Camp War Eagle 2022

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle 2022

Summer 2022

@auinvolve

Getting involved with a campus organization is a great way to meet others, build your resume and learn skills future employers seek. Whether you are interested in community service, saving the bees, building robots or growing as a leader, Student Involvement has a community for everyone. With more than 550 student-led organizations, we make it easy to discover your path at Auburn.

involvement BRANCHES • • • • •

Service Programs Emerge Leadership Programs Student Governance Student Organizations Student Programming Student Media

Log on to browse all organizations today! auburn.edu/auinvolve

SGA

SERVE . PROMOTE . U NIFY

BECAUSE

‘WELCOME TO CAMPUS’ SHOULD LAST MORE THAN A WEEK AUGUST 8 - OCTOBER 2 The First 56 provides hundreds of free events, free food, and fun to help you connect and build community during your first eight weeks on campus! Get engaged from the beginning! View all events online: aub.ie/welcomecalendar


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The Auburn Plainsman table of contents

WELCOME 5 | Letter from Mayor Anders 6 | Letter from President Roberts 7 | Letter from SGA President 9 | COLUMN | Let your roots grow 10 | Meet your CWE counselors 12 | Auburn traditions every freshman needs to know

TIPS 29 | Here’s what freshmen have to say about their first year 30 | How to make your living space feel homey 31| What to do in Auburn if you don’t like to party 32 | How to get involved on-campus as an off-campus freshman 33 | Where to go in Auburn to unplug

BASICS

COMMUNITY

15 | Acronyms to get you around Auburn

36 | Meet the Auburn City Council members 38 | New businesses growing in Auburn-Opelika area 39 | COLUMN | Why you should get involved in the Auburn community

16 | A beginner’s guide to RBD and Mell classrooms 17 | How to attempt to navigate the Haley Center

40 | What is your coffee shop aura?

18 | 1959 to now: The history of Aubie

42 | A guide to exploring downtown Opelika

20| Seniors pass notes of wisdom from academics to one’s social life

43 | Auburn construction’s status updates and progress

RESOURCES 22| How can Auburn help you get career ready?

SPORTS

23 | COLUMN | Mental health tips

46 | Disco golf team brings championship to The Plains

24 | COLUMN | How to get plugged into campus 25 | ISO provides space for an exchange of cultures

48 | COLUMN | Guide to game days 49 | LETTER | Welcome to The Jungle 50 | Tigers to look out for in 2022-2023 SHELBY BIRCHEAT | PHOTOGRAPHER


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle 2022

Summer 2022

The mission of your student-run newspaper By DESTINI AMBUS Editor-in-chief

Every year I’ve applied for The Plainsman and had to answer a similar question: What do you think should be the goal of your student-run newspaper? And every year, I would give the same dry answer: The goal of a student-run newspaper should be to be the voice of its’ students. And every year, I would be frustrated at my paragraph-long answer — I thought, of course that was the answer, it’s so obvious. There must be something deeper, something different and profound that the editors are looking for. After working for The Plainsman for two and a half years, I’ve learned, actually, that the goal of a student-run newspaper is at once, just that simple and so much more. Every year, the editor-in-chief of The Plainsman writes a letter to the incoming freshmen: Share your stories with us, we say.

Let us explain the mission of a student-run newspaper to you. We say: it’s for you, we are here to tell your story, so trust us, trust us. And while all that is true, this is also true: we here at The Plainsman love journalism, and in loving journalism we love the pursuit of a good story. That is always sitting there, at the top of our minds, on the tips of our tongues. We want the biggest, brightest stories, and we’re chasing that high with stars in our eyes. Now all of that might make you feel wary: Is the mission of the student-run newspaper to pad their resume? Do they care about my story, my voice, only when it’s what they deem to be a good story? I say all of this only for the sake of being completely transparent with you: we’re trying to build our resumes here, just like you. We want a job after college. And in the spirit of transparency I hope to build trust. Trust us, trust us, we say because your voice does matter, and we want to be the bullhorn that amplifies it. Trust us, that if you have a story to share, big or small we’re going to write it.

Summer Staff

The Auburn Plainsman

theplainsman.com

Editors Editor-in-chief: Destini Ambus Content Editor: My Ly Operations Editor: Kristen Carr News Editor: Tucker Massey Photo Edior: Brooke Fucito Sports Editor: Callie Stanford Assistant Sports Editor: Noah Griffith Podcast Editor: Kacie Barrett Opinion Editor: Catherine Haynes Copy Editors Abigail Murphy Sadie Eckenrod Social Media Andreya Ash Emily May

Photographers Daniel Schmidt Larry Robinson Hanjiaxi Qin Writers Dylan Flynn Ethan Stamper Jackson Yanosky Jakai Spikes Jolie Bishop Madie Champion SeAnna Grady Tyler Raley Advertising Advertising Manager: Conner Tumlinson

Contact Us: editor@theplainsman.com admanager@theplainsman.com

255 Heisman Drive 1111, Harold Melton Student Center Auburn, AL 36849

Trust us, that we’re going to pursue it tenaciously, and it’s going to be good. Trust us, because we want to be good journalists, and we’re going to make sure we do our job well. We make mistakes, as all people do. Sometimes we can’t get a quote to balance out our story, sometimes we trust that we have done everything right only to discover that we’ve messed up somehow. We’re college students, learning, just as you are. It happens. We get up, dust ourselves off, and try to never do it again, because that’s all we can do. Even through that trust us: this is our job, this is what we want to do and we want to improve on our mistakes. This letter is nearing its end, but I want to leave you all with this: Welcome to The Loveliest Village on The Plains. Auburn is a special place, with special people. You’ll undoubtedly have experiences here that will change your life. We’re in Suite 1111 in the Student Center. Tell us about them.


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Letter to the editor: Welcome to Auburn By RON ANDERS Mayor of Auburn

Welcome to the Plains! As a 1986 graduate of Auburn University and an Auburn native, I am proud you have chosen to spend this exciting chapter of your life in Auburn. We look forward to having all of you here as you live and study. The City maintains a lasting and meaningful relationship with Auburn University that has enriched our community. Our longstanding partnership with Auburn University for Auburn Research Park is evidence of that, and some recent examples of our collaboration include the state-of-the-art Gogue Performing Arts Center as well as a new medical facility on campus with an ER and surgery center, which is managed by East Alabama Health. While activities on campus will keep you busy, I encourage you to venture out into the city. You’ll find Auburn has a flourishing business community with hardworking owners of local eateries, shops, coffee bars and so much more. I know they look for-

ward to welcoming you into their spaces. We also have beautiful parks that I hope you will explore and exciting seasonal events that we invite you to attend. Find out all that our Parks and Recreation Department has to offer by visiting auburnalabama.org/parks or following @COAParksAndRec on Facebook and Instagram. You can keep up with the latest news and events by receiving texts or email notifications sent through the City’s eNotifier. Subscribe at auburnalabama. org/enotifier. You can also engage with us on social media @CityofAuburnAL. I encourage you to follow our Public Safety Department on social (@COAPublicSafety) or download our Auburn Public Safety app to stay informed and connect with the people who keep you safe. If you ever have a safety issue, call 911 for emergencies or reach us any time on our nonemergency number, 334-501-3100. Interested in what local government is up to? Our City Council meetings are streamed live on YouTube and Facebook and take place the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Tune in to watch your local

government at work. We strive to maintain a close relationship with the student body. The Auburn City Council hears a report from an SGA representative at each council meeting, and myself and the city manager attend monthly meetings with your SGA officers to discuss mutual topics of interest between the City and the University. We have a municipal election occurring August 23. As you are now a member of the Auburn community, I hope you will take the time to register to vote locally, learn which ward you live in and who the local candidates are. Register to vote at alabamavotes.gov by August 9 to participate in the municipal election, and learn your ward by visiting auburnalabama.org/redistricting. I look forward to seeing all of you around town. Please say hello if you see me, and don’t hesitate to reach out at randers@auburnalabama.org or at my office at City Hall, 334-501-7259. I am glad you chose to spend this chapter of your life at Auburn, and I wish you all the best of luck! War Eagle!

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle 2022

Summer 2022

WELCOME

Letter to the editor:

Welcome from University President Chris Roberts By CHRIS ROBERTS Auburn University President D TE

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Dear students, Welcome to Auburn University! We are excited to have you on campus. You are now a part of a community that the Princeton Review ranked, based on student ratings, as one of the “Most Loved Colleges,” with a “Great Quality of Life” and the “Happiest Students.” We are committed to helping you succeed from your first day at Camp War Eagle until you cross the stage at graduation. I’ve been amazed at your generation’s resilience in adapting to change when faced with the unparalleled challenges of the last few years. Those qualities will prove to be invaluable in your time at Auburn. To get the most out of your college experience, I encourage to get involved in your major and in your classes. Get to know your professors. They are experts in their fields, who love what they do and can serve as wonderful mentors. Those relationships will be instrumental as you advance through your major. I also encourage you to get involved in student organizations. Your Auburn experience is what you make it. Your camp counselors have a wealth of ideas on how you can be a part of something that’s right for you. With more than 500 campus organizations, there’s at least one that’s a perfect fit. Our campus organizations are a great way to meet other students and learn valuable skills that will help you succeed after graduation. Lastly, take advantage of all of the free activities and opportunities that we have on our campus. Attend a lecture with one of the world’s most distinguished scholars, business leaders or innovators. Attend a play or a concert. Talk a walk through the Kreher Preserve & Nature Center or Davis Arboretum. Cheer on our Auburn Tigers at a sporting event. See the collections at the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art. Don’t leave the Plains without making the most of every opportunity available to you on campus. I welcome you to the Auburn Family and look forward to seeing you around campus.

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BROOKE FUCITO | PHOTO EDITOR


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WELCOME

Letter to the editor:

Tips from SGA President

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War Eagle, Jake Haston, SGA President ‘23

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Welcome to Auburn University. Regardless of the factors that culminated in your decision to attend Auburn, there’s a reason you’re here, and the Auburn family is excited to have so many new family members. Your next four years here will be some of your most memorable, and they will give you the tools you need to be successful when you leave this lovely village. I’m very envious of the position each of you are in. I would give a lot to be able to start my Auburn experience all over again as a freshman. With that said, I’ve learned a great deal since my arrival at Auburn, and I want to give all of you some quick advice about your first year in college. Here are a few tips to help guide you to a great freshman year. 1. Don’t be too quick to draw conclusions about others. There’s something unique about every Auburn student, and every Auburn student deserves to be treated like a member of the Auburn family. 2. Know that you can call on me or any member in SGA if you have thoughts on how your Auburn experience could be improved. SGA is here for you, and I think you’ll quickly find that all Auburn administrators, professors and staff are too. 3. Try to branch out and meet as many new people as

9. Go to the Auburn Rec center as often as you can. The state-of-the art facility has everything you could dream of. Whether you lift like Popeye, shoot like Lebron, run like Usain Bolt, or just want to go lounge by the pool, the rec has something for every student. 10. Get the most out of your time here. You’re the pilot of your Auburn experience. Make it exactly what you want it to be, and lean on your supporters whenever there’s turbulence on your journey. Class of ‘26, I hope these tips will be helpful to you as you begin your time here, but at the end of the day, it’s completely up to you how you shape your experience. No two Auburn experiences are the same, but each has its triumphs and trials. Turn to the Auburn Creed if you’re ever struggling with a difficult situation or decision, as it has acted as a guiding principle for Auburn men and women for years. I can’t wait to see how each of you grows over the next year, and I hope your love for Auburn grows as well. Take it all in; you only get to be an Auburn student for so long.

LA

Dear class of ‘26,

you can. Some of these students will become your best friends, and they will be with you through the highs and lows of college. They’ll make you better and sharpen you like a knife. So don’t be afraid to make new friendships, whether they begin in the classroom, on the concourse or in Jordan-Hare on a game day. 4. Go for a ride along the streets of downtown Auburn. One of the things that makes Auburn special is its hometown feel, and nowhere displays that better than downtown Auburn. 5. Never lowball your estimation of how much time you should study for an exam. Always try to give yourself more time to study than you may actually need. It’s a big step up from high school to college, and more time in the library is never a bad idea. 6. Go to as many athletic events as you can. Regardless of the sport, every game, meet or match makes for an enjoyable day on the Plains. Besides, you never know when you may get to see the next Michael Jordan in their respective sport. 7. Be a frequent Tiger Card swiper at the dining halls on campus. The dining halls offer delicious meals, and they’re also a great place to build community with fellow students. 8. Sit on Samford Lawn when the clock hits noon to hear the bells play Auburn’s fight song. Admiring historic Samford Hall while listening to the beautiful, old-fashioned serenade is one of the most peaceful ways to spend an afternoon.

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SGA President

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By JAKE HASTON

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle 2022

Summer 2022

WELCOME

Fall academic schedule August 16: Classes begin August 22: Last day to add a course September 5: Labor Day (no classes) September 6: Last day to drop class with no grade assignment October 6-7 : Fall break November 18: Last day to withdraw November 21-25: Thanksgiving break December 5-9: Final exams December 9-10: Commencement ceremonies

SHELBY BIRCHEAT | PHOTOGRAPHER


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WELCOME

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COLUMN | Let your roots grow By KRISTEN CARR Operations Editor

KARA BETH CARR | PHOTOGRAPHER

As your roots grow deeper, you will undoubtably find opportunities to make your mark on Auburn.

The day when you move into your dorm room or your first apartment is a day you will never forget. The feeling when your parents walk out the door, get in their car and drive away might give you excitement, or a pit in your stomach and maybe some flutters too. There is a beautiful paradox in the feeling of beginning something new. The embarking, the journey of a new adventure gives you both a sense of excitement and uncertainty. All of a sudden you have more freedom and responsibility than you have ever had before. Don’t take it for granted. Don’t waste it. There’s an endless amount of things you can do once you get to college. You can be a part of Greek life, you can join a club, you can volunteer, you can go to student organization events and yes, you can go to football games. In all of the business, it can be easy to get bogged down and overwhelmed. My advice: learn to say “no.” One of the most important words you will ever learn to say is “no.” It is so simple and so small and yet, it can be the difference between you slipping into a state of mental decline or finding a balanced college experience. College can be so taxing on your mental health and a way you can combat that is to learn your limits. Know that you don’t have to say yes to everything and get involved in every club and apply for every position. Maximize your college experience by the old adage, “quality over quantity.” Pick one or two organizations to invest in and allow them to invest in you. Your relationships will develop, and your payoff, although not instant, will be visible over time. Creating space in your life can keep you from overdoing it and can also add value to the time that you do choose to fill. There is no sugar coating the fact that while you do have plenty of social opportu-

nities, you will encounter loneliness in college. In loneliness, there is a temptation to want to say yes to every single thing you’re invited to. This can lead to burnout and even further anxiety. Choose who you invest in and allow them to invest in you, while understanding that it takes time to build relationships. Let your roots grow. As your roots grow deeper, you will undoubtedly find opportunities to make your mark on Auburn. Along with some of those opportunities, you will get some yeses that will change your life, but you might also get some nos. It happens to everyone. It’s happened to me. So when it seems like a door you were supposed to walk through gets shut in your face, remember that you are not alone and you are not the only one. Truthfully, not everyone you meet or interview with is going to see your value. That does not make you any less valuable. Who you are on the inside — your character — not what you do or what you throw on a resume, is what really matters. So instead of trying to boost your GPA or your social media following, focus on boosting your character this fall. College will stretch you and there may be some growing pains but in the end, you will be so glad you did it. The best four years. That is what people tell you college looks like. They say “It doesn’t get better than this.” But the truth is, college is just a small taste of the many wonderful seasons your life has to offer. In all of the stress and assignments and exams don’t forget to soak up the good stuff. The little moments of getting coffee with friends or working out at the campus rec center. Not allowing the stress to overtake the joy is so important. Keep the big picture in mind — from rolling Toomer’s for the first time after a big win to trying to find your classroom in the Haley Center on the first day of class. This is only the beginning of your story — one full of meaning and purpose and promise. War Eagle!


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle 2022

Summer 2022

WELCOME

Meet your Camp War Eagle counselors By MARY LOGAN SEFTON News Writer

Most students have been to Auburn’s campus for a tour or maybe a football game before arriving for Camp War Eagle, but CWE counselor Charlie Fleury first stepped on campus with moving boxes in tow. Fleury is among the rising junior class whose senior year of high school was filled with virtual classes and online research of colleges during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. Even from his hometown in Minneapolis, Maryland, Fleury managed to learn all about Auburn. “I did a lot of online research. I talked to friends of friends of friends. I tried to do everything that I could to get a sense of what Auburn had to offer,” he said. “Having these conversations with friends of friends of friends or whoever, I got a good sense of not only what the University academically has to offer but what the culture is as a whole, and that culture is what drew me here.” This culture also drew him to become involved with SGA’s Hey Day, an Auburn tradition for over 70 years. “I like to joke with my friend but it’s not really a joke, it was one of the greatest days of my life. It was so fun, it lit-

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To Incoming freshmen 109 Camp War Eagle Lane Auburn, AL 36849

erally embodies what Auburn is all about,” he said. Fleury emphasized the main reason that he loves Hey Day is because of how it brings out the Auburn family feel, an aspect of Auburn he hopes to highlight to his campers. As part of the hiring process, the First Year Experience Office asks CWE counselor applicants to arrive in a costume that embodies the type of camp counselor they would strive to be. One of the reasons Fleury chose Buddy the Elf was because of his ability to foster community with a diverse group of people. He also referenced Buddy’s “big brother” type role. “His passion for Christmas got everyone else excited for Christmas, so I hope my passion for Auburn gets the freshman excited for this new chapter of life here at Auburn,” Fleury said. While moving across the country to a university campus he had never seen before may seem daunting, he offered a piece of advice to freshmen to help to ease his transition to college. “Be comfortable being uncomfortable,” he said. “I came all the way from Minneapolis, Maryland, to here in Auburn, Alabama, and that was definitely something outside of my comfort zone and something I had to get used to, I’m so glad that I did. I could not be any happier here.”

While most nursing students try to catch a quick break between class, studying and clinicals, Emma Jones, senior in nursing, is busily learning Auburn University history and campus resources. Camp War Eagle counselors spend three hours a week training to become high-energy students to lead groups of freshmen through orientation. “What I’ve done is used it as almost a study break, but not really. I like to practice my Tiger Talks on my nursing school friends in between classes,” Jones said. “It’s always fun to be like, ‘Did you know that William J. Samford Hall was named after the 31st governor of Alabama?’” Jones couldn’t wait to attend Auburn as a student after living in Auburn for part of her childhood. When it came time to apply to colleges, Auburn was the only school on her list. “I always knew that I was going to go to Auburn. It’s always felt like home to me since it was for long,” Jones said. Jones said one of her main goals for her time at Auburn was to hone her leadership skills,

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To Incoming freshmen 109 Camp War Eagle Lane Auburn, AL 36849

which is part of what got her interested in campus involvement. In addition to Camp War Eagle, Jones was a Pi Chi for two years, leading groups of potential new members through sorority recruitment week. Jones described her experience at callouts, an Auburn tradition where members of an organization call out the names of their newly selected members on the back steps of Cater Hall. “The accomplishment of getting to run up those stairs is something that no matter what you’re getting... is something that’s just so unlike any other experience, at any other university just because it’s so unique to Auburn,” she said. While Jones had prior campus involvement, it wasn’t until her junior year that she applied to be a camp counselor. “Even if it’s your junior year and you’re like, ‘Oh gosh I haven’t really done anything,’ you’ve still got another year,” she said. “Take advantage of whatever time you have at Auburn and all your resources, I can’t stress that enough.”

DANIEL SCHMIDT | PHOTOGRAPHER


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FROM YOUR BSU FAMILY,

WELCOME TO THE PLAINS! War Eagle! We are so excited that you have chosen Auburn to be your home for the next four years and we cannot wait to be a part of your college experience! Black Student Union has been a staple on Auburn’s campus for over 30 years. Throughout that time, we have welcomed thousands of high-achieving students, just like you, to continue making Auburn more equitable, diverse, and inclusive. We know the past few years have affected not only the Auburn Family, but the entire globe during this unfortunate health crisis. While the pandemic physically and socially distanced us from the college experience we have traditionally known and loved, it has also brought us closer together in ways we never truly imagined. We have stood firmly together against unequal opportunity and justice, not only as an organization, but as a university, so that we can continue to cultivate a climate that is committed to producing successful and culturally competent leaders for today’s society. BSU is also a close-knit community of over 1000 students willing to explore the many different backgrounds and identities this campus has to offer. We host a countless number of partnerships across campus with a variety of student organizations. This allows us to honor our mission statement of Unity Through Education and to provide our members with an opportunity to share their passions and talents with all of Auburn. We urge all Auburn students to get involved with BSU, whether it be attending our weekly General Assemblies on Mondays at 5pm for food, games, and fellowship, or coming to one of our many staple events such as the Soul Food Bazaar or our Jazz and Poetry Night.

We truly wish you the best in your first year at Auburn and we cannot wait to see you on the Plains this Fall!

Sincerely, Kai Jones


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle 2022

Summer 2022

WELCOME

Auburn traditions every freshman needs to know By ELIZABETH BARTLETT News Reporter

Tradition is an integral part of Auburn University. Founded on February 7, 1856, Auburn has built traditions among its students and faculty that have been practiced for years. These traditions are what contribute to the Auburn spirit and build a strong community among students and alumni alike.

Rolling Toomer’s Corner One of the most popular traditions at Auburn University is rolling Toomer’s Corner after the Auburn Tigers win a football game. This tradition began when Toomer’s was the only establishment with a telegraph. During away games when they would receive news of an Auburn win they would hang the

ticker tape from trees and powerlines around Toomer’s Corner. “I would say my favorite tradition is probably rolling Toomers since I get to just go with my friends and hang out after the games and Auburn winning football is always a fantastic thing when it happens” Hannah Campbell, junior in nursing school said.

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Eagle flight Another prominent Auburn tradition is the Eagle flight which is performed at every home game. The eagle flight began in 2000 as a way to promote wildlife conservation, one of Auburn’s education initiatives. The phrase “War Eagle” that comes along with it has a different history that relates directly to the eagle flight we see today. This battle cry dates back to BROOKE FUCITO | PHOTO EDITOR

1892 which is the first time Auburn ever played Georgia. A Civil War veteran who was a part of the Auburn faculty at the time had a pet eagle that he discovered on the battlefield during the war. At the end of the football game, the eagle escaped and began to circle the field just as Auburn managed to score the winning touchdown. Auburn fans started to chant the phrase “War Eagle” in celebration.


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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle 2022

The seal The seal is another tradition that Auburn has. In front of Langdon hall, there is a large Auburn seal planted into the concrete. Legend says that if one was to step on the seal, on purpose or by accident, then they will not graduate in four years and will not find their true love at Auburn. Many students af-

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ter they graduate finally step on the seal as a homage to the long-standing tradition. There is, however, a way to break the curse if one was to accidentally step on the seal. You must jump into the president’s foundation at midnight on the leap day of a leap year and the curse will be broken.

KARA BETH CARR | PHOTOGRAPHER

Tiger Walk Another coveted Auburn tradition is the pregame Tiger Walk. This tradition began in the 1960s. Each game day the Tigers will walk from the athletics complex to the Jordan-Hare stadium where the streets are lined with hundreds of

Auburn fans cheering on the football players. “My favorite Auburn tradition is the Tiger Walk because it really gets me amped up for the game and I enjoy the enthusiasm behind the tradition,” said Connor Buxon, sophomore in law and justice.

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Auburn rings Once you all have reached the end of your Auburn careers, right before you begin your senior year, you will have the opportunity to purchase an Auburn ring. The

rings are left on the Auburn seal from 18:56 (6:56 p.m.) until the current graduation year which in this case is 20:22 (8:22 p.m.) to symbolize the ring absorbing all of Auburn’s history from

when it was founded to the time (or year) you graduate. When you receive the ring you wear it facing towards you and when you graduate you turn the ring around to face the world.

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The Auburn Plainsman: Camp War Eagle 2022

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BASICS

Acronyms to get you around Auburn By ABIGAIL STEPHENSON News Writer

WDE War Damn Eagle Whether you’re pouring sweat in Jordan-Hare on game days, walking out of a test, rolling Toomer’s or just walking down the Haley Concourse, the proud exclamation of War Damn Eagle can be heard from every corner of campus. It is the official battle cry of Auburn students.

UPC University Program Council Whether it’s a carnival on the Green Space, a concert at the GPAC or indoor ice skating at the Student Activities Center, UPC plans fun and enjoyable events that are open to all Auburn students. They also collaborate with Health Promotion and Wellness Services for The First 56, which occurs the first few weeks of classes, where the entire campus is active with welcoming events and festivities for freshmen.

CLA College of Liberal Arts This college is home to a wide range of majors. The college goes beyond art majors including major such as political science, communication, professional flight, international studies and anything in between. This college attracts thinkers, creators, writers and innovators.

SI Supplemental Instruction So maybe freshman chemistry, biology or math wasn’t what you thought. Or turns out accounting is not as easy as filing your taxes before April 15. Whether you need a lot or a little help, SI sessions are your new best friend. Supplemental Instruction sessions are hosted by SI leaders who attend all class lectures and have a previous record of excelling in the targeted course. It is an opportunity to review class lectures, discuss more complex topics and develop beneficial study habits. The schedule for weekly SI sessions will be released at the beginning of the semester.

OID Office of Inclusion and Diversity This office serves students by providing events and opportunities to educate and engage Auburn students on the topics of inclusion and diversity. They have three main programs, the Cross Cultural Center for Excellence, Diversity Education and Engagement and Women’s Initiatives and Gender Equity.

CWE Camp War Eagle Camp War Eagle is orientation for incoming freshman students that provides the first taste of life as an Auburn student. CWE introduces freshmen to the Auburn experience, which is filled with opportunity, community and tradition.

SGA Student Government Association SGA is the governing student body of Auburn University. There are three branches of SGA, including executive, legislative and judicial. Each branch serves as a liaison between students and the University by promoting the voice and concerns of every Auburn student. Their motto is “Serve. Promote. Unify.” and Freshmen Forum provides an opportunity for freshmen to get involved with SGA and contribute feedback on their first year experience.

GPAC The Gogue Performing Arts Center Since its opening in 2017, the Gogue Performing Arts Center has provided an expansive and remarkable space for theater productions, musicals and other University events. Here, you might catch a concert put on by UPC, a performance by the AU Singers, the semi-annual Auburn Speaks competition or even a traveling Broadway show. The GPAC is named after Auburn’s 18th President, Jay Gogue, and his wife, Susie.

RBD Ralph Brown Draughon Library This is where you might find yourself studying at any time of day, or night, cramming for a final or just having a movie night with your friends in one of the group study rooms. RBD Library provides numerous academic resources, and it even has a Panera on the second floor that stays open for late night cravings. Make sure to check out the Ground Floor Special Collections and Archives to brush up on your Auburn history.

API Auburn Polytechnic Institute Auburn University has experienced three name changes since its original opening in 1856 as the landgrant East Alabama Male College. In 1872, it was renamed the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama and thirdly and, most recently, it was the Alabama Polytechnic Institute from 1899 until 1960. By 1960, Auburn University was made the official title of the institution. All four names can be found upon or around Samford Hall.

COSAM College of Sciences and Mathematics This college includes most medical and science majors such as biology, chemistry, pre-med, mathematics and geosciences. According to their website, COSAM’s vision is to provide impactful courses, forefront research and outreach and service programs.

WEGP War Eagle Girls and Plainsmen You may see their logo across campus, the War Eagle Girls and Plainsmen are a selected group of students who serve as the host and hostesses of Auburn University. WEGP upholds the ideals of excellence, camaraderie, chivalry and dedication, and they further serve the University and embody what it means to be a true Auburn man or woman.


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BASICS

LARRY ROBINSON | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Markers to find books in RBD line the rows of shelfing on each floor.

A beginner’s guide to RBD and Mell classrooms By SAMI GRACE DONNELLY Columnist

Auburn University has a campus library named after Ralph Brown Draughon, a former university president. You will never actually hear it called by this name, though, because students affectionately refer to it as “RBD.” RBD has something to offer every student at Auburn. Most students will have at least one class in Mell Classroom Building at some point in their college career. “Mell” is an extension of RBD. It was built onto the front to preserve the library’s original building. The first number of a classroom indicates the floor on which it is located. The first floor of Mell has two lecture halls — Room 2510 and Room 2550. The classrooms on higher floors are accessible by elevator or stairs from the lobby. The coveted study rooms and booths always provide a place to get work done. The study rooms can be reserved using D!BS or going through the library’s website. Arguably the most important rule for Mell and RBD is that the floors get quieter as one ascends. The first floor is noisy. Groups meet there and friends hang out and eat lunch while they get work done. The fourth floor is for the quiet floor to accommodate the more silent study sessions of students. There is certainly a place for everyone, but be mindful of your volume and location. The trick with Mell and RBD is that the lobby of Mell feeds into the second floor of RBD. This may sound confusing, but it’s nothing that a little experience (and reading signs) can’t fix. Don’t get confused when you’re traversing the two. RBD has books, obviously, but RBD has many other

LARRY ROBINSON | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The front-entrance view of the Ralph Brown Draughon library on April 22, 2022.

things you can “check out.” On the first floor, they have all types of technology for rent. Projectors, video cameras, microphones — all these things are yours to use with just the swipe of a Tiger Card. The Miller Writing Center is located on the second floor. No matter where you are in the process of writing a paper, head over to the Miller Writing Center for individualized, one-on-one help. The second floor also houses a Panera Bread for all those in search of a snack break or coffee to get them through the wee hours of the morning. The third and fourth floors are more suitable for singles, and there are so many locations to offer peace of mind and

a productive environment. Large tables, whiteboard tables, tables near the window, tables with couches — you name it, RBD has it with seating. During finals week, RBD hosts many events. This past year, they handed out stress tigers and passed around donuts at midnight. RBD is just one way that Auburn cares for its students because it is a place for them to engage in school while still enjoying the Auburn community and getting whatever help they need. All in all, RBD is a resource; it’s here to serve Auburn students. You will find something helpful — perhaps even enjoyable — should you venture in this coming fall.


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BASICS

How to attempt to navigate the Haley Center By SYDNEY HOUSEMAN News Writer

Auburn students may not agree on everything, but most would agree that the Haley Center is the most confusing building on campus. Being in one of the most central locations on campus, the Haley Center is seen by almost every student every day. The brick building is home to not only the Auburn University Bookstore but also Einstein Bros. Bagels on the first floor. You may not think this building could possibly be as bad as they say, but trust the student population, it probably is. The Haley Center was built in 1969 and named after Paul Shields Haley who served on the Board of Trustees for 51 years. It is said Haley only missed one singular BOT meeting during his time on the board. Now, the Haley Center

houses the College of Education and College of Liberal Arts and has a total of 10 floors. This makes the Haley Center the tallest building in Lee County. The layout of the Haley Center is like none other on campus. There are four quadrants that hold the majority of the classrooms and offices within the building. When looking at your classroom number, you must remember: The floor number is first, then the quadrant number and finally the classroom number. So, if your class is in Haley 3270, you will be on the third floor, in the second quadrant and in room 70. It may sound simple, but there’s another catch. Every quadrant is connected to one another, so when you’re walking through various doors to find your classroom, make sure you aren’t crossing into another quadrant. Also, the classrooms do not always go in numerical order. For example, room 2456

is next to 2474 and both of those are across from room 2462. Although the Haley Center may be confusing, this is something that the majority of Auburn students can relate to. If you need to ask for help when navigating this building, teachers and students will be willing to lend a helping hand to get you where you need to go. The best advice is to make sure you have plenty of time on your first day to find your classroom. But if you really want to make sure you know your way Auburn students can look up the floor plans online by going to cws.auburn.edu/map. Then click on the Haley Center, floor plans, sign in to your Auburn account and the floor plans are there for you. Once you have found a route to get there, use the same one for the rest of the semester.

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BASICS

MATTHEW POCZATEK | PHOTOGRAPHER

Aubie posing during the men’s basketball game vs. South Carolina on March 5, 2022

1959 TO NOW: THE HISTORY OF AUBIE By JACOB WATERS Sports Reporter

At Auburn, no matter the event, you can almost always count on seeing Auburn’s famous mascot Aubie the Tiger there to support. You may see Aubie in the student center early in the day, then at an organization’s campaign event on the concourse in the afternoon and then once more at a softball game at night. You will see him countless times while at Auburn and you will find that his rich history matches his warm and lively presence. However, Aubie wasn’t born overnight. Decades of evolution were required to bring the Aubie we know and love to life. So who is Aubie? First, Aubie is a mascot with a massive trophy shelf. The tiger was named the 2014 Capital One Mascot of the Year, inducted into the Mascot Hall of Fame in 2006 and crowned the UCA Mascot National Champion 10 different times — more than any other mascot in the United States. Aubie won his first national championship in 1991 and won his most recent championship in 2021. Aubie came into existence in 1959 when Phil Neel of the Birmingham Post-Herald created a cartoon tiger to appear on the Auburn vs. Hardin-Simmons football program. With the creation of Aubie, Auburn sports began to take off. The football team saw immediate success — winning its first nine games when Aubie served as Cover Tiger.

MARY ELIZABETH LANE | PHOTOGRAPHER

Aubie exhibit featured in the student center April 25, 2022

In Aubie’s 18 years as Cover Tiger, Auburn accumulated a home record of 63-16-2. Aubie regularly appeared on the covers of programs until 1976 before making his in-person debut at the SEC Basketball Tournament in Birmingham in 1979. James Lloyd, the then Auburn spirit director for the Student Government Association, contacted a costume maker in New York to bring Aubie to life. Using past Auburn football programs as reference, the Tiger costume was made for $1,350. Aubie walked into the Birmingham-Jefferson County Civic Center in 1979, and in his first performance as a real mascot, the Auburn Tigers, No. 9 in the SEC, were victorious in an upset over Vanderbilt. Auburn advanced to the semifinals of the SEC tournament in the first season under the now legendary head basketball coach Sonny Smith and in Aubie’s first event as mascot. Aubie made his football debut in 1979 in a home game against Kansas State. The Tigers won the game and the 50 thousand people in attendance saw the school’s new mascot for the first time. Since then, Aubie has become a staple in the university. Embracing the traditions of Auburn like Tiger Walk, the eagle flight before football games and rolling Toomer’s Corner, Aubie participates like any other Auburn fan. You can find him at any sporting event dressed in the appropriate jersey or sometimes dressed in a wacky costume. Wherever he is, whatever he looks like, Aubie will likely leave his mark on your memories while you are at Auburn.


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Seniors pass on notes of wisdom By ABIGAIL MURPHY Copy Editor

College of Liberal Arts Allen Li is a rising senior in political science and economics with a minor in philosophy from Birmingham, Alabama. He joined the Student Government Association freshman year and has been apart of it ever since. Li also served as a student recruiter for the College of Liberal Arts. Before he arrived on campus, Auburn had a special meaning to Li. His father got his Ph.D. at Auburn, and Li said he felt that was a turning point for his family. Li came to Auburn partly because of family ties and because he felt it would give him the college experience he was looking for. Li said one of the things he learned at Auburn was the value in simply introducing yourself to people. That is what SGA was all about for him — making connections with people. “I wanted to develop relationships with people that made Auburn happen,” he said. He credits the desire to make connections with his ability to get

the Truman scholarship, a scholarship award to 50 to 60 college students nationwide. Li said having a professor who can act like a mentor also goes a long way. It can start as simply as going to office hours to talk or staying after class to ask questions, he said. In other regards to academics, he said to try to start early with assignments when you can and find a system that works for you to keep track of everything. “Just stay on top of it. I have a blue sticky note that I write everything down on on my laptop,” Li said. “If it’s on a sticky note, it’ll get done. If it’s not on the sticky note, then it won’t get done.” Outside of the classroom, Li suggested to focus less on the amount of friends you have and focus more on the quality of friends. “I feel like the pressure of being a freshman is to make as many friends as possible and to find your group and get settled in with your group,” he said. “But honestly, I didn’t find my group until spring of freshman year … it takes time.”

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY ALLEN LI

College of Sciences and Mathematics Molly Morris is a graduated senior in biomedical sciences from Birmingham, Alabama. During her four years, she was involved with the Emerge Student Leadership Program, Campus Kitchen, PERIOD at Auburn, Honors College, was a wellness coach with Health Promotions and Wellness Services and a peer instructor with First Year Experiences. Morris said she didn’t start out studying biomedical sciences. Her first semester she was an exploratory major. She recongized her interest in science and healthcare early on and the exploratory major helped her find a way she could go into that field in a way she would enjoy. She decided on going to school at Auburn because she felt it was a comforting environment to learn how to be an adult in. However, she said what she learned the most from college is the importance of connections. “The most important thing that you can do while you’re in college is make connections with people. Because a lot of the informa-

tion in your classes that you’ll be able to look up on the internet 10 years from now when you’ve already forgotten it,” Morris said. “But the connections that you make, are what are going to carry you and help you go far.” With that mind, she encourages incoming freshmen to go to office hours when they are having trouble in the class. It might seem daunting to approach a professor in class, but she said she always had positive experiences going to office hours even if the professor seemed a little scary at first. On a similar note, Morris said to not be afraid to join a club or organization even if it’s something you have never tried before, there is bound to be people with all different levels of experience there. “It’ll just be a great way to go and, one, make new friends in different places, but also maybe learn some new skills,” she said. “Learn some things out about yourself.” PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY MOLLY MORRIS


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from academics to one’s social life College of Agriculture Johnathan Hampton is a graduated senior in horticulture from Huntsville, Alabama. He has been involved with the Auburn Landscape and Nursery Association, and he served as the vice president during his time there. He also was an Ag Ambassador for three years and was part of the Honors College. Hampton said growing up he always had an interest in nature and he knew Auburn had a strong agriculture college. He started going through the administrative process and heard about the horticulture major. He said seeing the opportunities offered here had a large play in him choosing Auburn. Hampton said a big part of the college experience is learning how to balance the new found freedom with school responsibilities. “I knew a lot of people coming in that underestimated the amount of responsibility that comes with having a 6-hour gap in your class schedule,” he said. “I would definitely advise incoming students, obviously to have fun and to get involved, but to be serious about the coursework and to prepare for it.” When needing to get serious about schoolwork, Hampton recommended to use the resources Auburn offers. He said the Supplemental In-

struction, or SI, sessions can be a very helpful tool, especially when prepping for a test. Hampton also said to try to sit near the front in classes because it tends to force people to engage more. “Professors notice that,” he said. “They pay attention to whether or not you’re in class and you’re actively learning.” Hampton said freshman year can feel overwhelming, but don’t be afraid to take it slow. Maybe for that semester take a smaller class load or slowly start to get involved with organizations. It doesn’t have to happen all at once, he said. However, he said eventually getting involved with an organization can really make the college experience. “[It’s] just a great way to meet people who have similar interests as you, to get immersed into the culture at Auburn,” Hampton said. Beyond getting to meet people, some organizations also offer an outlet for friendly competition and some also have scholarship opportunities, he said. His last bit of advice is to be prepared to do a lot of walking whether you live on campus, have a parking pass or take the transit. “I would definitely say that: be prepared to walk. Be prepared for the heat,” Hampton said. “Because that’s something that people have to get used to.”

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY JOHNATHAN HAMPTON

Having a professor who can act like a mentor also goes a long way. - Allen Li

Focus less on the amount of friends you have and focus more on the quality of friends. - Allen Li

Go to office hours when having trouble in the class. - Molly Morris

Do not be afraid to join a club or organization, even if it’s something you have never tried. - Molly Morris

Be prepared to do a lot of walking. - Johnthan Hampton

Harbert College of Business Brandon Kamil is a rising senior in finance from Huntsville, Alabama. He said he started as an engineering major, but before setting foot on campus as a student he switched his major to be in the college of business. Kamil picked engineering at first to follow in his dad’s footsteps. However, the summer before college he thought back on his experiences, like being the manager at Pizza Hut, and he realized his interest was in business. Kamil’s biggest advice going into college is to not slack off. “I started off thinking it’d be as easy as in high school where I didn’t have to study as much, and I could just easily ace a class,” he said. “But you get into college, and you have to study before each exam.” Kamil said he encourages freshman to hone in on making high grades because once it’s time for major specific classes they will be a lot more fun, but also harder. By giving your GPA some cushion in the beginning, it can be helpful later on

Top Tips

as class get more rigorous, he said. But for the more general college experience, Kamil suggested to try to take it all in while it’s here — whether through conversations with friends or doing an assignment for class. “Just soak in everything you hear,” Kamil said. “Everyone you talk to, try to make a connection with them that’ll last.” One way to help with that is it get involved. Kamil said his main involvement has been with Auburn Esports. However, he said there’s many organizations at Auburn to choose from and it doesn’t need to relate to your major. It can also be as simple as attending sporting events. “If you want to get involved, go to sporting events, go to the football games, go to the basketball game,” he said. “Make as many friends as you can and just get involved.” PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY BRANDON KAMIL

Learn how to balance the new found freedom with school responsibilities. - Johnathan Hampton

Getting involved could be joining a club or attending events. - Brandon Kamil Don’t slack off this year because our major-specific classes get more fun but also harder. - Brandon Kamil


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How can Auburn help you get career ready? By KELIS MCGHEE News Writer

Whether you know what you want to do or if you are not sure, career preparation is an essential part of the college experience. Although it may be exciting to some, declaring a major, interviewing, creating a resume and finding an internship can be overwhelming. Auburn University’s Career Center has a variety of online and in person resources for incoming freshman that can help make the process less complicated throughout their four years. Type Focus If you don’t know which major to choose or began to have doubts about the major you have selected, you can take this free online career assessment on the University Career Center website. This assessment gives students personalized reports on their personality, interests, skills, and values while exploring different career fields and majors that could best fit them and helping you narrow the choice down. It also provides help on interviewing, personal branding and skills needed in the workforce.

Merge Mentorship Program As an incoming freshman, you can sign up for the Merge Mentorship Progam on Auburn University’s Career Center website. This program is a semester long and gives students the chance has a monthly mentorship meeting with an industry professional. During this mentorship students will be able to develop skills needed for the workforce, receive guidance, and build a connection with their mentor that could benefit them in the future. Handshake Freshman students can find part time work, internship opportunities, co-op and full-time work all on this online resource. Students can update their profiles to keep their information current while exploring employers through this website and different career paths. Career events and employers attending the events are key things for students to watch out for so they can continue to make important industry connections. Students can also set up an appointment at the Univeristy Career Center or with their career advisor on this website. Rebecca Kovac, a junior journalism student, uses hand-

shake for internships and making appointments in the College of Liberal Arts. “They do provide a lot of different internships. It’s a good variety. I didn’t find one specifically on handshake, but I do think it was a good resource for finding an internship. Handshake can be accessed online on AU Access or students can download the app and login with their AU login information. She gets scheduled emails that a person has reached out for internship people can reach out profile and you can include resume. Once every two weeks (Junior) Journalism Major Campus Career Closet Whether you’re going to a career fair, an interview, or professional meeting, you will need business professional and business casual outfits for the occasion. The Campus Career Closet provides four pieces of individual attire to students per academic year for free. If you are unsure what to get, the Career Center has a job search guide that explains appropriate business professional and business casual attire. Students can drop in and shop Monday through Friday 10 a.m.-3p.m. The career closet is located on the third floor of Mary Martin Hall.


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RESOURCES

COLUMN | Mental health tips By ETHAN STAMPER News Reporter

Freshman year of college can be an overwhelming experience, but there are plenty of resources both on and off campus that can make the college transition easier. College is a challenging and stressful experience for everyone. The most important thing to remember is that you are not alone. Following these tips and understanding what services are available will help you to lead a more fulfilling college life. Auburn’s Student Counseling and Psychological Services on campus is the number one resource for students to use to help with any mental health concerns. Their services include individual therapy, group therapy, workshops, drop-in-groups and psychiatric services. They even offer Animal Assisted Therapy sessions with two therapy dogs on staff, Dr. Moose and Dr. Nessie. More information about other services and how to book appointments can be found online with a quick Google search. According to SCPS’s website, “the mission of SCPS is to provide comprehensive preventative and clinical mental health services to enhance the psychological well-being of individual students, as well as the broader campus culture.” No problem is too small; never be scared to schedule an appointment.

Meeting an intake counselor is entirely free of charge as well. Address any issues as early as possible before they potentially develop into something worse. These next tips to follow might all sound obvious, but they help you out far more than you might think. Tip number-one is to get connected, there are tons of organizations on campus to find like-minded students to interact with. Fostering a healthy social life by making friends and staying connected with your family are huge contributors to overall mental health. Don’t stay locked up in a dorm all day, get out and interact. Tip number-two is get enough sleep. We’ve had this message seared into our minds by parental figures our entire lives, but it turns out they were totally right. Don’t let stress, worry or assignments stop you from getting the right amount of sleep. Getting enough sleep makes a major difference in your day-to-day happiness and performance. Don’t listen to people who brag about running off three hours of sleep, those are probably the same people that wear shorts in the middle of winter. Now think to yourself, do you really want them as ideal role models? Tip number-three is to make time for yourself. Self care is a huge component of mental health. You deserve time to relax and unwind between tests and assignments. Don’t take that for granted. There is obviously a fine line to walk there, but once you find your balance, nothing will be able to slow you down. Look out for your fellow students; something as simple as a smile or kind remark can make someone’s day.

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COLUMN | How to get plugged into campus

LARRY ROBINSON | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Student Involvement suite in the Melton Student center

By ABIGAIL STEPHENSON News Writer

College is a time that you are not only getting to meet new people but also getting to know yourself, your passions, and what really matters to you. Whether you have a hobby in mind or you are unsure of Auburn has to offer, there are over 550 clubs and organizations that engage with every interest and provide unique opportunities in order for you to find the best fit for you. All of Auburn’s organizations can be found on AU Involve, which is located under the “My Campus” tab of AU Access. Here, students can browse a massive database of every club or organization on Auburn’s campus along with additional information and contacts. Bailey Blake, junior in biomedical sciences and president of Involvement Ambassadors, shared her advice on how to navigate AU Involve “I really encourage all new freshmen to get on there and click every button. There are also tabs where you can

narrow it down specifically to your major or a certain interest such as service,” Blake said. “It also shows an events tab where you can see all the events on campus, especially where the free food is happening.” There are also Organization Days, otherwise known as O Days, on Wednesdays throughout the semester where a variety of campus clubs will set up tables on the Haley Concourse between 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and engage with interested students. Auburn also provides a team of Involvement Ambassadors for students navigating involvement. This is a diverse group of students who are eager and available to meet with students one on one to talk about their interests and help them find an organization. Blake also discussed how Involvement Ambassadors host open consultations between 10 a.m.-2 p.m. during the week on the 3rd floor of Melton Student Center in Suite 3130. “We encourage new freshmen and students to come in, and we really want to know what their interests are,” Blake said. “If they want to do something they did in high school or move into something completely new, we are

here to help them find an organization that’s right for them. “ The Auburn family is always growing, thus students are also able to start their own club or organization to cultivate community on Auburn’s campus. Additionally, Auburn University Health Promotion and Wellness Services hosts First 56, which occurs the first 56 days of classes. From convocation to fall break, these eight weeks are designed to help Auburn students during their time of transition. It is packed with fun events and opportunities to connect with other students on campus. Blake also encouraged freshmen to step out of their comfort zone and be open to involvement during their time at Auburn. “I would encourage trying different things. Don’t come in thinking you know exactly what you think you might do because you don’t know where your interests might be,” Blake said. “Try four-to-five different organizations freshman year, and by the time you’re a senior, you’re gonna know which one you want to pour into the most.”


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RESOURCES

ISO provides space for an exchange of cultures By My Ly Content Editor

Auburn’s International Student Organization was created as a space for an exchange of cultures. According to ISO’s website their “mission is to improve the multinational understanding and promote relationships between people of different cultures.” Mason Nyew, sophomore in interior design, and the vice president of operations for ISO spoke about this mission statement. “ISO is a platform for international students to share their culture and our job is to provide a safe environment to have a space to show their traditions and culture to everybody,” Nyew said. During the semester, ISO holds a social hour that is open for all students to attend and share their cultures.

“So every Friday we collaborate with a student organization, for example the Indian Student Organization or Chinese Student Organization,” Nyew said. “We have free dinner and we host a place to let the student organization actually explain and share their culture to people who can’t usually see them so this is a really great opportunity to meet someone from that specific culture and develop a friendship with.” In the past, ISO has teamed up with other student organizations such as Student Government Association to hold events such as world fairs where students of different cultural backgrounds provide food and other displays to showcase their heritage. As organizations transition to hosting bigger events in the fall, ISO wants to also expand their outreach. “We have a lot of cool plans for the future. We are obviously going to continue the dinner thing

but we really want to get more international students to come and be involved,” Nyew said. “We were in a global pandemic for years that really hit ISO a lot since we had less international students come in but things are getting better in this past year and I believe more international students will be apart of the family of ISO and we can’t wait to provide them with the platform to show their culture.”

HANJIAXI QIN | PHOTOGRAPHER

Auburn’s International Student Organization holds culture festivals for students of different nationalitys to learn and share.


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the jay and susie gogue performing arts center at auburn university presents our

An Evening with Vince Gill Saturday, August 27

Aizuri Quartet Wednesday, September 21

Legally Blonde Tuesday, October 18 Wednesday, October 19

Fiddler on the Roof Tuesday, November 1 Wednesday, November 2

Clint Black Thursday, September 8

Croce Plays Croce Wednesday, September 14

Jessica Vosk Thursday, September 29

Tab Benoit & The Dirty Dozen Brass Band Thursday, October 6


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season performances Mark Morris Dance Group: The Look of Love: An Evening of Dance to the Music of Burt Bacharach Tuesday, November 8 Our Song, Our Story: The New Generation of Black Voices Musical direction by Damien Sneed Tuesday, November 15 Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox Friday, December 2 Jay Leno Monday, January 9

Chicago Monday, February 6 Tuesday, February 7 MOMIX: Alice Thursday, February 16 Orpheus Chamber Orchestra with Alessio Bax Friday, February 24 The Kat & Dave Show with Katharine McPhee & David Foster Sunday, February 26 Hairspray! Tuesday, February 28 Wednesday, March 1 Complexions Contemporary Ballet: Bach 25 and Love Rocks Tuesday, March 14 Jazz at Lincoln Center Presents Songs We Love Sunday, March 19 Chad Lawson with Judy Kang & Seth Parker Woods Friday, March 24 Trinity Irish Dance Company Friday, April 14

Tickets available on August 9! 334.844.TIXS (8497) · GOGUECENTER.AUBURN.EDU

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ACADEMIC SUPPORT RESOURCES AVAILABLE: ACADEMIC COACHING: This free program empowers students to achieve academic goals through improved study habits and strategies. Students work with a coach to identify action steps to meet personal outcomes.

PEER TUTORING BY STUDY PARTNERS: Provides students with free peer tutoring for a variety of undergraduate core courses. Tutors encourage students to grow as confident, self-directed learners.

SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTION (SI): Supports historically difficult classes with weekly, active review sessions facilitated by students who previously excelled in the course. During SI sessions, students work to improve their content knowledge, develop skills, and make peer connections.

LEARN MORE AND MAKE AN APPOINTMENT: academicsupport.auburn.edu | @AUAcadSupport 2234 Haley Center | (334) 844-5972

Summer 2022


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TIPS

Here’s what freshmen have to say about their first year By KARA MAUTZ Culture Writer

With the close of the spring semester and the transition into the summer, let’s take a look back and see how freshman spent their first year at Auburn. Students expressed that comng to college for the first time can be daunting but with time and experience it gets easier. Gigi Irwin, rising sophomore in apparel merchandising, said she feels that she has grown throughout this year through her experiences in college. “My first year at Auburn has been nothing short of fun,” Irwin said. “Auburn provides such a welcoming environment to its students.” Irwin said she grew up in Auburn, which made the adjustment easier. “One thing I learned as a freshman is that if you

want something the drive has to come from you,” Irwin said. “If you want to make a good grade, you have to make yourself go to classes and complete assignments. In college, there is no one to force or encourage you to do so.” Irwin said her favorite memory from her freshman year was having the opportunity to experience Auburn game days as a student. “It is so fun tailgating and hanging out with all of your new friends,” Irwin said. “The game’s atmosphere is always a great time and nothing short of entertaining.” Emily Legg, rising sophomore in wildlife ecology and management, said she has also grown immensely and learned a lot during her freshman year. “I learned to be kind to the professors, and they will be much more likely to help you,” Legg said. “Now I work with a handful of them as a student em-

ployee and they been so kind as to helping me get other jobs.” Legg said she had the opportunity to grow socially and make new experiences since her first day setting foot on Auburn’s campus. “My favorite memory would have to be my first Auburn football game as a student, it was just so surreal,” Legg said. “Overall, I absolutely loved my first year and I have no complaints at all. I think I did very well socially and academically.” Legg said she would advise future Auburn students to go out of their way to meet people and make connections, especially with professors and faculty. “I would tell future students to 100% get to know your professors, especially in college but they also may end up being a lifelong connection and could help you to get future jobs and opportunities,” Legg said.

The fifth oldest business in downtown Auburn has been open for 39 years and provides a variety of services including cuts colors, makeup, extensions and eyebrow shaping.

Located at 164 E Magnolia Ave, Auburn, AL 36830


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TIPS

How to make your living space feel homey

By KARA MAUTZ Culture Writer

As fall semester quickly approaches, there is much to do for students to get ready for the next school year. The transition from high school to college can feel overwhelming, but one thing that can make the adjustment easier is decorating your living space. Whether you are living on campus in a dorm room, or off campus in an apartment, there are easy and affordable ways to make your room feel homey. CHOOSING A COLOR PALETTE: One aspect of living on campus is that select dorm rooms come with an “accent wall” usually a blue, purple or pink color. The accent wall can affect the color palette that you choose, so if you are wondering whether your dorm has an accent wall or what color it is, call the Housing Office at 334-844-4580. Caitlin Sullivan, rising senior in public relations, said the accent wall in her dorm room in the Quad influenced the color palette her and her roommate chose for their dorm. “We had a teal accent wall and having the accent wall definitely impacted our decision to decorate the dorm room with accents of orange, teal and white,” Sullivan said. HOW TO DECORATE YOUR ROOM: When it comes to choosing decor and furniture for your room, it can feel overwhelming as there are lots of little decisions to be made. One suggestion to make this process easier, is to choose one item that you really like and center the rest of the room around that item. For example, if you find a bedspread that you real-

ly like, consider decorating the rest of the room with colors that match the bedspread and will make it pop. Sullivan said she chose a tapestry that she loved with bursts of teal, orange and white which inspired her to decorate her dorm in those colors. “My roomie and I decided on a teal and light orange theme based on a tapestry we both liked, and her mom made us matching pillows for our beds, and we bought matching bedspreads that coordinated with our theme and the colors in the tapestry,” Sullivan said. To find more decoration inspiration, consider scrolling on Pinterest or watching YouTube videos to find more options and example of how other college students have decorated their rooms. FINDING AFFORDABLE DÉCOR AND DECORATING ON A BUDGET: Decorating a dorm room or apartment can become expensive quickly, but there are many deals and student discounts, as well as affordable stores to make your wallet happy. Online stores such as Amazon and Walmart.com have many affordable, but trendy options to make your room feel like home. There are also stores in the Auburn-Opelika area that have many great options as well, such as TJ Maxx, Five Below, Target and Ross. “I got most of my decor from Dormify, At Home, Urban Outfitters and Amazon,” Sullivan said. While some of these options are not available locally, there is an At Home store location 45 minutes away from campus in Columbus, Georgia, as well as a Home Goods store in Montgomery, Alabama, an hour south of campus. UNiDAYS, a student discount app also contains hundreds of deals at popular stores such as Society6, Madewell, American Eagle and more. Simply create an account with your official school email and start saving with exclusive student discount codes, usually ranging from 15-30% off.


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What to do in Auburn if you don’t like to party By ELEANOR TOMISEK Culture Writer According to the Princeton Review, in 2020, Auburn was named as the school with the happiest student body in the country. The article comments on academic excellence, Auburn’s positive work environment, student engagement and beautiful campus. An aspect of Auburn student life not mentioned in the Princeton Review, however, is going to the bars downtown, or partying. Students are able to destress and have fun by going out with their friends, but for some, going downtown, drinking and dancing isn’t their favorite way to spend their weekend. Here are some alternative options in Auburn and Opelika other than partying or hitting the bars. A big piece of southern culture is swing dancing. A way to go meet new people and learn to dance without the drinking culture would be by visiting Phi Slam. This is an organization on 140 Toomer Street that hosts swing dancing almost every other Tuesday night, where students will gather in their driveway to learn to swing dance and dance with each other. They

also occasionally throw dry parties for those uninterested in the drinking culture. “One way that I have really become involved without fraternity ties is Phi Slam,” Reid Hess, freshman in exercise science, said. “They have been a staple in me meeting new people outside of the traditional party scene.” Another way to get out and spend time with friends without partying would be to go bowling. GoodTimes Bowling on East Glenn Avenue and AMF on Opelika Road are two options relatively close to campus. AMF offers deals such as unlimited bowling for just under $13 a person on Wednesdays, and $2.99 Tuesdays, both offered after 8 p.m. The alleys also have an arcade and offer a variety of food. Lauren Atkinson, freshman in secondary math education, said one way she likes to have fun is through escape rooms. “It’s about a 15-20 minute drive from campus and a more chill way to hang with your friends rather than going downtown,” Atkinson said. “The rooms are also good for birthdays.” The outdoors is also a way to go have fun without partying. Auburn has several outdoor activities within an hour radius. “Generally, if you don’t like partying, then you’re introverted like me, which means you probably like the peace and quiet

of the outdoors,” Richard Rudd, freshman in aerospace engineering said. Rudd talked about many areas in the Auburn and Opelika area where students could enjoy the outdoors, including Chewacla State Park. “Chewacla is a pretty good area. The trails are easy and a lot of people like to go there. The Smith Mountain Fire Tower is another good option, especially if you want to see the sunset,” Rudd said. “Oak mountain is my favorite place to hike, but it’s about an hour drive from Auburn.” Rudd said he also liked to go fishing at some of the water locations north of campus, but that he hasn’t caught much yet. The Agricultural Heritage Park is another outdoor, scenic option to visit. Eating at local restaurants is an alternative to the traditional party scene as well. Whether it’s a Mexican restaurant or Niffers, casual conversation and spending time with friends is a classic option. Hosting a movie night, cooking dinner for friends, hanging by a pool or going shopping are all other fun alternatives to partying. Auburn has much to offer, so go explore, check out local stores or restaurants and enjoy the outdoors.


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How to get involved on-campus as an off-campus freshman By BECCA BENNER Culture Writer Freshman year is both exciting and intimidating as new students enter into a world of unknowns. However, there is one thing freshmen can be certain about: involvement. Auburn University offers numerous opportunities for off-campus freshmen to get involved on-campus. With over 500 on-campus organizations, different educational opportunities and recreational activities, freshmen always have the chance to get plugged-in. The university provides learning communities for students to better learn their class material and to get to know their fellow classmates. According to Auburn’s website, learning communities are groups of students who share a common major. For Bradley Moreman, a rehabilitation and disabilities studies major, the members of the community learning group have turned into some of her best friends.

“A lot of the time we’re at the library into the wee hours of the morning studying for some kind of test we have coming up which is a good bonding activity,” Moreman said. Besides the learning community, Moreman participates in the Greek Life fundraising committee. A particularly busy student explains how she remains involved while having a heavy course load. Rhianna Helmers, freshman in Animal Science Pre-Veterinary, described her thoughts about entering into her freshman year. “I was definitely worried about being able to be involved while living off campus, especially as a freshman, but I feel like I made the best of it,” Helmers said. This year her involvement includeded the Auburn University Dance Marathon and the Pre-Veterinary Medical Association. She is also an active member of the Delta Gamma sorority. Helmers has taken 18 hours of courses for the past two semesters and strives to find the balance

between her social and school life. “It was a challenge not being able to live on campus and hangout with friends and visit study spaces with classmates as often as people living on campus could, but I’m so grateful for everything I was involved in despite living off campus,” Helmers said. Each new student can find something to be thankful for, and Katie Kern is especially thankful for her roommates. Kern is a freshman in Pre-Medical, and her experience living off campus has been a success. While college roommates can be hard to find, she explains her luck when it comes to her roommates. “I got really lucky with my roommates and we have an amazing connection and are best friends,” Kern said. Despite being off-campus, Kern loves feeling included in the school. “I was lucky enough to join a sorority that I love and that helped me find new friends and become involved at Auburn,” Kern said.


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TIPS

Where to go in Auburn to unplug By MARY ELIZABETH LANE Photographer It’s no secret college students can get bogged down by classes. Instead of throwing your laptop at the wall, unplug and let nature do the rest. Lucky for students, Auburn has plenty of places and ways to escape technology.

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Davis Arboretum FREE FOOD! STUDENT GROUPS!

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There are a multitude of things to do at Chewacla, no matter your skill level in the outdoors. The lake boasts a local spot for fishing and beach days. Students and other locals are allowed to bring kayaks and canoes to paddle on the lake. Apart from the lake, Chewacla is known PIONEER PARK for is its hiking and biking trails. One popular trail, Falls View Trail, Pioneer Park is far from a tradileads to Chewacla’sw waterfall. tional park. On the second Saturday of every month, Pioneer Park hosts an event catered to those interested in local history. Local history reenactors dress up in period clothing and demonstrate different trades, including blacksmithing, basket weavKIESEL PARK ing, and textile sewing. TOWN CREEK PARK Kiesel Park, similar to Town Creek Park, is a Town Creek park is a popular picnic spot. On green space with walking trails, a covered pavilsunny days, many Auburn students can be found ion and it’s own rock wall. The park is open from at the park enjoying the weather. Town Creek is dawn to dusk, and hosts various events throughout also home to walking trails and the Spring Sunthe year. down Concert series every year.

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CHEWACLA STATE PARK


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DEC.

EARLY 1 APPLI -BIRD CA DEAD TION LINE ($200 OFF)

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Students take 2 core courses to earn 6 credits in 4 weeks. Courses previously offered include: Fine Arts Core and Social Studies Core For more information, visit

aub.ie/corebarcelona or email Mariel Goble at mdg0052@auburn.edu.


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It's time for an adventure!

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COMMUNITY

Meet the Auburn city council members By My Ly Content Editor

The Auburn City Council is contructed of nine members, including the mayor, who represent eight sections of the city known as wards. The current members were elected in November 2018 and serve four year terms. The Council meets on the first and third Tuesday each month at the Auburn City Council Chamber. At each meeting, they vote on and discuss the meetings agenda and there are two oppurtunities where ciizens can address the members.

Mayor Ron Anders has served as the mayor of Auburn for 6 years. “Auburn students are a very important part of our community therefore it’s my goal for the municipal government of the City of Auburn to represent all of Auburn’s residents,” Anders said. “Auburn students are welcome at City meetings. I encourage students to get involved in the organizations of this community and help us continue to make Auburn a great place to live, retire, work and attend college.”

Mayor Ron Anders

Connie Fitch Taylor serves as an administrative assistant at Tuskegee University and her role as a city council member is her first position in public service. She is currently serving her first term as a Council member. Her ward encompasses northwest Auburn and the area surrounding the Auburn University Veterinary School.

Ward 1 Connie Fitch Taylor

Kelley Griswold graduated from Auburn University in 1977 and is a retired Army Colonel of 26 years. After retiring from the Army, Griswold worked as the Deputy Director for Operations at the Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center and later as the Vice President of Sigmatech, Inc. supporting Army programs. Griswold is currently serving his first term as a City Council member.

Ward 2 Kelley Griswold PHOTOS VIA THE CITY OF AUBURN


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Tommy Dawson is a retired police chief for the city of Auburn. He is currently serving his second term as a Council member. His ward consist of Auburns southernmost area. It houses many student housing complexes such as The Beacon, Samford Square and The Magnolia.

Ward 8

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Beth Witten is the founder of Blue Turtle Creative, which is a marketing and event management firm in Auburn. She is currently serving her second term as a member of the City Council. Ward 3 encompasses areas such as Creekside and Yugo Auburn North apartments.

Ward 3

Tommy Dawson

Mayor Pro-Tem Beth Witten

Bob Parsons worked as a police dispatcher in Chicago and Opelika before starting his work with the Opelika Fire Department in 2005. He is serving his first term. Ward 6 includes student housing and apartment complexes such as Evergreen Auburn and all on-campus dorms except Cambridge.

Brett Smith is the cofounder of Huff and Smith Law and serves as a board member for multiple local organizations. He is currently serving his first term as a Council member. Smith’s ward houses units such as 191 College, 160 ross and Village at Lakeside.

Ward 4

Ward 6

Brett Smith

Bob Parsons

Jay Hovey is a mortgage loan originator at Auburn Bank and is currently serving his first term as a Council member. Ward 7 borders South College Street and covers neighborhoods south of Interstate 85. It houses apartments such as The Garden District and The Connection.

Steven Dixon graduated from Auburn University in 2008 and is currently serving his first term as a Council member. In 2009, Dixon formed his own video production and photography business, Steven Dixon Media. Ward 5 houses living areas such as 221 Armstrong and Cambridge Dormitory.

Ward 5

Ward 7

Steven Dixon

Jay Hovey

PHOTOS VIA THE CITY OF AUBURN


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COMMUNITY

New businesses growing in Auburn-Opelika area By CAROLINE CRAIG Editor

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates Auburn as the fastest growing city in Alabama growing from a population of 53,000 in 2010 to 76,000 in 2020. As the population grows, businesses continue to grow along side the City with new businesses opening every year. New businesses cycle in and out of the existing store fronts downtown, and a

DANIEL SCHMIDT | PHOTOGRAPHER

growing city is no stranger to construction. Between the University and the City of Auburn, there is no shortage of projects developing in and around the town. These projects and businesses contribute to the growing local economy and provide entertainment for students and residents alike. Some businesses may be more accessible for students who don’t have cars, and others are worth the trip outside of walking proximity to the University. Auburn has many restaurants and entertainment to offer. Here’s a list of some of the new and exciting businesses in the Auburn-Opelika area.

BLADE & BARREL AXE CO. Axe throwing has become the latest trend in entertainment and Blade & Barrel is the new spot in town for those looking for some out-of-the-box entertainment. The axe throwing venue is located in Midtown Auburn and features nine axe throwing lanes where guests can test out their skills. The axe throwing company opened in March 2021 and has been busy since. Guests are expected to sign a waiver to participate and a personal “axepert” will guide groups during their stay. Blade & Barrel is open Wednesday through Sunday, and patrons can book a lane for up to six guests with time slots ranging from an hour to three hours. Private events are available for booking, and children 8 years and older can participate in the fun.

MY LY | CONTENT EDITOR

TEKILA MEXICAN BAR & GRILL Tekila is the newest Mexican restaurant in a town with an abundance of Mexican restaurants, but Tekila sits right on Magnolia with specials offered Monday through Saturday. Patrons of Tekila can find their favorites and classic Mexican dishes including burritos, flautas, fajitas, quesadillas and churros. The restaurant has a more modern look with lavish food presentations and margarita towers. Tekila features Mojito Monday, Taco Tuesday, Whiskey Wednesday, Tower Thursday, Fresa Friday and Skinny Saturday as its drink and food specials. Tekila opened its doors in November 2021 and is one of the latest restaurant to open up downtown. It offers specials and giveaways for Cinco de Mayo. Patrons can enjoy their food inside or on the patio and experience the downtown atmosphere.

HANJIANXI QIN | PHOTOGRAPHER

WHATABURGER The arrival of Whataburger was a much anticipated addition to the downtown store fronts. Whataburger now sits at the corner of College and Magnolia where many restaurants stood before with the most recent being Pieology. Whataburger is a fast food chain based out of Texas with a focus on service and creating a welcoming environment. The Auburn location opened in January 2022 and is the second Whataburger located in the area. The first is in Tiger Town. The burger joint offers more than just burgers like patty melts, chicken sandwiches, breakfast and dessert. Since its opening, Whataburger has seen a substantial amount of business and long wait times during the weekend because of its proximity to the bars downtown and late-night hours.


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COMMUNITY

COLUMN | Why you should get involved in the community By SAMI GRACE DONNELLY Columnist

Getting involved off campus can be advantageous and rewarding for a college student — especially an incoming freshman. If you want to get involved, you really can’t go wrong because there are so many incredible organizations within the Auburn community, each with its own function and culture. You will find that it’s good to get a break from being around college kids all the time. Having an identity in something outside the University’s bubble can help you feel balanced. Many organizations off campus are based in volunteerism and service. Not only can they benefit you as a person, but they can also give you community and responsibility — both of which help you grow as a person. College academics will teach you a lot, but “real-life” experience is where you put it all into practice. Getting involved off

campus can help you find your niche and set your resume apart. The more people you know, the more opportunities you will have to network and find reliable people to write those much-needed letters of recommendation in your future — not to mention, friendships are always a plus. A community that bridges the gap between off-campus and on-campus life can be very nourishing and wholesome. It provides respite and helps you set healthy boundaries with academics. Connections off campus may feel more genuine than the obligatory relationships you maintain on campus. However, it’s the best-case scenario when these authentic off-campus relationships flow into on-campus ones. Off-campus organizations often hang out on campus. They may get lunch, hang out in the student center or have members that are your classmates. No matter what way they interact with

the university, it’s important to realize that they do interact with it. Even when you’re involved in something separate from Auburn University, you will always find connections on campus. Getting involved is a matter of decision — not possibility. Whether its a service organization, community groups, a local church or a job, you will be able to get involved in whichever strikes your fancy. Your biggest problem will be choosing what to hone in on. The most helpful piece of advice I received going into freshman year was “lane changes are okay.” This gives you room to change things up when you find something more suitable, and it’s okay because you’re still going in the same direction. When you first decide to get involved, it will take some time to find things you like and filter out things you don’t like. Over time, you will find things you can’t

live without — things that make you feel like you’re doing what you were always meant to do. Some things you find will fulfill you and bring enthusiasm to all other parts of your life. You will also find yourself in places that don’t really do much for you. You may realize that they aren’t as fascinating as you once thought, or you may realize that your talents would fit better somewhere else. That is okay, too, because those situations can still help you find where you’re meant to be. It’s a part of college: everyone figuring out who they want to be and where they want to spend their time. The main idea is not to be afraid of trying something new; it’s always good to get out of your comfort zone. Give yourself time to do this, and don’t be afraid to make edits to your life. Even if it’s only for a while or in small measure, getting involved off campus is something you’ll never regret.


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What’s your coffee shop aura? By Destini Ambus, Mallorie McCoy and Sami Grace Donnelly Plainsman Staff

Welcome to the Lovliest Village on The Plains, with the Loveliest coffee shops! Check out our quiz to see which of these Auburn coffee shops suits your vibe. FILE PHOTO

Why do you go to a coffee shop?

1

A. To study

B. To drink coffee

C. First date choice

D. Read

E. To Journal

F. Hang out with friends

What do you consider yourself?

2

G. For a tasty treat

What’s your favorite part about coffee shops?

3

A. The atmosphere

B. The study vibes

C. The coffee

D. The pastries/food

E. The staff

F. Convenience

G. Hanging out with friends

If you answered mostly A’s you are: THE BEAN: With its wall of windows and playful geometric accent wall, the bean definitely speaks your language. You appreciate nonconformity, utility and aesthetics. It’s no surprise you match with this colorful blast from the past. If you answered mostly C’s you are: UNIQ You’re a bit of a minimalist — you want to make the most of your space and enjoy a more natural and comfortable way of living. You’re down to earth and you enjoy making people feel comfortable in your space, as best as you can. You enjoy putting in the

A. An introvert

B. An extrovert

C. An introverted extrovert

D. An extroverted introvert

E. An ambivert

F. I don’t consider myself

G. Prefer not to say

What do you do when you first wake up?

4

A. Eat breakfast

B. Shower

C. Brush teeth

D. Meditate

E. Check social media

F. Finish assignment that’s due in five minutes

G. Stay in Bed

If you answered mostly B’s you are: WELL RED: You cherish hushed, intimate conversations with friends in a crowded coffee shop, and giggling over the low murmurs of others conversations. You feel like fall, wrapped up in a person — comforting and homey, but accented with long days of working and long nights of being surrounded by friends. You enjoy comfort and ease and sinking into a soft couch to recharge with coffee or tea. You’re the mom friend: a bit pushy, but you always mean well, and that’s why you’re so well-liked.


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What food/pastry do you get?

What’s your go-to coffee shop order?

5

A. Latte

B. Chai

C. Mocha

D. Matcha

E. Anything sweet

F. Black Coffee

6

A. Cinnamon roll

B. Muffins

C. Cake

D. Oatmeal

E. Cookies

F. Cereal

G. Tea

G. Don’t usually get food

What describes your style?

Where would you like to live?

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A. Busy city

B. Suburbs

C. The beach

D. The mountains

E. Anywhere quiet

F. Auburn

8

A. Minimalistic

B. Eclectic

C. Warm

D. Colorful

E. Modern

F. Classy G. Trendy

G. Tuscaloosa

When are you most likely to visit a coffee shop?

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A. Morning

B. Afternoon

C. Evening

D. Between classes

E. Weekend

F. Getting coffee on-the-go G. Everyday

If you answered mostly D’s you are: COFFEE CAT You enjoy the authentic things in life: natural light, the smell of coffee, connecting with a friend or getting some much-needed study time. Your personality is engaging without being overwhelming. Peace is something you value, but you also enjoy a moment of spontaneity every once in a while.

If you answered mostly F’s you are: COFFEE MAFIA You must be a lover of eccentricity and all things eclectic. Coffee Mafia definitely resonates with your introspective side while still catering to your appreciation for the simple joys of life. It is the perfect place to simply ~vibe~.

If you answered mostly E’s you are: RISTRETTO You like to be around people, but you also hold a great appreciation for being alone. You surround yourself with people who appreciate your introverted nature but will push you out of your comfort zone.

If you answered mostly G’s you are: ROSS HOUSE You have a deep set of values rooted in the belief that there’s a force that guides all of us. So you surround yourself by those people that believe the same. You enjoy the more rustic side of life: stained wood, lots of greenery and the simplicty of completing goals with your own hands.


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COMMUNITY

A guide to exploring downtown Opelika By TUCKER MASSEY News Editor

Since Auburn is where most students will spend their days, many are unaware of the many things to do just down the road in downtown Opelika. Downtown Opelika is a historic, compact area covered with places to shop, eat and have fun. Among the many restaurants in downtown Opelika, Zazu Gastropub is popular among locals. Jeffrey Meyers, manager, said that Opelika’s close-knit structure allows for visitors to really embrace all that is packed into the downtown area. “It’s basically just a two-block area,” Meyers said. “If you’re standing at the railroad tracks, you can essentially see everything that’s offered here.” Throughout Opelika, you can find many other restaurants aside from Zazu, including Niffer’s Place, Cafe One Twenty Three, Ma Fia’s Ristorante and several others. Each place offers a unique dining experience that sets it apart from its neighbors. Opelika not only has a wide variety of restaurants, but it is also home to several local shops. These range

from clothing shops to record stores to almost anything, which can be found at Almost Anything on Ninth Street. Almost Anything lives up to its name. It sells anything from cards and other collectibles to video games to even swords and pocketk nives. Almost Anything can seem daunting upon first entering due to how much they have to offer, but it’s almost certain that you can find what you’re looking for. Across the railroad tracks, you can find several other stores. Among those is 10,000 Hz Records. This record store has a wide variety of records, covering the earliest days of blues and rock to today’s hits. When you need something to wear, Studio 3:19 provides all your women’s clothing needs. And for men’s clothing, Griff’s Goods can be found not too far from Studio 3:19. Other clothing stores include New York Fashion, Coveted Closet and Crowned Boutique, among others. Opelika also has many entertaining locations for students, including Rock ‘N Roll Pinball and Cyberzone Entertainment Center. These places offer anything from arcades to laser tag to pinball.

MARY ELIZABETH LANE | PHOTOGRAPHER

Downtown Opelika is a vibrant space with much to offer for everyone.


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COMMUNITY

Auburn construction’s status updates and progress By DYLAN FOX Writer

Louder Hall Financial Collaborative Lab Renovation The Harbert College of Business is one of the most popular colleges at Auburn University, teaching over 6,500 students in 2021. Louder Hall is the primary building facilitating the college’s programs. This project is renovating around 4,000 square feet inside Louder to create two state-of-the-art labs. These labs will be designed to teach students essential skills in the finance industry, such as investment banking, asset management, sales and market trading. The crews are currently installing HVAC systems, sheetrock walls and a variety of electrical systems. The renovation is set to be finished in June LARRY ROBINSON | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The newest addition to Auburn University’s campus, the Tony and Libba Rane Culinary Science Center, still under construction.

Quad Residence Halls Renovation The first of five planned renovation phases is underway. The Quad Dorms, originally constructed in the 1930s and 1950s, are being renovated in pairs for five years until they are all renovated to modern standards. Currently, Harper and Broun halls are under the knife, where crews are replacing mechanical, electrical, plumbing and HVAC systems. The dorms are scheduled to be finished before students move in in August. Little Hall and Teague Hall are likely the next to be renovated.

Football Performance Center The 233,000 square foot facility is one of the most high-profile projects that Auburn has ever constructed. Built to replicate facilities that were built at Clemson and Ohio State, the Football performance center was given inspiration by former head coach Gus Malzahn. The $92 million price brings with it two full-sized turf fields, sports medicine facilities, outdoor fields, offices, meeting rooms and weight rooms. The facility also features facilities designed to entice recruits, such as a barbershop, recording studios and even a flight simulator. “This is the largest athletics project that has been undertaken,” said athletic director Allen Greene. “…This is grand in scale. So, while this ceremony may be a little bit small, a little bit intimate, know that the impact is incredibly large.” The construction team is currently putting in utilities, erecting walls and installing the brick exterior. The project is set to finish in September of this year.

Tony & Libba Rane Culinary Science Center Located next to the AU Hotel, this Tony & Libba Rane Culinary Science Center was initially funded by a $12 million gift from Auburn Alumnus and Great Southern Wood Preserving CEO Jimmy Rane. It supports several programs in the College of Human Sciences, including hospitality management, Culinary Science, Event Management and Hotel and Restaurant Management, The project costs are estimated at $112 million, making it one of the most expensive educational facilities at Auburn. It will, however, generate revenue with operational food venues and hotel spaces. Currently, the builders are putting interior finishes in the building, such as tile ceilings, windows, and other aesthetic touches. Expect this to open in August.

Academic Classroom and Laboratory Complex The 151,000 square foot facility will become the second largest classroom space on campus, next to the Haley Center. Replacing the dated Parker Hall and Allison Laboratory, the $83 million project will hold 2,000 students in 20 different adjustable spaces. Construction, which started back in the spring of 2019, is now down to landscaping, interior decorations, and lab equipment. It is set for an opening in May.


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EXPL RE YOUR LEADERSHIP Scan for more information!

Form friendships through small groups Develop your leadership Network with other Auburn leaders

A support network for LGBTQ+ students in STEM majors Allies welcome! @auburn_ostem aub.ie/discord


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SPORTS

CONTRIBUTED BY AUBURN DISC GOLF

The sun sets on a scenic hole location in North Cove, North Carolina, April 2022.

Disc golf team brings championship to The Plains By NOAH GRIFFITH Assistant Sports Editor

It only took one Facebook post to bring a national championship and one of the fastest-growing sports in the U.S. to the Plains. “I heard one thing about the Auburn disc golf team and immediately knew that’s where I belonged,” said Tyler Gainer, sophomore in applied mathematics. “I didn’t even consider not joining.” After one glance at the post promoting the newly-born organization on the local disc golf Facebook page, he was sold. It worked out well for Gainer. He is now a Division 2 national champion in a sport he has been playing for less than two years. If you’re looking for a promising new organizations to be a part of, look no further than the newly-founded Auburn disc golf team. After Holden Tate, sophomore in marketing, started up the club in the spring of 2022, the team wasted no time taking off. At the team’s first competition in North Cove,

North Carolina, in April, just weeks after the organization came to life, four members of the club traveled to North Carolina to participate in the D2 nationals. With a -8 score, Gainer took home an individual National Championship while competing against 211 other players from D2 schools in two rounds of singles. None of the other teams could’ve guessed Auburn was new to collegiate competition based on their play. In fact, Gainer said these are two of his highest scores since he started playing disc golf at the beginning of his freshman year, and he hasn’t been able to put his discs down ever since. “I was very surprised when I saw that Auburn didn’t already have some sort of disc golf club already, especially when there’s such a prominent community for it in the Auburn-Opelika area,” Tate said. “Auburn was actually one of the last SEC schools to compete in disc golf. In fact, some schools, like [the University of] Georgia, have been competing for over a decade.” Even with some members having no collegiate experience or expectations of what other schools had to offer, the Auburn team didn’t shy away from competition as newcomers.

“I think we all felt confident going into it and knew we could hold our own in the championship,” Tate said. “Since it was our first collegiate event, I honestly didn’t know what to expect from the other schools, but I knew some of our guys definitely had what it takes to win.” An example can be made of Gainer: One doesn’t need to be a long-time professional to take up disc golf. Both Gainer and Tate encourage students both new and experienced to jump on the disc golf bandwagon. Tate said the club currently consists of 23 members that are a “good mix of beginners and pros.” The team practices at the Opelika Sportsplex disc golf course, and they welcome any students to come hang out and test out their skills at a practice, even if they aren’t certain they want to join the club. Discs are the only necessary equipment, and those are available at Academy and Dick’s Sporting Goods. “There’s no better way to get better at disc golf than to surround yourself with people who can help you improve, and that’s exactly what our club will provide,” Tate said.


Summer 2022 “As someone who hasn’t played disc golf for long and isn’t great at it, I was amazed to see such a helpful group

of students attend our first few practices.” With some early success, the organization isn’t done growing. Now, having some experience and a championship trophy under their belt after just one tournament, the organization looks to take the crucial next step of becoming a club team. To become a club team, the organization has to meet several requirements. It will need to fundraise 25% of its budget, complete 50 hours of community service, participate in two competitions (not including nationals), nominate two representatives, provide documentation of alumni networking, as well as attend all advisory meetings each month. In order to fulfill these requirements, the organization already has a plan in the works for some fundraisers and community service projects for the fall in the Auburn community and possibly even at the Opelika Sportsplex. “As many members as possible” is Tate’s hope so that

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the team can stand up to and eventually match the level of interest that other schools are showing.

Some schools even sent three or four teams to competitions because they have so many members who want to compete. “We are far from that level of interest, but we hope to establish that kind of community here at Auburn,” Tate said. “This will obviously take some hard work and determination, but we’re ready to establish a solid foundation for years to come.” Due to the organization being formed just after the season’s final qualifier for the D1 tournament in the spring, the team instead opted to compete at the D2 level in their first competition, but it is now prepared and plans to participate in several qualifiers in fall 2022 in hopes of earning a bid among the nation’s best. As the organization vies on its path forward, an addition of new members who are passionate about disc golf is the most necessary ingredient it needs to boost it to national prominence. “Our main goal at the moment is to build a solid foundation for the future of this club,” Tate said. “I definitely recommend joining. It’ll bring on some great experiences, and you’ll meet some great people along the way.”

CONTRIBUTED BY AUBURN DISC GOLF

Tyler Gainer poses by his National Championship trophy.

CONTRIBUTED BY AUBURN DISC GOLF Auburn disc golfers pose by a tough hole location.


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SPORTS

COLUMN| Guide to game days By MALLORIE MCCOY Columnist

There is nothing quite like game day at Auburn University. A beautiful, sunny day on The Plains full of tailgating and football, the infectious energy in Jordan-Hare Stadium, and the most passionate fans make Auburn football games what they are. Here is a little student guide to help navigate future game days. For all games: Make sure to enter through the student section gates. Arrive at the student section gates an hour or more before the game starts, because the line to get in the stadium will be long. Remember to download football tickets to your Apple Wallet, so that tickets can easily be scanned when coming in the gates. When planning a gameday outfit, make sure to look and see if there is a color theme for the game such as “white out.” I highly recommend flat shoes, because most students stand the whole game. As a reminder, students can carry only clear purses into the game. A shaker can be found on every student section seat. Students will use shakers throughout the entire game, so keep up with yours, and do not lay it down.

Try to be in a seat before the eagle flight and pregame festivities, which happensminutes before the game starts. And most importantly, go roll Toomer’s after Auburn wins. For afternoon games: Make sure to have eaten a little something before arriving at the game, because the concession stand lines are going to be long. Stay hydrated and do not wait to get water. There are free water stations scattered throughout the student section concourse. Every concession stand takes dining dollars, so don’t worry about spending extra money. Don’t forget sunglasses and wear sunscreen, to avoid sunburn. Afternoon games are typically hot, so wear something light and airy. For night games: These games are going to be the biggest and loudest games, so arrive excited and energized. Tie a jacket around your waist, because it gets cold when the sun goes down. Be in a seat before the team runs out for pregame fireworks. When the fourth quarter begins, be ready for the new and improved light show because it is really fun to watch at night. Make sure you got plenty of sleep the day before; some night games will go close to midnight. Hopefully these few tips help make game days run a little smoother. Get ready for some of the best college memories to be made on game days in Jordan-Hare.


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SPORTS

LARRY ROBINSON | PHOTOGRAPHER

Auburn fans cheer and use shakers during a men’s basketball game against Oklahoma on Jan. 29, 2022.

LETTER | Welcome to The Jungle By MICHAEL FLOYD Contributor

Greetings fellow students, I am Michael Floyd, and I have the amazing honor of serving as the Vice President of the Auburn Jungle, which is the official student section of Auburn University. This upcoming athletics year will be filled with excitement, and the amazing student-athletes have worked extremely hard over the summer to prepare themselves for the opportunity to compete for SEC and national championships. I encourage you to go tailgate on those warm

CONTRIBUTED BY AU ATHLETICS

Saturdays and fill Jordan-Hare Stadium with lots of enthusiasm. Coach Bryan Harsin and his staff have been hard at work, and they are ready to compete at the highest level. Line up early in Jungle Village to watch coach Bruce Pearl and the Auburn men’s basketball team defend their SEC regular season title in Neville Arena. Go out and watch the Auburn gymnastics squad earn a perfect 10.0 on bars, vault, beam and floor. They are primed for another Final Four run. Go support coach Johnnie Harris, as she enters year two leading our women’s basketball program. Bringing in a top-25 recruiting class, this will be another great step forward for the Tigers. Attend a volleyball, soccer, swimming & diving, equestrian, tennis, golf, baseball, softball, cross country and track & field event, for you will remember them as the best time of your college days. I ask that you join “the loudest roar in the country”, and become a part of such a great student section, one of the best in the nation. I can’t wait to serve you and help cheer on our Auburn Tigers. War Eagle! Michael R. Floyd Auburn Jungle Vice President

CONTRIBUTED BY AU ATHLETICS

Join the Fight Against Food Insecurity in Our Own Backyard! BBFD is an annual competition between Auburn University and the University of Alabama to collect food for their local food banks. Last year BBFD collected 352,389 pounds of food for the Food Bank of East Alabama and BEAT BAMA!

Join BBFD Committee! We are looking for hardworking Auburn students who are passionate about fighting food insecurity and want to get involved on campus and in the community through the Food Bank of East Alabama. Committee are the hands and feet of Beat Bama Food Drive, and we need you to help eradicate food insecurity throughout the state of Alabama. AUB.IE/BBFDCOMMITTEE

Scan here to join the fight!


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SPORTS

Tigers to loook out for in 2022-23 Owen Pappoe

By MATTHEW WALLACE Sports Writer

Athletic events are an integral part of the Auburn experience for students. As the athletic year goes on, the names of players become very familiar to every fan, but here are a few players to know before going to support the teams. Tank Bigsby With uncertainty at the quarterback position, junior running back Tank Bigsby could be called upon often, especially during the early portion of the season. Bigsby, who became Auburn’s first 1,000-yard rusher since 2018, has amassed 1,933 yards and 15 touchdowns in his Auburn career. Under new offensive coordinator Eric Kiesau, Bigsby hopes to have an expanded role in the offense this year. Rebekah Rath

FILE PHOTO

Rebekah Rath provides experience on a relatively young Auburn volleyball team. Rath, who led the team with 507.5 points and 438 kills, started all 28 matches last season. The senior transfer, who is in her second season at Auburn, was twice named SEC Offensive Player of the Week in 2021. Rath will be a key player as Auburn hopes to continue to improve its performance on the volleyball court.

One of the leaders of an experienced Auburn defense will be senior linebacker Owen Pappoe. Pappoe’s performance in 2020 led to him being named a preseason first-team All-SEC honoree in 2021, but a tough, injury-plagued season caused him to only participate in five games last year. Despite missing over half of last season, Pappoe has amassed a total of 165 tackles for his career, including 94 solo tackles. Pappoe’s return to full health could be a catalyst for Auburn’s defense to reach its full potential. Anna Haddock During a successful season for Auburn soccer in 2021, junior Anna Haddock was the team’s offensive leader. Haddock, who scored nine goals and assisted on eight last season, was named a first-team All-SEC performer. In March, Haddock was named to the U.S. U-23 Women’s Youth National Team. Haddock will be a critical piece for Auburn, as it hopes to host in the NCAA Tournament.

FILE PHOTO

Wendell Green Jr. Coming off its run to the SEC regular-season title, Auburn will return an experienced group of guards. Wendell Green Jr. who will be a junior this coming season, is one of the leaders of that guard corps. LARRY ROBINSON | STAFF Green PHOTOGRAPHER Jr. was a finalist for the Bob Cousy Award last season, given to the nation’s top point guard. The transfer guard led the SEC in the plus/minus stat, while appearing in all 34 games for the Tigers. Green Jr. played an average of 26.5 minutes per game, scoring just under 12 per game last year. With 136 baskets, including 59 three-pointers, and 172 assists, Green Jr. is expected to be a leader on Auburn’s 2022-23 squad that could conLARRY ROBINSON | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER tend for another SEC title.

SHELBY BIRCHEAT | PHOTOGRAPHER

Sonny DiChiara

LARRY ROBINSON | STAFF

PHOTOGRAPHER First baseman Sonny DiChiara slugged his way to a conference-best batting average (.436), on-base percentage (.597) and slugging percentage (.842). During the 2022 season, his batting average and on-base percentage lead not only the SEC, but the entire NCAA, while putting Auburn baseball on the map and helping get them in the top 20 for the first time since 2019. Make sure to clap along to No. 17’s walk-up song “Che La Luna” when he enters the batter’s box in his usual third spot in the lineup. The transfer from Samford is currently classified as a senior, but he has an additional year of eligibility from the 2020 season that was canceled due to the spread of COVID-19.


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The best thing you’ll do on the first day of class.

Meet Us At The Rec August 16, 5 to 7 p.m. The first 2,500 get the free t-shirt. Free Food - Thousands in Prizes - Karaoke - Job Fair Fitness Challenges - Obstacle Course - Inflatables

www.getrecdauburn.com #getrecdauburn

Follow Us @AuburnCampusRec


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Auburn football 2022 schedule

week

date

opponent

score

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

9/3 9/10 9/17 9/24 10/1 10/8 10/15 10/22 10/29 11/5 11/12 11/19 11/26

Mercer San Jose State Penn State Missouri LSU At Georgia At Ole Miss BYE WEEK Arkansas At Mississippi State Texas A&M Western Kentucky At Alabama

______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ FILE PHOTO

Head coach Bryan Harsin speaks to his players following the 2021 Auburn Football A-Day scrimmage on Saturday, April 17, 2021, in Auburn, Ala.


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BECAUSE

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‘WELCOME TO CAMPUS’ SHOULD LAST MORE THAN A WEEK

View all events online: aub.ie/welcomecalendar


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T h i s

i s

y o u r

s t u d y

b r e a k .

C H E W A C L A

S T A T E

M e e t t h e c o o l e s t c o l l e g e t o w n i n t h e S o u t h . A n d h i s h i p o l d e r s i s t e r. aotourism.com

P A R K