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The Auburn Plainsman A SPIRIT THAT IS NOT AFRAID

Thursday, December 1, 2016 Vol. 124, Issue 15, 16 Pages

First copy is free. Additional copies 50 cents per issue.

CAMPUS

DAKOTA SUMPTER / MANAGING EDITOR

Located across from the President’s Home, the memorial consists of seven pillars, each inscribed with a line from the Auburn Creed.

A place to remember

University cuts ribbon on SGA’s Auburn Memorial Corey Williams EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

After nearly 8 months of construction, the Auburn Memorial is complete. The monument was built in remembrance of all Auburn University students, alumni, faculty and staff who have died. The memorial has been in the works for several years, but former SGA President Walker Byrd, along with SGA executive members, made the project a top priority in 2015. The Board of Trustees approved the $1.3 million project in June 2015.

Located across from the President’s Home, the memorial consists of seven pillars, each inscribed with a line from the Auburn Creed. The words are meant to “unify the entire Auburn Family through the traits upon which the University is known: hard work; education; honesty; mind, body, and spirit; obedience to law; the human touch; and service,” according to SGA documents. “Auburn students and the Auburn Family needed a place that would allow peaceful remembrance of the lives of fellow members of the Auburn Family who have passed away,”

said Byrd. “Previously, there was no peaceful place for people to gather to remember a loved one. Students had few options of where they could hold a service or memorial in a peaceful setting. The Auburn Memorial will serve to be that place to memorialize those with a connection to Auburn University.” The memorial sits inside the Garden of Memory. Built by the Garden Club of Alabama, the Garden of Memory was established in 1954 to honor Alabama veterans.

ADMINISTRATION

The project included renovations to the original garden, which is now made up of the memorial, a new seating area, a plaza and a lawn space. “The Auburn Memorial is a project that has been worked on for the past 5+ years,” said SGA president Jesse Westerhouse. “This is a project that gives the Auburn Family a place to go and honor those that have come before us. It is exciting to see this project completed, and know that it is going to impact Auburn for the better for years to come.”

SPORTS

President Gogue reflects on time with University Corey Williams EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

President Jay Gogue has been a university president for almost 17 years. He served as President of New Mexico State University from 2000 to 2003, chancellor of the University of Houston System and president of the University of Houston from 2003 to 2007. Since 2007, he has been the president of Auburn University. "It's been a great ride," Gogue said to The Plainsman. He announced his impending retirement at September's Board of Trustees meeting. "It's probably time. You know, you get old, and you get cantankerous," Gogue joked. He wanted to give the Board of Trustees ample time to search for a new president, Gogue said.

Page 3

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Jay Gogue announced his plans to retire earlier this year.

The walls in Gogue's office are lined with books. He looks forward to doing more of what he loves most after retirement: reading.

"I haven't had much time to read for pleasure," Gogue said. "After I left Auburn and went to work, I probably read 30 books a year. I look forward to free

Page 5

time to read more. I look forward to continue to learn." Gogue's time with the University won't end with his retirement. He plans to stay in the area and said he might even come back and teach a few classes — throughout his career he's taught a variety of courses, from literature to engineering. Out of all the universities Gogue has been involved with, he said he believes Auburn students are most concerned with outreach. "Students here are more engaged with out of class activities and concern for the community and developing countries around the world," Gogue said. "It's really impressive to see. I think some of those experiences are what make Auburn people a little bit unique."

Page 7

ADAM SPARKS / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Trey Matthews (28) celebrates after Auburn’s win over LSU.

Auburn likely to play in Sugar Bowl Nathan Deal SPORTS REPORTER

Though its regular season might have ended sourly, Auburn could still have an ending to the 2016 season that’s as sweet as sugar.

Page 15

Despite having four losses, thanks to chaos throughout the league, Auburn was ranked 14 in the College Football Playoff Selection Committee’s penultimate

» See FOOTBALL, 2 INDEX Campus

3

Community 5

‘Bikepacking’

Most significant rain in months

Soccer makes program history

Sarah’s style

Sports

7

Opinion

11

Lifestyle

13


News 2

The Auburn Plainsman

FOOTBALL » From 1

top 25 on Tuesday night, making it the SEC’s second-highest-ranked team. That means that, if No. 1 Alabama takes care of business against No. 15 Florida in the SEC Championship Game on Saturday, the Tigers will clinch a berth in this year’s Sugar Bowl to face the Big 12 champion (which will come down to the Oklahoma-Oklahoma State game). The Sugar Bowl wasn’t where Auburn expected to land after its 1-2 start nor after its poor finish, but because they beat another four-loss team, LSU, head-tohead in week four, they finished second in the SEC West and in prime position for a New Year’s Six Bowl game. The Tigers have a lot of history with the SEC’s most prestigious bowl. If they do earn a bid to go to New Orleans, the Sugar Bowl will be tied with the Gator Bowl for the most-played bowl game in Auburn history, as both bowls will have hosted the Tigers six times. In its five Sugar Bowl appearances, Auburn is 2-2-1, with an average score of approximately Auburn 14, opponents 18. All but one of Auburn’s appearances in the bowl has been decided by fewer than six points: its first. After the 1971 season, the Tigers faced Oklahoma, which very well could be their bowl op-

ponent this year. If so, Auburn will hope it didn’t go how this game went. The No. 3 Sooners cruised to a 31-0 halftime lead and blew out their fifth-ranked SEC foes, 40-22. To this day, the 1972 Sugar Bowl remains the only time Auburn has played a team from Oklahoma. Twelve years later, head coach Pat Dye led his 10-1 SEC champion Tigers, led by a young sophomore running back named Bo Jackson, to New Orleans. Auburn ran for 301 yards on the night and used three Al Del Greco field goals to rally against the No. 8 Michigan Wolverines, 9-7. One of the most controversial bowl games in Auburn history came in the 1988 Sugar Bowl. One-loss SEC champion Auburn took on 11-0 Syracuse. With one second left, down 16-13, Dye elected to kick a 30-yard field goal to end the game as a draw rather than go for the win from the 13-yard line. The decision cost the Orangemen a perfect 12-0 record. Upset by the result, a radio station in Syracuse sent Dye more than 2,000 ties in the mail. Dye then autographed and sold all the ties for more than $30,000, which he donated to the Auburn general scholarship fund. A year later, the Tigers, once again champions of the SEC under Dye, went back to New Orleans looking to pull out

a victory this time around. However, they were denied by No. 4 Florida State. Down six and having driven Auburn to the Seminole 22-yard line, quarterback Reggie Slack was intercepted in the end zone by eventual NFL legend Deion Sanders. Florida State beat Auburn, 13-7. Auburn’s most recent trip to New Orleans was one it really didn’t want to make. Sitting at 12-0 with the SEC crown, Tommy Tuberville’s Tigers were denied a spot in the BCS championship game in Miami in favor of USC and Oklahoma. Despite facing a let-down situation against No. 8 Virginia Tech, the 10-2 champions of the ACC, the Tigers took care of business in a defensive battle. Auburn led 16-0 going into the final quarter and held on for a 16-13 win over the Hokies to finish 13-0. Though that Auburn team was denied a national title, it was the first team to show the country that a two-team system just wasn’t enough. The 2004 Tigers, along with the 2011 Alabama Crimson Tide, were the catalysts behind the creation of the College Football Playoff. Now, a dozen years later, the committee for the playoff that Auburn helped create are the ones that will likely put Auburn in the Sugar Bowl. Despite a sluggish finish to the year, the Tigers will gladly take it.

CRIME

Toomer’s fire suspect may be allowed to return to Germany Staff Report

Jochen Wiest, the man who allegedly set the tree fire at Toomer's Corner following Auburn's win over LSU earlier this fall, requested to have his passport returned from local authorities - but it will be another week before a judge decides if the German native will be allowed to return home. During a hearing in Lee County Circuit Court Wednesday morning, judge Steven Speakman continued a bond hearing for Wiest, who requested the return of his passport, which he surrendered per the conditions of his $3,500 bond. Multiple witnesses said they

saw Wiest lighting a piece of toilet paper on fire. Wiest is charged with first-degree criminal mischief, a felony; desecration of a venerable object and public intoxication. Speakman said he is "inclined to grant" Wiest's request for the return of his passport if he waives his right to extradition and post a larger bond, according to Opelika-Auburn News. Speakman asked to hear from Gary Keever, horticulture professor as to the current "absolute worst case scenario, the maximum that this could cost" to replace the tree. Last month, Keever esti-

WIEST

mated between 60 to 70 percent of the canopy was dead and it would cost between $15,000 to $20,000 to replace.

CAMPUS CRIME LOG

"I'm more inclined to take Dr. Keever's word for it [as to the maximum cost for replacement of the tree] given the circumstances," Speakman said. "I want to make sure that the victim's [Auburn University] interests are protected before he gets to the airport." Margaret Brown, Wiest's attorney, said her client is willing to sign an extradition agreement that would ensure his return to the United States should there eventually be an indictment in the case. Speakman set a hearing for Dec. 8 to set a new bond amount and decide if Wiest can return home.

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Week in review Your weekly roundup for state, national and international news State • An all-time high of 2,137,482 Alabamians voted in the presidential election, the State Canvassing Board announced this week. Alabama voters set records, both in total turnout and in the number of votes for a presidential candidate, according to Secretary of State John Merrill. • Wendell Ray Lewis — longtime security chief to Gov. Robert Bentley — filed a suit this week against the governor, revealing details about Bentley’s relationship with former aide Rebekah Mason. • Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange has thrown his hat into the ring to replace Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate after he vacates the seat to become U.S. Attorney General. National • Four people were killed in raging wildfires in Sevier County, Tennessee, and officials are bracing for the possibility of more blazes. The wildfires have damaged or destroyed hundreds of buildings in and near eastern Tennessee’s resort towns of Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge in 24 hours, officials said. • Eleven people at Ohio State University were injured Monday, after a knife-wielding attacker plowed into pedestrians with a car and then stabbed multiple people on the campus. Abdul Razak Ali Artan, the suspect, was killed by a police officer after the attack. ISIS claimed Artan was one of its “soldiers.” • Protesters fighting the Dakota Access Pipeline construction must vacate property near the Cannonball River in North Dakota — the location of a large campsite for demonstrators — by Dec. 5 or face arrest, the Army Corps of Engineers said this week. International • Fidel Castro, the leader of Cuba’s communist revolution and ruler of the island nation for more than 50 years, died this week after a long illness. Castro was 90. • A charter flight crashed Monday night while carrying players from Chapecoense, a soccer club from Chapeco, Brazil. The accident killed 71 people, officials said. The team was heading to Colombia for a regional tournament final for the first time in more than three decades. • Up to 16,000 people have fled the violence in Syria’s warravaged eastern Aleppo, with food stocks “practically finished” and every hospital bombed beyond use, the UN’s humanitarian chief said this week.

PHOTO OF THE WEEK

Date Reported

Type of Incident

General Location

11/28

Theft of Property Fourth Degree

11/28

Theft of Property Fourth Degree

300 Block of Wire Rd

11/28

Criminal MischiefThird Degree

700 Block of W Magnolia Av

11/28

CriminalTrespass Second Degree

200 Block of Mell St

11/26

Duty Upon Striking an UnoccupiedVehicle

600 Block of DeKalb St

11/25

Public Intoxication

100 Block of W Magnolia Av

11/22

BurglaryThird Degree

500 Block of W Samford Av

11/20

Discharging Firearm in City

Two incidents reported on one report 100

11/20

Permitting Dogs to Run at Large

Block of S College St

11/19

Forgery - Counterfeiting

Two incidents reported on one report 100

11/19

Public Intoxication

Block of S College St

11/19

Theft of Property Fourth Degree

200 Block of Mell St

200 Block of S Donahue Dr

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Raindrops on a window at The Village,Tuesday, Nov. 29. More on the most significant rain in months on page 5. 11/18

Theft of Property Fourth Degree

200 Block of S Donahue Dr

11/18

Theft of Property Fourth Degree

400 Block of S Donahue Dr

11/18

Theft - Miscellaneous

900 Block of W Thach Av

11/18

Criminal Mischief First Degree

300 Block of W Thach Conc

11/17

Failure toAppear (Bail Jumping Second Degree)

300 Block of P O Davis Dr

11/17

Duty to Give Information and RenderAidAfter

200 Block of Foy Union Cir

11/17

TrafficAccident

Shug Jordan Pkwy @ Wire Rd

11/17

Theft of Property Third Degree

300 Block of W Magnolia Av

There will be no printed editions of The Plainsman during the winter break. Check ThePlainsman.com frequently and follow us on Twitter (@TheAUPlainsman) to stay current on Auburn news. Happy holidays!


Campus

Thursday, December 1, 2016

3 ThePlainsman.com

Campus

SENATE

CONTRIBUTED BY AMELIE MAROHN

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

College of Liberal Arts senators host free breakfast Doughnuts and Chick-Fil-A breakfast were served at the event.

Kressie Kornis CAMPUS WRITER

The College of Liberal Arts hosted a free breakfast at Tichenor Hall in the Dean’s Conference Room as a chance for students within the same college to come together. The Dean’s office and SGA representatives were at the breakfast to answer any questions students may have about the College of Liberal Arts, and Chick-fil-A breakfast and Krispy Kreme donuts were offered to guests. The event was planned by the Vice President of Liberal Arts Schools Council Ken Ward. Alex Patrick, junior in economics, said Ward worked with the Dean’s staff on the project for about three weeks. “His office is very helpful and easy to understand,” Patrick said. Jacqueline Keck, junior in economincs and SGA president pro tempore, said she was proud of the result of Ward’s work. “He [Ward] planned all of it and we are so

Jacqueline Keck chats with students during College of Liberal Arts free breakfast.

It gave them an opportunity to have a voice and to have conversations about their Auburn experience, classroom experience and what it’s like to be a student on Auburn’s campus and to voice anything they’ve seen heard or have experienced that they’re concerned about.”

—Jacqueline Keck

SGA PRESIDENT PRO TEMPORE

thankful for that,” Keck said. “He really fulfilled his role as vice president.” Keck said the event went well and saw a variety of students attending. “We got to have conversations with them and talk about where they’re from and what their major is and what they want to do,” Keck said. Keck said she got to meet international students as well and learn about their journey

with joining the campus community. “We had a student from Thailand come in that was a computer science engineer who went through Auburn Global to be acclimated to Auburn,” Keck said. Keck said she enjoyed getting the opportunity to speak with the student from Thailand about his experiences. “It was cool to hear him talk about it and to hear about the job opportunities that he is

pursuing,” Keck said. Keck said the breakfast was a good chance to meet new people. “We got to meet people that we wouldn’t have on an average day,” Keck said. Keck said the goal of the breakfast was to create an opportunity for students to come by and meet SGA representatives, as well as the dean and associate dean. “It gave them an opportunity to have a voice and to have conversations about their Auburn experience, classroom experience and what it’s like to be a student on Auburn’s campus and to voice anything they’ve seen, heard or have experienced that they’re concerned about,” Keck said. “So we as campus leaders can really meet their needs.” This event is an example of how SGA representatives can use the conversations they have with other students to bring different issues before University administration. “Then we can talk to administration and speak on behalf of them,” Keck said.

ORGANIZATION

STUDENT AFFAIRS S P OT L I G H T James E. Foy Information Desk

FILE PHOTO

Bikers prepare to begin their race on campus.

Auburn Outdoors prepares for its new ‘Bikepacking’ program romy iannuzzi CAMPUS WRITER

Bikepacking is a way to trek across expansive areas by bike rather than traveling by foot or in vehicles incapable of navigating dirt roads and other terrain. Auburn Outdoors is introducing their first bikepacking program this month. It will begin on Sunday, Dec. 11 through Thursday, Dec. 15. for those looking to explore the Southeast and test their mountain biking skills. The excursion costs $175 per participant to cover expenses related to transportation, instruction, backcountry food, equipment, bicycles and helmets, according to Auburn Outdoors Director Scott Dirksen. Dirksen said the event was

made possible by students who wanted to introduce more people to the sport of bikepacking. “Many students involved with Auburn Outdoors have tried bikepacking: a form of backpacking, but on a bike,” Dirksen said. Bikepacking is a growing sport and this trip is an opportunity for students to try it out over their winter breaks, Dirksen said. “Bikepacking allows people to travel further in the same time with no weight on their backs,” Dirksen said. “This trip is a great introduction into bikepacking and a nice getaway before the holiday break.” Dirksen said the event is all-inclusive and students are free to join regardless

of background, encouraging those with mountain biking experience to sign up. “Anyone with mountain biking experience is encouraged to join us on the trip,” Dirksen said. “Students will learn the essentials of bikepacking and no previous experience is required.” While modern bathroom facilities will not be available throughout this trip, attendees will get first hand experience in the sport, according to Auburn Outdoor’s calendar. Dirksen said the trail is filled with greenery and wildlife. “We will bike the Hurricane Trail that winds through central Florida with beautiful moss-filled trees and a variety of wildlife,” Dirksen said.

The James E. Foy Information Desk, located on the second floor of the Student Center, provides information and answers to any question from details on Auburn events to the number of bricks in the Haley Center. Named for Auburn icon Dean James E. Foy, the desk can be reached at 334-844-4244.

auburn.edu/StudentAffairs

@AuburnStudents

facebook.com/AuburnStudents

@AuburnStudents

Auburn Students


Campus 4

Thursday, December 1, 2016

The Auburn Plainsman

POLICE

ELLEN JACKSON / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Auburn recently opend a campus police precinct.

CATHERINE WOFFORD / PHOTOGRAPHER

LEFT: Participants in the police and students Together We Can event fill their plates. BOTTOM RIGHT: The Together We Can event brought together students and police force.

University hosts dinner for law enforcement Kressie Kornis CAMPUS WRITER

The Auburn community and local law enforcement met Thursday, Nov. 17 at 6:30 p.m. in the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences Building to recognize lives lost during police interactions and police officers who have lost their lives in the line of duty. The night was also a way to “reconcile, reflect and understand the perspectives of both the community and police officers,” said Jade Kiny, the event coordinator. “Over the summer there were a lot of police shootings coming up and it was pretty traumatizing for some of the people in our program, the Association of Counseling Psychology Stu-

dents,” Kiny said. “We all got together and we were pondering what we could do in our local community to prevent that from happening.” The community and local law enforcement ate dinner together and began discussing the topic. “I kind of foresaw the police officers would sit on one side of the room and everybody else would sit on the other side of the room, but it didn’t happen that way,” Kiny said. After dinner, the local law enforcement and community recited a unity pledge, written by Kiny: “I pledge to build relationships with those who are different than me despite their creed, race or religion.

DIVERSITY

To keep an open mind when I encounter cultural adversity and to recognize that my way of life is not the only way to live. And lastly, to love because in love there is the strongest force of compassion that mends the deepest of wounds.” “We need to bond and maybe not necessarily look past our cultures because our cultures are very important to us, but just to understand that one way somebody is expressing or is living their life doesn’t mean that is hurtful or harmful to somebody else than someone who is living their life differently,” Kiny said. “We can find fulfillment in different ways.” Kiny said she’d like to do this more often and encourage the police department to join

SENATE

SGA passes recommendation to remove registration TBAs Romy Iannuzzi CAMPUS WRITER

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

The Auburn Global Thanksgiving was decorated with cornucopias.

Auburn Global Thanksgiving ‘builds community’ Loren Kimmel CAMPUS WRITER

​ T he Office of International Programs hosted their Thanksgiving Pie Reception to help students staying in Auburn celebrate the holiday. Jenn Mason, director of international initiatives, said provides services in relation to immigration. “[The OIP] serves as international students at Auburn by providing immigration-related services” Mason said. The office also provides services in relation to the Auburn Abroad program, Mason said. “OIP also encompasses the study abroad functions of the University, providing students the opportunity to study and work abroad through facultyled programs, exchange programs and internships,” Mason said.

in with the community. “I think that would help us,” Kiny said. “The police officers there told me that they are training to help students on campus understand how to interact with the police if they ever do interact with the police officers or their paths cross.” Kiny said she was shocked by the attendance. “I didn’t think that many people would come out,” Kiny said. “I think that everybody mingled with the police officers and actually talked to them which was wonderful to see. People were just opening up in ways that I didn’t think that they would so I was really happy with that.”

Mason said her department plays an important role in making students from different cultures feel welcome. “In the Office of International Programs it is so important to provide international students with a sense of community and belonging here at Auburn,” Mason said. Creating a sense of community for students of different cultures begins with attendance of these events, Mason said. “Encouraging the events they put on to encompass not only Auburn culture, but those of various nations to create a collaboration of cultures and a welcoming environment,” Mason said. Mason said there are several benefits the program has among the Auburn community by offering a new perspec-

tive. “We want these students to integrate into our campus and local culture for their own benefit and also enrich the perspectives of our domestic students, faculty, staff and community members,” Mason said. In an effort to accomplish this sense of community, Mason said OIP hosted their annual Pie Reception for the second time. Mason said she was pleased with the turnout and her team; She said there was approximately 500 people there. “The whole OIP staff looks forward to the opportunity to interact with students in such a fun atmosphere and share some of our traditions with them as [the international students] are so often generous enough to do for us,” Mason said.

SGA representatives passed a resolution that recommended administration make it a priority to remove as many “TBA” assignments as possible in the hope it may simplify registration for students. During executive announcements, EVP of Initiatives Trey Fields gave a slideshow presentation which announced SGA is taking action to reduce the number of class slots marked “TBA” during registration, spearheaded by At-Large Senator Brock Hendon. “TBAs make it more difficult for students to make informed decisions that allow them to tailor their semester schedule around other responsibilities and their learning style,” Fields said. “Recently, Auburn’s student senate passed a resolution calling for an emphasis to be placed on cutting down the amount of TBAs during our registration.” The bill reads, “We, the Auburn University Student Senate, recommend that the ad-

TBAs make it more difficult for students to make informed decisions that allow them to tailor their semester schedule around other responsibilities and their learning style.”

—Trey Fields

SGA EVP OF INITIATIVES

ministration prioritize removing the ‘TBA’ assignments within the registration by establishing a culture of best practices that expect returning faculty to be assigned to courses by the first day of registration and adjunct faculty and graduate assistants be assigned to courses within one week of the first day of class.” The senate passed a resolution urging Auburn Athletics, Parking Services and other administrators to reconsider the University’s game day parking policy. The Senate also approved a reserve fund request for renovations in the EagleEye and WEGL work spaces. At-Large Senators Cooper Elkins and Reagan Drake pre-

sented a resolution to recommend Parking Services and Athletics change the game day parking schedule in response to students’ frustration with the old scheduling. The bill reads, “We, the Auburn University Student Senate, recommend that the administration postpone the current RV parking time of 2 p.m. in the Coliseum lot to 3 p.m. and allow students to park in the Coliseum lot until 2 p.m. on the Friday before game day.” College of Business senator Chris Smillie passed a $60,000 reserve fund request he said was for the renovation of the Eagle Eye and WEGL student media facilities in the Student Center.

FILE PHOTO

Tiger Scheduler was introduced last year to help simply the class registration process.


Community Thursday, December 1, 2016

5 ThePlainsman.com

Community

WEATHER

City gets most significant rainfall in months Kris Martins

COMMUNITY REPORTER

Auburn received its most measurable rain in over a month early this week. The area received 1.68 inches of rain Tuesday and was expected to receive up to an inch Wednesday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service in Birmingham. Monday received only a trace of rain, which isn’t enough to measure, said Tara Goggins with the weather service. The area last received rain Oct. 16 with 0.57 inches, she added. Lee County was under tornado watch late Wednesday morning and into the afternoon. Several other areas of the state received tornado watches and warnings Tuesday and Wednesday. Property was damaged across the state, and three people died as of Wednesday morning, according to the Associated Press. No hazardous weather is expected for the rest of the week, though Goggins urged people to remain weather aware. Low rain chances will return to the area Saturday and chances will increase by Sunday, potentially extending rain into the beginning of next week, Goggins said. The week’s rain amount falls short of what’s needed to lift the statewide “No Burn Order,” or Drought Emergency Declaration, Gov. Robert Bentley issued in early November, said Chambers County forester Matthew Lowe. The order prohibits all outdoor burning. The east and central areas of the state are more than 10 inches

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

The Auburn area saw its first bout of significant rain in months on Tuesday and Wednesday.

behind its normal yearly rainfall, Lowe said, adding that the Farmer’s Almanac is predicting a warm and dry winter. “We’d need at least 14 inches, I’d say, before we get back into normal,” Lowe said, noting that there were still 13 fires throughout the state Tuesday despite the rain.

The U.S. Drought Monitor’s Nov. 22 report records about 70 percent of Lee County in extreme drought conditions with the remaining 30 percent in exceptional drought conditons. Last month, the Auburn Water Works Board implemented mandatory water restrictions in response to the drought conditions.

HOLIDAY

Food pantry feeds meals to hundreds for Thanksgiving K ris M artins

COMMUNITY REPORTER

Four hundred people in Lee County who might otherwise have not had a Thanksgiving meal had food on their tables last week. Lines of cars pulled into Auburn United Methodist church on Magnolia Avenue on the Friday before Thanksgiving, making their way toward a group of volunteers of students, church members and firefighters who placed boxes and bags of food in their trunk. Through the church’s Food Pantry, Lee County residents who meet the USDA

guidelines for assistance preregistered to receive a meal that morning on Nov. 18. “This is our big to-do for the year,” said Reeder Dulaney, director of the Food Pantry. What began as six boxes of food 16 years ago at the Food Pantry’s origins has evolved to this year’s 401 Thanksgiving boxes, which include a turkey, milk, eggs, bread and more. Ruthie Wofford, senior in political science, said she enjoys fellowshipping with others outside of the student population and being surrounded by the community. “It’s really neat to see everyone together,”

STATE GOVERNMENT

TODD VAN EMST / THE OPELIKA-AUBURN NEWS POOL PHOTO

Gov. Robert Bentley testifies during former House Speaker Mike Hubbard’s felony ethics trial.

Former security chief sues Bentley Chip Brownlee

COMMUNITY EDITOR

Gov. Robert Bentley’s impeachment investigation may be suspended for the time being, but he isn’t in the clear just yet. Last week, his former top security chief accused him of maintaining a physical affair with his former top political aide Rebekah Mason. Wendall Ray Lewis, the former head of the governor’s security detail and chief of the office of dignitary protection, filed a lawsuit Nov. 23 against the governor and Mason. Lewis accused the pair of defaming him, pushing him into an retirement against his will and interferring with several job opportunities after he left state government. Though Bentley has denied ever having a physical affair with Mason, he has admitted to a nonphysical relationship. Now, Lewis is accusing the government of lying. He said Bentley had a long-term physical relationship with his former top aide. “Governor Robert Bentley had a physical and sexual affair with Defendant Mason,” Lewis said in his lawsuit. Bentley and his wife

Dianne Bentley divorced in September of 2015. In early 2016, recordings surfaced of Bentley taking part in lewd telephone conversations with Mason. Since then, members of the Alabama House of Representatives filed articles of impeachment against Bentley in April, and the Alabama Attorney General’s Office confirmed an investigation into Bentley in early November. Lewis’ new lawsuit seems to back up previous accusations from former ALEA Secretary Spencer Collier and others who claim the governor was physically involved with Mason. “On a couple of occasions, the Governor told Lewis that he loved Rebekah,” the lawsuit reads. “One time, on the front porch of the Governor’s Tuscaloosa home, he also told [Lewis], ‘I love Dianne [Bentley]. But I love Rebekah more.’” Lewis said the governor confirmed the physical affair several times to him in person. Lewis, other top staffers in the governor’s office and Business Council of Alabama head Bill O’Conner pleaded

with the governor to end the affair several times as well, but no one succeeded, according to the lawsuit. Lewis is seeking full compensation for the financial damages he says he endured following his early retirement. The unlawful termination lawsuit claims Bentley lied to the media about accusations that Lewis had overused overtime pay, which defamed him. Eventually, Bentley and Mason became so angry over his attempts to end their relationship that they forced him to retire early and, after his retirement, worked to impede future job opportunities with the University of Alabama and Alabama Power, he said in his lawsuit. Bentley, in a statement released last Thursday, denied all of Lewis’s allegations: “The outrageous claims are based on worn-out internet rumors, fake news and street gossip. These bogus claims are an attempt to smear my Administration, to distract from the important matters facing our State, and to attempt to assign wrongdoing where it does not exist.”

Wofford, who has volunteered for three years, said. Even though Karli Ewing just began volunteering at the Food Pantry in August, she said she enjoys talking one-on-one with the community members at the end of the week. “It’s so rewarding, and it’s a great way to start my weekend,” Ewing, junior in social work, said. She volunteered on Friday as a part of Impact, which organizes service projects with local nonprofits, and said she sees God at work in the organization.

“It’s really cool to see how much food they’re being blessed with,” she said. “There’s always enough to be able to provide them with.” The AUMC Food Pantry is open each Friday morning and is funded mostly through donations, though the church budget also supports the ministry. Its goal is to “provide emergency assistance to hungry families in Lee County” so families can increase spending dollars for needs besides food. About 200 people were already signed up for the Christmas boxes, Dulaney said.


Community 6

Thursday, December 1, 2016

The Auburn Plainsman

CITY GOVERNMENT

Piloting Ward 6: Dick Phelan shares military past Lily Jackson

LIFESTYLE EDITOR

In 1988, Dick Phelan, Ward 6 city councilman, and his wife were given the decision between making a life in Nashville or Auburn. The Phelans pulled off exit 51 for a visit, drove straight through what seemed like a ghost town and never set eyes on a single person or car. “It was a Sunday morning in the middle of June, and I looked at her and said, ‘We’re stuck here for three years,’” Phelan said. Because of the close proximity of their two daughters in Athens, Georgia, the Phelans chose Auburn and have seen it grow and prosper for the last 28 years. Phelan’s family life consists of his wife, four children and 10 grandchildren, all between the ages of 7 and 15. All four of his children graduated from the University of Georgia. After graduation, none of his children got married for more than eight years, Phelan said. “When they all got married they said, ‘We don’t have any children. If we want to have children, we’ve got to have them quick.’ And then it was wham, wham, wham. We’ve got four boys that are 9 years old.” Despite his children’s alma mater, Phelan said ‘by-in-large’ he roots for Auburn, but on occasion he will cheer for Georgia. Phelan grew up in a fairly different environment. Although some refer to Auburn as the “Cow College,” Phelan’s home state of Iowa wins the claim for rural land. Phelan spent his younger years in Davenport, Iowa, on the banks of the Mississippi River. He left and never went back, he said. While growing up, Phelan hadn’t been west of Des Moines or east of Chicago. After high school, Phelan joined the United States Navy and became a pilot, thinking the work would grant him the opportunity to see a beach. Phelan attended the Naval Academy before joining the service, and while on active duty, he received three separate master’s degrees in management, operations analysis and security affairs. Thirty-one years of service brought him to Alabama where he worked as head of the ROTC unit at Auburn University in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s for about three years. As his time in that position came to an

CRIME

Opelika man arrested for burglaries in Auburn

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Ward 6 City Councilman Dick Phelan stands outside of his office on Friday, Nov. 18, 2016 in Auburn,Ala.

end, he picked up his current profession with Wilson Investment Group. In 1991, Phelan and Ted Wilson started Wilson Investment Group. Today, the company continues to grow and assist investors. While Phelan occasionally misses his time as a pilot, coming to Auburn has been enjoyable, and he’s happy to call the city home, he said. Phelan hasn’t lost touch with his military background and utilizes the skills he acquired during his time in his current work. “I think the primary thing you learn in the Navy is leadership,” Phelan said. “I got a master’s degree in operations analysis, and you learn to analyze things by looking at various quantifiable accounts and determining what is best.” Phelan uses this leadership mindset in his personal work, as well as his city involvement. Running for Auburn City Council began as something Phelan wanted to try for a term. Now in his fourth term, Phelan said he enjoys the work and feels that he brings much to the board. In terms of next steps and thoughts on policy, Phelan said he believes there are too many

rules and regulations put in place for the city and its citizens to abide by. In the long run, Phelan said time should be dedicated to finding ways to reduce taxes. “Our taxes are not huge, and we certainly do a good job at spending taxes, but I think overall we ought to look at what we can do to reduce taxes over the long run,” Phelan said. Raising or cutting taxed depends on the time and the purpose, he said. Overall, he believes that the city handles taxes well. Phelan said the main element to consider when discussing and making decisions concerning taxes is the people. One can not forget that the money is coming from hard working citizens, Phelan said. “I’ve gotten to know more people from being on City Council than I would have if I wasn’t,” Phelan said. “That helps when making decisions for the ward.” Terms continue to pass, and Phelan continues to run and serve his ward to the best of his ability, he said. What began as an opportunity and a chance has become a crucial part of his life.

OUTDOORS

Staff Report

The Auburn Police Division arrested an Opelika man on Saturday, Nov. 19 in connection with a convenience store burglary the prior Thursday. On Nov. 23, he was charged with additional counts. APD arrested 41-year-old Jason Eric Woodall for second-degree burglary, fourthdegree theft of property, possession of drug paraphernalia and giving false information to law enforcement, police said. On Nov. 23, the Auburn Police charged with two additional counts of third-degree burglary and fourth-degree theft of property in connection with two other separate convenience store burglaries on Nov. 17 and 18 on Cox Road and Lee Road 146, police said. Wo o d a l l w a s

WOODALL

arrested last week in connection with the robbery of a closed convenience store on Thursday, Nov. 17 at about 12:30 a.m., police said. Police responded to an alarm at the convenience store on the 7300 block of U.S. Highway 280. Officers found evidence of forced entry. and stolen cigarettes, cigars and alcohol. The Auburn Police developed Woodall as a suspect after an investigation into video surveillance, they said. He is being held on a $5,500 bond and an additional $7,000 bond in the Lee County Jail.

FILE PHOTO

The bridge at the Preserve was constructed by a Boy Scout for his Eagle Scout project.

Opelika preserve and nature park to host birding walk this weekend Kris Martins

COMMUNITY REPORTER

Bird watchers, photographers and families can get a glimpse of several dozen birds this weekend at the Winter Walk at an Opelika preserve and nature park. The Opelika Wood Duck Heritage Preserve and Siddique Nature Park will host the free event Dec. 3 beginning at 8 a.m., giving attendees a guided trail walk to the holding pond and duck blind while identifying birds, including wood ducks, along

the way. The walk will begin with a meet-up at the homestead entrance of the preserve and nature park on Waverly Parkway, and Barry Fleming, president of the Board of the Friends of the Opelika Wood Duck Heritage Preservation and Siddique Nature Park, will lead the group. The 73-acre preserve and nature park has hosted walks in the past but the Winter Walk strives to specifically draw attention to the site and the state’s natural resources, said project

manager Joanne Ninesling. “Wood ducks are stunningly beautiful … and that’s what a lot of people want to see,” she said. The number of species and birds also differs during this time of year, especially with the cold front this week, Fleming said. He estimates attendees will see, on average, 35-40 species of birds and about 100-150 wood ducks. The preserve and nature park has seen over 175 recorded species of birds and is listed on ebird.org as the No. 1 hotspot for birding in

Lee County. “We’ve had as many as 400 ducks of 10 species” at one time, Fleming said. The preserve and nature park is managed through a partnership between the city of Opelika and the Friends of the Opelika Wood Duck Heritage Preservation and Siddique Nature Park, a nonprofit organization. Trucks used to dump leachate into the pond as part of a contract with a neighboring city, Fleming said, but have stopped within the past year. Waste-

water is still pumped to the bottom of the pond, he said, but the water doesn’t contain any contaminants. It’s also not uncommon for such sites to attract several birds because of increased biodiversity, he added. Attendees are encouraged to bring water and wear comfortable shoes, as the trail is primarily unpaved. No registration is required. “It doesn’t have to cost anything to have a great outdoor experience,” Ninesling said.


Sports

7

Thursday, December 1, 2016

ThePlainsman.com

Sports

On to history

Soccer pioneers first ‘Elite’ season

CONTRIBUTED BY DAN AVILA

Karli Gutsche (20) takes a shot during the Elite 8 NCAA Tournament when Auburn faced the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

Emily Shoffit SPORTS EDITOR

The best season yet in Auburn soccer history came to a close in Los Angeles, California on Nov. 25. The Auburn soccer team made the Elite 8 in the first time in program history, but fell to the University of Southern California Trojans on their home turf 1-0. The Tigers (17-7-0) held a 12-11 advantage in shots over the Trojans paced by Casie Ramsier who had five.

Sarah Le Beau went the distance between the posts and touted a tournament-best six saves. “Congratulations to USC,” Auburn head coach Karen Hoppa said. “They’re a great team and Keidane [McAlpine] is one of my best friends, so I’m happy for him and they played a great game. Like most sports, soccer is a game of inches and they caught one break early. I felt it was a great soccer game. There were chances both ways, it was wide open and both teams played their

game. “I’m really proud of my team. They laid it all on the line and played their hearts out.” The Trojans (17-4-2) lit up the scoreboard just four minutes into play when a cross was sent into the box and was finished at the near post. Auburn responded right away by lacing four shots and earning a corner across the next 25 minutes, including a free kick by Courtney Schell, but were unable to find the back of the net.

Just before the half, Le Beau made a diving save in a 1-on-1 situation. USC led 1-0 at the half. Coming out of the break, the defense continued to fend off the USC front line. Kiana Clarke, Karli Gutsche, Samantha Solaru and Taylor Troutman all deflected chances by the Trojans in the opening 20 minutes of the second half. USC held on in the final moments and took the result, 1-0. The careers of Haley Gerken,

Brooke Ramsier, Casie Ramsier, Alyse Scott, Clarke and Solaru all came to an end after the final minute, but not without raising the bar for the future of the program. “Our senior class, what an unbelievable career,” stated Hoppa. “Not just this year, obviously, but the four years they’ve had here. They came in a time when we were rebuilding and every year we’ve gotten better. They’ve taken us to new heights and they’ve set new standards for Auburn soccer.”

FOOTBALL

Sean White reported to return for Auburn’s bowl game Sam Butler

ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

ADAM SPARKS / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Sean White (13) scrambles in the backfield in the first half. Auburn vs Mississippi State on Saturday, Oct. 8 in Starkville, Mississippi.

The quarterback that piloted Auburn to six straight wins this year will reportedly be back for the bowl game. Auburn coach Gus Malzahn told ESPN’s Chris Low on Sunday that Sean White will be “full force and ready to go” for the Tigers’ bowl game. White was among the most efficient passers in the nation when healthy, but he suffered a shoulder injury in the win over Ole Miss. He sat the first half against Vanderbilt but returned at halftime to lead Auburn to a win, then aggravated the shoulder in the first series against Georgia. Against the Bulldogs, White went just 6-of-20 for 27 yards and an interception that was returned for Georgia’s only touchdown in what ended up being the difference in the game. “Sean hung in there and tried to play against Georgia, but

just wasn’t close,” Malzahn told Low. “We weren’t going to rush him back after that, but he should be fine for the bowl game.” White sat out Auburn’s final two games of the regular season, and senior Jeremy Johnson started in his place for both. The Tigers split the games, topping FCS opponent Alabama A&M but falling to No. 1 Alabama in the Iron Bowl. “Sean White’s our leader,” Malzahn said Saturday following the loss. “Sean White’s our quarterback. We’re pretty efficient when he’s healthy.” The Tigers find themselves to be a top contender for the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 2 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Unless there is an upset and Florida defeats Alabama at the SEC Championship in Atlanta on Dec. 2, Auburn will be heading to The Big Easy to face off against the Big 12 Champion (either Oklahoma or Oklahoma State).


Sports 8

Thursday, December 1, 2016

The Auburn Plainsman

This week in Auburn sports

ADAM SPARKS / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Left: Jeremy Johnson (6) during Tiger Walk before the Iron Bowl at Bryant-Denny Stadium Right: Steven Roberts (14) and Sammie Coates, former Auburn wide receiver talk during pregame.

ADAM SPARKS / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Left: Jeremy Johnson (6) throws a pass during the first half. Above: Kamryn Pettway (36) runs for yardage in the first half.

CATHERINE WOFFORD / PHOTOGRAPHER

Kerryon Johnson (21) runs for yardage in the first half.

CATHERINE WOFFORD / PHOTOGRAPHER

Tray Matthews (28) makes the tackle against Alabama’s O.J. Howard (88)

ADAM SPARKS / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Gus Malzahn and Nick Saban meet at the 50-yard line postgame.

ANTHONY HALL / AUBURN ATHLETICS

Above: Jesse Earl (3) digs during the season finale game.

CONTRIBUTED BY DAN AVILA

Below: Courtney Schell (8) dribbles during Auburn’s game against University of Southern California.

Football Auburn’s regular season has drawn to a close. It’s been a bit of a roller-coaster ride, given that Auburn started 1-2, reeled off six straight wins, and dropped its final two SEC games to finish at 8-4. The Tigers undone by an ineffective offense, fell to No. 1 Alabama in the Iron Bowl Saturday night. Jeremy Johnson got the nod to start the Iron Bowl for the second year in a row, and just like last year, he was limited in how much he was able to throw. Johnson finished 4-13 for 34 yards, and the offense couldn’t do much of anything in the first half. John Franklin III came in later during the second half, and he was able to spark the offense to life a bit. He threw a 55-yard pass to freshman Eli Stove and broke off a few nice runs. However, he still couldn’t guide Auburn into the end zone. After the game, coach Gus Malzahn emphasized how young of a team Auburn has, and how bright the future is. Eli Stove led Auburn in receiving with four catches for 87 yards, including that 55yard bomb from Franklin. He was frequently the recipient of sweeps, and although he wasn’t able to turn the corner and get upfield much, his speed poses a problem for defenses. And if not for Daniel Thomas on defense, the game might’ve been much worse. He picked off Alabama quar-

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Mustapha Heron (5) jumps to shoot over USC Upstate defense.

terback Jalen Hurts twice, once on a good undercut on a throw against the sideline, and another that Hurts threw directly to him. This marks the second game where Daniel Carlson accounted for every point Auburn was able to score, along with the 1813 win over LSU back in September. He was 4-of-5 against Alabama, his only miss being a 52-yarder that hooked to the left. . Including his four kicks Nov. 26, Carlson has made 26 on the year, which are the fourth-most in SEC history. His 67-of-81 mark for his career is the best in Auburn history, the second best in program history; his 347 points are just behind Wes Byrum’s 363. Volleyball The Auburn volleyball team closed out the 2016 season with a 3-1 (19-25, 25-12, 25-21, 2523) loss to Texas A&M Nov. 26 in Auburn Arena. The Tigers conclude the season with a 15-16 overall record and 9-9 in Southeastern Conference play. That league record placed Auburn tied for fifth overall, which marks the best finish in the SEC since 2010 when the Tigers also finished tied for fifth. Auburn had four studentathletes with double-digit kills in the match. Brenna McIlroy led the way with 15 kills, while Gwyn Jones, Breanna Barksdale and Macy Reece each had 10. Setter Alexa Filley had a

match-high 47 assists. Defensively, libero Jesse Earl had a match-best 16 digs and McIlroy chipped in 10 for her 12th double-double of the year. Both Earl and McIlroy led the Tigers with three service aces each. Texas A&M (21-8, 15-3) was led by Kiara McGee with 16 kills, while Ashlie Reasor and Emily Hardesty had eight a piece. Men’s Basketball The Auburn men’s basketball team earned their fifth victory of the season Nov. 29 in Auburn Arena against USC Upstate. The Tigers lead by as much as 18 in the first half, but were out rebounded by the Spartans which kept the contest too close for comfort throughout the second half. Auburn headed into the locker room at halftime up 10, but they returned in the second half to reply on Heron when the score got tight. The freshman five-star scored a game high 23 points for the Tigers. “I’m happy with being 5-1 after six games but I’m not happy with our overall play,” head coach Bruce Pearl said. “We’re not playing well together as I want to. I thought Upstate played a little harder and better than we did tonight. We did not play with effort and energy on the defensive end.” Sam Butler, Emily Shoffit and Jack Winchester contributed to this article.


Thursday, December 1, 2016

Emily Shoffit

The Auburn Plainsman

PLAINSMAN PICKS

Washington vs. Colorado (8 p.m., FOX)

Viriginia Tech vs. Clemson (7 p.m., ABC)

Florida vs. Alabama (3 p.m., CBS)

Penn State vs. Wisconsin (7 p.m., FOX)

Oklahoma vs. Oklahoma State (11:30 a.m., FOX)

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Sports 10

Thursday, December 1, 2016

The Auburn Plainsman

MOVING UP

Women’s basketball ranked in AP Top 25 for first time since 2009 Will Sahlie SPORTS WRITER

For the first time since the 2009 SEC Championship season, the Auburn women’s basketball team is ranked in the AP Top 25, coming in at No. 23. The Tigers are 6-1 on the season after a thrilling, comefrom-behind 71-67 victory over Indiana Sunday that saw Auburn trailing by 17 points in the fourth quarter before outscoring the Hoosiers 32-14 in the fourth quarter. Auburn has played five of its seven games away from home so far in 2016-17, earning road wins at North Carolina A&T and East Carolina along with neutral site victories over Ball State and Marist. The Tigers only blemish so far this year came in a four-point, neutralsite loss to then-No. 19 West Virginia, who moved up to No. 16 this week. It’s the first ranking for Au-

burn women’s basketball since the final poll of the 2008-09 season when the Tigers were ranked No. 9. That year, Auburn won its fifth SEC title and was a No. 2 seed in the NCAA Tournament, advancing to the second round. Auburn is one of seven SEC teams ranked in the top 25. Defending SEC Champion South Carolina is ranked No. 3, followed by Mississippi State at No. 6. Kentucky and Florida are ranked No. 17 and No. 19, respectively, followed by Tennessee at No. 22 and Texas A&M at No. 25. Auburn continues a stretch of three straight games against Power Five non-conference opponents Dec. 1 when the Tigers travel to Kansas State for a 7:30 p.m. tip as part of the SEC/Big 12 Challenge. The Wildcats are 6-0 this season including victories over North Carolina State and LSU.

CATHERINE WOFFORD / PHOTOGRAPHER

Auburn’s women’s basketball team cheers after scoring against Troy on Friday, Nov. 11, 2016 in Auburn.

COLUMN

In defense of Malzahn

SPORTS PHOTO OF THE WEEK

Nathan Deal SPORTS@ THEPLAINSMAN. COM

The end of the 2016 regular season was not a pretty one for Gus Malzahn’s Auburn Tigers. After starting 7-2, earning a spot in the College Football Playoff selection committee’s top 10 and entering the national championship picture, the Tigers were decimated by injuries and limped through losses to Georgia and Alabama. Auburn combined for 19 points and 346 yards of offense in the losses. After squashing any hot seat talks with a six-game win streak after an offensively inept 1-2 start to the season, some are calling Malzahn’s capabilities into question again. To fully pin the poor finish on Malzahn, however, is unfair. No, the hurry-up-no-huddle enthusiast isn’t blameless here. Outside of an injury-prone Sean White, none of the quarterbacks Malzahn has brought to the program out of high school have been developed properly. Jeremy Johnson’s struggles on the field have been well-documented. Junior college transfer John Franklin III didn’t pan out to be the Nick Marshall-type of star Malzahn was hoping for. The play-calling early in the season also put the team in a hole that it might not have deserved, though that was more of a product of Malzahn trying to do too much instead of just being the head coach. That’s backed up by the results the offense produced once Rhett Lashlee got the keys. However, despite a missed opportunity at competing for the SEC title, it would be foolish to label 2016 as anything other than a success. The Tigers went from 6-6 to 8-4. Two of Auburn’s losses came to Clemson, which will make the College Football Playoff with a win in the ACC Championship Game, and Alabama, which is a lock no matter what happens in the SEC Championship Game against Florida. Auburn improved its SEC record from 2-6, good for last in the SEC West, to 5-3, good for second. The argument could definitely be made that the SEC is having a down season outside of Alabama, but finishing second in the nation’s hardest division is impressive, especially considering preseason expectations, as well as expectations after a 1-2 start. Offensively, Auburn finished with 32.3 points and 449 yards per game, an improvement of 4.8 points and 79 yards from last year. Defensively, Auburn allowed 15.6 points and 348 yard

CATHERINE WOFFORD / PHOTOGRAPHER

Daniel Thomas (24) celebrates with teammates after picking off Alabama quarterback Jalen Hurts during the Iron Bowl in Tuscaloosa, Ala.

CATHERINE WOFFORD / PHOTOGRAPHER

Guz Malzahn previews Sanford Stadium in Athens, Ga., on Saturday, Nov.

allowed per game, an improvement of 11.7 points and 74 yards per game from last year. Not only was Auburn improved in 2016, but once its offense really got clicking, it was fense really got clicking, it was vastly superior to last season’s team. That’s not a high bar to clear, but Malzahn and his staff cleared it with ease, and now it’s likely that the Tigers will go from the Birmingham Bowl to the Sugar Bowl. Of course, the elephant in the room must be addressed. Auburn’s offense was simply atrocious in its rivalry losses, games in which Lashlee was the playcaller. But White was too injured to make the offense work in Athens, a fact that he hid from his coaches until it was too late. The playcalling didn’t help that day, but after the Tigers’ Iron Bowl loss, it’s easy to see why the coaches wanted to stick with him rather than their other options. In the Iron Bowl, many have claimed that Malzahn used the same kind of gameplan that he used in the 19-13 loss to Clemson in the season opener, and while the style of play was similar, the context and reasoning was completely different in Tuscaloosa. Against Clemson, Malzahn had too much on his plate and tried to do too much. Against Alabama, he was without White, the unquestioned leader of his offense that led the SEC in passing efficiency when healthy. He likely believed that the only was his offense could move on Alabama’s defense was with trickery, which he wouldn’t be wrong to think. LSU ran a more conventional offense against the Crimson

Tide and it resulted in no points, 125 yards of offense and 6 first downs. Alabama hasn’t allowed a touchdown since the third quarter of the Texas A&M game, which was played on Oct. 22. Simply put, Alabama has the best defense college football has seen in a long time, and without White, Auburn’s offense was virtually doomed from the start, especially on the road. The 12 points Auburn scored were the fourth-most allowed by Alabama all season. Sometimes, a bad matchup is just a bad matchup. One can’t just point to the losses to Georgia and Alabama as proof that Malzahn’s program isn’t going in the right direction while ignoring the context of injuries, depth, location of the games and the quality of the opposing defenses. Malzahn has confirmed that White will return fully healthy for the bowl game, and if the Tigers pull off a win, they’ll enter 2017 with momentum and high expectations despite some departures from the defensive line and the secondary. What Malzahn does at the quarterback position will be interesting. White has proven that the offense can work wonderfully with him under center, but with his injury history, freshman Woody Barrett could contend for the job, while former Baylor quarterback Jarrett Stidham, the most sought-after transfer in the game right now, visited The Plains this week. But recent history has shown that Malzahn’s offense can be one of the best in the entire country if it has the right quarterback. If he finds a reliable starter and improves the depth of the position, history will repeat itself.

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Opinion Thursday, December 1, 2016

11 ThePlainsman.com

Opinion

Discern before you devour news EDITORIAL

FALL EDITORIAL BOARD 2016

One of the latest developments dominating headlines is the recent proliferation of fake news. Throughout Facebook timelines and Twitter feeds, fake news has reached millions of people itching to taste their preferred flavor of politics. Fake news provides exactly that – in the form of sensationalistic and false news stories often depicting a political party, idea or person in an unpleasant light. False articles claiming President Obama is banning the national anthem, Elizabeth Warren endorsed Bernie Sanders and Sweden banning Christmas lights to prevent angering Muslims have been swapped around and gobbled up. Fake news companies are able to take advantage of people’s natural intolerance and disenchantment toward the “other,” or in this case, opposing political parties, ideas or people. The more sensationalistic the fake news, the more visits its host websites get, the more ad revenue is generated for their owners. The issue of fake news has developed such a gravity that two of the biggest internet companies, Facebook and Google, have been forced to attack fake news by targeting its ability to carry ads. According to Pew Research Center, 62 percent of American adults get news on social media, which shows how potentially damaging fake news can be. Oftentimes, these stories contain words which trigger powerful emotions in readers and contain images which may provoke readers. The stories elicit strong emotional reactions from readers and feed into our personal echo chambers, cementing our personal versions of the truth. This year has provided an environment conducive to the growth of such a cancer. Ridiculing the “lamestream media” has become a politically expedient tool for deceitful politicians to use. Delegitimizing the media helps prevent these politicians from being held accountable to their failures and inconsistencies, hence to myriad

STERLING WAITS / GRAPHICS EDITOR

of issues which bounced off of Donald Trump throughout his campaign. As the media is delegitimized, fake news fills the vacuum. It’s important to note, though, that skepticism toward all media sources, especially mainstream ones, is healthy and necessary. But there is an optimal level of skepticism which lends readers a more objective outlook on the news without being mired in complete cynisism. Both of the extreme outlooks on media, deep cynicism and unwavering faith, are undesirable. The former creates a post-truth atmosphere where truth and lies are interchangeable and the latter creates a mob of submissive and unthink-

ing citizens. We implore people to be discerning on the internet. Too often, articles are shared without being read, let alone its sources being checked. Too often, headlines are read which confirm the reader’s worldview and are subsequently shared all across social media without any sort of vetting. We must escape the habit of bolstering our egos at the cost of letting fake news slip by us. But that isn’t to say we stop sharing news which may carry a political bias. The distinction between news sources which lean in one way politically and news which is demonstrably false is incredibly important.

Conservative-leaning sources like the Wall Street Journal and The Federalist along with liberal-leaning sources like MSNBC and The Huffington Post are reliable sources of news. Despite any bias stories from these sources may or may not have, they have been shown to be reliable with respect to sending out accurate reports. We all need to check the authenticity of the news we absorb, and we must pay special scrutiny to news that feeds into our specific worldview. In doing this, the media, including The Plainsman, will be held more accountable to its readers and misinformation won’t have such an easy market to thrive in.


Opinion 12

The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, December 1, 2016

COLUMNS

Give my generation a chance Chip Brownlee COMMUNITY EDITOR

I’m 19 years old. I’m still a teenager — still a millennial. I’ve been working with politicians and businesspeople through work for a few years now. Aside from a few skirmishes, I’ve never been treated like a kid. The same is expected of me as would be expected from a 35- or a 50-year-old. I wouldn’t have it any other way. When I walk into the City Council chambers here in Auburn or the Statehouse in Montgomery, I have the same credentials as the other 20 reporters. As far as the other journalists there, I might be 20 or 30 years their junior, and even younger than the politicians, but they expect me to get it right just like they do. And I usually do, or I try to at least.

That’s my job, which I happen to take very seriously. I’m not the only 19-year-old with two jobs, a full course load, several co-curricular responsibilities and not to mention thousands in studentloan debt. I’m not the only productive youngin’. But I’m also not the only young person with the stigma of “millennial” hanging over my head. Every generation derides their successors. For us millennials, we can’t go a day without facing accusations of laziness, whininess, profaneness or wastefulness. We get the brunt of it. Everything is our fault. There is a lot of scapegoating, and — to use a millennial term — it’s kind of unfair. The accusations are usually devoid of an individual target, because they’re hard to find. They’re not directed at me, and it’s not directed at the millennial who runs one of Auburn’s most successful law firms or the millennial who put up one hell of a fight to run as a Libertarian to replace former House Speaker Mike Hubbard. We are the most educated generation in American history. We’re more tolerant of people who

look different than us. We believe in the American entrepreneurial spirit and we are philanthropic. Our successes are ignored while our failures are highlighted. It’s hard to point fingers when you have to point at the people who are working themselves through trade school, the people who work minimum wage jobs to support their young families despite having college degrees, the people who face unprecedented challenges and still come out on top — even if they’re a little banged up. They can’t complain about the Auburn men and women who run charities and design new software, or the millions of millennials who will be, or already are, our next generation of doctors, nurses, pharmacists, engineers, welders, electricians, writers and scientists. These are the people who will solve the many crises we face but didn’t create — the crises that have been handed to us — from the drug epidemic, to the $17-trillion national debt, to climate change or the over-saturated job market. We’ll fix them. It seems like we — as a collective, as the “mil-

lennial” generation — can’t catch a break. We watch too much Netflix. We complain too much. We are too attached to our phones. We are too socially liberal. We are too politically correct. All of those things are true, but they’re also blown out of proportion. Every generation has their vices, but ours are painted to be worse than the Baby Boomers or worse than the Greatest Generation. Getting a few things wrong is part of growing up. It’s part of coming into our own. We’ll figure it out. Don’t blame us for struggling to support ourselves under rising tuition costs and lack of opportunity. Don’t vilify us for relying on mom and dad when there are few jobs to support our education. Don’t deride us for not saving when our rent is $500 a month, our paycheck is $300 and we still want to eat sometimes. Don’t paint with a broad brush. Give us a chance to succeed, because we will.

derful university in the first place — to get ready for our careers, duh. Yes, having endless nights screaming karaoke songs and stuffing your face with Little Italy pizza is definitely fun and part of the experience but focusing on my career the last two and a half years has really made all the difference. However, if it hadn’t been for The Plainsman I probably wouldn’t be sitting here confident that I am well-prepared and qualified to enter the workforce. It was only summer 2014 when I got involved with the student newspaper. But I didn’t let that stop me. Sorority and majorette obligations dominated my first two years at Auburn but when I walked into Suite 1111 in the basement of the Student Center for the first time I knew I needed to work my butt off and quick. And I did just that. I’ve pretty much done it all

minus being a photographer. I ran the paper for summer 2015 and that was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. In one summer, I learned more than I would’ve learned in an entire year as Editor-in-Chief. See, I was dealt a hard hand because the paper was going through a change in advisement. I attended countless meetings and helped keep The Plainsman afloat during the Student Media restructure. However, the 11 Plainsman staffers and I just kept on working through it covering every side of news in Auburn. When you’re put through hard situations that sometimes seem impossible, it makes you come together and go the extra mile to get the work done. I’ve been told that working at a student newspaper is quite possibly the hardest job you’ll ever have. But when it’s all said and done you have a

heap of memories and a support system you can lean on for years to come. So, find your people. Whether it’s in your major classes, on a sports team or through your job — find the people you can count on. Oh and if you’re worried about not having time to do it all, don’t. I was a majorette, in a sorority, on the Relay for Life committee for a year, in two honor societies and I worked a total of three jobs so it’s definitely possible. I don’t regret being super busy and running 99 miles per hour most of the time because it’s gotten me to where I am today — a confident almost graduate with five potential internship offers in front of her.

Chip Brownlee can be reached at community@ThePlainsman.com

Do it all, when you look back you’ll be glad Emily Esleck DESIGN EDITOR

Nine semesters, three summers spent working, 65 football games and four and a half years later, graduation is staring me straight in the face. Soon, I will walk across that stage and my time in college will be over. I’ve had plenty of time, and it’s been great so I’m not about to waste your time with a mushy gushy “oh, I’m going to miss college so much” farewell. But I will let you in on a couple secrets that made my college experience the best it ever could be. First, I’ll start with why we’re all at this won-

Emily Esleck is a senior graduating this December.


Lifestyle

13

Thursday, December 1, 2016

ThePlainsman.com

Lifestyle

ENTERTAINMENT

“Frick*: Baseball’s Third Commissioner”

Auburn journalism professor publishes first book, holds book reading and signing Lily jackson

LIFESTYLE EDITOR

After the publish of his first book, John Carvalho, associate professor and director of journalism, said he had heightened his awareness. He overcame a mental barrier, wrote a book and became completely aware that he could do it again. On Nov. 28, Carvalho stood in front of colleagues, students and friends at Pebble Hill for his first book reading and signing. Stacks of Carvalho’s first book, “Frick*: Baseball’s Third Commissioner,” sat waiting for signatures as a storm brewed outside. Carvalho’s book showcased the life and career of Ford Frick, the third commissioner of Major League Baseball. According to the book’s synopsis, “Ford Frick is best known as the baseball commissioner who put the “asterisk” next to Roger Maris’s record.” George Plasketes, professor and associate director of media studies, walked to the podium bearing a Stan Musial jersey. The jersey symbolized the significance of the occasion, Plasketes said, as Musial was his faMADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR ther’s favorite player. “I’m treating this like a ceremonial throw- John Carvalho, professor and director of journalism, signs copies of his newly published book after a reading ing out the first pitch, which I know I’ll nev- at Pebble Hill on Nov. 28. er be asked to do,” Plasketes said. “I’m going to live my fantasy out right here with John’s surprise flooding in the Haley Center threaten- the fan.” book and throw out the first pitch on John’s ing the safety of his archives to the periods of Carvalho — journalist, scholar, historian and book tour.” “radio silence” in between writing, editing and fan — began his reading with an excerpt from Plasketes said the book is a significant reviews, the process was something to admire the introduction of his book. He continued with achievement, something he is proud to ac- as Plasketes addressed, but something attain- one of the many stories told in the biography knowledge and honor. He recalled the start of able for Carvalho. about a confrontation between Frick and St. Carvalho’s research through the writing and ed“The book itself represents the best of John, Louis Cardinals pitcher, Dizzy Dean. iting stages, as a “labor of love,” for the author. both professionally and personally,” Plasketes Carvalho said this confrontation and the One does not breeze through the book pub- said. “When you read it you will hear John the many other encounters portrayed in his book lishing process, Carvalho would said. From a journalist, John the scholar, the historian and were a puzzle he pieced together from family

CULTURE

A review of Lady Gaga’s new album ‘Joanne’ Lily Hendrix INTRIGUE WRITER

Lady Gaga seems to be a jack of all trades. She’s an actress, singer, songwriter and activist. Her odd fashion statements and experimental music has been turning heads since 2008. Each album by Gaga differs in sound, style and throughout the years it seems as if she has matured after each release. Gaga’s first studio album, “The Fame,” initiated the beginning of her dance pop genre. After this album, she progressively became more strange, but in a way that broke boundaries and caught everyone’s attention. What’s interesting about her is that while she knew she would become more popular with her wild and fearless behavior on and off stage, she was really just being true to herself and not holding back in her rise to fame. There was no “trying” for her to be different. Gaga was a very theatrical performer and made her way to earning a role in the fifth season of “American Horror Story: Hotel.” Today’s image of Lady Gaga seems to have calmed down and focus on career choices which resulted in her release of her new album “Joanne.”

This album has mixed roots of country, dance-pop, and classical piano ballads. Though it isn’t as risky as her previous albums, it undoubtedly shows us a different side of Lady Gaga. The opening track, “Diamond Heart,” is filled with emotional vocals, overpowering everything else. Thing about it, isn’t that what Gaga wants? While listening to the album, it sounds like the music was recorded in the room next door while the vocals fiercely dominate. This track is a perfect opener, however not everyone may love it depending on their musical preference. Singer Florence Welch from Florence and the Machine, makes an appearance in the track, “Hey Girl.” Two of the strongest vocalists of today paired for this track proves this album revolves around vocals. This song is a passionate slow-jam featuring Welch and Gaga sing in unison followed by funky keyboard and subtle, crisp percussion. The more delicate tracks like “Sinner’s Prayer” and “Joanne,” portray her progressive development and talent. Her powerhouse vocals are not overshadowed by any other elements, as she is only accompanied by light music and soft tones. The artist, Father John Misty, made an appearance to help her with the percussion in “Sinner’s Prayer.” Several other beloved musicians and pro-

ducers collaborated on this album. Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker, Beck, and Josh Homme from Queens of the Stone Age, all make a guest appearance and contribute to this dynamic album in notable ways. Each and every song is easily a fun sing-along. Especially the tracks, “Perfect Illusion” and “Million Reasons.” “Come to Mama” gives a warm welcome to listeners as a favorable track that’s full of bursting horns and harmonious female vocals. Lady Gaga continues to be an admirable artist that strives to make a statement and continuously reinvents her sound and image. “Joanne” exhibits Gaga’s maturity and fills fans with anticipation to see what Lady Gaga will do next.

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records and intensive research. Piecing all of the stories together presented a challenge he was unsure of at the beginning, Carvalho said. Tracing Frick’s life through his stories sustained his interest. Carvalho initially became intrigued by Frick when he came to know of Frick’s beginnings in sports journalism. “The fact that [Frick] started out as a journalist and then got into a job like commissioner of baseball, you usually don’t see that,” Carvalho said. After the work dedicated to his publication, Carvalho described the next steps of his journey as a blast. Carvalho said to think that he could actually “pull it off” was a great feeling. As a journalism professor, Carvalho said he encourages his students to be thorough and read through their articles out loud before submission. He didn’t stray from his preachings. A week before he sent his work off, he read the book cover to cover aloud, a task that took him around four days to complete. “It’s different than a newspaper article, because it’s like you write it and then it’s there,” Carvalho said. “I finished this [book] last December and it went out for a couple of reviews then I had to write, then it went out for line editing, then editing and proofing. There’s so much radio silence between all of that, so when it finally gets out you think, ‘Well, now I don’t have to think about this anymore.’” Carvalho will be visiting baseball enthusiast groups throughout the U.S. over the next year on his book tour. On Dec. 15, he will be giving a presentation at a baseball shop in New York City, something he is looking forward to.

John Carvalho is a former Plainsman editor and advisor.

CAMPUS

CONTRIBUTED BY GRACIE BREITENFELD

Student STARS

Chandler Donegan and Gracie Breitenfield founded STARS.

Jessica Ballard LIFESTYLE WRITER

Gracie Breitenfeld, founder and president of Standing Together Against Rape and Sexual Assault, or Stars, decided to start Stars after a first hand experience with sexual assault. Breitenfeld said it was hard coming back to Auburn feeling alone. Having gone through such a hard experience during the summer between her freshman and sophomore year she felt isolated. “I was sexually assaulted in June and it was really hard coming back to Auburn,” Breitenfeld said. She made it her goal to take back the power and control in hopes of a small piece of justice for herself. She wanted to find every other person on Auburn’s campus feeling the way she did. Breitenfeld said one night as she sat in her dorm room she made a snap decision to start the organization. She immediately called friends, including the current vice president of Stars, Chandler Donegan. Within five days of making the decision, Stars had 10 members, the minimum number of students to start a University-approved organization. Breitenfeld asked Holly Dunlap, professor in the department of creative writing, to be the faculty advisor. The Stars executive board told the organization council their vision for Stars and got approved to be an organization that night. “Our exec team is so great, and I couldn’t have done anything without them,” Breitenfeld said. Within three months Stars had

over a hundred applicants to join the organization on AU Involve. Since the organization’s approval, Stars has had concourse hours promoting their club and spreading the word. They’ve also held multiple meetings featuring various speakers ranging from rape and sexual assault victims to Auburn University’s rape counselor. They hope to have speakers at all of their meetings to offer insight and comfort to attendees. Stars has had one benefit night at Moe’s Southwest Grill so far and hopes to have another during the Spring semester. Recently Stars participated in the Take Back the Night walk, an event that honors sexual assault victims and survivors of relationship violence. “We want to get registered as a 501c3, so that we can reach out to other campuses,” Breitenfeld said. The organization hopes to be able to spread beyond just Auburn’s campus in order to help as many victims of sexual assault and rape as possible. Stars is currently collaborating with Rape Counselors of East Alabama. “They do a great job of connecting people with both medical and legal services,” Donegan said. “That’s the part of all the stories that is most surprising to me; the legal and medical side of things usually don’t get handled the way they should from anybody’s stance. Either people don’t know what to do when it happens to them or the legal system just fails them.” Stars meetings are every other Monday at 9 p.m. in the student center.


Lifestyle 14

Thursday, December 1, 2016

The Auburn Plainsman

THIS WEEK

Everything you need to know about the next seven days

THURSDAY

CAMPUS EVENTS

December 1, 2016

COMMUNITY EVENTS

NIGHTLIFE

WHAT: $3 Top Shelf Wells and $1.50 Beer WHEN: 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. WHERE: SkyBar Cafe

WHAT: $3 Top Shelf Wells, $1.50 Beer, Draft & Daiquiri WHAT: Artist Talk: Jane Goldman Specials, No Cover WHEN: 5-6 p.m. WHEN: 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. WHERE: Jule Collins Smith WHERE: SkyBar Cafe Museum of Fine Art

WHAT: Samford Hall Lighting Ceremony WHEN: 6 p.m. WHERE: Samford Lawn

WHAT: Pint Night, $1 off Select Beer WHEN: 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. WHERE: Auburn Draft House

FRIDAY

CAMPUS EVENTS

December 2, 2016

WHAT: Egypt Themed Social Hour WHEN: 4-5 p.m. WHERE: Student Center 2222 & 2223

SATURDAY December 3, 2016

SUNDAY

SPORTS WHAT: Gymnastics Preview WHEN: 2 p.m. WHERE Auburn Arena

December 4, 2016

NIGHTLIFE

MUSIC

WHAT: $2 20oz Wells & $2 Beers WHEN: 6-9 p.m. WHERE: SkyBar Cafe

WHAT: Az-Izz WHERE: SkyBar Cafe WHAT: Ray Fulcher WHERE: SkyBar Cafe

SPORTS

MUSIC

WHAT: Men’s Basketball vs UAB WHEN: 7:30 p.m. WHERE: Birmingham, Bartow Arena

WHAT: Ty Renolds WHERE: SkyBar Cafe

CAMPUS EVENTS

COMMUNITY EVENTS

WHAT: Ring Ceremony WHEN: 5 p.m. WHERE: Student Center Ballroom

WHAT: Pancake Dinner WHERE: AUMC Epworth Center WHEN: 8-9:30 p.m.

NIGHTLIFE

COMMUNITY EVENTS WHAT: Winter Walk WHERE: Opelika Wood Duck Heritage Preserve WHEN: 8 a.m.

WHAT: $1 Mimosas, $5 Bloody Mary’s WHERE: Auburn Draft House

MONDAY December 5, 2016

NIGHTLIFE WHAT: $.50 Wings and $1 Budweiser Draft WHEN: 7 p.m. and 4 p.m. - 9 p.m. WHERE: Moe’s Original Bar B Que WHAT: Bingo WHEN: 9 p.m. WHERE: Moe’s Original Bar B Que

TUESDAY December 6, 2016

CAMPUS EVENTS WHAT: Up All Night Donuts & Juice WHEN: Every midnight until Friday, Dec. 9 WHERE: RBD Library and Student Center

NIGHTLIFE WHAT: $5 Bottles of Wine WHEN: 4-9 p.m. WHERE: Moe’s Original Bar B Que WHAT: Pint Night, $1 off select beer WHEN: 5-9 p.m. WHERE: Auburn Draft House

WEDNESDAY December 7, 2016

All events listed above are subject to change.

NIGHTLIFE WHAT: Ladies Night, $2 Wine WHERE: Fat Daddy’s WHERE: $.50 Natural and Busch Light Cans WHEN: All Day WHERE: Moe’s Original Bar B Que

COMMUNITY EVENTS WHAT: Victorian Front Porch Christmas Tour WHEN: Dec. 7 - Dec. 11 WHERE: Opelika Historic Distric, 8th & 9th Streets

MUSIC WHAT: Ty Renolds WHERE: SkyBar Cafe


Thursday, December 1, 2016

Lifestyle 15

The Auburn Plainsman

Sarah’s style: How to pack for the holidays Sarah Partain Lifestyle Writer

The struggle is #real when trying to pack for the holidays. Collecting clothing and predicting necessities for the entire month of Christmas break can be nearly impossible. There’s so much room for a variety of activities in the 30-something days when students are released from campus like two turtle doves in a cage. How does one know what to pack? I travel constantly, almost every weekend, whether it be driving a short distance or flying across the country. These are my tried-and-true tips for packing that work in any circumstance, but especially during the holidays.

1. Make lists. Make lists. Hey, make a freaking list. I am the biggest list-maker in the world. I have lists about making lists. I operate solely from the notes section of my iPhone. This particular skill can make packing (and eventually dressing) much less stressful. Planning outfits in advance for any scheduled trips maximizes available space and prevents struggling to put together an outfit from a crowded suitcase. This is also useful if visiting different climates, such as the beach versus New York City. No one needs to take home their entire closet. I’m traveling to New York during the first half of my break, and as much as I want to take my wholewardrobe, I can’t fit it all in a carry-on. My home, however, is in Georgia, so I won’t need cold-weather clothing like I will in New York. Therefore, planning specific outfits for each day I’m going to cruise the city saves time and space. 2. Take the essentials, buy the others. Toiletries can take up massive amounts of critical space in a suitcase. I always take any specialty products, but buying items such as contact solution or hairspray at the destination can make traveling much easier, especially if flying you are flying. Getting stopped by TSA at the airport for liquid products is such a drag. I’ve learned through experience that lighter bags make for a happier traveler. By the time Christmas break rolls around, most of my supplies are running low anyways. It isn’t worth packing an extra bag full of half-empty shampoo bottles when you’re going to have to buy more in the near future. Plus, getting them at home means using dad’s credit card. 3. Try to fit it all in some kind of bag, preferably easy to carry. There’s nothing I hate more than having to take multiple trips back and forth from the car to my room once I get home, I’m lazy, I’m aware. I mean honestly, there’s no worse bicep burn than carrying a stack of hanging clothes.

A U B U R N

SARAH PARTAIN / PHOTOGRAPHER

I swear I broke my pinky once on a stray metal hook, not worth it. Bag type is a crucial choice for airport traveling. My favorite combination for flying is a trusty carry-on with a larger duffel or shoulder bag that can hook onto the handle of the suitcase and sit on top. This leaves one hand completely free and doesn’t cause back pain that comes with lugging around an uncomfortable spare bag. It also makes security easier. Putting laptops or electronics in an accessible position in the tote makes scanning a breeze; no more sweat-inducing digging as crowds leer behind you and security agents glare.

4. Packing for the unplanned: what about the last-minute holiday party invites? I’m a chronic over-packer. Even with all my little tricks, I always stress about having the right clothing for the occasion. There will inevitably be unforeseen events during the holidays, so planning a few outfits for various affairs makes the days go smoothly. One of my biggest tips for these instances is making sure to take clothing that I feel confident and comfortable in. Again, planning ahead is a game changer. I’ll put together the entire outfit (dress, shoes, jewelry, etc.) before even leaving my apartment. Knowing the clothing I have fits well

and looks great allows me to enjoy the season without worrying about my appearance. Having one or two spare outfits for any level of dressiness gives options but doesn’t overcrowd suitcases. 5. Pick accessories with intention. I love shoes. Shoes are life. I always struggle with packing shoes: they’re bulky, difficult to fit into a suitcase and heavy. When planning for a smaller trip, it is important to take one or two pairs that would work with any outfit in the suitcase. I always take a dressier pair and a casual, easy-to-walk-in pair, as well as some trusty sneaks. For airport traveling, I wear my bulkiest pair ­­­­­­­— which are typically my fave over-the-knee boots — to reduce taken space in my bags. Jewelry and purses also take up valuable space. If I take too much jewelry, it gets tangled and I can never decide what to wear. Matching jewelry and bags to selected outfits makes getting dressed so much easier. Giving a little bit of time to plan clothing in advance saves time that would be spent on figuring out outfits from an overflowing suitcase. Putting a little bit of thought into packing can help all of us type-As spend our time celebrating the reason for the season instead of jumping on suitcases and tossing around clothes.

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Lifestyle 16

Thursday, December 1, 2016

The Auburn Plainsman

#DatingIsHardBecause

Unwarranted dating advice for Twitter hashtaggers from a single gal Jessica Ballard LIFESTYLE WRITER

Recently the people of Twitter got the hashtag #DatingIsHardBecause trending to vent their complaints. As I read them I realized I have priceless insight to offer. So here I am to offer advice and fix everyone’s problems. @seangrandillo: “We are all awful, every single one of us.” You’re absolutely right. Every single person, of the seven billion on this Earth, is awful. The key is to find the right kind of horrible person that complements your own horrible. For example, if you’re a raging narcissist find someone who likes to constantly criticize others. You’re ego might take a little bit of a blow on a daily basis which is exactly what a narcissist needs. Another viable option is to lower your standards and understand that people are complex. @D1lln: “I’m a 2 that likes 10’s.”

Gain some self confidence and stop expecting so much from others. There’s a nice middle ground to be found here. Or find a 10 with bad vision. @drewryanscott: “The one I want doesn’t want me back” Manipulation tactics are crucial here. Have mutual friends subtly mention all of your positive qualities. They could drop comments about how naturally gorgeous you are when you wake up. Or how you always let your significant other win arguments even when they’re obviously wrong. Another super effective strategy is to post pictures on social media of how handy you are to have around. For example, a Snapchat story of how nicely you can fold clean clothes or the light bulb that you replaced all by yourself. At this point you’re basically irresistible. Changing how people feel is always possible if you try hard enough. @capricemind: “There’s always one person that gets more attached than the other and ends up getting hurt the most.” We always like to think of ourselves as the better person or the victim of someone else’s faults. The reality of it is break ups aren’t just painful for the person

PLAINSMAN PICKS PLAYLIST:

this week, the plainsman editors chose their favorite comforting songs for exam week. lis-

getting broken up with. The super fun part about breakups is you’re either feeling the pain of hurting someone you once loved or the pain of someone you love no longer feeling the same way. It’s the nature of break ups. Accept it and brace yourself or get comfortable being single. @McMannofthepeop: “I don’t have a single thing to wear that goes with this ankle monitor.” It’s obviously time for a shopping spree. Get some clothes that can really accentuate the monitor. I’m assuming the monitor is black and it’s getting closer to winter so darker colored clothes are in. The ankle monitor can even be a statement piece. @morninggloria: “Any children that could be produced from your successful union will die as a result of climate change.” Everyone dies at some point. Why let the inevitable doom of your children stop you from reproducing with the person you love? But if your child dying at some point is significant enough of an issue for you then there is a pretty wild option you could go for. Don’t have children. @McMannofthepeop: “Human interaction is not my forte.”

STERLING WAITS / GRAPHICS EDITOR

The internet is making it increasingly easy to live our entire lives without ever leaving the comfort of our Cheeto dust covered couches. For those of us with fun social anxiety problems or a natural aversion to people, online dating is a great option. The ability to portray yourself exactly how you wish is a gift and certainly one to take advantage of. I suggest you start an online relationship. Relationships in which you’ve never met the person are usually the most successful.

Auburn dog of the week

ten to their picks and follow the auburn plainsman at spotify.com/the_auburnplainsman.

“Gooey” by Glass Animals Emily Shoffit, sports editor “This is how my brain feels.”

“Peace Sign (Acoustic)” by LIGHTS Lily Jackson, lifestyle editor “Just counting down the days till peace returns.”

“Prélude in E minor, Op. 28, No. 4” by Frédéric Chopin Weston Sims, opinions editor “Classical music clears my head.”

“Adagio For Strings, Op. 11” by Samuel Barber Chip Brownlee, community editor “It is said that this is the saddest song ever written and that is how I feel during exam.”

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Fitz Goble walks with his owner Savannah Goble, junior in human development and family studies, at Samford Hall on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 in Auburn, Ala.

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RELEASE DATE– Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

ACROSS 1 Divers’ destinations 6 Japanese cartoon art 11 “Shoot!” 14 Send to cloud nine 15 Sir Arthur __ Doyle 16 Traffic court letters 17 Spread some gossip 19 Chow fixer? 20 Emphatic affirmation 21 Paperless tax return option 23 Original “Veronica Mars” airer 24 Hybrid toaster oven snacks 27 Surrealism pioneer Max 29 That being the case 30 “... Mr. Tambourine Man, __ song for me” 32 __ standstill 33 Birch or beech 37 Buns and flips 38 He has a nest at 1231/2 Sesame Street 42 Actress Gardner 43 Racing legend A.J. 45 “Later!” 46 Absolute 48 Sharif of “Doctor Zhivago” 50 Prophets 52 Stayed on 56 Dutch banking giant 58 Homeric epic 59 Philips electric toothbrush brand 62 “Teen Wolf” network 63 Young player on the rebound ... or, in another way, what each set of circles in this puzzle represents 66 Iron source 67 Go off-script 68 Mix 69 Baby goat sound

70 Like mosquitoes 71 In disarray DOWN 1 Second try 2 Philanthropist Yale 3 “No sweat” 4 1862 Tenn. battle site 5 Match makers? 6 Nailed the test 7 Brand for serious last-minute preparation 8 Italian food ending 9 Tarnish 10 Comes in 11 Pain reliever sold in Liqui-Gels 12 “Peachy” 13 Windy weather fliers 18 Arms-akimbo joints 22 Arch site 25 Oft-baked pasta 26 Miles away 28 Arrest 30 Adobe file format 31 Head of a pub? 32 Prez on a fiver 34 Rodent-eating reptiles

35 Day before a big day 36 Shucker’s unit 39 Letter-shaped beam 40 Pita sandwich 41 Deserving 44 Frat party wear 47 Barely flow 49 Wild 50 Hoity-toity 51 Flamboyant Dame

52 Handmade bleachers sign 53 Hyper 54 Skin “Creme” in blue tins 55 Workout buff’s motto opener 57 Impish looks 60 SALT weapon 61 Whirlpool 64 Metered praise 65 Portland Timbers’ org.

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

xwordeditor@aol.com

By C.C. Burnikel ©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

08/10/16

08/10/16


The Auburn Plainsman 12.1.16