South Carolina and Louisiana, that’s a problem. Clemson and LSU were the most manageable trips, but, of course,

VS. WASHINGTON HUSKIES (ATLANTA) — SEPT. 1, 2018 Just when Auburn thought it might be getting off the hook with the Clemson series concluding, another playoff contender enters from stage (very) north. The colossal Week 1 throwdown in the Benz should be one of, if not the most, influential game of the week. Both teams have playoff aspirations this season behind stellar defenses and a Heisman hopeful under center. Luckily for Tiger fans, this should be a pseu-

AT ALABAMA CRIMSON TIDE (TUSCALOOSA, ALA.) — NOV. 24, 2018 If you thought last year’s “Amen Corner” was bad for Auburn, how about playing both national championship teams on the road? Two of Auburn’s final three games of the regular season are enough to boost its strength of schedule into the top 10. Playing the defending champs on their turf is no small task, but as any football fan in the state knows, the past goes out the window in the Iron Bowl. Friends are easy to find in Tuscaloosa, and if you don’t have any from your high school, try making some connections. For all the flak the respective schools catch in the fall, there is a mutual respect between the two — and probably a shared hatred of Georgia. A lot of Auburn fans grew up rooting for the Crimson Tide and vice versa. Once the conversation moves past Saturday night’s game, a trip to

do home game. It’s a two-hour trip to Atlanta from campus, and the game will more than likely be one of ESPN’s night caps, meaning the whole trip can be done in a day. Washington fans, on the other hand, will need to carve out a long and expensive weekend to traverse the states and see their Huskies open the season. There’s plenty to do in Atlanta before the game, and although traffic will be dreadful heading home, a victory will inject momentum into Auburn’s upcoming homestand.

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

AT MISSISSIPPI STATE BULLDOGS (STARKVILLE, MISS.) — OCT. 6, 2018 Aside the obviously nightmarish November at Georgia and Alabama, the upstart Bulldogs might be Auburn’s biggest true road threat in 2018. It should be a great game, as State will return star QB Nick Fitzgerald paired with new head coach and offensive mastermind Joe Moorhead. Auburn fans will be catching football fever at this point, coming off a four-game homestand against Alabama State, LSU, Arkansas and Southern Miss, the longest stretch of consecutive home games since 2016. The showdown in Starkville could be an 11 a.m. CST kick like it was two seasons ago, or it could be primetime game if both teams are playing well. If it’s the former, the four-hour drive becomes that much more daunting. No matter the kick time, Auburn students should make note to inquire about friends of friends in Starkville early in the year if planning to attend the game. MSU knocks out of state tuition for Alabamians at a fairly average ACT score, making it a popular choice for students who want the SEC experience but want to get away from the Auburn-Alabama bind.

AT GEORGIA BULLDOGS (ATHENS, GA.) — NOV. 10, 2018 Athens is often compared to LSU in terms of its rambunctious and wily fanbase, but if you’re willing to weather the storm, Sanford Stadium is a must-see. UGA is arguably the hottest program in the country and is rapidly joining the likes of Clemson and Alabama as perennial national title contenders. If nothing else, seeing a budding dynasty in person in The Deep South’s Oldest Rivalry should be reason enough to make the three-hour drive from Auburn, as there’s nearly no doubt this will be a night game. Much will ride on this matchup, including the pecking order of the conference and, ultimately, the SEC Championship teams. Auburn will be out for revenge after an embarrassing loss in Atlanta last year, and Georgia should be hungry for the same reason (different game). If Auburn can pull it off, you’ll want to be there.


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SPOTLIGHT

Meet Camp War Eagle counselor Whitney Say By STEPHEN LANZI Staff Writer

When most people come up with a mythical animal-human combination, it’s typically something like what the Greek myths had. But, when picking out her identifier as a Camp War Eagle counselor, Whitney Say showed her Louisiana roots when she thought of cropping her face onto a crawfish. Most people from Baton Rouge attend the school that’s right in their backyard like much of Say’s family did. However, one of her aunts was passionate about another school — Auburn. Because of how much her aunt had loved her Auburn experience, Say decided to take a tour, and she said that, as most students do on their tour, she fell in love with the Auburn Family. She said her experience thus far has been nothing short of what she expected. Say said that she loved the campus on her visit. For her, it all started at CWE, which is why she wanted to be a counselor herself, so that she could give the same experience to many incoming students. “I know whenever I came in, I had been to one Auburn foot-

ball game ever, and I’m sitting in the pep rally reading my little yellow book with all these random cheers that I had never heard in my life, and I was so confused, but at the same time, so excited to get to know what all this stuff meant and the passion behind it all,” Say said. “So, it’s exciting that I get to pass that onto freshmen this summer.” Say, a rising junior, is a pre-dental student studying biomedical sciences. She is also working toward a minor in business because she plans on eventually opening up her own practice. “A lot of the dentists that I’ve talked to said the one regret they have is not taking accounting classes in college,” Say said. The warm embrace at CWE was continued throughout her freshmen year and beyond. A great deal of this came from all the involvement she has been a part of. From being the assistant vice president for marketing organization for SGA to frequently volunteering with Impact, Say has found friends and great opportunities with involvement. She has also gotten involved with Auburn Tooth Fairy, which is a new organization that spreads education to local elementary schools about oral hygiene. “I couldn’t imagine my college experience being anywhere

VIA FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE OFFICE

Whitney Say is a CWE counselor this fall.

else,” Say said. “From the teachers always going out of their way to help students to people that I’ve met through involvement through SGA and other things, I’ve had an incredible experience so far, and I can’t wait to continue it.”


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music

best spots for live music By KAILEY BETH SMITH Staff Writer

If you are looking for places to catch the best live music in Auburn, look no further. The Auburn music scene is alive and well, and The Plainsman has curated a short list of some of the best places to catch local artists jamming out. AVONDALE BAR AND TAPROOM Overlooking downtown Auburn, the Avondale Bar and Taproom hosts numerous gatherings per month, showcasing some of the most talented local artists in an easy-going atmosphere. Views of the sunset through the front windows welcome listeners in as they sip their drinks, carefully crafted by Avondale’s bartenders. JOHN EMERALD DISTILLING COMPANY Located in the heart of downtown Opelika, this is a warehouse-style distillery with a special listening atmosphere. Concerts and shows take place in the outdoor space next to the distillery. Listeners are exposed to harmonious sounds and picturesque views of the night sky, dotted with delicate stringed lights floating above their heads. COFFEE CAT If you are looking for some java to go with your jam, look no further than Auburn’s own Coffee Cat. This small coffee shop is located on Tichenor Avenue, next to City Hall, and hosts monthly concerts in their open space. STANDARD DELUXE A tiny dot on the map 15 minutes from Auburn, this place is the home of the annual Waverly 280 Boogie and is a local favorite. They host shows Out in The Yard and often serve up Mama Mocha’s coffee and local cuisine to accompany the sultry Southern sounds that roll over The Plains. INGRID SCHNADER / PHOTOGRAPHER


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R E A D Y.

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S E T.

P L A Y.

free food // hundreds of prizes from local businesses free t-shirts // massages // games // giant inflatables war eagle warrior challenge // distance cycling photo booth // soccer darts // giant jousting ready. set. play. // follow us @auburncampusrec the best thing you’ll do on the second day of class

AUGUST 21, 2018 // 5-7 P.M. // AT THE REC

G E T R E C D A U B U R N . C O M


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living

what should be on your dorm shopping list By JOSH FISHER Photographer

You are going to have a lot of lists thrown at you during Camp War Eagle, and those lists are going to tell you about all sorts of things you need to buy for your dorm. As someone who lived in a dorm all of my freshman year, some of the stuff they said would be vital I did not touch until I threw it into the trash on move out day. Here’s some stuff that you truly will need. A GOOD FAN You do not have to go out and buy a fancy bladeless Dyson fan, but depending on the dorm you end up in, a fan is a necessity for some of the older dorms. A fan will help a lot with keeping the room cool during those hot days, and when it gets cold, a fan can help keep the room from being stifling with the heater blasting.

MICROWAVABLE BOWLS One of the mainstays of a college students’ dorm is the microwave, so it’s a good idea to get a couple of different size bowls that are microwave safe. Having the different sizes allows flexibility with what you can make in your microwave, whether it is rice, ramen or rigatoni. TOILET PAPER Now it may seem like a simple and obvious thing to say, but at Auburn, toilet paper has a big use outside of the bathroom. Every time an Auburn sports team wins a home game, Tiger fans will march down to Toomer’s Corner and cover the trees their with toilet paper. And after football games, every store is going to be sold out by the time you get out of the student section and down to the corner of College and Magnolia. Make sure to get yourself some cheap stuff so you get more bang for your buck.

JOSH FISHER / PHOTOGRAPHER

Summer and Fall Calendars Cheat Sheet 2018 Summer Semester May 17: Classes Begin May 28: No class, Memorial Day June 21-23: No class July 4: No class, 4th of July July 27: Classes end Aug.1-3 Exams Aug. 4: Commencement

May 21-23: Drop Course Penalty Days Drop with only $100 fee May 23: Last day to drop with no grade June 20: Last Withdraw Day. W assigned

Mini-Semester 1 May 17: Classes Begin May 28: No class, Memorial Day June 20: Classes End June 22-23: Exams

May 21-23: Drop Course Penalty Days Drop with only $100 fee May 23: Last day to drop with no grade June 4: Last Withdraw Day. W assigned

Mini-Semester II June 25: Classes Begin July 4: No class, 4th of July July 27: Classes End Aug. 1-3: Exams

June 27-29: Drop Course Penalty Days Drop with only $100 fee June 29: Last day to drop with no grade July 11: Last Withdraw Day. W assigned

P

2018 Fall Semester Aug. 20: Classes Begin Aug. 27-Sept. 10: Drop Course Penalty Days Drop with only $100 fee Sept. 3: Labor Day Sept. 10: 15th Class Day Last day to drop from course with no grade assignment Last day for potential tuition refund for dropped classes Oct. 9: Mid-Semester - 36th Class Day Oct. 11-12: No class, Fall Break Oct. 18: 41st Class Day Student deadline for request to move finals Nov. 2: Last Day to Withdraw Last day to withdraw from course with no grade penalty. “W” assigned if dropped. Nov. 19-23: No Class, Thanksgiving Break Dec. 7: Classes End Dec. 8-9: Study/Reading Days Dec. 10-14: Final Exam Period Dec 15: Commencement


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Summer 2018

CHIP BROWNLEE / EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


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THE MEADOWS

5bd/5ba $895 Per Bedroom Utilities Included Walking Distance To Campus

• Covered Patio • Covered Deck • Security System • Parking Included

• Stainless Steel Appliances • 2 Stackable Washing Machines • 2 Stackable Dryers

• Hardwood Floors • 2 LED TV’s “Living Room & Covered Deck”

THE MEADOWS

One of Auburn’s Newest Student Housing Developments

Call 334.707.3152 Email Us @ themeadowsauburn@outlook.com


CAMPUS RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

AUBURN WESLEY FOUNDATION

By KAILEY BETH SMITH Staff Writer

AWF made its home in Auburn 80 years ago, and it serves as Auburn’s affiliate with the United Methodist Church. Their facility is located at 191 South Gay St., and their doors are always open. Dinner and Bible studies take place each week on Thursday, and worship occurs every Sunday night.

AUBURN CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP ACF is a group of students committed to loving and serving the Lord. This non-denominational organization hosts events every Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Summer 2018

BAPTIST CAMPUS MINISTRY The BCM’s mission is to grow, connect, engage and mobilize students in their faith. Their facility is located on South College Street and is open to all students. Their weekly events include worship on Tuesdays and fellowship on Thursdays.

REFORMED UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIP

One of the largest campus organizations, RUF meets weekly on campus in classrooms determined each semester. For a calendar of their special events, visit their website.

CATHOLIC STUDENT MINISTRY

AUCSO is Auburn’s Catholic Student Fellowship. They partner with St. Michael’s Church to educate, involve and commission followers of God.

HILLEL

MUSLIM STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION

Affiliated with Congregation Beth Shalom, The Auburn University Hillel and Jewish Student Organization emphasizes inclusion and diversity, as they strive to bring together Auburn Family members from all walks of life. They are headquartered in the Student Center Involvement Suite.

This organization is all about education and understanding, centered on issues within the Muslim faith. Located in the Cross Cultural Center for Excellence in the Student Center, they welcome the Auburn community to be a part of their ministry.

For more information and other religious groups on campus, visit AU Involve


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SPOTLIGHT

Meet Camp War Eagle counselor Hamilton Wasnick By HANNAH LESTER Staff Writer

Hamilton Wasnick came to Auburn from Seattle, Washington, as a freshman. He served as a camp counselor last summer and is now a head counselor for Camp War Eagle. Wasnick, senior in history, is hoping to pursue a career in the Central Intelligence Agency. As a freshman attending CWE, Wasnick recalled people telling him he could be a counselor. “I was reading into the Camp War Eagle program and it talked about being a servant leader and serving others,” Wasnick said. “That’s when it hit me, the job is more or less you get to be a servant for the freshman. What that looks like is being somebody’s first genuine connection at Auburn, that’s like an actual student here.” He is excited to share his Auburn experiences with incoming freshman. “You have the opportunity to be somebody’s first like ‘hey I live on campus, I’ll hang out with you, I want to help you with what you’re going through,’” Wasnick said. “And to me, that

opportunity is so cool and so valuable. You get to be somebody’s first connection at Auburn University.” Wasnick has had many experiences outside of CWE during his past three years at Auburn University. Ultimate frisbee drew Wasnick in from the start. “I grew up playing ultimate frisbee in Seattle and I knew that Auburn had a team that was pretty good,” Wasnick said. “My senior year of high school they made nationals for the first time, and I was like ‘ok a nationals level team,’ but I didn’t really know much other than that. I came out and absolutely just fell in love with the team … Those guys are my brothers, they’re my family. I would do anything for them.” Wasnick has also served as an Resident Assistant in South Donahue Residence Hall Wasnick has gone from a freshman attending, to a counselor and now head counselor. “I would like to say thank you to the University for this opportunity,” Wasnick said. “To my mom and my dad, especially, my family, my sister and my older brother. Without y’all, I don’t know if I would be here … I’m so appreciative of this University and all the members of its family.”

VIA CAMP WAR EAGLE WEBSITE

Hamilton Wasnick is a CWE counselor this fall.

His advice to incoming freshman is to call home and talk to family, Wasnick also has advice for parents. “To the parents, your students are going to the best university in this country and I guarantee you they are thankful for it,” Wasnick said. “I understand sometimes it’s going to be difficult for you guys to understand us, but I ask that you just give us more patience, let us grow and thank you.”

THIS IS REALIZING YOU MADE THE RIGHT DECISION. The College of Liberal Arts offers numerous study abroad programs in incredible places across the globe. From summers in Shanghai to exchange programs in Paris, our students have exciting opportunities to gain new perspectives, become globally minded and embark on thrilling adventures, all while making unforgettable memories and lifelong friendships. For more information about the College of Liberal Arts and studying abroad, visit our website at www.cla.auburn.edu.

THIS IS AUBURN.


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AUDM.BBFD.BSU. IBP.ISO.SGA.UPC. Deciphering organization acronyms AUDM AUDM stands for Auburn University Dance Marathon. This is Auburn’s extension of Dance Marathon, a nationwide program in which each participating institution raises funds for their local Children’s Miracle Network hospital.

By SAMANTHA STRUNK Staff Writer

BSU

BBFD

BSU stands for Black Student Union. Its mission is “to represent the interest and concerns of Black Students at Auburn University and to bring together all aspects of Black Student life for the purpose of improving the campus environment and encourage involvement of Black students in all campus activities.”

BBFD stands for Beat Bama Food Drive. Auburn University and the East Alabama Food Bank team up against the University of Alabama and the West Alabama Food Bank. Each team attempts to raise more non-perishable food items than the other to give back to its respective community.

UPC UPC stands for University Program Council. UPC is Auburn’s student-led programming board. UPC plans a variety of events throughout the year to promote a positive and engaging atmosphere for students. They host events like stadium movie nights and Auburn Airwaves.

IBP

ISO

SGA

IBP stands for International Buddy Program. The organization pairs international students with local American students in efforts to foster relationships, share cultures and facilitate smooth transitions into life at Auburn for all involved.

ISO stands for International Student Organization. ISO works “to improve multinational understanding and promote relationships between people of different cultures.” Further, ISO aids international students in their transitions to Auburn University.

SGA stands for Student Government Association. SGA is involved in many areas of campus through programs and initiatives. It also has a hand in a number of internal and external affairs, both with faculty and the city.


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Summer 2018

TIGERS 2018 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE WEEK

DATE

OPPONENT

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Sept. 1, 2018 Sept. 8, 2018 Sept. 15, 2018 Sept. 22, 2018 Sept. 29, 2018 Oct. 6, 2018 Oct. 13, 2018 Oct. 20, 2018 Oct. 27, 2018 Nov. 3, 2018 Nov. 10, 2018 Nov. 17, 2018 Nov. 24, 2018

Washington Alabama State LSU Arkansas Southern Miss at Miss State Tennessee at Ole Miss Off Week Texas A&M at Georgia Liberty at Alabama

FILE PHOTO / THE AUBURN PLAINSMAN

SCORE

P


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AWARDS

Harrison School of Pharmacy ranked in top 25 nationally By STAFF The Auburn Plainsman

Drug Store News has ranked Auburn’s Harrison School of Pharmacy among the top 25 pharmacy programs in the country. The national trade magazine listed the top 25 best pharmacy programs in the country to help hiring managers find the right pharmacists for specific retail environments, the University said in a news release. The top programs are all accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education. “Being recognized as one of the top 25 pharmacy schools in the country is a testament to the hard work of our students, faculty and staff,” said School of Pharmacy Dean Richard A. Hansen. Hansen said he believes Auburn offers one of the best student experiences in the country and a new “Practice-Ready Curriculum” adds to that. “Auburn and the Harrison School of Pharmacy have always been on the cutting edge of pharmacy education and this curriculum continues that trend as we prepare our graduates to step right into practice and be successful practitioners,” Hansen said. The Harrison School of Pharmacy — which has locations on Auburn’s main campus and in Mobile, Alabama — recently rolled out its new Practice-Ready Curriculum, which reimagines how pharmacists are trained. The school’s mobile location is through a partnership with the University of South Alabama. The curriculum is designed around key competencies that every graduating pharmacist must master, and the teaching methods covering those competencies are integrated across all aspects of practice with authentic learning environments and assessments, according to the University. Students are allowed greater opportunities for electives through the program’s flexibility, and they’re allowed to focus on areas pertinent to their specific career paths. “We believe the Auburn practice-ready graduate will be the best prepared pharmacist ever trained,” Hansen said. “At the Harrison School of Pharmacy, along with an innovative curriculum, we have an outstanding faculty that is not just made up of leaders in the classroom, but also in practice, as most of our faculty continue to practice in locations around the state.”

FILE PHOTO

Pharmacy students give out flee flu shots.

VIA AUBURN UNIVERSITY

The Harrison School of Pharmacy was ranked in the top 25 nationally.


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sports

changes coming to jordan-hare in the fall By TYLER ROUSH Sports Writer

The home of Auburn football is undergoing some renovations. With a new $31.4 million, 44,000-square-foot facility at the southwest corner of Jordan-Hare Stadium, Auburn will be provided with a new locker room, press box, club seating area and a recruiting area that is decorated by defining moments and relics of Auburn football. Though the corner of Heisman Drive and Donahue Drive will be redefined, the Auburn Board of Trustees also approved plans for a video board for the south end

zone that will be half the size of its northern counterpart that was installed in 2015. It is expected for both renovation projects to be complete prior to the 2018 season. “It will be the best of the best,” former Athletic Director Jay Jacobs said in a school release. “It will be the gold standard in college athletics recruiting.” In addition to the corner’s developments, the home locker room will undergo a 16,000-foot renovation. “It will be a phenomenal facility, not only on Saturday, but will be able to be used throughout the year for a host of different banquets and events,” Jacobs said. “It’s going to add so much to our game day experience and also to the exterior of our stadium.”

OF THOSE SURVEYED IN A 2013 UNIVERSITY POLL REPORTED THAT THEY “MOSTLY OR ALWAYS” USED A CONDOM IN RECENT SEXUAL ENCOUNTERS. WHICH MEANS HALF WEREN’T PROTECTED

99% BIRTH CONTROL PILLS WORK

CAN TEST FOR STDs AND HELP YOU FIND TREATMENT IF YOU CONTRACT ONE

YOU MAY NOT KNOW IF YOUR PARTNER HAS AN STD OR STI AND THEY MAY NOT EITHER

OF THE TIME BUT OFFER NO PROTECTION FROM STDs OR STIs. CONDOMS WORK 98% OF THE TIME WHEN USED PROPERLY

DECISION

NO ONE CAN TELL YOU WHAT IS OR IS NOT RIGHT FOR YOU BUT BETTER SAFE THAN SORRY

ABOUT

ONLY

50%

THE MEDICAL CLINIC

HIGH RISK: ALL TYPES OF SEXUAL ACTIVITY INVOLVE RISK, BUT SOME ARE MORE RISKY THAN OTHERS. PENETRATION WITHOUT CONDOMS OR PROTECTION INCREASES THE RISK OF CONTRACTING AN STD OR STI

65%

VAGINAL, ANAL AND ORAL SEX

SAFE SEX SCOOP YOUR THE DECISION TO HAVE SEX IS

VIA AU FACILITIES MANAGEMENT WEBSITE

COITUS INTERRUPTUS OR

PULLING

OF AUBURN STUDENTS ARE

OUT

BUT LESS THAN 45% HAD INTERCOURSE IN THE LAST MONTH AND MORE THAN 75% ONLY HAVE TWO OR LESS PARTNERS A YEAR

YOU’RE NOT PROTECTED FROM STDS, EITHER

SEXUALLY ACTIVE

IS FAR LESS RELIABLE THAN CONDOMS OR BIRTH CONTROL, WORKING ONLY ABOUT 90% OF THE TIME IF DONE PERFECTLY.

INFORMATION FROM THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH AND THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH AND WELLNESS SERVICE / GRAPHIC: CHIP BROWNLEE / EDITOR-IN-CHIEF


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

ss wellne why you should try intramural sports By NATHAN KING Summer Managing Editor

Intramural sports on campus offer students an outlet to play their favorite sport on a level of a competition of their choosing. Intramural sports allow for leagues to play competitively or casually. In order to form a team, an interest form must be completed on the campus recreation portal for intramurals. Once filed, the program will call for a team captain to be present at a meeting to set up the league. Because the games need to be played, the program also needs referees and umpires. Classes are offered for the positions, and students can apply to work as a ref at the aforementioned portal as well.

With Auburn intramural sports, students get the full experience of the nation’s top recreational athletic facilities, including the intramural fields behind the softball complex. Any given season will last a few months, and the schedule will be emailed to a team and its captain. Once on a team, whether it be with friends or strangers, the games will be what you make them. No previous experience is required for any of the sports, and participation at all games isn’t mandatory in every league. Intramural sports at Auburn encompass individual and team sports for both male and female students. Team sports include flag football, sand volleyball and soccer. Special events and tournaments such as tennis, golf and swimming and diving are also held during the year.

FILE PHOTO

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ts armelissa mccarthy brings hollywood to the plains INGRID SCHNADER / PHOTOGRAPHER

Melissa McCarthy takes a selfie with a fan ahead of the premiere of her new movie, “Life of the Party.”

By LILY JACKSON Managing Editor

On the first scorching day of Alabama’s spring, Melissa McCarthy and the cast from “Life of the Party,” threw toilet paper, day drank at Moe’s and walked a red carpet to the sound of “Bodda Getta” and “War Eagle.” Debby Ryan, mean-girl Jennifer in the movie, said she secretly wished for Auburn to win the competition. Warner Bros. partnered with New Line Media to pit college campuses against each other off the football field. Only one school would win the world premiere of “Life of the Party,” and to Ryan’s pleasure, the Tigers took the win. Ryan, originally from Huntsville, was happy to join her fellow Alabamians once more. “I went creepy deep diving into the town,” Ryan said. The rest of the cast enjoyed their time wandering in the orange and blue town, as well. As they walked through campus on the Monday of finals week, students did not let their stress show. At the on-campus celebration, the cast threw toilet paper into the Toomer’s Oaks with the help of Student Government President Dane Block. By way of forest green golf carts, they made their way to Haley Concourse and parked in front of Ha-

ley Bookstore for interviews and a donut party. Matt Walsh, who plays Dan, the father in his mid-life crisis, said being back on a college campus brought back memories of his college days. The team stopped for barbecue and beer at Moe’s. The easy pace of it all reminded him of carefree days of day drinking. “I was a good student in college — I didn’t just party,” Walsh said. “I do love the academic environment for learning or pursuing anything you want. It’s like, in America you’ve got this time to figure out, ‘This is what I want to do with my life.’ We are indulged with this self-exploration if we have a little money saved up.” That self-exploration is exactly what takes shape in the movie when mother and wife Deanna, played by McCarthy, goes back to college to get her degree after her husband goes off with a realtor, played by Julie Bowen. From struggles with public speaking to sneaking out of a fraternity house without her daughter seeing, McCarthy’s character takes a crash course on college life. McCarthy said shooting with young actors made the film for her. She said their energy and dedication to the product was infectious. “These women came in strong and confident and really kind, which is a beautiful mix,” McCarthy said. “They are all very dif-

ferent, but on the first day, we all clicked in such a weird way. It just seemed like we had known each other already. We had weird jokes immediately and for whatever reason, no one felt nervous.” McCarthy said working with the strong woman cast gave her hope for the future of women. Julie Bowen, who plays Marcie the mistress, grew up in a house of women and went to all girls schools growing up. To her, women were always supposed to do what they want and be what they wanted to be. “I never got the idea that girls shouldn’t be running the world,” Bowen said. It only occurred to her later in life that other’s do not feel the same way. She felt right at home with the cast of “Life of the Party.” Stephen Root, who plays Mike, felt right at home on Auburn’s campus, as he is an SEC man, too. Having graduated from the University of Florida, Root was happy to be back in the South. “I wish I was 22 again,” Root said. He specifically enjoyed the Southern food at Acre the night before, raving about the collard greens, butter beans and shrimp and grits.

» See MCCARTHY. 55


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MCCARTHY » From 54

Luke Benward, who plays a fraternity brother named Jack, differed from his character in that he did not attend college. He did some research with friends who attend the University of Tennessee. He, too, was happy to be back in the South having been from Franklin, Tennessee. “They have quite the Greek life there, and it’s a very SEC school,” Benward said. “That’s the only real taste I got, and the rest I just assumed from Barstool Sports or whatever.” McCarthy said her memory of this SEC school will be the “innate excitement.” She said walking the campus was exciting, thrilling and inspiring. She left memories of the premiere, donuts and a $50,000 check for the Jay and Susie Gogue Performing Arts Center. A stage door will be named after her. “Walking that campus — I don’t know — I got a little choked up almost,” McCarthy said. “It’s all these amazing kids, and it’s finals week for God sakes, and they are still happy. They are just starting their lives and figuring what they want and who they want to be. That’s such an exciting thing to be in the midst of. You can kind of feel it.”

INGRID SCHNADER / PHOTOGRAPHER

The stars of “Life of the Party” pose for pictures and greet fans on the red carpet ahead of the premiere.


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sports

enjoying the student section

By NATHAN KING Summer Managing Editor

BASEBALL America’s pastime is an enjoyable one on The Plains, as games at Plainsman Park feature some of the best amenities of any sport on campus. Students have a specific student section reserved along the third-base line, however, once the game gets rolling, you can find a seat in most places in the stands. The games are long, yes, but the comfortable seats and entertaining nature of one of the best teams in the conference makes for a relaxing but thrilling outing. And if you can’t make it in the park or you want to grill out on your truck bed with some friends while you catch the game, venture up to the top floor of the stadium deck and hang with the “Plainsman Parking Lot.”

BASKETBALL For both men’s and women’s hoops, there is one simple rule: be loud. When Auburn is on defense, The Jungle, Auburn’s basketball student section, erupts with one of the loudest roars in the conference. With the Tigers experiencing their best season in recent history last year, students were quick to claim that basketball games were sometimes even more fun than football. If you want the best seats in the house, you’ll have to get there early. Gates open an hour and a half before tip-off, but you’ll need to secure your spot in line before that at conference games. Outside, be patient. Bring card games or bring friends. But definitely don’t cut, lest you be tabbed “that person” for the remainder of the season.

FOOTBALL After Jordan-Hare finished the 2017 season undefeated, fans should be excited for what the stadium has in store for an encore. Gus Malzahn’s 2018 home slate is manageable in comparison to most SEC gauntlets, as the Tigers’ home conference opponents next year were a combined 24-26 last season with no bowl wins. Auburn’s trio of non-conference opponents — Alabama State, Southern Miss and Liberty — figure to be relatively easy, double-digit victories for what should be a highly ranked Auburn squad. The possibility of back-to-back undefeated seasons on Pat-Dye Field aside, students should always be amped for Auburn football seasons; it’s what makes this school and its community go round in the fall. The football student section is perched in the southeastern corner of the stadium, next to the Auburn University Marching Band and under the largest video board in college football. This positioning alone is enough to liven a student’s game-day experience with trumpeting tunes from the band and bass-booming effects from the Jumbotron. The crowd and team will feed off the band and video board, but it’s the students’ job to make the energy churns each quarter. There will be low points; Auburn will trail. But just as the faithful rely on their team to produce on the gridiron, the Tigers rely on their fans to rattle opposing offenses and keep momentum in favor of the orange and blue. When the clock hits zero, you’ll be disappointed if you didn’t give the game your all. There’s nothing to lose, and the friends you’re there with will be just as crazy. So be loud and consistent, and maybe you’ll play a part in making Toomer’s Corner roll-able that night.

SOFTBALL If you’re seeking the stereotypical relaxing style of baseball, veer away from Auburn softball. Tiger softball fans are some of the most loyal on The Plains. Outings at Jane B. Moore Field are short, action-packed and will almost always pack a surprise. Like baseball, students have seats reserved on the third-base line, but unlike at Plainsman Park, it’s strongly discouraged to go looking for better seating mid-game. Auburn has been one of the best teams in the nation on the women’s diamond for almost a decade, and the Tigers will more than likely host a few regionals over the course of your college career, giving one of the best chances to see a major Auburn sport play in the postseason live.

GYMNASTICS Gymnastics is different. There’s never much of a hostile feel to an Auburn gymnastics meet, despite the SEC being the nation’s leader in the sport. Win or lose, Auburn gymnasts are always all smiles, happy with their own performances. It’s common to clap for other team’s routines and showings, even though Auburn’s “gymnasties” will do their best to comically imitate them. Gymnastics meets pack out the student section, so be wary of arriving late. If you’re looking for an interesting, inspiring and entertaining getaway for your Friday nights, save the dates inside Auburn Arena.

FILE PHOTO


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How to stay healthy By PAUL BROCK Staff Writer

FINDING THE ‘FREE’ FILE PHOTO

How to take advantage of freebies By INGRID SCHNADER Photographer

When you first get to Auburn’s campus, you may feel overwhelmed by all of the events and opportunities that are offered to students. Start your semester right by taking advantage of all Auburn has to offer. First, go see Auburn’s state-of-the-art Recreation and Wellness Center and sign up for some group fitness classes. During the first week of the semester, these classes are free for everyone. The classes utilize different excursive methods such as dancing, biking, jumping on trampolines, swimming and more. They range from 30 minutes to over an hour, and different classes are offered seven days of the week. After the first week of the semester ends, a Group Fit Pass is required to take these classes, which costs $50 for a semester or $100 for an annual pass. When you come to The Plains in the fall, you can also take advantage of Welcome Week — a series of events coordinated by the University Program Council. In the past, Welcome Week events have included free food such as pizza, ice cream and waffles. Additionally, these events give new and returning students a chance to get to know some of the organizations and departments on campus. The schedule for the Fall 2018 Welcome Week isn’t

up yet, but check back on the Auburn Guides phone application to keep up to date with the upcoming schedule. Stopping by the concourse in front of the Haley Center on the way to class is a great way to meet people from campus organizations and another way to grab some freebies. The concourse has been known in the past to pass out candy, bubble wrap, popcorn, Scantrons and other essentials. If you really want to see the concourse crowded, come during O-Week from Monday, Aug. 27 to Thursday, Aug. 30. During this week, tents from different student organizations will line the concourse, usually with sign-up sheets so you can get more information. Make an effort to stop by the concourse this week to get involved with some of the organizations on campus. Although football requires students to purchase tickets, your Ignited Card will get you into other sports games for free. Go to the Auburn Arena to get your Ignited Card. In August, sports like soccer and volleyball will be in season, so check those schedules as soon as you move in to Auburn. To see what sports are playing at home, download the Auburn app and click Events. Last, grab a copy of The Plainsman when you move in this fall. Your first copy every week is free, and there are newsstands scattered all around Auburn’s campus and community.

When you come to college for the first time, you will probably have to accept more responsibility than ever before, and for the first time, have complete charge over many aspects of your life. “Everybody is an individual, and their needs are going to be really unique,” said Eric Smith, director of Health Promotion and Wellness Services. Smith said that a major health issue freshmen struggle with is anxiety. “When you’re a freshman, you want to do everything you can,” Smith said. “You’re going to want to join 10 different clubs, and you’re going to want to, at least at the start, go to all your classes,

and you’re going to want to get involved with everything you can under the sun.” Smith said when a student learns how to manage their time well, it goes a long way in reducing their stress. Smith said having a daily routine before going to bed and not watching Netflix late at night can help students go to sleep at reasonable hours. Smith said students often get into bad eating habits while in college and said that talking to a registered dietician at the Office of Health Promotion and Wellness is a great way to establish healthy eating habits. “In our office, we’re big believers in all foods are good foods, but you can’t always eat all the cookies and ice cream you want,” Smith said.


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle To Place an Ad, Call 334-844-9101 or E-mail admanager@theplainsman.com

Summer 2018

Tigermarket

Print Deadline Noon three business days prior to publication

RELEASE DATE– Thursday, May 17, 2018

The Auburn Plainsman

ThePlainsman.com

The Auburn Plainsman

Local News • Campus News • Sports • Opinion • Lifestyle • Entertainment

@TheAUPlainsman

@TheAUPlainsman

@TheAuburnPlainsman

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

ACROSS 1 Selfies, e.g. 5 Consumer protection org. 8 Grey Poupon variety 13 “I must be cruel, __ to be kind”: Hamlet 14 Bar mixer 15 Slip away from 16 __ all-time low 17 “Beat it!” 18 Bit of Blake 19 Trousers in the Liberace Museum? 22 Guffaw syllable 23 Estadio cheer 24 Hardware item 25 Overalls part 28 Aquarium fish 30 Title for Maggie Smith 31 “Mr. Robot” TV network 32 Less colorful African carpet? 35 Morales of Netflix’s “Ozark” 37 Father of octuplets on “The Simpsons” 38 Not yet up 39 Surfeit of sweets? 44 Many a craft beer 45 Folk singer Axton 46 Scenic highway offerings 48 “Absolutely” 49 Hose users: Abbr. 50 Holm of “The Hobbit” 51 GI address 53 Made-to-order drum? 56 Cold dish 59 Island off Tuscany 60 Whodunit canine 61 Interspersed with 62 Nectar flavor 63 User of black lipstick, perhaps 64 Gumption 65 Nursery purchase 66 “Orinoco Flow” singer

DOWN 1 Cook in hot milk, say 2 Since 3 “Homeland” Emmy winner 4 Harmonized, with “in” 5 Lawn game 6 Vanilla 7 Drive someone home? 8 Fan 9 Composer Charles 10 8-Across holder 11 Goes overboard (on) 12 Wedding notice word 14 Forensics facility, briefly 20 Circle dance 21 Unfeeling 25 Masters champ in 2012 and 2014 26 “That’s clear” 27 Meter writer 29 Twin Cities daily, familiarly 30 Home __ 33 Slow-but-steady progress

34 Demolish 35 Former Skype owner 36 Dover fish 40 “Dang!” 41 Some assents 42 Video game figure 43 Spanish lad 47 Inconsistent 50 Boast in a 1987 Michael Jackson hit

52 Lincoln neighbor 53 “__ help you?” 54 Muffin spread 55 Sorcerer in fantasy games 56 “Grace and Frankie” actor Waterston 57 Latin trio word 58 Cured salmon

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

By Jeffrey Wechsler ©2018 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

05/17/18

05/17/18


SummerColumbusCVB-43139 2018

CampWE Program Ad 2018-2-FINAL.pdf

2

4:44 PMPlainsman: Camp War Eagle The Auburn

5/10/18

WKND

Quiet weekend on campus? Head east on Hwy. 280 to one of the most adventurous cities in the South—Columbus, GA. Friday kicks off the fun with Uptown’s Concert Series, live music and fantastic food. Every Saturday starts with Market Days featuring over 200 vendors. And almost every weekend there’s a festival, show or performance— check out our Events page for a to-do list that’s all out packed!

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Auburn-Opelika is discovery. It’s new adventures and forgotten joys. It’s original. It’s authentic.

Log on now to find what

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Camp War Eagle 2018 — The Auburn Plainsman  

Camp War Eagle 2018 — The Auburn Plainsman

Camp War Eagle 2018 — The Auburn Plainsman  

Camp War Eagle 2018 — The Auburn Plainsman

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