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CAMP WAR EAGLE visit us online at THEPLAINSMAN.COM

DELIVERING NEWS SINCE 1893 PAGE

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A LETTER FROM PRESIDENT GOGUE

SUMMER 2017

The Auburn Plainsman PAGE

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ALTERNATIVE CWE BREAK IDEAS

A SPIRIT THAT IS NOT AFRAID PAGE

46

SGA’S STUDENT TICKET CHANGES


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Table of Contents: (4) (7) AUBURN BROADCAST AND RADIO (9) MEET YOUR SGA PRESIDENT

LETTER FROM OUTGOING PRESIDENT

(16) A RUNDOWN OF AU FALL SPORTS

(36)

ALTERNATIVE BREAKS FOR CWE CAMPERS

(32) ACADEMICS MADE EASIER WITH (40) HELP FROM ADVISERS PARENTS PLACE FOR VEGGIES AND MARKET MAYHEM

(19) APARTMENTS OR DORMS?

(46) MEET YOUR SGA OFFICERS IT WAS LIKE IN AUBURN’S (51) WHAT HISTORIC WITTEL DORM

(26) (29) SUMMER PLAYLIST

(54) RUNDOWN OF CAMPUS (58) AND CITY SAFETY MEASURES

RECRUITMENT CHECKLIST AND TIPS FROM THE HEAD PI CHI

WHERE TO FIND CHEAP, TASTY FOOD AROUND TOWN

Cutouts: (19) Auburn Creed (42) Fall and Spring Academic Calendar cut-Out (50) 2017 Football schedule Cut-Out

FILE PHOTO


Thursday, May 18, 2017

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Thursday, May 18, 2017

FILE PHOTO

Letter to the editor: Advice to freshmen from outgoing President Gogue You’re probably getting a lot of advice these days. In conversations that happen about this time every year, family members, former teachers, friends already in college and others eagerly pass along their experiences on what it’s like to move away from home and how to be successful as a university student. It’s an exciting time as you start on this new adventure, and those who care about you want to be helpful. As we look forward to you arriving on campus, we too want to offer a few simple tips that we’re confident will help you get the most out of your Auburn experience. First, go to class. I bet you’ve already heard this one, but I’m offering it again for a reason you may not have heard previous-

ly. Yes, it’s true that regular class attendance is key to academic achievement and good grades, but another reason is that it’s a great way to get to know your professors. They love what they do and want the best for you. In addition to expert knowledge in their field, they know what it’s like to balance studies, work and a social life. They’re also great mentors. Get to know them by name. Many of these relationships will last a lifetime. Second, get involved. Your Auburn experience is what you make it, and your camp counselors have a wealth of ideas on how you can be a part of something that’s right for you. Studies consistently show that students involved in the life of the institution outside the classroom are happier and make better grades. With more than 500 campus organizations, there’s at

least one that’s a perfect fit. Third, make a list of things you want to accomplish. Over and over, I’ve heard soon to be graduates say, “I wish I had done…” Don’t be one of them. Make the time to create lasting memories. For the past 10 years, I’ve enjoyed the awesome privilege of serving Auburn as its president. You begin your Auburn career this fall with a new president, Dr. Steven Leath, who arrives after leading Iowa State University since 2012. Please join me in giving him an enthusiastic Auburn welcome. Editor’s note: This letter was submitted by Jay Gogue, outgoing Auburn president. The 2017 Camp War Eagle sessions will be his last.

Letter from the managing editor: Take charge of your life now Lily Jackson MANAGING EDITOR

Take a moment to recall everything you have been told about college — what it is, why you are here, what you “need” to be. Now forget it. Wipe the slate clean and toss out those hand-me-downs. College is and will be everything you make it. There is very little luck involved. What you work for is what you get and vice versa. Auburn is a relatively safe place to find out what you want, who you are and begin working toward the life you desire. The key is to be-

gin moving in that direction. It’s too common a scenario to hear of students “buckling down” in their last four or five semesters. College is a time to enjoy life, express yourself and feel free. But it is crucial to stay completely self-aware and continue to strive for accomplishment, connections and the pricey degree you are here for. College lasts four years and in the scheme of an average life, that is not long at all. Remember to work through an end game. You will most likely leave this quaint village and carrying what you’ve gained from your time here, you will be expected to help add to the history of our world. Dramatic, but true. Considering something this mind-blowing will snap you out of think-

ing it’s okay to go to Sky Bar the night before a huge exam. You’ve got responsibilities now and the only person that will feel the consequences is the one considering taking shots. Know your time here can be hugely beneficial. Or it can be a waste of thousands of dollars. Every person you meet is valuable and crucial to your development as a person, employee and citizen. Who’s to say your GTA won’t be your boss one day? Remember names and faces, connect them with personal anecdotes and never shy away from making an impression. While packing for my freshman year, a family member of mine told me to “lay low” my first year. “Learn how everything is run there and then find your spot.” I completely disagree with this advice now as

a junior. I say go head first and don’t look back. Be confident in who you are, what you will do and start making waves. No one is remembered for sitting back and watching the world go by. Question authority. Open up controversial discussions. March with passion and speak with conviction. Being freed from the stuffy halls of a suffocating high school has left you to make all of the questionable decisions you could ever dream of. Think of our world today, how fascinating it is and consider how everything we have today began in a “crazy person’s” garage. Today, we have the most power we’ve ever had, and we can do with it what we wish. Take this fresh dose of freedom and do your worst. You never know when your worst could be the world’s next best.


Thursday, May 18, 2017

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

125 YEARS OF WOMEN AT AU Lily Jackson

MANAGING EDITOR

They came in abiding by a dress code and curfew. They fought for their rights to higher education, and this year marks 125 years of women at Auburn University. The 125 years of women at Auburn University celebration will include a series of events, keynote speakers and a gala. The last celebration was the centennial where the book, “Blossoms Amid the Deep Verdure: A Century of Women at Auburn, 1892-1992,” by Leah Rawls Atkins was published in celebration. In the book, Atkins wrote how many women in the first two decades of the twentieth century enrolled thanks to a pre-existing connection to the university. This changed over time as faculty became more open to women in higher education. “In the past 25 years, we’ve grown so much as an institution and country with

equality, so the University saw it as an opportunity to really celebrate in a meaningful way,” said Jaylin Goodwin, intern for the Women’s Leadership Institute. Goodwin said the 125 team is making a conscious effort to get Auburn women back on campus to tell stories of their successes and celebrate the education that got them there. The Alumni Center has launched a website where Auburn alumni can submit their stories post-college and from their time at the University. These stories will play a role in the 125 celebrations. Aside from events and speakers, the new Mell Classroom building will feature an interactive permanent monument that will teach the history, and stand as a reminder of how women got to Auburn, Goodwin said. Speakers have not been selected yet, but announcements will be made toward the beginning of the fall semester.

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Get to know Auburn’s third female SGA president Lily J ackson

MANAGING EDITOR

Everything SGA President Jacqueline Keck got involved in throughout her first years at Auburn started with someone asking her to just give an idea — a role on campus — a chance. Way back when, Keck gave Auburn a chance. Having studied at the University of Alabama for early college, she thought she had found her four-year fix with the Crimson Tide. It wasn’t until friends from Girls State, a summer leadership and citizenship program, encouraged her to give Auburn a shot that she visited the campus. “I came, and I fell in love with the campus like everyone else does,” Keck said. “You feel the warmth, and I came to Auburn because of that.” Despite the 180 switch from Elephants to Eagles, Keck

knew no matter where she was she wanted to be involved. Keck said she never knew it would be to the extent it is now, though. Keck was heavily involved in her highschool’s Student Government Association and had a heart for what they were doing. More specifically, Keck cared deeply about bridging the gap between the community and student body. When she arrived at Auburn, a senior in her sorority mentored her and encouraged her to pursue Freshman Leadership Program. She went through the interview process for Freshman Forum and was chosen. After learning the ropes, she was encouraged by the same sorority sister to run for senator. She won by a slim margin. Following the same theme as before, she ran for a leadership position in the senate and once again succeeded.

On the side, she found herself applying, being chosen and working as a War Eagle Girl. “It is so much fun to romp around the town with them and go to away games with some of my best friends,” Keck said. Keck’s attributes her story and what she has done at Auburn to others encouraging her. “People kind of encouraged me and saw something in me that I didn’t see in myself, and they gave me the confidence and a little push to get me going,” Keck said. Keck said she bases her successes in hard work but never thought she would be SGA president. She tries to encourage fellow students to work hard as well and give their dreams a shot. “Even if you don’t get it, that’s okay,” Keck said. “I have learned more from what I haven’t gotten than what I have.”

Jacqueline facts: - At the age of nine, while balancing a remote on her foot it fell and cracked her front tooth. Half of her front tooth is fake -She serves as the sweetheart of the economics department -She is from Guntersville, Alabama and graduated with a class of 150 students -She is majoring in economics and would like to work in economic development - She was a War Eagle Girl, the official hostesses of Auburn University MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

SGA President Jacqueline Keck is the third female SGA president.


Thursday, May 18, 2017

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Keck’s long-term and short-term agenda Lily Jackson

MANAGING EDITOR

“Dining is a big one,” Keck said. Auburn will receive a new dining contract next spring and SGA is working to ensure students’ thoughts are heard and considered when working toward a new arrangement. Keck said SGA is pushing heavily for dining hall style eateries to enforce an element of community she sees as crucial to Auburn. “The culture of dining at Auburn will be changing and this year we are laying the foundation for that,” Keck said. Keck said SGA plans to engage students as much as possible when trying out different dining options. She said they want to know what students like and what they don’t. Another project Keck is working on is the Auburn Intern Housing Initiative. This program matches current Auburn students with Auburn alumni to provide housing as the current student interns in said city. Rent is free, allowing students the luxury of not having to take on multiple rents on top of other living expenses. The Plainsman’s issue announcing Keck’s win.

The pilot program is in Washington, D.C. There is a project in place to work toward a professional clothing closet. This closet would serve as a check-out station for students that are in need of presentation or interview clothing. This project was piloted and founded by former Miss Auburn, Madison Rolling. During her time in office, she held a clothing drive to start the process of getting the closet up and running. Keck said she has a team of four students working to further the project and have it functional as soon as they can. Startup date has not been decided yet. SGA is working to rebrand as the next year begins. They hope to tell their story better and have more influence and communication with the student body. Keck encourages students to follow SGA on Instagram and Twitter for more information about what is coming down the line this year and to give feedback. The rebranding process will be evident on all of their social media platforms, Keck said.

See page 46 for the rest of the SGA Cabinet


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Auburn alumna becomes new Alabama governor Chip Brownlee EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Alabama has a new governor, and she’s an Auburn alumna. Kay Ivey, who was serving as lieutenant governor, ascended to the governor’s office in April after former Gov. Robert Bentley resigned amid a spiraling sex scandal that involved a former top political aide. Ivey, who graduated from Auburn in 1967, has served in state government in one form or another since 1979. While at Auburn, she was pres-

ident of her Alpha Gamma Delta pledge class and was in student government for all four of her years at Auburn. Ivey was the first woman elected as SGA vice president and president of the Student Senate. She is also the second female governor in Alabama’s history. In 2002, Ivey ran as a Republican for state treasurer. She was elected and served in former Gov. Bob Riley’s cabinet from 2003 to January 2011.

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Student-run broadcast and radio services Eagle Eye TV is Auburn’s student run television station. Eagle Eye offers students the ability to learn about the TV industry in a fully functional television studio. Alumni have moved on after Eagle Eye to work for ESPN, CNN, the Weather Channel and local news stations across the country. Eagle Eye offers a variety of content each week in news, sports, and entertainment. In fall 2016, we used the election season as an opportunity to produce a seven hour, network style, live Election night show called Eye On The White House. Our team had reporters stationed at voting stations in many states, and live coverage using some of the best technology that we have available. Eagle Eye TV was the first news outlet in the Country to announce the winner of the election. Auburn Feud is our fall semester game show that has campus organizations facing off to answer survey questions that are uniquely Auburn. Other programing includes weekly news shows, a morning talk show, two sports shows, and much more. Submitted by Station Manager Brandon Etheredge, junior in media studies.

WEGL 91.1 FM is Auburn University’s student run radio station that serves as a learning lab providing students with experience in writing, editing and live production. WEGL is non-commercial allowing the station to be flexible with its programming. WEGL’s staff comprises of students who have a hard work ethic and are interested in the radio-world. Three of these positons are paid which includes the station manager, program director and chief engineer. In addition to these titles, there are other non-paid positions. These include the music director, format directors (which relates to music genres and sports and news), marketing director, website director, PSA director and director of program development. In addition to the staff, students have the opportunity to become a DJ at WEGL. DJs are the main providers of the station’s content and are required to have a one hour show once a week. In addition, DJ’s will be expected to participate in events and services that WEGL caters or provides. WEGL’s purpose is to serve the student body through the content it delivers over the air and through DJing events on and off campus. Submitted by Station Manager John Horton, senior in media studies.


The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Thursday, May 18, 2017

We Deliver

Suspicious?

The Auburn campus myths and legends Kressie Kornis CAMPUS WRITER

The urban legend of the seal in front of Langdon Hall, placed in the 1970s, is arguably one of Auburn’s most well-known myths. Legend has it that if any student steps on the seal, they will not graduate on time or marry an Auburn man or woman. Hannah Burke, junior in elementary education, learned this the hard way. “I heard that if you step on the seal you won’t graduate on time, you won’t find true love at Auburn and you will have seven generations of Bama fans,” Burke said. There are a few different ways to reverse the curse according to the legend, including jumping into the president’s fountain at midnight on the leap day of leap year. The next leap year is 2020. “In order to counteract the curse, it used to be that you had to jump in the fountain but then they got rid of the fountain, so now you have to eat dirt out of the president’s garden or something like that,” Burke said. Burke believes the legend is true because she has experienced the consequences of stepping on the seal firsthand. “Freshman year, my friend and I were walking home from the bars and she stepped on the seal and was distraught, so she pushed me on the seal so she wouldn’t be the only one with bad luck,” Burke said. “I believe it is so true because I’m not graduating in four years. I’m graduating in five, and I doubt I’ll find true love at Auburn.” Burke said she doesn’t mind graduating in five years or not finding true love at Auburn, but she does care about having seven generations of Alabama fans. “I will be devastated,” Burke said. Regardless of Burke’s curse, she still believes having traditions like the legend of stepping on the seal is important to the Auburn family. “Cheesy as it is, we’re rooted in our family and traditions are really important to alumni and students because it makes you feel like this is where you belong,” Burke said. However, there is another urban legend Auburn bears that is less likely to negatively affect a student as heavily

as stepping on the seal would, which is the legend of the lathe next to Samford Hall. The tradition of the lathe is a way to find out if a student has found their true love at Auburn. Noah Cotton, senior in industrial engineering, explained the legend. “If you take a girl there at night and the lathe doesn’t move or something like that, then she’s an Auburn woman and you should marry her.” Cotton also recalled a shortly-lived myth about the two men in bunny costumes sculpture that reside in the pond in front of the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art. “People thought that the statues of the guys wearing the bunny suits that are in the pond at the museum, that was just an art project, at first thought, it was pledges in the water,” Cotton said. Another Auburn legend is an explanation of why Auburn does not have sorority houses. Auburn sororities have dormitories in the Village for members to live in and host chapter meetings, but no houses. Prior to the Village, the Hill residence hall was used as sorority housing. The myth most commonly states when women were first allowed to attend Auburn in the late 1890s and began to form sororities, a wealthy donor felt more than five women living together would be considered as a house of ill repute. Ashley Moore, junior in applied mathematics, is a member of a social sorority and thinks it’s unfair they don’t have houses like the fraternities do. “I was told on one of my tours of Auburn that some lady donated a crap ton of money to Auburn and her one request was for sororities to not have houses and to be on campus,” Moore said. “I also think that houses could make some sororities a lot better than others and make it more competitive than it needs to be, but it is still unfair.” When asked if not having houses has affected her sorority experience as compared to other schools with sorority houses, Moore said maybe. “It is kind of unfair though that the guys get to have them and have parties in it and we don’t even have houses, but if we did, we wouldn’t be allowed to have parties in them anyways,” Moore said.

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Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

‘The Auburn Look’

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Bailey Smith, (below) junior in media studies, and Alex Cottrell, (above) junior in entrepreneurship and family business, model normal outfits for campus life.

Lily Jackson

MANAGING EDITOR

What you see is what you will most likely be after a week at Auburn University. These looks, this style — it’s not so easily mastered. The balance between effortless charm, comfort considered and time-conserving indifference is one that takes thought and understanding. While your mother may say you look like a bum, you’ll fit in with one of your 50 Auburn T-shirts, a sturdy pair of Nike shorts, socks that reflect your inner self and running shoes you’ve never run in. This style is addicting and ever-loyal to Auburn students as it has been a topic of much ridicule and has stood strong through the storm. Take comfort in the crowd and wear your threads with confidence.

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Thursday, May 18, 2017

How to conquer the Chick-fil-A line

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Student Affairs. Here for

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Anne Dawson ASSISTANT EDITOR

Alright, it’s 9:50 a.m. and you just finished class. You’re starving and all you want is a juicy, tender Chick-fil-A chicken biscuit. So logically you decide to go peacefully hop in line, right? Wrong. If you were to follow through with that plan, you’d be right along side the rest of the University who just got out of their 9 o’clock class. So how do you go about this situation? It takes skill, experience and a little bit of luck. Here’s what I’ve learned when it comes to conquering the dreaded mile-long Chick-fil-A line. 1. Do not go right after class Every single other student has the same idea as you. Never go as a class has just let out unless you want to wait for

an hour. If you absolutely have to have a biscuit after your class lets out, wait until the hour rolls over — for example in my 10 a.m. scenario — so you can at least weed out the ones who are trying to squeeze some chicken minis into their 10-minute break. 2. If you can, wait until the middle of a class time On MWF it’s smartest to go at the half-hour, so like 9:30 or 1:30, while you know most students are well into their classes. On TR you’re better off waiting until 45 minutes into each hour, so like 9:45 or 1:45. Whatever you do, just make sure you’ve got at least 10 minutes until the next class ends so you miss the traffic of classes that got out early. 3. Go with a friend Just in case you do get stuck in line, aside from prayer, make sure you have a pal with you to keep you company. If you follow my advice you should be fine, but on the off-chance that your luck betrays you, make sure you stay well-entertained because it might be awhile my friend. Chick-fil-A is most definitely worth it, but don’t wait in that impossibly long line if you don’t have to.

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YOU ASKED. WE LISTENED.

STUDENT FOOTBALL TICKETING CHANGES Learn more at aub.ie/ticketing

2017 - 2018

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Apartment living

Thursday, May 18, 2017

VS.

On-campus living

er.

Anne Dawson ASSISTANT EDITOR

Living on campus may put you close to other students, classes, Tiger Dining and the library, but living off campus definitely has it’s perks too. With more freedom, easier access to your car and a full kitchen, living off campus can be one of the best experiences for students. Just like all student-housing, there are many ways to optimize your living experience. Here are some tips for making your living situation the best it can be. 1. Make friends with the people in your building You can either make friends or enemies with your neighbors, and I highly suggest making friends with them. Having someone to feed your cat or water your plants when you can’t make it home will definitely make a difference on days when you’re stuck at work or on campus. Also, I’ve had neighbors make extra food and text me asking if they could bring some down. Trust me, it helps to make friends. 2. Use the Tiger Transit app A lot of students are scared of the transit. They think it isn’t reliable or takes too long. If you use the app Rider, it can make the whole transit experience so much smooth-

The app tells you when the next few transits are coming so you can see exactly when you need to head out the door in order to make it to class on time. 3. Take advantage of the free activities in your complex Most apartment complexes offer free activities such as pools and gyms. Some even offer volleyball courts, tanning beds and game rooms. Take advantage of these. Go to the pool a few times a week with your friends, play a rousing game of beach volleyball with your neighbors and go lounge in the game room with your roommates for a change of scenery. 4. Actually cook in your kitchen I have so many friends that bragged about having a kitchen to cook in, but have never actually turned their stove on. Use the full kitchen to your advantage. In dorm rooms you live off of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and ramen, but once you move into a big-boy/girl apartment you need to finally make real meals for yourself. Having your own kitchen can save you money by allowing you to cook food instead of eating out, and can also probably help you shed a few pounds if you choose to cook healthier meals. Living off campus has it’s perks so be sure to use it to its full potential.

Nathan King STAFF WRITER

Depending on who you ask, whether it be an Auburn student past or present, most will provide you with differing opinions of living on campus. Some will inform you that dorm life couldn’t be worse, that your RAs are hell-bent on ruining all your fun and everyone on your floor will be completely different from you. These people will insist that off-campus housing is the only way to go. On the flip side, some students will tell you there is no better way to enhance your firstyear experience than to immerse yourself in the campus life. They’ll insist that placing yourself in the heart of campus is the best way to make friends, attend university events and in general be closer to all the Auburn action. Regardless of where you swing on this residential pendulum, one constant exists for both parties: there are a multitude of ways to improve on-campus life. “Definitely get out of your room and meet the people in your building,” said Gillian Carusone, Little Hall RA. “Go spend time in your lobby, because that’s how you meet people outside of your major and outside of the people you graduated high school with.” “That’s how you find out about what’s happening on campus and how you just make friends in your building. It’s a really convenient thing to have your first year. When you’re both awake at 2 in the morning, it’s fun to have somebody to just run off to Waf-

fle House with.” Finding friends in your building is an incredibly vital part of improving your first-year experience, Carusone said. Many freshman forget that everyone in the dorm is in the same boat. Most incoming students don’t have a plethora of friends to choose from during the first few weeks of class. RAs encourage students to not be afraid to put themselves out there and meet new people. Carusone, sophomore in economics and political science, will be an RA in the Upper Quad’s Little Hall again next semester. “The residents have been my favorite part,” Carusone said. “They’re why I became an RA.” The utilization of your resident assistant will vastly increase your quality of life in the dorm. Your RA is there to be a friend and a mentor, along with someone to guide you through the ups and downs that are sure to come with getting comfortable on campus. RAs offer a couple of helpful tips: Leave your hall on the last day of class without any regrets. Have an open mind towards others and approach the challenges of freshman year with your peers. They’re going through the same things you are, so embrace those trials in a fun and constructive manner. Carusone stressed the importance of relaxation during Camp War Eagle. “A lot of what you’re told during camp will be harped on by your RAs,” Carusone said.


Thursday, May 18, 2017

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Making crucial connections while making bank Chris H eaney STAFF WRITER

For many incoming students, getting a part-time job is the last thing on their mind when having to move to a new place, meet new people and start new classes in a totally new environment. While starting college is definitely a challenge, what many new students don’t realize is that having a part-time job or internship can be just as important as a good GPA when applying for jobs in the future. Addye Buckley-Burnell, assistant director of career development at the Career Center, said work experience is crucial in today’s job market. “80-90 percent of employers are telling us that having actual work experience is useful to students when applying for positions, and students with experience are seen more favorably by employers,” Burnell said.

Burnell said the first step to finding a job is joining Handshake. Handshake is a job-posting site where employers express employment needs and all kinds of time commitments. Registered students will automatically be added to the system and can log in with their University credentials. Once logged in, Burnell said to optimize one’s profile. “We encourage students to have [their page] as updated as possible,” Burnell said. “They can essentially upload a resume and click ‘add to profile’ which will include all the elements of their resume fully.” Burnell said the system works best when used frequently. The success rate in finding a position using this system is very high for students, Burnell said. Helping to find a job during college isn’t the only service that the Career Center provides, though.

“It’s for everything career related, from the day they first walk on campus to five years after they’ve graduated,” Burnell said. Students who visit the Career Center will be able to utilize services like career assessments, interview preparation, resume and CV reviews and professional development discussions. The Career Center is open to all students of any major, and students can have walk-in appointments during business hours, Monday-Friday. For students eager to get a job when the fall semester starts, the Career Center will be holding an internship and part-time job fair on Aug. 30. It will feature employers from the Auburn area who are going to be hiring in the fall. The event is free to all students. “It’s a great way for students to get connected with positions they may not know about,” Burnell said.

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LET’S PLAY BALL

What to expect from Auburn Athletics in the fall Nathan King STAFF WRITER

It sometimes feels as if Auburn athletics make the world turn on campus. Powered by the intense energy from the fans and inspired by the great athletes of old, sporting events at Auburn University can be some of the most exciting and influential undertakings for a young student. They can also be some of the most daunting. There is an immense plethora of information and statistics that come with an Auburn game. To become fully immersed in the almost tangible spirit of the surrounding student section, it is helpful to become educated on the team in front of you. The fall is shaping up to be an exciting time for Auburn sports, as the promises of new potential and successes have fans looking forward to brilliant seasons. MEN’S BASKETBALL After the 2016-17 campaign, Auburn

men’s basketball had completed the first winning season under now fourth-year head coach Bruce Pearl. However, the season finished on a decline, as the Tigers went from a sure-fire NIT contender to not making any sort of postseason tournament aside from the conference’s. Auburn’s fate was due not in small part to their shortcomings in the SEC Tournament, dropping the opening game to conference bottom-feeder Missouri on a last-second buzzer beater. Amid NCAA March Madness, Pearl made a guarantee to Auburn fans that the Tigers will be in the big dance in 2018. Auburn lost a few players to graduation and a few that transferred, but the Tigers will reload with an impressive recruiting class and an infusion of a talented junior college transfer in Malik Dunbar. Auburn consistently played one of the youngest rotations in the country, as Jared Harper, Danjel Purifoy, Mustapha Heron, Austin Wiley and Anfernee McLemore all made significant im-

pacts as freshmen. Those young Tigers will be a year older and year wiser, hungry for a postseason run. WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Coach Flo’s squad made the NCAA Tournament for the second year in a row in 2017, falling handily t North Carolina State in the first round. Like the men, the women’s team fell victim to a disappointing opening-round loss in the SEC tourney, losing to the Georgia Bulldogs. The Tigers consistently turned in some of the most impressive clips on the defensive end, recording high numbers of steals and takeaways. It was the offensive inefficiency that plagued Auburn in losses, however. The Tigers will lose a trio of seniors in starters Katie Frerking and Brandy Montgomery, along with defensive specialist Khady Dieng. Although Auburn will be without the firepower of Frerk-

ing and Montgomery, the 2016-17 season saw younger players such as Janiah McKay and Tyra Johnson emerge as every night scorers. Up front, Auburn returns the Jones twins of Jazmine and Jessica. To succeed next season, Auburn will have to continue to play Coach Flo’s brand of basketball in order to compete in a league where the 2017 National Championship was between two behemoths from the SEC. SOCCER Coming off the best year in program history, a season in which Auburn reached the Elite 8 for the first time ever, the ladies of Auburn soccer want more. The 2017-18 brand of the team looks to continue their success with a fresh recruiting class and the experience that a deep postseason run brings. The Tigers graduate six talented se-

» See AUBURN ATHLETICS, 44

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

KAE HENDERSON / PHOTOGRAPHER

Mustapha Heron (5) looks to pass the ball during Auburn Men’s Basketball vs. Missouri on Saturday, March 4, 2017 in Auburn,Ala.

Brandy Montgomery (10) looks to pass the ball during Auburn Women’s Basketball vs.Alabama on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017 in Auburn,Ala.


Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

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PA R E N T & FA M I L Y P R OG R A M S

AU B U R N U N I V E R S I T Y PA R E N T S ’ AS S O C I AT I O N : Participating in the Auburn University Parents’ Association is an excellent way to stay connected as a part of the Auburn Family and support the education of your son or daughter. Membership benefits include: Subscription to a bi-weekly eNewsletter designed specifically for parents with timely information from campus Access to a dedicated AUPA Board representative Increased student retention from first to second year Higher 4-year graduation rates FILE PHOTO

Join today by visiting www.auburn.edu/joinaupa or through the Parent and Family Programs Guide in Auburn Guides. AU B U R N G U I D ES A P P : The Office of Parent and Family Programs has gone mobile! Download the Parent and Family Programs guide within the Auburn Guides app. This free, mobile app is available in the mobile App Store or on Google Play. This guide is your one-stop-shop for frequently asked questions and resources for you and your Auburn student.

PA R E N T R ES O U R C E G U I D E : College can be overwhelming—even for parents. The Parent Resource Guide within Tiger Transitions is here to help you. This guide is designed to answer questions that you may have during your student’s time at Auburn. Browse the guide via Tiger Transitions or at www.auburn.edu/aupa.

CO N TACT U S : (334) 844-1493 parent@auburn.edu www.auburn.edu/aupa

War Eagles over Elephants all day, every day Sam Willoughby STAFF WRITER

I transferred to Auburn University about a yearand-a-half ago from the University of Alabama with my tail between my legs. I’d spent my life as a Bammer and a die-hard Auburn hater. But looking back, I regret nothing about the choice I made to transfer to this cow college, and if you’re reading this, I can only assume you’ve made the right choice from the outset. I’m reminded of something my lifelong-Auburn-fan friend said as we were enjoying the downtown nightlife one night and discussing my turncoat-ness. “It’s not a cult when you’re in it.” I used to “joke” about the pretentious Auburn Family (capital ‘F’, always a capital ‘F’) and compare it to a cult, which is not an entirely un-true comparison. The Family is definitely a thing. It’s a far-fromperfect thing that probably needs a long while before it truly feels like a Family to all, but it’s a thing nonetheless. Beware of when people, including-and-especial-

ly the University, exploit the concept of the Family for their own gain and comfort. There are gigantic issues with inclusion here like there are all across this state and country, and all too often they will trot out the concept as a catch-all to show that there’s really nothing to see here — we’re all one big happy Family. But it’s true, I’ve bought into the concept of the Family in a way I never thought I would and never felt at Bama. Football games in Tuscaloosa may be rowdier, but the town of Auburn is lovely and uniquely tightknit. I think that is why so many alumni choose to return to The Plains decades after graduation and why they are so proud of proclaiming what year they graduated upon their return, lest someone think they’re some sort of carpetbagger. I recommend you immerse yourself in the distinctive charm of the town, its residents and the University. Call out the problems when you see them and work to change them. Not everyone feels like it’s a Family, and their feelings are very real and reflective of problems here. But we, and now you, can do the best to strengthen the bonds of the true Auburn Family and bring as many as possible into the fold.


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SAVE THE DATE! Thursday, August 24th 4:30 to 6:30 pm Davis Arboretum

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Microwave hacks

Cooking up culinary masterpieces in your college dorm Kris Martins ENTERPRISE EDITOR

Cooking is one of those tasks you’ll slowly learn to improve as you progress through your college years. Even if you have some recipes up your sleeve already, if you’re living in the dorms, communal kitchens may discourage you from truly cooking too often. If you’re having one of those days in which you just want to make something quick and not leave your room, grab a mug and fire up the trusty microwave. Here are a few treats you can make quickly and easily with those two items — and that are mindful of some dietary restrictions. Mug Omlet: Servings: Makes 1 mug omelet

Vegan hot chocolate: Servings: Makes one 8 oz mug

Sometimes you won’t feel like dragging all your kitchen utensils and ingredients into the communal kitchen area in the dorm hall just to make a meal.

Just because it isn’t made with whole milk doesn’t mean it isn’t delicious. Take a break from dairy and try this super-simple coconut milk hot cocoa.

For this wholesome breakfast, you won’t need to. You can stay in your dorm and have fun experimenting with new combinations of mix-ins for a tasty morning meal.

It’s perfect if your roommate keeps the temperature at freezing temperatures or if you’re like me and just love drinking hot chocolate all year-round.

Ingredients 2 eggs 1 spoonful of milk, dairy-free substitute or water Omelet mix-ins of your choice (cheese, spinach, tomatoes, ham, etc.) Directions Grease mug. In the mug, beat eggs well. Add milk or water and beat again. Add in toppings (I used cheese, spinach, tomatoes and ham) and heat for 1–2 minutes in the microwave, until eggs are cooked through. Let cool for a couple minutes. (Adapted from The Country Cook)

Ingredients 8 oz unsweetened coconut milk 1 tablespoon cocoa powder 1 1/2 tablespoons dairy-free chocolate chips 1 spoonful coconut sugar (or sweeten to taste with desired sweetener) Directions Heat milk for 1 minute. Add cocoa powder, chocolate chips and sweetener and mix well to combine. Heat more to help dissolve if needed. (Adapted from Minimalist Baker) » See HACKS, 21


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Gluten-free pumpkin chocolate chip mug cake: Servings: Makes 1 mug cake It’s perfect for when you need a bit of sweetness to top off your meal or when you want a dessert at night. This pumpkin chocolate chip mug cake is just the right level of sweet and doesn’t take too much time to make. Add more honey or chocolate chips if you have more of a sweet tooth. Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut flour 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice 1 egg 2 tablespoons pumpkin puree 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil 1 tablespoon honey 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract Chocolate chips Directions In a small bowl, combine dry ingredients. Add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and mix well until combined. Add chocolate chips and pour into mug. Microwave for 2 to 2 1/2 minutes. Let sit for a couple minutes and top with additional chocolate chips. (Adapted from leelalicious)

PHOTOS BY KRIS MARTINS

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GOVERNOR » From 8

Ivey said in her first press conference in April that as governor her priorities would be steadying “the ship of state” and restoring the people’s trust in government. The new governor promised to restore Alabama’s image. “People all over the world, much less the nation, have all their eyes on Alabama, and it’s not for the right reasons,” Ivey said. “That’s very troubling. People have lost trust in their government leaders.” Ivey promised to turn the state around after its image and morale were marred by criminal prosecutions of its two top officials, Bentley and former House Speaker Mike Hubbard — both within the course of one year Bentley, accused of misusing state funds to facilitate an affair with a former top staffer, Rebekah Mason, left office as part of a plea bargain from prosecutors, agreeing to admit guilt to two misdemeanor charges. “His actions were not complimentary to any of us,” Ivey said of Bentley, whom a Montgomery County circuit judge sentenced to 12 months unsupervised probation. The judge also ordered him to pay nearly $7,500 in fines. Since taking office in April, Ivey has been cleaning house.

Thursday, May 18, 2017 She has accepted the resignation of several top Bentley holdover staffers and cabinet members, including the former law enforcement secretary and the director of the Department of Community and Economic Affairs, among others. “Any time there is a transition or a change of administration, there are going to be changes,” Ivey has said. “We’re going to be deliberate and consider and evaluate each one of the cabinet offices.” Between Hubbard, Bentley and former Chief Justice Roy Moore, who was suspended last year for violating the Alabama Canons of Judicial Ethics, Alabama has lost its top three elected officials to ethics scandals. “This is the people’s business, y’all,” Ivey said about the state’s ethics laws. “This is the public’s money. This is not a personal agenda by any means.” Moore, who was elected chief justice in 2010, also resigned in late April. Ivey appointed Associate Justice Lyn Stuart, a 1977 Auburn graduate, to lead Alabama’s judicial system as the chief justice of the state’s Supreme Court. Stuart, only the second woman in Alabama to hold the post, had been serving as acting chief justice since Moore’s preliminary suspension in May 2016. Stuart, the first female Republican chief justice, will serve out the rest of Moore’s term, which is set to expire in January 2019. She has said she will seek re-election to the post in the 2018 statewide general election, but she already has some competition.

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY ALBERT CESARE / MONTGOMERY ADVERTISER


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Building a wardrobe without breaking a budget KARL HACKMILLER STAFF WRITER

New to the area, many Auburn freshman might be coming in with just a suitcase, a few boxes and absolutely no idea where to go to build their wardrobe or furnish, however lightly, their new housing. Plato’s Closet, located in Market Square Shopping Center on Opelika Road, is a clothing store that sells men’s and women’s gently used, brand-name clothing at discounted prices. Offering anything from shoes to backpacks, Plato’s Closet has a host of summer and winter wear. For those students looking not to build their wardrobe but to get rid of the old threads, Plato’s Closet is always buying used clothing, offering a rare opportunity for the cashstrapped college student to make a little extra money.

Harvest Thrift Super Store, located at Pepperell Corners on Pepperell Parkway, is another essential stop for incoming freshman or anyone with a student budget in general. Past the acrid smell that lingers weirdly around the entrance of this thrift hub is a wonderland of used furniture from couches to recliners to porch décor and more. They also sell kitchenware, coffee mugs, well-used Erotic novels as well as pocket bibles and, to top it off, Harvest Thrift also sells men’s and women’s clothing at prices akin to Goodwill and often even lower. Live Savers Mission Thrift is a convenient shopping stop for those students on the south side of town. This affordable store, located off of East University Drive, offers a large selection of cheap clothing for men and women, home décor, used athletic gear, such as golf clubs and bicycles and kitchen wear from cutlery to dinner plates. Auburn freshman and transfers alike won’t need to stretch their budgets if they look in the right places, and these stores may be a place to start.

FILE PHOTO

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Auburn turns a new ‘Leath’ with new president this Lily J ackson

MANAGING EDITOR

Auburn will be welcoming it’s 19th president this year as Dr. Steven Leath takes the reigns from former Auburn President Jay Gogue. Leath will be departing from his former college and place of employment, Iowa State for Auburn and will begin work on July 15. He was named the new University president in March. Leath studied plant science at Penn State University, University of Delaware and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. According to a statement released by Auburn, Leath’s presidency brought Iowa State it’s lowest student debt rates, highest graduation rate and best fundraising records. The university received its largest private donation as well.

During his time at Iowa State, enrollment also reached a record-high number. Increasing nearly 44 percent in the past decade, reported by the Iowa State Daily, Leath is leaving the college with his mark intact in many ways. He spent a decent amount of time and effort on expanding the Iowa State Research Park established in 1987. The park has doubled in size since Leath’s projects. “Fundraising is an interesting experience, and it’s not, as many people think, you know like task-orientated,” Leath said in an interview with the Iowa State Daily in October. “I don’t walk up to you and say, ‘Hi, I’m Steve Leath, I’m from Iowa State. I’d like you to give me a million dollars.’ And if I did, you’d think, ‘What is the matter with this guy?’ “It’s about relationships and trust. Donors and people that want to support you

have to believe that you are going to use the money the way they want it used.” Sports fans might be happy to hear of Leath’s relationship with athletics while at Iowa State, as his support and involvement for said programs was shown through his presence at games. “I don’t know what will happen here because I’ve never been to a football game at Auburn,” Leath said. “But generally Janet and I will make an appearance in the student section every football game.” He attended Iowa State’s second-round game in the NCAA Tournament and has been present during each tournament season since he became president. He prides himself on winning, something he made very clear to Iowa State Athletic Director Jamie Pollard as the search for a new director pressed forward. “When this process started, I told Jamie I did not want a coach that was going

to publicly humiliate players, throw chairs onto the court and kick,” the president said. “That was important to me. Winning was hugely important to me.” Despite Leath’s accomplishments, his time at Iowa State was one of scandal and controversy. Leath’s personal use of the university-owned aircraft and the eventual hard landing in 2014 lead to a public controversy and $14,000 in damages. An ethics debate erupted. Leath believes the situation was drastically overblown. “The plane issue was poorly reported and taken to an extreme level,” Leath wrote in the email. “Two audits showed no policies were broken and as it turned out some of the flights questioned had been paid for by me.” For more on Leath’s story visit ThePlainsman.com. Former staff members contributed to this story.

FILE PHOTO


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Thursday, May 18, 2017

LETTER FROM THE

HEAD PI CHI As summertime approaches, the countdown to Fall Formal Recruitment 2017 becomes an increasingly prevalent topic. More importantly, as the opening registration date of June 1 nears, more questions are inquired. As this year’s Head Pi Chi, I will share some tips I think you will find useful as you prepare for recruitment. Although you feel overwhelmed and anxious right now, I guarantee you will feel at ease as soon as you have the opportunity to meet your Pi Chi and your Pi Chi group at Recruitment Kickoff on Aug. 11, 2017. I know the week of recruitment is filled with some discomfort along with melancholy for some, but your Pi Chi group will be the perfect encouragement you need to make it through the week! I urge you to reach out to each and every

FILE PHOTO

girl in your Pi Chi group, as well as your Pi Chi, because this is a great way to form lasting friendships prior to joining a sorority. While there are many items I am sure you feel are essentials, I feel a battery-charged fan, a brush, an umbrella and mints are the four items you will need most. If you forget any item you deem important, there is no need to worry because your Pi Chi will have a backpack full of items, ranging from a mirror all the way to a first aid kit. Throughout the week of recruitment, I encourage you to be yourself, and all that may encompass you. Instead of trying to mold yourself to be the “perfect” match for a particular sorority, I strongly advise you to give all 18 sororities the opportunity to get to know your authentic personality.

You may feel discouraged at times, or unhappy, due to your schedule and during these times your Pi Chi will be there to lend a hand and a hug every step of the way. Allow yourself to be vulnerable and connect with others, specifically your Pi Chi and your Pi Chi group. I strongly recommend each of you to take notes upon leaving each party. Hold onto the positive conversations you have and this will help you differentiate the 18 sororities. Lastly, if a sorority you like regrets to invite you to their next party, remember that every sorority on Auburn’s campus is worthy of praise. The best way for you to make the most out of your recruitment experience is to open your mind to all 18 wonderful sororities. If you are currently in the process of deciding whether or not you want to become a

part of Auburn’s Panhellenic community, then I strongly encourage you to seek advice from someone who is, or was, a part of Greek life, as well as someone who is not, or was not, a member of a sorority. For me personally, pledging a sorority at Auburn University has not only allowed me to form substantial friendships, but my sorority has also held me accountable to succeed in significant areas as an undergraduate student, such as academic achievement and involvement on campus. Whether you join a sorority or come to the conclusion that recruitment is not what you want to take part in, I assure you that your college experience at Auburn University will truly be remarkable regardless of your decision. This letter was submitted by Head Pi Chi Hannah Dean.

Sorority Recruitment 2017

Sorority recruitment at Auburn begins in August, but registration is already open. Regular registration ($25) is open until July 11, 2017, and late registration ($150) is open until July 25.

Essentials You Should Bring 1. Extra pair of shoes to slide into after heels 2. Hair fixing materials (bobby pins, brush and mirror) 3. Mints for fresh breath 4. Poncho or umbrella 5. Notebook to write characteristics or names from each sorority

What is that? What is recruitment? The process by which a woman joins a sorority. What is a Pi Chi? A recruitment group leader and counselor. FILE PHOTO

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR


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International Buddy Program “Connecting cultures one friendship at a time� IBP provides a way for international and local students to form meaningful, same-gender friendships with one another. Buddies are encouraged to spend time together in ways that fit their own interests and schedules, as well as participate in monthly acticivites with other IBP members. Want to learn more about IBP or submit an application? Visit the International Buddy Program page on AuInvolve. Application Deadline: September 7, 2017

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ADAM SPARKS / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

STUDENT PHARMACY

STUDENT PHARMACY

auburnpharmacy.com @AUStudentRX

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

CATHERINE WOFFORD / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

CONVENIENT, HIGH-QUALITY SERVICE. Conveniently located on campus at the AU Medical Clinic, the Auburn Student Pharmacy is a full-service pharmacy serving Auburn students and their families. The AU Student Pharmacy is accessible by Tiger Transit and offers universal parking, making it the ideal pharmacy location for both on- and off-campus students.

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

The AU Student Pharmacy accepts most major insurance providers, including Tri-Care and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Alabama.

Charge your prescriptions to your eBill! At the Auburn Student pharmacy, we can charge students’ AU bursar account for all pharmacy purchases, including prescriptions, over-thecounter medications, and other medical supplies.

VISIT US TODAY! Auburn University Student Pharmacy 400 Lem Morrison Drive P: (334) 844-4641 Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Open at 9 a.m. on Thursdays Saturdays: 9 a.m. - Noon | Closed Sundays

CATHERINE WOFFORD / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER


Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

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PLAINSMAN PICKS PLAYLIST: this week, the plainsman staff chose their favorite summer vacation songs. listen to their picks and follow the auburn plainsman at spotify.com/the_auburnplainsman.

“Still Feel Like Your Man” by John Mayer Anne Dawson, assistant editor “I’m not a man, but this song is groovy.”

“Soak Up The Sun” by Sheryl Crow Weston Sims, opinions editor “I’m ginger, so I won’t be doing this, but it’s a nice sentiment.”

“The Boys of Summer” by Front Country Lily Jackson, managing editor “Boys? What boys?”

“There’s Nothing Holding Me Back” by Shawn Mendez Chip Brownlee, editor-in-chief “I’ll see y’all at the pool.”

A ‘Best City for Summer Travel with Family’ FILE PHOTO

S taff Report

Auburn was ranked in the Top 500 Best Cities for Summer Travel with Families. After looking at many other cities, LendEDU placed Auburn in the ranking based on the summer population, food services industries and local entertainment options. Auburn placed 388 on the list of 500. The press release states that this list includes all types and sizes of cities ranging from New York which takes the lead as No. 1 to Birmingham and Montgomery. Auburn sits on the list between Palestine, Texas, and Conroe, Texas, which all have a similar score of a 93 out of 100. LendEDU reviewed thousands of cities across the United States, the release said. There were three metrics used when evaluating each city, including the population increase during the summer season, accommodation and food service employees, and total entertainment options. The total accommodation and food service employee metric in the city was used to get an understanding of how well the city could handle an uptick in population during the summer season. Total entertainment included amusement and recreation parks, aquariums, public swimming pools, water parks and zoos.


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Thursday, May 18, 2017

Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art closes until fall for renovations Staff Report

The Museum of Fine Art closed to the public in May in preparation for a series of renovations that will keep the museum closed until improvements are finished in the fall, a museum spokesperson said. JCSM is undergoing renovations to improve educational, storage and public spaces, according to a release from the museum. It is part of a comprehensive strategic build-

ing place to keep the museum up to date. Contractors will renovate storage areas so the museum will have space for holdings and future growth. They also hope to solve some problems with acoustics, lighting and temperature in the Grand Gallery, Rotunda, and Dwight and Helen Carlisle Lobby and Museum Café. The museum will remain closed to the public until Sept. 5 at 10 a.m., when it will open again with a new set of ex-

hibitions including Leo Twiggs’ Requiem for Mother Emmanuel. The opening will also feature permanent collection selections. Another exhibition, Out of the Box: A Juried Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition, will open on Friday, Oct. 6. The museum grounds, outdoor sculptures and pathways will remain open to the public throughout the renovations. The museum café will also be closed. MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

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Olo Sushi to replace API Trading Co. over summer Alex Hosey STAFF WRITER

The on-campus Carribean- and latin-themed restaurant API Trading Co., located on the first floor of Auburn University’s Student Center, will close temporarily so that Olo Sushi can take its place over the summer. Gwen Ward, an administrative assistant for on-campus dining at Auburn University, said the changing of restaurants will only be in effect for this summer. “API will definitely come back in the fall, but during the summer with summer camps and Camp War Eagle, sushi is really, really popular and we’re having to move Olo Sushi from where it was next to the Foy Information Desk, so that was the logical place to have it this summer,” Ward said. When API Trading Co. comes back to its original location in the Auburn Student Center this fall, Olo Sushi will move again to the Village Dining building. Completion of Olo Sushi’s move to the first floor of the student center is expected to be completed soon, Ward said. “We hope that the sushi place is going to be open in time for [summer] classes to start,” Ward said. “If it’s not open this Thursday then it will definitely be open next Monday.” Once open, Olo Sushi will be open from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. every weekday and will serve signature sushi rolls, rice or noodle bowls and a “create your own” sushi roll option.

FILE PHOTO

Chris Lin, founder and head sushi chef at Olo Sushi, makes a


Thursday, May 18, 2017

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Thursday, May 18, 2017

Alternative CWE BREAK IDeas Loren Kimmel STAFF WRITER

Your counselor has just released you for the first time since you have been introduced to your group. It’s been nonstop icebreakers, games, informational meetings and WALKING, and now the choice is yours on how to spend your allotted amount of free time. Now, of course, you are supposed to pick from the list of smaller and more interest-specific informational meetings that have been compiled by the First Year Experience to be

beneficial for you and your family members to attend and learn more about the University. However, if you are feeling restless, can’t imagine sitting through another informational meeting or do not want to reiterate your first couple Tiger Talks to your parents, we have a better idea. To be clear, this is in no way discouraging attendance to these meetings. I for one, without the knowledge this cool article, sat through three lengthy but very resourceful informational meetings with my parents, did the housing tour and before I knew it was right back in my group on my way to the next informational meeting.

Don’t be me. Instead, try these activities on for size.

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

1. Grab your new friends and take the stroll to Toomer’s. While there will be an opportunity to visit Toomer’s later in the evening for ice cream, grabbing a famous lemonade and hanging out with some of the people in your group is a great way to talk in a less forced environment. Explore your new school together as you walk through some of the loveliest and most traditional parts of campus. Plus, it is summertime in Alabama so a cool beverage never hurts. MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

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2. Go to one of the local bookstores. If your parents are feeling equally as restless, embark on the short walk to one of the local bookstores near campus and pick up a few items to begin your auburn collection. Because of the time of year, many of the bookstores have different deals or promotions so take advantage of your parents treating you, in most cases this will not go on forever, and when you are shivering in RBD you are going to be glad you have your Auburn University sweatshirt handy.


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Hungry? 3. Get Chick-fil-A while you can. If you have worked up an appetite get yourself to the Chick-fil-A in the Student Center while you still can. This will be one of the few times and a real luxury when you can get through the extensive labyrinth and get your food in under 10 minutes. Come fall, you can kiss this and at least 15 minutes goodbye. 4. Bring Momma Goldberg’s with you where you go. If you are feeling up for a little snack and in the mood for the Auburn-established deli, head down to the convenience store on the bottom floor of the Student Center and pick yourself up a bag of nacho cheese Doritos and one of their on-the-go packages with cheese. Taking these supplies across the hall to the microwave, place the cheese over the chips and heat until the cheese is melted. When it is done you will have a warm snack and mastered a dorm recipe that you can commit to memory for the rest of the year.

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Ashton Wells, junior in pre-elementary education, Garrett Johnson, junior in fine arts and Jakob Geiger, junior in political science, study on Samford Lawn

5. Gather a group and head toward Samford Lawn. Taking friends from high school or your hometown and your new acquaintances from your group, head over to Samford Lawn for some time to relax and hang out. Play a pick-up game or just socialize and acquaint yourselves with one another at your new school in one of the most beloved locations on campus. FILE PHOTO

6. Take a trip to the Arboretum. Just passed the President’s house stations our school’s arboretum, a quiet, natural oasis filled with trees and plants of varying origin, a patio and a pond. For an escape from the noise or in seek of some shade, the arboretum serves as the perfect place for a recharge. If you are apprehensive about the long walk over, realize that if you are living in the Hill, you will be making this walk multiple times a day and you might as well get used to it now. 7. Read the rest of this paper. If the heat has gotten to the best of you or you are in search for a little, “me time” find a comfy, quiet spot in the student center (most likely check the third floor) and read this copy of The Auburn Plainsman. This issue has been compiled by former and present Auburn students who have reflected on their experiences and are offering their advice and expertise to the incoming students. Read this issue in its entirety and learn about the most recent happenings on campus, some of the in’s and out’s of college and hey, you are already skipping the informational meetings, so you can read this paper.

FILE PHOTO


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Thursday, May 18, 2017

THE PLAINSMAN’S TOP 9 PICKS

BEST OF AU TWITTER The Auburn Plainsman

AU ALERT

AU FAMILY

Auburn University

Auburn UPC

AU Emergency Mgmt

Auburn SGA

Auburn Tigers

Drunk Aubie

@theauplainsman

@AuburnU

@AuburnSGA

@AUALERT

@AuburnUPC

@AuburnTigers

@AUFAMILY

@AuburnU

@DrunkAubie

Selections: The Plainsman Summer Editorial Board


Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

where you’ll meet your new #AuburnFitFam 8.22.17, 5-7 p.m. Recreation and Wellness Center

08.22.17 // getrecdauburn.com // a welcome week event for the auburn university student follow us @auburncampusrec // free t-shirts while they last // 50+ sponsors // lots of free food fitness competitions // free massages // games // inflatables // obstacle courses & more everyone will be there // you should be too // we promise // pinky swear // cross our heart

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Thursday, May 18, 2017

PHOTOS BY KAILEY BETH SMITH / STAFF WRITER

The Market returns to Ag Heritage Park for the summer 2017 season Kailey Beth Smith STAFF WRITER

The Plains are ripe with fresh fruits and vegetables for the Auburn Family. The Auburn University Market at Ag Heritage Park went into full swing in the afternoon of May 11. David Lawrence, manager of the Auburn University Market at Ag Heritage, encourages community members and visitors alike to come out and support local produce from individuals and farms across the state. “Vendors will feature locally grown fruits and vegetables, baked goods, jams and jellies, and other locally made products,” Lawrence said. The Market is held every Thursday from 3-6 p.m. from early May until mid-August. The Market features a variety of vendors from across the state, such as Alpin Farms of Slocumb, Gigi’s Fabulous Foods of Montgomery, Hornsby Farms of Auburn, Leo’s Produce of Tallasee and Wells’ Produce Market of Cottonwood. Kim Slay, one of the vendors, said, “Depending upon the

weather, I will be here with garden vegetables as we go throughout the season.” “It’s funny, because I used to work here,” she said of Ag Heritage Park. She noted how the landscape had changed, and mentioned that her old boss had just stopped by her table to greet her and browse the tomatoes she was displaying. Gene Thornton, with Sneaky Crow Farm of Randolph County, is a regular vendor with the market. He greeted customers as they strolled by, and conversed with those he considered to be his friends -- regulars at his produce table. Thornton said, “Our mission and vision is to provide organic, locally grown vegetables and fruits to customers in east Alabama and west Georgia at local farmers markets and at our roadside stand at the farm.” Jacky Hornady of Hornady Coffee said, “We will be here all summer. We are local in Opelika, and we roast our own, and we do a home delivery service that is free to all of Lee County. We do ground or whole bean, and we do several different origins.” Hornady moved to Alabama in 2001 from Oregon, where she

learned “the art of espresso.” Another group represented, Lee County Farm City, is comprised of volunteers. A national organization with no fees, they host breakfast meetings once each month to discuss events, such as their presence at the Market at Ag Heritage. “Every county in Alabama has a Farm City, whose purpose is to get farmers and city people together, and you can get involved, too,” said Bob Harris, president of the Lee County Farm-City Committee. Ag Heritage Park is a venue located on approximately 30 acres of land, beginning at the south corner of Samford Avenue and South Donahue Drive. The address for the Market is 580 South Donahue Drive, Auburn, AL 36382. The Edward L. Lowder Barn is located across the pond from the ALFA pavilion, or what students refer to as the “Big Red Barn.” The Market has been opening annually since 2004, and is now in its 13th season. For more information on the market and its vendors, visit the website at http://www.agriculture.auburn.


Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Imagine a map where each time a red dot appears, it represents a moment when words, choices or behaviors contribute to sexual assault, dating/ domestic violence, stalking, bullying or abuse. Now imagine there are green dots appearing on that map. A green dot appears on our campus every moment when words, choices and behaviors communicate intolerance of violence.

REAL LIFE GREEN DOTS Pulling a friend out of a high risk situation Checking on a colleague you are worried about Displaying an awareness poster in an office Utilizing social media to support WE.auburn

*

ANY INDIVIDUAL CHOICE AT ANY MOMENT TO MAKE YOUR COMMUNITY SAFER

Distract, delegate, direct Consider realistic options if you are a bystander in a situation where something seems “off” to you or that seems to be escalating in severity. Could you be direct with the people involved? Could you delegate to someone else who could help? Could you distract them by asking for directions or to use their phone so the situation is interrupted?

additional opportunities Consider green dot opportunities that we have every day. Consider the question: If a friend, co-worker, or group member were introduced to your social group, workplace, church, organization, how would they know two things: 1. VIOLENCE ISN’T TOLERATED 2. EVERYONE IS EXPECTED TO DO THEIR PART wear a green dot pin or button spread the word through social media learn about local resources share about green dot with friends request a green dot training for your organization or group

fo r mo re infor mati on p l e as e v i s it h ttp s:/ / www.l i ve the g re e ndot.com /

BE THE DOT, BE THE DIFFERENCE #weDOTauburn @auburnhealth wp.auburn.edu/healthandwellness/

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RBD with a view of Samford Hall

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Auburn Memorial

Learning how to study in style

Where to find aesthetically pleasing study spots Lily Jackson

MANAGING EDITOR

While gazing out of your dust-covered apartment window, feelings of complete hatred form in the seat of your gut. “Why am I inside learning about

World War II trench warfare, instead of enjoying the beautiful Alabama weather?” you ask yourself. Friends, there are ways to do both or at least enjoy the view from afar. Studying is never completely enjoyable, but as summer sneaks in behind

its sister, spring, studying reflects pulling teeth or watching grass die. Exams are approaching and sunlight, flowers and fresh air are sometimes the only sources of energy and hope. F i n d i n g a f r i e n d l y, w e l c o m i n g place to crack the books and work to-

ward that 4.0 GPA is all-around a positive find and addition to a daily routine. Here are some beautiful places around Auburn’s campus for you to do just that. Who said studying had to be aesthetically unpleasing?

The Red Barn

Langdon Garden PHOTOS BY MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR


Thursday, May 18, 2017

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Thursday, May 18, 2017

Advisers’ insight for incoming freshmen

FILE PHOTO

K ailey B eth S mith STAFF WRITER

“Prepare yourself for an overwhelming amount of information,” said Molly Husley, an accounting adviser with the Raymond J. Harbert College of Business. Moving away from home for the first time can be daunting, and adjusting to college life can be a difficult task. Advisers understand and are here to help. Stephanie Morawo, academic adviser with Raymond J. Harbert College of Business, encourages incoming students to be prepared in a number of ways. “Do your homework,” Morawo said. “Go to auburn.edu and explore different majors. Choose a major that has a subject matter that interests you. Your major should be chosen [based] on what you love to study. Your career will be chosen based on what you love to do. These two do not always have to match.” Students will meet with their advisers before registration, to discuss options for classes and schedules. Things do not always go as planned, however. Husley offers encouragement to students who do not get the schedule they are looking for. “Sometimes, 8 a.m. classed are unavoidable, but try to

see the bright side,” Husley said. “If you have an 8 a.m., you will be done earlier, and then you will have time for naps. If you have an evening lab, then you can park anywhere. You should not be discouraged if you do not get the perfect schedule your first semester.” Morawo reminds students of a few things, including the importance of having a plan B when it comes to choosing your major and your courses. “Make sure to choose something that is interesting to you and something that speaks to your academic strengths,” Morawo said. “Also, it is always good to have a plan B, just in case you pick a major and then find that you do not enjoy it, you need a plan B so that you can pick a different major and a different career path.” David Hinshaw, academic adviser with the Honors College, warns students of the time management obstacle that they must overcome when beginning college. “One of the biggest challenges in adjusting to college life is the amount of unstructured time you have,” Hinshaw said. “At first, you may think that you have a lot of free time, but you actually just have unstructured time that needs to be filled with studying outside of class.” Hinshaw notes how many students come to college

without the basic study skills needed to do well in their classes. “Once you get to college, you realize that intelligence is not enough; you need to have good study skills and a strong work ethic as well,” Hinshaw said. “You have to study a lot and really learn the material, not just learn it for a test.” He leaves students with a helpful tip: “It is difficult to learn to be self-motivated and schedule out your time properly so that you devote enough time to your studies,” Hinshaw said. “One thing that will help you is to schedule time to study during the week so that you have that time set aside for academics. Then, once you make this schedule, stick to it.” Advise Assist is the main network used by students to set appointments with their advisers. “See your adviser at least once a semester,” said Richard Enkeboll, adviser in the College of Liberal Arts. “Advise Assist is the key to making appointments. You can use it for college, as well as departmental advisers.” Students will be able to contact their advisers through email, set appointments through Advise Assist or drop by during office hours for anything they may need.

How do you even ‘Canvas?’ Features to pay attention to:

Where you find your classes.

Click the three dots in the right hand corner of each course box to change the color and “nickname.”

Where your due dates are.

Get the app for your phone, add personal date to the Canvas calendar and combine resourses for easy access.

An overview of your classes and notifications.

Here you will find all of your classes, notifications, due dates to the right and access to grades.

Where you will find messages from classmates and teachers.

Make sure to check this daily for messages from fellow students and professors.


Thursday, May 18, 2017

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COLUMN: Welcome to the Family, y’all

Greetings to all bright-eyed freshmen from a cynical senior Karl Hackmiller STAFF WRITER

You’re now a part of the Auburn Family and that is nothing to shrug about. Or should I say, Shrug. Just a little Auburn humor to get us started. Brothers and sisters, now that your FAFSAs are filled out, your housing deposits are, well, deposited and your mother already has “Auburn Mom” stuck on the top left corner of her minivan rear window, for all intents and purposes, you are locked in. The first week of freshman year is an exciting time, that’s for sure. A host of you young Republicans are sure to join Greek

Life, to which I say: it’s your dad’s money, so spend it however you like. There are certain benefits to Greek Life to be sure, for example, test banks and binge drinking. I think about wraps it up. The rest of you will have to find your way without the help of a super-secret shadow organization that runs your life and the life of students on campus. To the lonely independents, I can address you with some confidence, as I too have been in your size eight Keds. Gearing up for football season, I’d use your cool older sister’s ID to buy your franks and low shelf beer in bulk now. Two weeks before the game and you will find the shelfs completely empty of beer that is in your price range. Assuming you can get your hands on student tickets, given the recent and wildly unpopular changes brought to you by your faithful SGA representatives, you’re not go-

ing to want to blow all that money every weekend on food for your tailgate. After all, our lovely alma mater will be increasing her tuition over the next two years. “It’s fine,” they say. “It’s what must happen.” In preparation, I bought fifteen pounds of Ball Park Kosher Franks three years ago. Though, now that Neo-Nazis will be at our tailgates, that might not have been such a good idea. They did tell you about the Neo-Nazis on your admitted student tour, right? Anyways, welcome freshman, to the next six years of your life. “Don’t you mean four?” you ask. I know what I said. Editor’s note: Opinion pieces such as this do not represent The Auburn Plainsman as a whole.

MA J O R S CO V E R L E T T E R S INTERNSHIPS RESUMES JOBS

CAREER CENTER auburn.edu/career

YOUR CAREER OUR MISSION AUBURN UNIVERSITY CAREER CENTER YOUR CAREER. OUR MISSION. 334.844.4744 | 303 MARY MARTIN HALL AUBURN.EDU/CAREER


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Tips for Tiger football while on the road Jake Wright STAFF WRITER

In the SEC, football is king. The pageantry of SEC football allows fans to travel the Southeast to watch their team. Football is the main reason for such road-trips, but each city has their own vibrant attractions that make these road-trips a must while in college. Auburn is centrally located, so it is a car ride away to most campuses across the Southeast. To make your road-trip successful, there are a few guidelines to follow. Find several of your best friends or make friends who want to embark on the journey of a lifetime. Try to plan your trip in advance and find any side trips that you wish to see while on the road. I have done both, and they can be equally as fun and memorable. My friends and I drove to Texas A&M two years ago, and we stopped in New Orleans on the way. Nothing is better than driving and telling stories with your friends, while stopping at inter-

esting sites along the way. Every SEC stadium and town has their own atmosphere that makes them great. I have been to Texas A&M, LSU, Alabama, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Kentucky, Vanderbilt, Tennessee and Georgia. This fall I will experience Clemson, Arkansas and Missouri. All that leaves for me to see is South Carolina and Florida. Each of these destinations are unique in their own way and have must see attractions. Texas A&M has the best stadium in the SEC. Kyle Field recently underwent $450 million in renovations, and it is a sight to behold. At LSU, Tiger Stadium at night has one of the most electric atmospheres in college football. The Parade Grounds is an excellent place to tailgate as well. Vanderbilt is the “city” school of the conference, and Nashville is a fantastic place to take a weekend trip. At Ole Miss, The Grove is the one of premier spots to tailgate in the country. Georgia has a beautiful campus and one of the best downtown areas in the country. At Mississippi State, the downtown area of The Cotton District is vastly underrated and has good food. Kentucky has a newly renovated stadium that is not huge in capacity, but it is an excellent place to watch a game.

Tennessee has the river that runs right up to campus and the stadium. It is a beautiful scene and Neyland Stadium is massive. Lastly, even if we go to Auburn, Alabama can be fun, and most in-state kids will have friends that go there. As for the places I will go this fall, I am excited for several reasons. At Arkansas, Fayetteville has a reputation as being a beautiful city tucked away in the Ozark Mountains. Clemson has one of the neater pre-game rituals with Howard’s Rock and is the reigning national champions. Missouri has a unique stadium, and will be a lengthy road-trip that leaves quality times for friends. After this year, it leaves two campuses left to visit in the SEC. At Florida, the Swamp is one of the most historic venues in all of athletics. South Carolina has a big city feel and a nice downtown area as well. Williams-Brice Stadium is off-campus by a mile with a ton of land to tailgate around the stadium. Every single SEC stadium and town is distinct in their own way. There are plenty of stadiums that seat well over 100,000, while several are smaller and less intimidating. All of these cites and campuses are must-see while in college. Stop making excuses, pile up a van of fellow fans and get on the road because being on-site for the hype is better than you’ll every imagine.

Summer and Fall Calendars Cheatsheet 2017 Summer Semester May 18: Classes Begin May 29: No class, Memorial Day June 22-23: No class July 4: No class, 4th of July July 28: Classes end Aug 2-4: Exams Aug 5: Commencement

2017 Fall Semester May 22-24: Drop Course Penalty Days Drop with only $100 fee May 24: Last day to drop with no grade July 8: Last Withdraw Day. W assigned

Mini-Semester 1 May 18: Classes Begin May 29: No class, Memorial Day June 21: Classes End June 23-24: Exams

May 22-24: Drop Course Penalty Days Drop with only $100 fee May 24: Last day to drop with no grade June 12: Last Withdraw Day. W assigned

Mini-Semester II June 26: Classes Begin July 4: No class, 4th of July July 28: Classes End Aug 2-4: Exams

P

June 28-30: Drop Course Penalty Days Drop with only $100 fee June 30: Last day to drop with no grade July 18: Last Withdraw Day. W assigned

Aug 21: Classes Begin Sept 4: Labor Day Sep 11: 15th Class Day Last day to drop from course with no grade assignment Last day for potential tuition refund for dropped classes Oct 6: Early Alert/Mid-Term Grade Deadline Oct 10: Mid-Semester - 36th Class Day Oct 12-13: No class, Fall Break Oct 19: 41st Class Day Student deadline for request to move finals Nov 3: Last Day to Withdraw Last day to withdraw from course with no grade penalty. “W” assigned if dropped. Nov 6: Spring Registration Begins Nov 20-24: No Class, Thanksgiving Break Dec 8: Classes End Dec 9-10: Study/Reading Days Dec 11-15: Final Exam Period Dec 16: Commencement


Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Need Housing? $10 GIFT CARD

1255 SOUTH COLLEGE ST. AUBURN, AL 36832 (334) 826-1202 APPLY ONLINE WWW.THEBEACONAUBURN.COM

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Thursday, May 18, 2017

AUBURN ATHLETICS » From 16

niors, however head coach Karen Hoppa recognizes their impact and the bar they set for the program. “Our senior class, what an unbelievable career,” Hoppa said. “Not just this year, obviously, but the four years they’ve had here. They came in a time when we were rebuilding and every year we’ve gotten better. They’ve taken us to new heights and they’ve set new standards for Auburn soccer.” FOOTBALL New offensive coordinator Chip Lindsey brings an interesting show to the Plains and Jarrett Stidham is the headliner. Stidham, the sophomore transfer quarterback from Baylor, impressed coaches throughout spring practices and impressed fans at Auburn’s annual spring A-Day game. Stidham looks to be exactly the solution that head coach Gus Malzahn needed, as last season’s quarterback situation lacked consistency and big-game ability. On offense, the Tigers return the two-headed monster in the backfield of Kamryn Pettway and Kerryon Johnson from the 2016-17 Sugar Bowl team. The offensive line will be bolstered by a pair of transfers from Jacksonville State and Florida State. Auburn returns a loaded receiving corps, which will include the lightning-fast John Franklin III, who was switched to receiver from quarterback by the coaching staff in the spring. Despite Stidham’s successes, Malzahn has not yet named a starter. 2016 starter Sean White and freshman phenom Malik Willis round out the depth chart after Woody Barrett left the team to transfer. As the savior of many games for Auburn last season, the defense looks to improve upon a successful 2016 under Kevin Steele. The Tigers lost the defensive line anchors of Montravius Adams and Carl Lawson, but reload with the emerging Kevin Holland, Byron Cowart, Marlon Davidson, Paul James III, Derrick Brown and Dontavius Russell. Auburn only lost backup TJ Neal in the linebacking department. In the secondary, senior leaders Rudy Ford and Joshua Holsey both heard their names called at the NFL Draft, therefore upcoming senior Tray Matthews will look to hold down the back end. Across the board, Auburn will fill in holes on the roster with their No. 9 overall recruiting class. Expectations are high for this team, which hasn’t boded well for overhyped Auburn squads of the past. A rigorous schedule will uncap the potential of the team early on, as Auburn travels to defending national champion Clemson in the second week of the year in what is projected to be a Top 10 matchup. Auburn will host rivals Georgia and Alabama late in the season in pivotal SEC contests, rounding out a home slate that also includes Georgia Southern, Mercer, Mississippi State and Louisiana Monroe. The away schedule is highlighted by an intimidating stretch in which Auburn won’t return home for over a month following their showdown with Ole Miss. Aside from the defending champs, Auburn will take on Missouri, LSU, Arkansas and Texas A&M on the road.

CATHERINE WOFFORD / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Kerryon Johnson (21) runs the ball during Auburn’s football game against Georgia on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2016 in Athens, Ga.

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Kerryon Johnson (21) runs the ball during Auburn Football vs Vanderbilt on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016 in Auburn, Ala.


Thursday, May 18, 2017

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Thursday, May 18, 2017

Meet your SGA officers

PRESIDENT

VICE PRESIDENT

TREASURER

CHIEF OF STAFF

Jacqueline Keck

Justin Smith

Frank McEwen

Samantha Moore

Senior in economics, Jacqueline is from Guntersville, Alabama.

Senior in chemical engineering and political science, Justin is from Auburn.

Contact her @ jak0037@auburn.edu

Contact him @ jts0042@auburn.edu

Senior in finance, Frank is from Chelsea, Alabama.

Senior in public relations, Samantha is from Peachtree City, Georgia.

Contact him @ flm0003@auburn.edu

Contact her @ jsnmoore@auburn.edu PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED BY SGA

What you need to know about SGA’s ticketing changes Lily Jackson

MANAGING EDITOR

Student Government Association released a new student ticket policy through Athletics entailing changes like the replacement of student-to-student ticket exchanges and the implication of penalty points. This will be the second year of SGA announcing policy changes during finals. What is changing The student-to-student ticket exchange will be replaced with a Ticket Pool. The announcement, signed by SGA President Jacqueline Keck, said once students transfer their ticket to the pool it can be requested by any student wishing to attend a game at any time of the year. “The pool will immediately redistribute returned tickets to students that have requested one on a first-come, first-serve basis,” Keck said in her announcement. According to SGA’s website, the original owner of the ticket will not be reimbursed once the ticket is put in the pool. “We have created a system that preserves the purpose of these tickets and gives more Auburn students, and a limited amount of their potential guests, access rather than the highest-paying bidder on Facebook or elsewhere,” the website said. “We understand that in the past, some students have sold many of their tickets to help pay for tuition, living ex-

penses, etc. but this is not what student tickets are intended for. We don’t believe gouging fellow Auburn students aligns with the spirit of the Auburn Family.” Penalty points will be used to ensure a full student section. The email outlined the system and points given. No penalty for students that return their unwanted tickets to the ticket pool by 11:59 p.m. on Sunday night before the game. One point will be given if the student returned their ticket by 5 p.m. on the Friday before the game. Two points will be given if the student does not return their ticket before 5 p.m. on Friday and doesn’t attend the game before the beginning of the 2nd quarter. Receiving four penalty points will result in a student losing post-season ticket eligibility, as well as being lowered on the priority scale for the following year. Guest ticketing will be taking a turn as well, as a minimum of 250 guest tickets will be distributed through a lottery before the season. Students can request a guest ticket and will be notified of their status on obtaining that guest ticket on Aug. 23. Students may still request guest tickets on a gameby-game basis after the lottery beginning at noon on Sunday until 9 a.m. Thursday. Guest tickets will be $20, excluding tickets to the Alabama and Georgia game where $30 will be charged.

FILE PHOTO

Auburn students will enter through Gate 6 with their guest. What is staying Two of the current policies will be staying with Jordan-Hare in 2017. Students will still be required to show their Ignited Card upon entry to the stadium. A second form of identification should also be carried as well, the announcement said. First-year students will remain unable to receive full season packages. The announcement said two six-game packages, one three-game package and a three-game package will be available for some first-year students to attend SEC games. “I am excited about the fall and genuinely think that the changes being made will benefit us by simplifying the ticket process,” Keck said.


Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Happiness awaits just outside Auburn University. Hidden away in the world-class golf courses at RTJ Grand National, the community of National Village offers everything you’ll need for everyday living. Reside in award-winning Craftsman-style cottages, explore miles of picturesque nature trails, and enjoy multiple fishing and boating options on our lakes. Dive into the resort pools and serve up some fun at the tennis and pickle ball complex. Golfers will love the three courses at Grand National on the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail. Homes from the high $200,000’s to over $500,000 in three distinctive neighborhoods. FURNISHED MODELS OPEN DAILY FROM the $200’s to OVER $500,000

nationalvillage.com (334) 749-8165

NEW DESIGNS LOCATED ON THE GRAND NATIONAL GOLF COURSE

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Thursday, May 18, 2017

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Learn to write the right way at the Miller Writing Center Alex Hosey STAFF WRITER

– r e f l e c t yo u r s ty l e –

1 6 8 E A ST M AG N O L I A AV E open 10–7 mon–sat :: 12–5 sun

always open @ btgauburn.com

Jakob Geiger, a junior in English and political science, has worked at the Miller Writing Center for a year and a half. According to Geiger, an employee at the Writing Center sees an average of six student clients a week to discuss writing of all kinds, both academic and nonacademic. “A lot of the more common mistakes are grammar, which are things we don’t really emphasize in our tutoring practice,” Geiger said. “We focus on the big picture things like, ‘Can you formulate a thesis? Can you organize your paper logically?’” According to Geiger, once a client learns how to do that, then tutors will begin helping him or her focus on what Geiger calls “the nit picky things,” such as avoiding gender bias in the writer’s use of pronouns, appropriate placement of commas and diversifying the sentence structure of a paper. “Our mission at the Writing Center is ‘All students, all writing,’ so every student, no matter what they’re writing, should feel comfortable coming to the Writing Center with whatever they might be working on,” Geiger said. “My boss says this a lot in our training. He says that our goal is to create better writers, not better writing. We’re not focusing just on your one paper. We want to give students the tools that they need to improve their

future writing.” The writing center’s range of help for students doesn’t stop at just papers for class. The tutors are also trained to help students work on PowerPoint presentations, video projects, resumes, cover letters and more, according to Geiger. “This year especially, we focused on what’s called ‘multi-modal writing,’ so writing using different forms of media,” Geiger said. “We have e-portfolio training too, so we know how to work with WordPress and Weebly and Wix, so we have a very technologically proficient staff.” To schedule an appointment with the Miller Writing Center, one can visit the front desk located on the second floor of the Ralph Brown Draughon Library or go to auburn.edu/writingcenter to look at hours of availability and learn more about the tutors available to meet with. The Miller Writing Center is open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. during the school year at the Ralph Brown Draughon Library. Tutors are also available to meet at several other locations around campus, including the Student Athlete Development Center, the Forestry and Wildlife building, Foy Union Hall and the Library of Architecture, Design, and Construction. “Every student is able to use any location, so if an appointment is booked at RBD for the time that you’re free then you can make it at one of the other locations,” Geiger said.


Thursday, May 18, 2017

49

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

LETTER FROM THE

IFC PRESIDENT My name is Duncan Asbury, and I have the pleasure of serving as the Interfraternity Council president for 2017. Auburn’s Greek Life is an exciting community to be a part of, and I am thankful for your interest. I have learned numerous lessons throughout my time as a fraternity man at Auburn, and I hope the following tips prove to be helpful in the recruitment process. 1. Get your name out there The biggest part of recruitment is letting people know you are interested and providing a line

P

of communication. The best way to show interest and ensure contact from fraternities is to register for recruitment at https://cws.auburn.edu/ ifc. Also, all fraternity President’s and Recruitment Chairman’s contact info is available on the Auburn IFC website under the “Fraternities” tab. Reaching out to these officers directly is a great way to learn more about the organization, upcoming events, etc. 2. Keep an open mind Do not fixate on one group throughout the recruitment process. Keep your eyes and opinions open. This behavior will lead to a more meaningful recruitment experience where you maximize your exposure to multiple organizations. However, it is good to have a few fraternities in mind when going through recruitment. Due to the sheer number of fraternities on Auburn’s

campus, it is unlikely that someone would be able to visit everyone, so it would be beneficial to determine a list of a few fraternities that peak your interest and go from there. 3. Check your peers One of the best parts of recruitment is the opportunity to build relationships with fellow freshman men before classes start. With that being said, it is important to check the other guys that are at the recruitment events as well as the members that are near your age because these are the people you will likely spend your entire college career with. 4. Check the upper classmen Another important aspect of recruitment is meeting older members; these are the juniors and seniors in the fraternity. As older members, they have been involved the longest and

Thursday, May 18, 2017 have the most insight to provide on the fraternity. Look to these older members and ask yourself, “Are these the kind of guys I want to be like when I’m older?” Whether that question is answered do to college major, campus involvement, personal convictions, or other factors, asking this question will only enhance the recruitment process. 5. Seek meaningful conversations and relationships Recruitment is all about meeting people. Let these interactions be meaningful and enjoyable. Because this is such an incredible time to broaden your horizons, do not squander it by staying in your comfort zone. Get out there and meet people, and you will not regret it. Duncan Asbury is the Interfraternity Council president.

TIGERS 2017 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE WEEK

DATE

OPPONENT

1

Saturday, Sept. 2, 2017

Georgia Southern Eagles

3

Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017

Mercer Bears (Homecoming)

5

Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017

Mississippi State Bulldogs

2 4 6

Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017

Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017 Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017

7

Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017

9

Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017

8 10

Ole Miss Rebels at LSU Tigers

at Arkansas Razorbacks

Saturday, Nov. 4, 2017

at Texas A&M Aggies

Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017

ULM Warharks

Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017

13

Saturday, Nov. 25, 2017

FILE PHOTO / THE AUBURN PLAINSMAN

at Missouri Tigers

Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017

11 12

at Clemson Tigers

OFF WEEK

Georgia Bulldogs

Alabama Crimson Tide

SCORE


Thursday, May 18, 2017

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Growing up in Auburn’s historic Wittel Dorm Sam Willoughby STAFF WRITER

Pat Tremaine, 72, remembers seeing her first Auburn football game in 1957, the year the Tigers finished as undefeated national champions. She remembers seeing the very first game at Beard-Eaves-Memorial Coliseum in 1969, when LSU’s baggy-socked “Pistol” Pete Maravich dropped 46 points in a 90-71 loss to Auburn. She remembers walking with her friends to the Tiger Theatre downtown to ogle at the “local celebrities” — the Auburn student athletes. But most of all, Pat remembers her time spent in Auburn’s historic Wittel Dorm, built by her grandfather Samuel Wittel in the 1940s as a residence for professional women in town. Because of increased enrollment after World War II, it soon became the first private women’s dorm in Auburn. Along with female college students, over the years it housed three generations of the Wittel family, including Pat. Pat lived in the dorm’s three-story private residence along with her parents and grandparents, even throughout most of her years in college. “I had to have the same rules that Auburn [students] had,” she

said. “I couldn’t be a minute late ... girls had to be in at 8:30 during the week. You could not wear any pants at all [during the week].” Samuel, his wife Estelle Wittel and the rest of the family would often invite the young women living in the dorm over for dinner or tea. In her youth at Wittel Dorm, she says she always felt like she was in college. “I was right there with the dorm and all the people,” she said. “I knew who everybody was. It was just a great place to grow up.” While in high school, she would sell flowers to students to pin to their suits before football games. Afterward, she would walk to the stadium to get a ticket for a dollar. She never missed a game. Pat says there are a lot of differences between Auburn in her collegiate days and today. Classes at Auburn were $75 per quarter and textbooks cost $30 a piece. If you went down East Thach Avenue far enough, you’d run into farmland. Stores closed early on Wednesday afternoons. Though the town has changed since her youth, Pat said she is still a fan of the downtown area and how the city has kept it.

» See WITTEL, 56

PHOTO BY MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Pat Tremaine in Auburn, Ala.


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

OF THOSE SURVEYED IN A 2013 UNIVERSITY POLL REPORTED THAT THEY “MOSTLY OR ALWAYS” USED A CONDOM IN RECENT SEXUAL ENCOUNTERS. WHICH MEANS HALF WEREN’T PROTECTED

99% BIRTH CONTROL PILLS WORK

CAN TEST FOR STDs AND HELP YOU FIND TREATMENT IF YOU CONTRACT ONE

YOU MAY NOT KNOW IF YOUR PARTNER HAS AN STD OR STI AND THEY MAY NOT EITHER

OF THE TIME BUT OFFER NO PROTECTION FROM STDs OR STIs. CONDOMS WORK 98% OF THE TIME WHEN USED PROPERLY

DECISION

NO ONE CAN TELL YOU WHAT IS OR IS NOT RIGHT FOR YOU BUT BETTER SAFE THAN SORRY

ABOUT

ONLY

50%

THE MEDICAL CLINIC

HIGH RISK:

ALL TYPES OF SEXUAL ACTIVITY INVOLVE RISK, BUT SOME ARE MORE RISKY THAN OTHERS. PENETRATION WITHOUT CONDOMS OR PROTECTION INCREASES THE RISK OF CONTRACTING AN STD OR STI

65%

VAGINAL, ANAL AND ORAL SEX

SAFE SEX SCOOP YOUR THE DECISION TO HAVE SEX IS

Thursday, May 18, 2017

COITUS INTERRUPTUS OR

PULLING

OF AUBURN STUDENTS ARE

OUT

BUT LESS THAN 45% HAD INTERCOURSE IN THE LAST MONTH AND MORE THAN 75% ONLY HAVE TWO OR LESS PARTNERS A YEAR

YOU’RE NOT PROTECTED FROM STDS, EITHER

SEXUALLY ACTIVE

IS FAR LESS RELIABLE THAN CONDOMS OR BIRTH CONTROL, WORKING ONLY ABOUT 90% OF THE TIME IF DONE PERFECTLY.

INFORMATION FROM THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH AND THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH AND WELLNESS SERVICE


Thursday, May 18, 2017

FILE PHOTO

LETTER FROM

THE SGA A former member of SGA once told me something that I found bold and exceedingly true. Hunter Gibson, former Executive Vice President of Programs, said, “freshmen are the bravest people I know.” These words might have seemed minuscule to most, but when said

53

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

to me, my freshmen year, they meant a great deal. As most progress through college, they forget how terrifying it is to step onto a new campus, into a new life, and to do so blindly. From the moment I stepped onto Auburn’s campus, I knew that I had found my home. It seemed only natural to want to make my home a better place to live, so I thought the best way to do that would be through the Student Government Association. Unaware I could begin my service to Auburn as a freshman, I dismissed the notion of joining SGA. However, I soon learned from a new friend that I could get involved with SGA in my first year through a program called

Freshman Forum. This unique opportunity allows approximately forty-five freshmen to serve as representatives of first-year students to the Student Government Association. Through this program, each participant works in a mentorship with a division of SGA gaining hands-on experience in service to our community. Whether that be in Senate, Elections, or even the Miss Auburn University Scholarship Program, freshmen have the opportunity to work in almost any part of SGA. Forum allows freshmen the opportunity to form friendships with other students that they will be working with throughout the year and develop lasting bonds. All Freshmen Forum members work with SGA throughout the year to execute the organization’s mission of “Serving and promoting the individual student; unifying all that is Auburn.” Freshmen interested in this exciting opportunity to serve Auburn early can apply at aub.ie/forum. Applications close August 30th. Even if students do not want to commit to being a full-time member of SGA, the organization asks for volunteers at events year round. Many of SGA’s major events cannot be fully

staffed by just members, events like Hey Day, filling the student section with shakers prior to every home game, or even sitting on a board or committee. In addition to volunteering, helping to serve Auburn can be as simple as filling out a survey. SGA is always in search of student feedback that can be provided anytime at auburnanswers.org or specifically asked for through surveys distributed randomly. The opportunities to serve in SGA are endless no matter the time of year or your position on campus. To anyone reading this, I speak on behalf of the more than one-hundred members of the Student Government Association in saying that I hope you will consider joining us in our mission to make Auburn a better place. Freshmen, you have an incredible journey ahead of you that is impossible to completely comprehend quite yet. You are now a part of something much bigger than yourself — the Auburn family. I truly hope you find your place on the Plains and that SGA can help make your coming years at Auburn some of the best of your life. This letter to the editor was submitted by Jacob Sparks, sophomore in business, who serves as SGA’s director of print media.

Lower the cost of college. Stay in Auburn.

Take a class at Southern Union!

www.suscc.edu 334-745-6437


54

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Staying safe in Auburn

FILE PHOTO

Alex Hosey STAFF WRITER

Whether students are coming to Auburn University for the first time or returning for classes, there are general safety guidelines they can follow to ensure their college careers aren’t riddled with unfortunate accidents or arrest records. According to Auburn police Lt. Jamey Presley, the number one legal issue that affects students is theft of property, the risk of which is easily mitigated by using common sense. “When people go to the library and other places, they tend to have their laptops sitting out on tables and get up to go to the bathroom or to get a cup of coffee because they think, ‘Nobody would ever steal this $1500 computer,’ and five minutes later it’s gone,” Presley said. “It’s very, very quick and easy for people to steal a laptop.” The easiest ways for students to prevent theft is to be mindful of their possessions and to lock their doors. Whether they live in a dorm, apartment or house, Presley encourages students to always have their doors locked, and the same should apply to car doors. Another prevalent safety issue for college students is irresponsible drinking, including public intoxication, drunken driving and binge drinking. “If you’re not of age, don’t drink alcohol,” Presley said. “But I’m not naïve, I know it happens all the time. If you are out drinking, make sure you’re with friends. If you go out to a bar make sure you go with friends who will look out for you and make sure you don’t drink too much and ensure that you will get home safely.” The lieutenant also said that students should not go home with strangers, to only accept drinks that students have seen the bartenders open and to always either call a cab, use an Auburn University Security Shuttle, call an Uber or have a designated driver instead of drunken driving. Associate Director of Auburn University’s Department of Safety and Security Susan McCallister said that traffic violations are also a leading threat to the safety of students, many of which are affected by the use of alcohol in one way or another. “I see a lot of issues with pedestrians at cross walks and not knowing the rules of the road. To me one of the big issues is motorist, cyclist and pedestrian safety,” McCallister said. “Of course drinking is a big issue that we see and is probably the root cause of a lot of the issues we see reports on.”

At home, on campus and in town Several measures have been taken by Auburn University to ensure the safety of its students, such as a contract with the Auburn Police Division to ensure that there are patrolmen present in and around Auburn’s campus at all times, blue light phones stationed around campus that will immediately contact the Auburn police dispatch center if a student feels endangered, camera systems placed around campus to deter, solve and report crimes and a campus community emergency response team made up of almost 400 Auburn employees who have gone through emergency preparedness training. “I always emphasize that Auburn itself is generally safe, but we have the same crimes as every other city does,” Presley said. “We just don’t have them on the same scale. So, I always tell people to be aware of their surroundings. That’s the number one way to be safe.”

PHOTO BY ELLEN JACKSON


Thursday, May 18, 2017

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

55


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Thursday, May 18, 2017

WITTEL » From 50

“Everything was so convenient [then], you didn’t have everything spread out. Everything was downtown,” Pat said. “Downtown [today] looks really great. The downtown hasn’t really expanded much.” Since its construction in the early 1940s, the dorm has changed hands a couple of times but has remained a women’s dorm. Soon, the building that has served as a home for generations of collegiate women will be converted into a 40-bed boutique hotel. In January, the Auburn Planning Commission approved the requests of the new owners of the dorm, who plan on converting it into a boutique hotel. The new owners, according to plans, intend to keep the structure of the building mostly the same, adding only a wraparound porch on one end and building a brick driveway for valet service. Today, Pat lives in Alaska with her husband Les Tremaine. The couple moved there in 1969 after Les graduated from Auburn’s veterinary school. Pat said she would love to live in Auburn again but is moving to North Carolina soon to be closer to her children. Regardless of the building’s purpose, it is clear. The impact Wittel Dorm has had on both Auburn and Pat. “It’s a wonderful project,” said Ex Officio Planning Commissioner Dan Bennett about the hotel plan in January. “It’s really important not only to the history of this community, but to our future as well.” In 1999, it earned recognition from the Auburn Heritage Association as “one of Auburn’s most significant examples of classic nineteenth-century design.” Pat said she hasn’t been inside of the building in almost 15 years but is eager to see how the new owners will handle renovations for the new hotel. “My grandfather always sat by the window in the sitting room,” Pat told The Plainsman in January. “I still look at that window when I go by and can almost see him still there.”

PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED BY PAT TREMAINE


Thursday, May 18, 2017

57

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

BACK-TO-SCHOOL EVENTS

HOW TO

AUG 28 - 31

GET INVOLVED

AUG 17 - 25

GET INVOLVED IN AUGUST

AUBURN.EDU/INVOLVEMENT

THIS IS INVOLVEMENT. | #THISISWHY

FIND INFORMATION ABOUT CAMP WAR EAGLE PARENT & FAMILY PROGRAMS STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS WELCOME WEEK UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COUNCIL

HOUSING & RESIDENCE LIFE PARKING SERVICES AUBURN GLOBAL STUDENT CONDUCT & MORE!


58

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Get fit real quick

Auburn’s recreation center offers loads of choices Gabby Dance

COMMUNITY WRITER

Hoping to avoid gaining the freshman 15? Look no further than the Auburn University Recreation and Wellness Center. Located on Heisman Drive, “The Rec” is a great place for students to get active after a long day of classes. The Rec has many state-of-the-art features, including two 50-foot climbing walls, a 45-person hot tub, a PGA Golf simulator and eight basketball courts. Leanne Greene, associate director of communications and marketing for campus recreation, said a trip to The Rec will benefit any student. “There is something here for everyone, and our hope is that students discover something they really enjoy, or that they’ve never been exposed to before,” Greene said. “Classes, exams and other campus commitments often lead to stress and can leave students feeling overwhelmed. Incorporating some form of recreation into their daily schedule can truly be a difference maker

and enhance the overall college experience.” In addition to individual exercise options, The Rec offers group fitness classes, such as “Tiger Pump,” a cardio class and “Butts and Gutts,” a strength training class. For those looking for outdoor adventure, The Rec offers trips, workshops and equipment rental. There is also a bike repair shop available. On August 22, 2017, The Rec will be hosting their annual welcome week event, “Get Rec’d.” This event gives students the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the facility and see everything on full display. “The atmosphere is exciting and students get the chance to participate in fitness challenges and activities,” Greene said. Staff will also be present to answer any questions that attendees may have. Local businesses will be providing free food and prizes. Visit http://campusrec.auburn.edu for more information on The Rec. To learn more about “Get Rec’d,” visit http://www.getrecdauburn.com/.

FILE PHOTO

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

Cheap eats around town

Eating good food on a college budget Anne Dawson ASSISTANT EDITOR

Living in a college town can get pretty pricey. Going out to eat multiple times a week can add up because restaurants charge more than normal simply because they can. Just because certain places cost a lot doesn’t mean you can’t go out to eat a few times a week. We all know that sacrificing eating out essentially means sacrificing your social life. I’m here to help, though. I eat out several times a week, and because I budget my money weekly I’ve found ways to save and eat well simultaneously. I’ve also found the just downright cheapest places to eat when you want to try something new. 1. Chipotle We all know and love it. A whole bowl of your favorite foods for under $7?

MADISON OGLETREE / PHOTO EDITOR

It doesn’t get better than that. But I’m about to make it even better. You can save $5 by getting a burrito with only rice and cheese. You can also save some money by ordering a veggie bowl instead of meat — you get a free side of guac with all veggie bowls. 2. Tacorita Taco Tuesday is my favorite occasion. In celebration, Tacorita has $2 tacos on Tuesday nights. You can get an entire meal for $4-6, as log as the taco is on their Taco Tuesday menu. 3. Chick-fil-A I can’t get enough of Chick-fil-A. You can get a sandwich, drink and fries all for around $5. Granted, this price varies if you are eating on campus, but on any other occasion, it’s totally worth the money and a great price for all of the food you get. Freshman year is an adjustment for everyone. Don’t go overboard spending money on going out to eat — budget your money and try these cheap eating options to save some cash.


Thursday, May 18, 2017 To Place an Ad, Call 334-844-9101 or E-mail admanager@theplainsman.com

Employment

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Wearable health and athletic technology businessman expanding. Some sales, promotional management or MLM experience preferred. Go to www.hal.helo.life then email any questionswith contact info to:

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59

The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle

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To advertise email admanager@theplainsman.com For more information

Print Deadline Noon three business days prior to publication

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Halloween costume that may involve a red cape and tail 6 Respected men 10 Banana Boat initials 13 “I Fall to Pieces” singer 14 “America’s FLAVORite Frozen Beverage since 1967” 15 Considerable age 17 Words requesting a pass 19 Apple choice 20 “Phooey!” 21 Words indicating a pass 23 Prof’s aides 24 Cardio chart 26 Overly 27 Team with 121 medals at the Rio Olympics 28 Throw water on 30 Put the kibosh on 32 Before, once 36 Genetic material 37 Cantaloupe and honeydew 39 Words constituting a pass 42 Infomercial staples 43 Tack on 44 “I almost forgot ... ” 45 “I’m extremely interested in squalor” speaker of literature 46 Ripoff 48 “Viva __ Vegas” 49 Homer stat 51 Camera inits. 52 Hrs. at Coors Field games 55 Words printed on a pass 58 Childcare worker 60 Nullify 61 Words seen in a pass 63 View from a pew 64 Dalí house 65 Great Lakes natives 66 That, in Tijuana 67 URL starter 68 Holding corporation that owns Kmart DOWN 1 Get moving 2 Dominant 3 Levels in a park 4 Gunn of “Sully” 5 Like matryoshka dolls 6 Kim, to Khloé Kardashian 7 Offer of help

5/18/17

By C.C. Burnikel

8 Faraway 9 Take care of 10 It often spans decades 11 Egg roll cooking medium 12 Pete Seeger’s forte 16 Rocket launcher 18 Chaperones 22 Emulate a news helicopter 25 Tries hard (for) 29 Doctor’s request 31 Disney character who sings “Let It Go” 32 Curved letter 33 Ali ring trademark 34 Simply Cocoa maker 35 Other people 37 Splash guard 38 __-Cat 40 Frost advisory, e.g. 41 Poetic paeans 46 Doughboy’s helmet 47 Peace offerings 48 Soap brand with volcanic pumice 50 Big name in kitchen appliances 52 Two-time French Open winner Sharapova 53 Sunken ship explorer 54 Long lock 56 Creative

Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

flash 57 __ China Sea 59 Untainted 62 Genre using speakers?

5/18/17


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