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Thursday, July 19, 2012

A SPIRIT THAT IS NOT AFRAID www.theplainsman.com

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Vol. 119, Issue 10, 8 Pages

No fall break for 2012, but maybe for 2013? Nathan Simone ONLINE EDITOR

The results are in: students want a fall break. Yesterday, the Student Government Association issued a press release announcing the results for the recent student survey concerning the interest in a fall break occurring during the 2013-2014 school year. SGA President Owen Parrish said that the results were very positive and encouraging. “If you look at the data, students are indicating that they want a fall break,” Parrish said. The results do seem to indicate that students are in favor of the calendar change next year. According to the official press re-

lease, 69 percent of respondents stated that in general the University should add a two-day fall break. Seventy percent said they would personally prefer to have such a break. Approximately 21 percent of respondents did not want to see a fall break implemented, and 10 percent had no opinion. The press release also showed that 65 percent of students stated that they would be better prepared to perform academically if a fall break was implemented. Respondents stressed that students do not want a fall break at the expense of a week-long Thanksgiving break. The fall break task force and

If you look at the data, students are indicating that they want a fall break.” —Owen Parrish SGA PRESIDENT

SGA have agreed that Thanksgiving break should not and will not be shortened. Only four percent of respondents suggested this option, but half of the respondents suggested that the two missed days could possibly be made

up by beginning fall semester on a Monday instead of a Wednesday. Now that the student survey is in, SGA Chief of Staff and student leader of FBTF Collier Tynes said there’s still a lot of work to be done. “Now that we have the student recommendations, we’ll be conducting a faculty survey,” Tynes said. “After we get those results in, if they’re both positive then we’ll send a recommendation to the University Senate Executive Committee.” According to the planning of the FBTF, after the recommendation is sent to the Senate, they will decide whether to forward it to the Academic Calendar Committee. If the Academic Calendar Committee decides that the Senate

should vote on the issue, then a recommendation will be sent to the Provost’s office for approval and then the President’s office for approval. If a fall break does occur during the 2013-2014 school year it would mostly likely occur in October, right after the middle of the semester, according to Tynes. However, the exact date of the proposed break will be decided by the Academic Calendar Committee. The survey, which opened on July 2 and closed on July 15, received approximately 4,700 responses. Seniors were the top class represented, with 32 percent of respondents identifying themselves as such.

Accused AU shooting accomplice sentenced to 20 years for manslaughter Andrew Yawn COMMUNITY EDITOR

Jeremy Thomas, 18, was sentenced to the maximum of 20 years in prison Thursday, July 12, for the manslaughter of 14-year-old Takira Gaston of Montgomery in June 2011. Thomas was a possible witness for the defense of Desmonte Leonard, the alleged shooter in the University Heights tragedy. Leonard's attorney Susan James had asked for Thomas to be brought to the Lee County Justice Center from Montgomery, however she elected not to call him to the stand in Leonard's preliminary trial on Wednesday June 11. Thomas had been originally charged with murder after he shot the Montgomery teenager in the chest, but was indicted on manslaughter charges after claiming it was an accident. A week before his trial, he was arrested on June 11 and charged with first-degree hindering the prosecution for his alleged involvement in helping Leonard evade authorities. Thomas was also purport-

DANIELLE LOWE / PHOTO EDITOR

The road-widening project on West Glen Avenue, between Donahue Drive and North College Street, should be completed by the end of August.

CONTRIBUTED

Jeremy Thomas, alleged University Heights shooting accomplice, was sentenced on Thursday, July 12, to 20 years in prison for manslaughter.

edly on the scene when the fight broke out at University Heights that culminated in three deaths and the injury of three others. On June 13, four days after the shooting, Thomas pleaded guilty to the manslaughter charges leading to his sentencing by Circuit Court Judge Eugene Reese. Thomas's defense attorney Wallace Mills said that the sentencing was a straight one and does not include probation. Leonard, a Montgomery

resident and the suspected gunman in the June 9 shooting at University Heights apartment, allegedly killed Auburn resident Demario Pitts and former Auburn football players Ladarious Phillips and Ed Christian. Leonard turned himself in to the U.S. Marshals Tuesday, June 12, after his attorney Susan James arranged a deal that he would be taken in peacefully and without media coverage, James said in an interview with WSFA Montgomery.

Glenn Avenue construction to be completed in August Robert E. Lee EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

The road-widening project on West Glenn Avenue, between Donahue Drive and North College Street, should be completed by the end of August, according to Auburn Director of Public Works Jeff Ramsey. “The contractor is making good progress,” Ramsey said. “They are putting in a curving gutter, some storm drains, and we’ve laid quit a bit of storm pipe already, and hopefully if the weath-

er holds out and everything continues on, we should be through with this project at the end of August.” The construction includes widening Glenn Avenue to three lanes from Donahue Drive to North College Street, with a middle turning lane to decrease traffic congestion. The city council approved the work in April and the job is under contract by D&J Enterprises. Other projects currently underway include the Moore’s Mill Road Improve-

ment Project and the Bragg Avenue widening project. Owen Meadows, junior in entrepreneurship & family business, travels on Glenn three times a week to go to Southern Union State Community College. “ The construction on Glenn has definitely affected me. But then again, not having solid sidewalks and safe roads down that part of town is extremely dangerous. It does affect my trip to southern union but in the end, it’ll be worth it for all us.”

Stadium deck solar panels next step for energy reduction Robert E. Lee EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

As Auburn tip toes toward reducing its carbon footprint, 24 solar panels have been installed on the parking deck of Jordan Hare Stadium to power 10 electric vehicles and other needs for the University. The panels installed are used to power the electric vehicle charging stations on the bottom level of the stadium. “Electricity basically flows where it’s needed,” said Energy Engineer for Facilities Ken Martin. “Most likely, it’s powering lights in the deck or things that are using power within the deck. If there are no cars being charged, the power generated from the panels is used on the electric grid within the University.” The panels were installed in late April and are capable of producing 6.6 kilowatts of power per day, which comes to about 13,250 kilowatthours of electrical energy per year. “It all started with a conversation that our office had with Dan King, the vice president

for facilities,” said director of Campus Sustainability Operations Mike Kensler. “He said that he was interested in providing funding for some innovative and prototype sustainability projects, and he said, ‘If you all come up with something interesting, then we’d be glad to provide the funding for it.’” Biosystems engineering seniors also worked with the office of sustainability and facilities on a potential expansion of the solar panels. Kensler said his office and King are working on ideas to move away from depending on fossil fuels and relying more on renewable energy sources. However, the questions remains on how to fund future endeavors. “(King) is being very aggressive and consciences about saving energy on campus,” Kensler said. “He’s leading the charge for the University to become more energy efficient.” The panels are located on the top of the two eastern stairwells in the stadium’s parking deck.

While Martin believes advances in renewable energy is feasible in the future, funding remains an issue. “While the prices are getting better on the panels … and efficiency is getting better, we also have really good electrical rates here,” Martin said. “We’re not in the best position to jump on solar (energy) because the payback can be longer, but I think if we were to expand we’d love to find some sort of grant funding to help with the cost. That would greatly help the payback.” Kensler also mentioned a possible new strategy in renewable energy for the University. “We’re also thinking about starting a fund working with facilities that would pay for this kind of energy conservation and renewable energy project,” Kensler said. “We are thinking about ways that can create creative funding sources to pay for this kind of thing.” Eight out of the 10 charging stations are occupied by

COURTESY OF BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING STUDENTS

A rendering of a possible expansion of the current solar panels places panels on the other two corners and middle of the parking deck’s roof.

» See SOLAR 2

INSIDE  Campus » 1  |  Opinions » 4  |  Community » 5  |  Sports » 7  |  Classifieds » 8  | 


Thursday, July 19, 2012

Campus 2

The Auburn Plainsman

DANIELLE LOWE / PHOTO EDITOR

The Lowder Business building is receiving new exterior brick to match surrounding buildings on campus, as well as new windows to fix issues with water leakage.

Lowder renovations continue, noise causing issues TJ Harlin CAMPUS EDITOR

Auburn University is an ever-evolving campus. There is rarely a time when new buildings are not being built or current buildings are not being renovated. In the last 12 months, Auburn has completed a new practice facility, built new residence halls, added a mail room to the Village and the Shelby Center for Engineering, just to name a few. One project the University has been working on since early January is a renovation of the Lowder Business Building. The building, which was constructed in 1992, houses the Auburn University College of Business. The building was beginning to experience problems. “There was a lack of waterproofing on the

building shell,” said Ron Booth, director of Program Management and Project Execution. “Whenever we had rain, we would get water infiltrating into the building.” The only way to fix the problem was to remove all the existing brick on the building. Once the brick was removed, a waterproof material was put on the building to prevent any leakage from occurring again. This demolition has created noise and barriers that have inconvenienced many students. “I love Lowder, but I was definitely affected during the re-bricking process,” said Reaves Coker, senior in finance. “The noise that the drilling caused going on right outside of a classroom was a little distracting of an environment.” However, Coker said that he was never affected by the noise during testing or final exams.

“We have a construction manager on site, B.L. Harbor, and they’ve worked a lot with the building occupants to work around the class schedules as far as the demolition which causes some of the noise,” Booth said. “But we should be done with all of the demolition in the next couple of months.” Demolition has already been completed on parts of the building. The brick, which had been darker than the rest of the brick on campus, is being replaced with lighter colored brick to match other buildings across campus. “ I like the fact that it looks like its going to be matching the brick of the Shelby Building and the new wellness center,” said Jim Parrish, director of MBA Admissions and Operations. Some students also like Lowder’s new look. “I think Lowder looks better with lighter

SOLAR » From 1

electric vehicles: two from the office of accessibility, three student-run free taxis that provide rides to locations in close proximity to campus, two from the College of Liberal Arts information technology staff, and one for a Johnson’s Controls contractor who monitors and services campus buildings. Martin said as the University attempts to move toward renewable energy sources, it must continue to look into potentially generating its own energy. “We have some goals in our energy reduction strategy where we’d like to eventually cap the amount of purchased utilities based on the 2010 baseline,” Martin said. “That means even as we’re building these new buildings, we’d like to not buy any more kilowatthours.”

Only 1 more issue left for the summer Plainsman! Next week, July 26, is the final summer issue of The Auburn Plainsman. After that, we resume publication with these special issues:

Published Thursday, August 16 – first day of classes – this special issue welcomes new and returning students to campus and to town.

Advertising deadline: Noon, Wednesday, August 1

THE AUBURN PLAINSMAN

Regular weekly print publication returns on Thursday, August 23, with special advertising pages recognizing Alabama Restaurant Week.

We’re also thinking about starting a fund working with facilities that would pay for this kind of energy conservation and renewable energy project. We are thinking about ways that can create creative funding sources to pay for this kind of thing.” —Mike Kensler DIRECTOR OF CAMPUS SUSTAINABILITY OPERATIONS

The Auburn Plainsman A SPIRIT THAT IS NOT AFRAID EDITORIAL

Benjamin Croomes

Advertising deadline – regular paper: Noon, Monday, August 20 Advertising deadline – restaurant guide: Noon, Friday, August 17

The Auburn Plainsman’s popular football preview – GameDay – returns on Thursday, September 20, for the opening home conference game against LSU. Enjoy this and four additional GameDay issues this season!

Robert E. Lee Editor-in-chief Melody Kitchens Managing editor Anna Claire Conrad Copy editor Danielle Lowe Photo editor TJ Harlin Campus editor Rebecca Moseley Campus reporter Andrew Yawn Community editor Zeke Turrentine Community reporter John Holtrop Sports editor rachel suhs Design editor Nathan Simone Online Editor

WELCOME BACK

GAMEDAY

brick like Shelby Center and the rest of campus, but I kind of liked it when it was all black (without the brick),” Coker said. “It looked like the mayor’s quarters in Gotham City.” The inside of Lowder has also received some upgrades. Early this summer, Lowder Lounge, a coffee shop inside Lowder, was opened. Lowder Lounge serves sandwiches, snacks and different types of pastries. There is also a Caribou Coffee inside Lowder Lounge. The project cost $5.5 million, and according to Booth, should be completed by March 2013. “Construction always causes some headaches but I think its going to be the best in the end,” Parrish said. “It’s going to be a great facility for our college of business students.”

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Student Union Suite 1111 Auburn, Al 36849 Editor: 334.844.9021 News: 334.844.9109 General Manager: 334.844.9101 Advertising: 334.844.4130 AUSTIN PHILLIPS Editorial Adviser adviser@theplainsman.com JUDY RIEDL General Manager gm@theplainsman.com KIM RAPE Office Manager MAILING ADDRESS 255 Heisman Drive, Suite 1111 Auburn, Al 36849


Thursday, July 19, 2012

Campus 3

The Auburn Plainsman

Move-In Mania to help new Auburn Family members John Burns WRITER

Each year, thousands of students move into dormotories on campus at Auburn University, and many of those students are freshmen. The new students usually toil with furniture in the heat, having only their family members to help with this staple move in their academic career. However, Auburn has come up with a solution to this reoccurring problem. Auburn’s department of housing and residence life in the division of student affairs will host Move-In Mania this fall in order to make moving in easier on dorm residents. Move-In Mania is a program that utilizes student and faculty volunteers to aid students in the move in process. The dates for Move-In Mania are Sunday, Aug. 5 and Saturday, Aug. 11, from 6:30-11 a.m. at all campus residence halls.

“Move-in Mania is our carefully orchestrated move-in process in early August to make that experience as painless as possible for our soonto-be residents and their parents,” said Kim Trupp, director of housing and residence life. “Students are assigned to move-in [in] waves to minimize congestion, thereby making it easier to move their stuff into their residence halls. University staff and many volunteers from both the campus and greater Auburn community assist with greeting students and helping them move in.” The amount of volunteers is growing exponentially with each passing day, and housing and residence life encourages anyone and everyone to aid the incoming students. “We want to ramp up our effort this year so the newcomers don’t have to move all their belongings in alone,” said Emily Crane, move-in intern for

housing and residence life. “We have more than 250 volunteers now, and we expect that number to climb before Aug. 5.” Potential volunteers should know that there are several jobs that will be required of them should they join the effort. The “movers” will help the students transport their belongings into the dorms while the “greeters” will welcome new residents and families and answer any questions they may have about life on Auburn’s campus. “Refreshment providers” will provide everyone participating in this effort with cold water. Volunteers wiill be needed from 6:30-9 a.m. and 8:30-11 a.m. on both August move-in dates. Along with the reward of helping new members of the Auburn family, volunteers will receive a raffle ticket for every hour they work and a compli-

mentary tee shirt. Incoming freshmen are looking to utilize this unique and free service, especially because it is less time they have to spend out in the heat. “It sounds like a great idea,” said Allison Childress, incoming Auburn freshman. “I’m going to need help when I move in, so I’ll definitely appreciate those volunteers.” Another freshman had a similar outlook. “I have so much stuff to move into my dorm,” said Ann Ashton. “I am glad to know there will be someone there to help me during all that stress.” It goes to show that the volunteer work put forth by the faculty and students will not go unnoticed by the new students. Those interested in volunteering may contact Crane at eac0007@auburn.edu and include his or her name, T-shirt size, email address, preferred position, and shift time.

RACHEL SUHS / DESIGN EDITOR

SGA adviser moves on TJ Harlin

path I’m on right now.

CAMPUS EDITOR

James Winfield, Student Government Association adviser, announced his resignation in an email effective Thursday, July 19. The email discussed his difficult decision to leave the University and student government in pursuit of the advancement of his life and professional career. Winfield agreed to sit down with The Plainsman and discuss his approaching departure. Mr. Winfield, how long have you been at Auburn? From my undergraduate to professional career, I’ve been here for nine years. And how has your experience been? My experience has been mutually beneficial. Auburn has granted me a lot of opportunity. I’ve earned two degrees and got my first professional position working with student government. I aspire to excel within higher education, so that’s something that has been really good for me. What’s your favorite memory associated with Auburn in the nine years that you’ve been here? My favorite thing would have to be my service as a Camp War Eagle counselor. I learned that I wanted to work in higher education. Seeing the staff within the First Year Experience office and how they impacted me really gave me a newfound perspective and an understanding that I could do this for a living and help out students. That overall experience led me to the

What led to your decision to resign? Have you been thinking about this for a while? I can’t say that I had necessarily been thinking about it for a while. Like many professionals in higher education, you start off in a position for a few years and then you move on. Where are you looking to go? Right now that’s not truly definitive. I don’t want to divulge anything, as I’m weighing my opportunities right now. I’ll be letting the institution and others know as soon as everything’s settled. What are your plans for now until you gain a new position? With that, I’m kind of refocusing. In my transition, I’m focusing on those potential opportunities that I have. As I said, I’m not really open to talking about them right now, but that’s my focus. In this time, that’s my focus. I’m not truly concerned about anything else at the moment but that I transition out of my current position and make sure that my executive officers and the student body is fine with all the initiatives and programs going on, so that’s a part of my transition also. Closing things out here, and then coming back and focusing on myself. You discussed making sure that the student body is happy with the programs that you and your staff have implemented over the years. What’s been your biggest achievement or big-

gest program that you’ve implemented in your term? I’ve seen so many things come to fruition during my term as adviser. The implementation of Toomer’s Ten was something that was pivotal, I watched that grow tremendously. The students in SGA seem to have all become more initiative based, which is really cool. Their collaborations with Tiger Dining to insure that the services are meeting the needs of students, that’s been great. The various programs such as Hey Day and the high school leadership conference have been brought to a whole new level. We’re now engaging 300 high school students throughout the state of Alabama and the Southeast on a yearly basis to be engaged in leadership. It’s also a good recruitment tool for Auburn, so I’ve enjoyed seeing these programs grow. What will you miss most about Auburn? We always talk about the Auburn family and the Auburn experience, but the people make that. With that, something we never mention is the Auburn opportunity. Auburn is an institution that has looked out for me. I’m a first-generation college student , a fact that I take much pride in, and Auburn gave me an opportunity. Not only the opportunity to pursue my education, but to (laughs) to convert my family to Auburn fans. That’s just been something that’s been indescribable. I’m going to be back in the fall at football games and partaking in all the traditions that Auburn has.


Opinions

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Thursday, July 19, 2012

Campus

Our View

Humanity is more important than a rivalry

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

... at the end of the day, I feel like Auburn is the place for me and my family ... I am 100 percent confident with my final decision.” — RUEBEN FOSTER Auburn Commit

THE PLAINSMAN POLL Vote at theplainsman.com

We want to take this time to offer our deepest sympathies to our friends and rivals in Tuscaloosa. While we may disagree on many issues, it is important for us to stand together in solidarity and support each other in any way possible when either school or town is the victim of a heinous crime. Unfortunately, we are all too familiar with tragedy of this nature, and we want them to know we have nothing but our sincerest empathy for the victims and their families. In the past, our rivalry with Bama has led us to say and do some mean things, and those ill-spirited deeds have escalated in the past few years. Hopefully, in light of recent trage-

dies, we can all tone down the animosity and adopt a spirit of cooperation. The universities and cities of Tuscaloosa and Auburn have had a tumultuous past two years. Both have been victim to the devastation of tornadoes, although Tuscaloosa suffered infinitely more that the Plains, and both have now experienced the horror of mass shootings. We think now is the time when both schools should put aside their shared trivial enmity and work toward a greater good. We’re not saying the long-standing competition on the football field should expire, not in the least; but the hate and bitterness that has be-

come part of our relationship as competitors certainly needs to stop. If anything, the calamities we have both been forced to endure should remind us that both schools and towns consist of real people, not just victory-obsessed football fanatics. It is these people who hurt the most when tragedy intrudes the safehaven of the places we call home. These events are not about football, and they never will be. There is nothing wrong with a competitive attitude that drives all of us to achieve our greatest potential. However, when fanaticism and hate start to eclipse the humanity of either side, that potential is lost. As we said when the June 9 shoot-

ing happened here in Auburn, we are stunned and at a loss for answers, if there are any to be found. We are more than grateful that no one has lost their lives, and we hope for the best for those still in critical condition. All of us at The Auburn Plainsman want speak on behalf of everyone here, on-and-off campus, and offer our heartfelt sympathy to the victims of this crime, their families and the family that is the University of Alabama. We don’t hate you, Bama; and we hope our bitter rivalry will eventually evolve into a friendly coexistance. Regardless of when that happens, we still have your back.

His View

‘Birther’ movement should tone down and wise up Zeke Turrentine COMMUNITY@ THEPLAINSMAN. COM

Believe it or not, “birthers” are still around. Yes, we’re still dealing with crazies who think every major and most minor news organizations are part of a grand conspiracy to cover up the President of the United States not being eligible for the office. Joe Arpaio, the sherrif of Maricopa county is back in the news saying he has found proof that Obama is not an American citizen. Of course, Arpaio has lost all credibility because of his unconstitutional prison conditions, refusal to cooperate with the Department of Justice and recent acts of racial profiling. You should remember the

beginnings of the “birther” movement from the last presidential campaign. It began when a small group of Hillary Clinton supporters. Around the time Hillary’s campaign started to be the clear loser, anonymous Clintonites distributed chain emails questioning Obama’s citizenship. In the wake of this controversy, Jim Geraghty of the widely-known conservative magazine and website the National Review called for Obama to release his birth certificate. Geraghty said that if Obama didn’t want people to think that he was hiding anything, then he should share his certificate with the nation. Three days later, the Obama campaign posted a short-form birth certificate on the website for Fight the Smears. That document was the one provided by Hawaii and yet somehow critics immediately

said it wasn’t good enough because it wasn’t the “long-form’ certificate. The state of Hawaii explained it had swapped to electronic records in 2001 and didn’t issue long-forms anymore, but that it could find Obama’s in the state’s records house. They did, and the certificate has since been handled and seen by many experts, none of whom have questioned it. Every medical, governmental and judiciary expert who has seen the document has not had a problem with it. Of course this didn’t stop the birthers, who are obviously smarter than those of us who don’t think the world is out to get us and don’t buy into raw conspiracy theories. They claimed it was a digital forgery through Photoshop and didn’t have a raised state seal. Jerome Corsi even wrote a

book about how Obama’s campaign was setting up conspiracy after conspiracy to lie to the American public. He said on Fox News that “it's been shown to have watermarks from Photoshop. It's a fake document.” Alabama Republicans certainly couldn’t let the opportunity to rile up their base pass them by, and in 2009, the Cullman Times reported Senator Richard Shelby was holding a town hall meeting and was asked if Obama was a natural-born citizen. Shelby said, "Well his father was Kenyan, and they said he was born in Hawaii, but I haven’t seen any birth certificate.” Once again, numerous people familiar with grandiose forgeries, Photoshop and Hawaiian officials said it was in fact a legitimate legal document. FactCheck.org dealt with the original papers and has posted lengthy explana-

tions on their website of how it cannot be a fake. Birthers, apparently the most stubborn people in America, still wouldn’t relent. In 2011, Obama, along with the state of Hawaii, released his long-form birth certificate and once again thought the matter settled. Of course, it wasn’t, and the Drudge Report started rerunning the claim that it was a forgery made with Photoshop. Nathan Goulding, chief technology officer of the conservative National Review magazine, said the argument that there are layered components in the White House’s PDF by suggesting that "whoever scanned the birth certificate in Hawaii forgot to turn off the OCR setting on the scanner." He went further and said, "I’ve confirmed that scanning an image, converting it to a PDF, optimizing that PDF, and

then opening it up in Illustrator does, in fact, create layers similar to what is seen in the birth certificate PDF. You can try it yourself at home." By the spring of 2012, a few states still weren’t convinced, and as they were preparing their ballots for election season, Arizona and Mississippi asked Hawaii for verification that Obama was born there. It was provided. Now, this is not to say being in the minority makes you wrong. I also don’t believe in backing down from your beliefs easily. But, please, how about before we buy into something and claim it as a fact, especially as grand a theory as this, do some research? When the people who don’t do any research end up in the spotlight, like the birthers and their 15 minutes of fame, their stupidity shines like sun.

His View

When the Plains turn into mountains: a trip out West Nathan Simone ONLINE@ THEPLAINSMAN. COM

Hey Auburn, how ya been? I bet you didn’t even notice that for the last week I was roaming around the wonderful state of Oregon instead of on the loveliest village on the Plains. What did he say? Oregon? Didn’t we annihilate them in football a couple of years ago? Yes, we did, but Oregon is so much more than a faceless football team somewhere way out in the Pacific Northwest. To me, it’s potentially a new The Editorial Board Robert E. Lee

home. I’ve given it a good deal of thought, and I believe that I might have to move out there pretty soon, but don’t quote me on that. Why, you might ask? Why would anyone move so far away from the hospitable and tropical South? It’s nothing personal, really. I’ve been a man without a true home for awhile. Born in Ohio and largely raised in Atlanta (one of the most northern southern cities), I’ve felt the tugs of the North and South all of my life. Not knowing which region to pledge allegiance to is enough to drive a man to drink…soda. Or, is it pop? Ac-

John Holtrop

EDITOR

SPORTS EDITOR

Melody Kitchens

Rachel Suhs

MANAGING EDITOR

DESIGN EDITOR

Andrew Yawn

Danielle Lowe

NEWS EDITOR

PHOTO EDITOR

TJ Harlin

Anna Claire Conrad

CAMPUS EDITOR

COPY EDITOR

Nathan Simone ONLINE EDITOR

Ben Croomes OPINION EDITOR

tually, it depends on the area. See, the cultural differences are already too crazy to handle! Laughter aside, there is something about the West that has attracted people for centuries and continues to attract me now. Not only does the air smell like pine trees, but I feel like there is a more public exchange of ideas than we are accustomed to seeing in the South. Oregon is a mecca of progressive and eclectic people you will not find anywhere else in the United States. Every hairstyle and tattoo known to man has somehow wound up in Oregon, and

the people who display them know about a myriad of depressing situations that are happening in a distant corner of the world that you should proudly protest against. Each city in the state is nothing like the others, yet they all seem to be concurrently “Oregonian.” Portland may be the exaggerated subject of the televised parodied comedy show “Portlandia,” where everyone rides bikes and questions the authenticity of vegan restaurants; but, seriously, Portland is like that. Eugene is home of the University of Oregon, where, (shockingly) life does not revolve around football. The

whole town rallies around running-related sports, such as cross country and track amd field. Bein the birthplace of Nike, it kind of makes sense. Salem may be the tiniest capitol that I’ve ever been to, and it might have only taken the passing of about four lights before we were in front of the Capitol Building. I’m not even sure that the gold on the dome is real, but I pretend that it is to encourage economic growth. And I love it. As a journalist, I thrive on change. Switch up times, people and landscapes in an instant to make me feel right at home. Oregon does that every day. Where else in the U.S. do

you usually have mountains on one side and the ocean on the other, besides sunny and expensive California? Did I see my share of perfect stereotypes? Yes, but for every overly-liberal Prius tree hugger that I saw in Oregon I’ve seen an ignorant NASCAR-lovin’ F-350 driver in Alabama. You take what you can get. Oregon is one big aura of green and blue with plenty of different people of colors to mix right in. Am I a traitor? Of course not. I saw an eagle fly over Corvallis. Seriously. I may have been bred on the Plains, but when I’m out West, I shout, “Go Ducks!” War Damn Oregon.

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Thursday, July 19, 2012

Community

Chief Dawson looks back on 25 years of service to community Andrew Yawn

ten to his radio and gauge the activities of his larger family. “I’ll wake up sometimes at Becoming chief of the Auburn Police Department was 3 in the morning, turn it on always in the plans for Tom- and see what the guys are domy Dawson. ing,” Dawson said. Sunday, July 15 marked the As Dawson recounts the 25th anniversary of Dawson’s most memorable cases in his first day donning the blue and career – the death of Lauren beginning an illustrious ca- Burke and the fatal shootreer serving the Auburn com- ing of the three young men at munity. University Heights– it’s clear Sitting in his office at the that he feels responsible for police station the tragedies he on North Ross had no power to Street, Dawstop. son reminisced “You can go about his 1987 home, but you job interview can’t sleep,” with Bill HoldDawsone said. er, who was the “It wouldn’t be chief of police right for me to at the time. be home sleepDAWSON “Chief Bill ing when the Holder asked guys are out me what I wanted to do and I here working and a mama said, “Well, eventually I’d like and a daddy are somewhere to be chief of police here at crying,.” Auburn,” Dawson said. During the aftermath of Dawson begun his working the June 9 shooting, varilife as a construction worker ous reports on the manhunt and later on as a Wal-Mart and the status of the victims employee. were permeating the mediaNot feeling fulfilled in ei- sphere. ther of those professions, he And yet, it was Dawson decided to become a police who kept the chaos organized officer. as he informed the public of Dawson, however, did not all necessary and factual inview the Auburn Police de- formation in his trademark partment as a job. measured, Southern accent, “If you’re in it for a job, all the while aching at the you’re in the wrong business,” losses himself. Dawson said. “It’s a calling.” One of the people Dawson The son of a Baptist minis- called that night, Montgomter, Dawson was instilled with ery Police Chief Kevin Mura desire to help his communi- phy, said he had nothing but ty from an early age. the utmost respect for his AuNot wanting to become burn compatriot. a pastor, Dawson aspired “I thought he provided the to follow in the footsteps of city of Auburn and the memthose he admired to serve the bers of his department with town he loved in the best way outstanding leadership durhe knew how: becoming the ing very troubling times,” chief of police. Murphy said. His cousin Edwin Dawson Auburn has sensed this was chief of police for a num- passion and have respondber of years, and Dawson said ed in turn, most recently he always looked up to him with a bevy of letters, emails, and his fellow officers. phone calls and an employee When Sgt. John Davis of the month award from the spoke to a young Dawson’s city thanking Dawson for his 3rd grade class, Dawson knew work on the case. he had found his calling. However, Dawson remains “From that day on, it was humble. the career I wanted to pur“The group of officers we sue, (because) he left such got here, they give their all; an impression on me,” Daw- so that’s the people I’d like to son said. see get the most credit for it,” Dawson finally achieved Dawson said. his goal on July 7, 2010, Becoming chief was nevwith the retirement of for- er about the power, the monmer Chief of Police Frank de ey or the prestige for DawGraffenreid, another one of son. It’s about taking care of Dawson’s heroes. his own. “I was just humbled,” Daw“If I can save one life or son said.   “I had received a turn one around, I feel like lot of awards, and everytime my whole 25 years have I made rank in the depart- been worth it,” Dawson said. ment I was humbled and felt “What I try to look at is not if extremely blessed, extremely you’re good at your job, but thankful.” are you a good person.” Already married to his wife For a man that has seen too Candy and father of his then much blood, death and tears, 17-year-old daughter Hannah he has learned not to take life while also caring for 12 goats, for granted and has devoted a brood of chickens and a his life to doing exactly what brace of ducks, Dawson took the shield on his chest sugthe helm of the police force gests: protecting. and extended his care to the As for the students, in the newest members of his fami- area, Dawson has a message ly: the citizens of Auburn. intended directly for them. “I feel very responsible ( for “If any student has a probthe community),” Dawson lem, email me with it and I’ll said.  “The day I can come in get someone on it or get on it here and not feel responsible myself,” Dawson said. “This is for this community [means] just as much their police deit’s time for me to get out of partment as anybody.” this business.” For questions or concerns, Even when he’s at home, contact Chief Dawson at Dawson feels the need to lis- tdawson@auburnalabama. COMMUNITY EDITOR

CONTRIBUTED

From left to right: Yogafly instructors Kate Kirby, Peach Dumars and Jessica Carry.

Residents take flight at new yoga studio Andrew Yawn COMMUNITY EDITOR

Monday, July 9, saw the opening of Auburn’s first pure yoga studio. Located downtown, the Yogafly studio is nestled in a loft above Behind the Glass clothing boutique. There, customers can flex, bend and find inner peace while looking through the window onto the bustle of Magnolia Street below. However, the name Yogafly doesn’t refer to feeling you get from leaning too far over the street, according to co-owner Peach Dumars. “That’s our motto because [in] this style of yoga we teach you feel like you’re flying,” Dumars said. “You breathe; you

move quickly; and when you get into the flow it’s like a beautiful dance.” Dumars and her business partner Jessica Carry both moved to Auburn to support their husbands’ careers, and now they have begun their own. They, along with Auburn native Kate Kirby, teach three different styles of yoga. The power vinyasa class is a dynamic, flowing style of yoga, according to Dumars, and it will make you sweat your stress away while binding your breathing to your movements. The second option, called slow flow, is less comprehensive and focuses on building towards one peak, advanced postion.

Lastly, the three offer yin yoga, which is a passive, relaxing style of yoga highlighted by deep stretches. While the classes sound unusual, Dumars points out that each class is a balance of the relaxation of meditation and the intensity of a workout. “I would not describe one class as being easier than the others [...,] but they challenge you in totally different ways,” Dumars said. Due to their recent opening, Yogafly is also offering a special $12 for 12 days deal where customers can go to as many yoga classes as they want in a 12-day span. One such member, Aaron Nette, senior in nursing, has been to four classes so far and

enjoys the classes’ quality. “[The instructors] are great, knowledgable and very nonjudgemental towards my inflexibility,” Nette said. The location downtown is also a positive in his eyes. “It’s a really good class, and it’s really close to where I live,” Nette said. “I enjoy it a lot.” For those who think yoga is simply lying on the floor meditating, Dumars contests that their classes offer a bit more than expected. “It’s not your mama’s yoga. Come give it a chance,” Dumars said. “[We] bring a lot of fun and funk to the class.” For more information on Yogafly, checkout their Facebook page at www.facebook. com/YogaflyStudio.

AU Veterinary, Hanger Clinic successfully pin the leg on the donkey

Zeke Turrentine COMMUNITY BEAT REPORTER

Today, Emma is 11 weeks old, and loves running around, especially to show off when guests are watching. However, she was born looking a little different than your average donkey. Emma is a miniature donkey, which means she is more petite than the average donkey. She was also plagued with a severe congenital hind limb deformity. The charming foal arrived at the John Thomas Vaughan Large Animal Teaching Hospital along with her owner, Cece Smith, who is also a technician at the hospital, at just two days old and was prepped for amputation and the placement of a prosthetic leg. The College of Veterinary Medicine and the Hanger Clinic teamed up to perform the surgery. Both are hoping Emma will help find answers to prolonging the life of horses and donkeys that have birth defects or are severely injured. Equine surgeon Dr. Fred Caldwell, an assistant professor in the department of clinical sciences, performed the surgery, and, along with Billy Fletcher of the Hanger Clinic, created a prosthetic limb for Emma’s injured hind leg. The limb needed to be strong and stable, yet flexible and light. So, the team went with carbon fiber, Kevlar and fiberglass: the same materials used to create many prostheses made for war veterans and Paralympic athletes, as well as other famous amputee animals. The Hanger Clinic notably made the prosthetic tail for Winter, the dolphin star of the

It has been a group effort on behalf of many caring individuals willing to go to great lengths to save her.” —Dr. Fred Caldwell DEPARTMENT OF CLINICAL SCIENCES

COURTESY OF THE WAR EAGLE READER

Miniature donkey Emma was fitted with a prosthetic leg by the College of Veterinary Medicine and the Hanger Clinic. Hanger notably made the prosthetic tail for Winter, the dolphin in the film “Dolphin Tail.”

2011 film “Dolphin Tale” starring Harry Connick, Jr., Ashley Judd and Morgan Freeman. “Billy was excited and enthusiastic to assist,” Caldwell said. “Once we amputated the limb, he provided a small footplate to incorporate into the cast to even out the length of her hind limbs so she could bear weight until we could get the surgical site healed.” Caldwell said he was proud of the way the hospital employees have worked together. “It has been a group effort on behalf of many caring individuals willing to go to great lengths to save her,” Caldwell said. The large weight of a horse or a full-size donkey, as well as the relative rarity of congenital defects in equines, makes applying prostheses to large equines an uncommon medical practice. Luckily, Emma is only expected to weigh 350 pounds when fully matured. Caldwell is hopefully she

will experience no problems with the leg, and Emma seems to be doing just fine thus far. “She hasn’t known anything other than the prosthesis,” Caldwell said. “She absolutely loved it from the get-go. It was a very impressive design, and she did very well in it. She is getting stronger. She’s growing and doing wonderfully.” Fletcher is a clinician who works at the Opelika and Columbus, Ga. Hanger Clinic locations. He said Emma may go through eight or nine different sizes and types of prosthetics before she is done growing. “The next step is trying to make sure we keep the prosthesis set up so she’s ambulatory and she can run and play and do things uninhibitedly, but to also keep the area of concern, the surgical site, offloaded so Dr. Caldwell can do his job in keeping her completely healed,” Fletcher said. “As time goes by, we’ll continue to provide a prosthe-

sis that’s going to allow for growth. We want to provide her with full range of motion, but also give her the ability to use full strength. I think she’s got that in her current set-up. So, the big thing now is keeping everything offloaded so she heals completely. Fletcher also said he and his collaborators will continue to increase the size of Emma’s prosthesis as she grows. “Obviously, we don’t plan these kinds of things, but it’s a great opportunity to learn when something like this comes up,” Caldwell said. This was the first procedure of its kind at Auburn, according to Caldwell. “Every opportunity [when] we have with a case like this, I think we get a little closer to being able to consider this [as] a viable option,” Caldwell said, in reference to the impact of this case on future horse injuries. “It’s been very educational for me as an equine surgeon.” Caldwell also said he believes there is still a long way to go before it can become a routine surgery, “but for a prosthetic limb to be an option in horses is something that’s pretty exciting.”

If you’re in it for a job, you’re in the wrong business.” —Tommy Dawson AUBURN POLICE CHIEF


Thursday, July 19, 2012

Community 6

The Auburn Plainsman

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New waste rendering process turns slaughter house trash into treasure Summer Austin WRITER

Rather than wasting common by-products, a new agricultural rendering process has developed at Auburn University that converts the offal into a valuable commodity.  The by-products come from the entrails, skin, heads, and bones left over in slaughter houses and poultry plants.  In the past, the rendering process has involved cooking the waste down, which produces high-strength wastewater that must be properly disposed of. However, the Agricultural Byproduct Value Recovery System developed in partnership by Ken Mosley and Rick Renninger and finetuned by Dr. Jesse Chappell, assistant professor in the department of fisheries and aquaculture within the college of agriculture, dehydrates the material and produces a dry meal in approximately 60 seconds.   This process results in three products: water vapor from the dehydration process, dry meal and lipid oil, all of which have been separated in a press. It eliminates the noxious smell associated with the wastewater and improves air quality, according to Chappell. “This new ABVRS process produces no wastewater [or] smell. As a result, I think it will ultimately be adopted and more broadly [used] over the years,” Chappell said.   Mosley, a 1971 Auburn graduate working in industrial processes and engineering in Birmingham, said the idea for the process originated from previous patents he had in the 90s regarding disposal of wastewater from food processing plants.

  Mosley said he thought some of the previous ideas could apply to a new process that would recover catfish offal without creating a large amount of waste that is detrimental to the environment. He said his business partner and fellow engineer Renninger was extremely helpful in the mechanics of developing the process.   According to Mosley, the Alabama Department of Environmental Management and the Environmental Protection Agency had positive reactions to ABVRS. He said with every 1,000 pounds of offal about 700 pounds of water are used to cook it, and, consequentially, that immense amount of water ends up being wastewater. “Our process evaporates [the water] and sifts it off as clean steam,” Mosley said. According to Chappell, the ADEM and the EPA have watched the ABVRS process and measured the emissions from the machinery. He said the agencies were surprised that there was little to no emission from the process.  “We were trying to be proactive with the environmental groups so they understood where we were coming from and how our process is different from what’s done conventionally,” Mosley said. “They liked what they saw. They were very receptive to what we did.” The process could also improve Alabama’s economy because it turns something “noxious” and “cost-setting” into an income, according to Chappell. He also said the processor will retain the value of the material and producers will get

more for their product. Mosley said catfish producers were previously spending over $1 million a year in freight to ship waste to Mississippi. Mosely also said he recognized that Alabama needed its own facility and developed a process that would allow that while also being more environmentally conscious. The process can be applied to any agricultural by-product. The process will also be utilized at plants in Alabama, whereas waste products was previously hauled away to Sunflower, Miss. Chappell said the technol-

This new ABVRS process produces no wastewater and no smell. As a result, I think it will ultimately be adopted and more broadly over the years.” —Dr. Jesse Chappell DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE

ogy is timely because the cost of diesel fuel is so high that plants need a process in which the waste can be utilized instead of hauling it away. The process will ultimately end up being cheaper as well, according to Chappell. Chappell said both the traditional cooking process and the new ABVRS process re-

quire energy to either cook down or dehydrate the waste. The difference between the two is that the wastewater not only has to be disposed of with the traditional method, but the plant expends energy to build lagoons to aerate and assimilate the waste load. The ABVRS process can also be made portable with only a few wheels, which is beneficial to coastal areas that might need to move machinery in event of a hurricane.  The technology is currently leased to Kyser Family Farms near Greensboro, Ala. from Falcon Protein Products Incorporated. Falcon Protein Products Inc. is the parent company established by Mosley and Renninger and other shareholders to commercialize their entity. The technology is licensed to Falcon Protein Products Inc. from the University, which owns the patent. According to Chappell, Auburn is a major shareholder in Falcon Protein Products Inc.. Chappell also said another plant in Illinois is interested in the technology as well to turn waste into fish meal while simultaneously removing it from the Mississippi River. Mosley said the two potential future processes he is working on involve removing clam and black fly larva wastes vrom the water.  “We’re hoping to further demonstrate our technology on campus at the University,” Mosley said. Mosley said he and his partners are negotiating with the University to get the process moved on campus to help it fluorish and gained some welldeserved attention.


Sports Thursday, July 19, 2012

7 www.theplainsman.com

Sports

Tigers feed the wolves at SEC Media Days John Holtrop SPORTS EDITOR

With the 2012 football season looming in the near horizon, Auburn coach Gene Chizik and players had their first chance to meet and talk with media on topics ranging from the June 9, shooting to the new four-team playoff on day two of the SEC Media Days at the Wynfrey Hotel in Hoover. Auburn’s time slot opened up with comments from Chizik thanking everyone for their support and consideration throughout the offseason. “I’d like to take this opportunity to start out to thank, first opportunity I’ve had to publicly thank, so many people for their outpouring of love, prayers, emails and phone calls to the Auburn family,” Chizik said. “I’m very proud of our football team. I think in the midst of some very difficult times they’ve really bonded together and done a great job trying to move forward.” Chizik said even though his players still had a ways to go in the healing process, they were doing everything they could. Moving on to what more than 1100 members of the media came out for, Chizik talked about issues on the field and what can be expected in 2012. He started with the momentum and confidence gained from the Chick-fil-

ROBERT E. LEE / EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Top: Coach Gene Chizik spoke at SEC Media Days in Hoover on Wednesday. In his opening statement, Chizik said how grateful he was for the support the team received in regards to the June 9 shooting. Right: Defensive end Corey Lemonier spoke at SEC Media Days and said the new playoff system should work well and an extra game would not be an issue.

A Bowl win over Virginia on Dec. 31, 2011. “You might ask, ‘Well, a year before you played in the national championship, now you’re in the Chick-fil-A Bowl,’” Chizik said. “But it was a very big moment for us because that night there were a lot of young football players that stepped up to the plate, and we beat a very good football team in Virginia.” The Tigers enter the season with 16 returning starters, six of whom are seniors. A number Chizik said may not reflect the true depth of a lot of positions. “The truth of the matter is we have guys, in many cases, right behind those guys that are considered one of the starters pushing them for a starting job,” Chizik said. “We certainly have a few question marks at some positions. But again, I think if you go back and look over the previous three years, we’ve got guys right now that are pushing for jobs.” As the press conference opened up to questions, the quarterback situation was a hot-button topic that remained unresolved. “The situation in general is probably everything you know it is, it’s up for grabs,” Chizik said. “We’re looking for the guy that can take Auburn and lead them to win football games. Kiehl is strongly considered in the mix, I think he’s grown

a lot as a football player. “It’s going to be a battle. Obviously in two-a-days is when that is going to be decided.” Senior wide receiver Emory Blake will play a major role in the success of the offense as well as the quarterback selected to start the season against Clemson. “Kiehl has come a long way, but Clint has gotten better as well,” Blake said. “Coach Loeffler is such a quarterback guru. The way he talks to them, expects them to do their job and go through progressions with the ball. I see the way he talks with them and it makes them better quarterbacks.” When asked if a quarterback has an edge has in the decision, Blake laughed and said simply, “No, good try though.” Joining Blake were senior tight end Philip Lutzenkirchen and junior defensive end Corey Lemonier. Chizik said the decision to bring the three came down to not just what they accomplished on the field, but how they carry themselves. “They’re great students and really worked hard at it,” Chizik said. “They work hard off the field in terms of the weight room, trying to be leaders on our team. I think it’s well deserved.”

» For more photos and video coverage of this event visit us online at: www.theplainsman.com

Fostering hope for ‘13 recruiting class John Holtrop SPORTS@ THEPLAINSMAN.COM

The Auburn Tigers football team may be in for an exciting 2013 recruiting class. As it stands today, the Tigers’ recruiting class is ranked No. 11 according to Rivals. They are dangerously close to breaking into the top 10 and staying there until National Signing Day. The biggest pickup that may change everything is the commitment from five-star inside linebacker Reuben Foster. Foster, a 6-foot-2 228 pound transfer from Lagrange, Ga. to Auburn High School, flip-flopped his commitment from Alabama to Auburn. This switch may change the 2013 recruiting landscape for a couple reasons. It starts with a little “get back” at the Crimson Tide. The impressively-dressed Foster sat behind a microphone at the Auburn High School cafeteria last Thursday, July 12, spoke only a few words and declined to answer questions. What came out was an unverified, but assumed, shot at the in-state rivals. “I have a lot of respect for Alabama and the coaches and all the other people that are there,” Foster said. “But at the end of the day, I felt like Auburn University is the place for me and my family and had the best situation for me and my family. I am 100 percent confident with my final decision. I feel great about my decision, and I’m excited to get started.” These were the final words spoken at the press conference and were almost verbatim to T.J. Yeldon’s, a 2012 running back recruit that switched from Auburn to Alabama. In a time when Iron Bowl

banter is all speculation in hopes of a successful season, Foster provided Auburn fans and coaches a bit of payback. Rest assured that the new tattoo Foster sported at last weekend’s Auburn Mini-Camp II should guarantee the stability of his commitment. The No. 2 overall recruit according to Rivals could also sway the decisions of other potential recruits. It has been reported that Foster has close relationships with four-star tight end Alabama commit O.J. Howard; four-star safety, Georgia commit Tray Matthews; and four-star running back, 2014 recruit Bo Scarborough. Howard and Matthews are both in the Rivals100. The obvious impact Foster will have is on the field. He’s big. He’s fast. He’s an allaround monster at the linebacker position. The videos speak for themselves. Foster is a down-hill player that makes blockers seem irrelevant. He also excels in coverage making him a threat to any offense. In 2011 Foster racked up 185 tackles and 14 sacks at Troup County High School in LaGrange, fitting numbers for a recruit of his caliber. Foster will join 15 other verbal commits in 2013, nine of which are defensive players. Most notably are five-star defensive linemen Dee Liner and Carl Lawson. Foster is also the fourth linebacker to commit, joining four-star Trey Johnson, three-star Jarrad Davis and three-star Cameron Toney. Newly appointed defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder should look forward to the added depth and talent to his linebacker corps as the already thin roster consists of two seniors and one junior. As exciting as recruitment is, Auburn will have to wait for the 2013 recruiting class to have their time to shine.

RACHEL SUHS / DESIGN EDITOR

Auburn persists as Penn State falls John Holtrop SPORTS EDITOR

As the college football world tries to make sense of what went down in State College, Pa., universities and their athletic departments across the nation are forced to put their own programs under the microscope. Auburn University is no exception. To put together what is known, on Nov. 5, 2011, former Penn State University defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky was arrested after being arraigned on 40 criminal counts. Now, fast forward to June 22, 2012. Sandusky was found guilty on 45 of the 48 counts related to sexual abuse of boys over a 15-year period. As if the actions of Sandusky were not enough, last week former FBI Director David Freeh released a report of his investigation to the public. The report condemned former PSU President Graham Spanier, former Athletic Director Tim Curley, former Senior Vice President Gary Shultz and the late football coach Joe Paterno for the cover-up of Sandusky’s actions. One of the most damnable things reported was the plan that Curley, Spanier and Shultz drew up that called for the reporting on Sandusky. After talking with Paterno, it was documented that the

plan was scrapped. Though Paterno may have been more influential than Auburn’s own Gene Chizik, it brings up the question of how much pull do our own coaches have, especially in the face of a potentially damaging scandal. Senior Associate Athletic Director for External Affairs Scott Carr said Auburn’s rules and procedures are clear and unwavering. “We have great lines of communications with all of our coaches, but the athletic department makes the final decision on everything,” Carr said. “We, of course, respect our coaches’ opinions, but [we] don’t allow them to dictate what we do here.” Auburn’s athletic department has not made many changes to the way things are run in response to the PSU scandal. The lack of change is not from ignorance, but rather the continuance of practices that have been in motion for more than two years. “It comes down to a culture that [Athletic Director] Jay Jacobs has created here at Auburn,” Carr said. “He has spent numerous years creating an environment that doesn’t allow illegal and immoral actions to occur. In all of his years, he has let the staff know if they see it, report it.” Carr said the athletic department holds one mandatory staff meeting per month

reminding its employees to speak up and utilize EthicsPoint thorughout the academic year. According to EthicsPoint Inc., it is a simple and anonymous way for employees to confidentially report activities that may involve certain improper conduct. “It gives everyone in our office the ability to report things at their own comfort, even if it is anonymously,” Carr said. “We don’t want anyone to be afraid to speak up for any reason.” Outside of the athletics department, the University has also tweaked procedures as well as continue its means of preventing and reporting on campus issues. “One of the first things that we did was put together a committee relating to minors on campus,” said Auburn University President Jay Gogue. “They oversee the camp groups, summer athletics, science camps, and similar oncampus events that host children. They then come back to us and recommend changes. Their overall goal is to ensure the safety and well-being of underage participants at Auburn.” Gogue said his office studied information, looked into procedures and policies to make sure its risk management was up to par. Beyond the discretion of

employees, the situation the Freeh Report illuminated is the actions taken by those in charge in response to a scandal that could tarnish a program’s and a university’s image. Where is the line drawn between what is morally right and on-field production? Carr said the line is clear and never crossed. “We have a mission statement that has two absolute values on it: always tell the truth and treat others as you expect to be treated,” Carr said. “We always elect to do the right thing, even at the expense of wins and losses.” Gogue said he is confident that Auburn athletes are not treated differently as students. “There is (just) as much priority placed on graduation as anything else,” Gogue said. “Things like APR and GPA are constantly monitored, and we make that clear in the contract that all student-athletes sign. This is bigger than sports.” If students would like to report anything that may seem out of place or illegal regarding students, athletes, coaches, or anyone on campus and affiliated with the University, contact EthicsPoint at 866294-4871. Gogue and Carr said their doors are always open if a student ever needs to talk about a crime or incident that warrants reporting.


Sports 8

The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, July 19, 2012

A week of Auburn sports All- A total of 64 Auburn student-athletes have been named to the 2011-2012 Southeastern Conference FirstYear Academic Honor Roll to rank as third in the league, announced Thursday, July 12, by SEC Commissioner Mike Slive. Baseball- Sophomore centerfielder Ryan Tella has turned down the San Francisco Giants as an 11th-round selection in the MLB draft. Tella was voted Second Team All-SEC by the league’s coaches. He led Auburn and was fourth in the SEC with a .360 batting average. He also ranked among the conference leaders in slugging percentage (.508, 11th), on base percentage (.448, sixth), hits (85, fourth), triples ( four, tied-fifth), total bases (120, seventh), walks (35, tied-eighth) and stolen bases (17, tied-third). In league-only games, Tella placed seventh in batting average (.333), tied for third in hits (41) and tied for fifth in stolen bases (six).

-The Allstate Insurance Company and the American Football Coaches Association announced Lutzenkirchen as one of 117 nominees for the 2012 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team. This award recognizes a select group of college football players committed to making a difference in their communities. -Lutzenkirchen and Lemonier were also named to the 2012 Lombardi Award watch list. This award is given to the nation’s top lineman or linebacker.

ROBERT E. LEE / EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Five-star linebacker Reuben Foster after his press conference.

Men’s Basketball- Former forward Kenny Gabriel played for the Sacramento Kings in the NBA’s Las Vegas Summer League at the Thomas & Mack Center and Cox Pavilion. The Kings played five games, which were all televised on NBA TV in seven days.

-Five-star linebacker Reuben Foster from Auburn High School switched his commitment from Alabama to Auburn last Thursday, July 12. This brings Auburn’s total 2013 verbal commitments to 16, three of which are fivestar recruits.

Football- The first SEC BeachFest will be held Aug 23-26, 2012, along the Alabama Gulf Coast in Gulf Shores and Orange Beach. National Championship winning SEC coaches Gene Chizik, Nick Saban, and Les Miles will be in attendance to rally SEC fans one last time before the 2012 season kickoff. Retired coach appearances include Pat Dye of Auburn, Gene Stallings of The University of Alabama, Vince Dooley of The University of Georgia and Phillip Fulmer of The University of Tennessee.

-Placekicker Cody Parkey is one of thirty players to make the 2012 Lou Groza College Place-Kicker Award watch list, presented by the Palm Beach County Sports Commission.

-Five Auburn players have been named to the 2012 SEC preseason Coaches All-SEC Team. Junior defensive end Corey Lemonier and senior tight end Philip Lutzenkirchen were selected for the first team. Senior wide receiver Emory Blake and junior punter Steven Clark were named to the second team. Senior linebacker Daren Bates was chosen for the third team.

-Punter Steven Clark is one of 25 players to be named to the 2012 Ray Guy Award watch list, which honors the nation’s top collegiate punter. -Lemonier is one of 84 players to be named to the 2012 Bronko Nagurski Trophy watch list, which recognizes the nation’s best defensive player awarded by the Football Writers Association of America. -Blake was named to the 2012 Bilentnikoff Award watch list, which recognizes the most outstanding receiver in college football.

-Auburn will face Mississippi State University in Starkville, Miss. at 11 a.m. on Sept. 8. The Tigers will play their first home game versus The University of Louisiana at Monroe at 11:21 a.m. on Sept. 15. The season kicks off versus Clemson in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta on Sept. 1 at 6 p.m. Men’s Golf- Former golfer Jason Dufner has been named to the 156-man field for the 141st Open Championship at Royal Lytham & St. Anne’s in Lancashire, England. It runs July 19-22. Dufner has finished in the top five in the last three tournaments he has played, including a fourth-place finish at the U.S. Open. Dufner enters the Open Championship ranked third in the FedEx Cup and ranked seventh in the world. Women’s Basketball- The women’s basketball team will travel to Australia Aug. 4-14 for a tour that includes stops in Cairns, Brisbane and Sydney. As part of the trip, the Tigers will play games against the Logan Thunder, Cairns Dolphins, Sydney Flames and Sutherland Sharks. Softball- ESPN’s high school signee Lexi Davis was named ESPNHS National Player of the Year after posting a 33-1 record as a pitcher and leading Porter Ridge High School Indian Trail, N.C. to the Class 4A state championship. Davis was also named the Gatorade State Player of the Year in North Carolina after the 2012 spring season. She is one of seven incoming freshman that will begin their collegiate careers in the fall of 2012.

To Place an Ad, Call - 334-844-7928 or Email classifieds@theplainsman.com

FOR RENT Nice 1BR Apartment Attached to a House. Unfurnished garage apartment in a quiet, wooded single-family neighborhood. High ceilings, walk-in closet. Everything included. Looking for quiet, responsible student. Aug. 1st. 1-yr lease. Email mehtash@auburn.edu

Trailer for Rent. 50 Lee Road 952 (Off Wire Road) Saddlebrook I Trailer Park. (Approx. 4 ½ miles from Vet School) 2Br/2Ba. W/D.Available Immediately $450.00 Deposit/$450.00 per month. Call (334) 319-2082 $500RENT except electric.1999trailer 3bd,2bth AllAppliances,All Electric. FOR SALE$15,000 OBO. PETandHORSE friendly!!Quite neighborhood.10 min drive toAUonHwy280. Email:coygirl15@yahoo. Roommates wanted 2 males needed to share 3br furnished apt near AU. Own room + shared bath :$250mo + utl. Own room +own bath: $300/mo + utl. Contact Andrew: 310-702-6152; winslow.a@gmail.com Email winslettes@aol.com

Print Deadline Noon three business days prior to publication

ROOMMATE WANTED 2012/2013 Looking for Male Roommate to share 2BR, 1BA ap’t. Just $295 + utilities, Just 2 blocks from Campus and Downtown. Great Shape--Full Kitchen, separate dining + large living area. Call 757-8483774 or email ejc0012@tigermail.auburn.edu Email dkclbi@aol.com Female Roommate Needed Private bedroom/bath. 3BR townhome in Creekside. Rent includes utilities, new gym, wireless internet, tanning bed, beautiful pool and many other amenities. We are on the Tiger Transit Route. Rent is $495/ month with a 12 month signed lease. Call Anna 334-7509659 for more information. Email aed0008@auburn.edu

EMPLOYMENT AmeriCorps Opportunity Full-time and Part-time positions available from September 1, 2012-August 31, 2013 in Alabama (Auburn, Opelika, Phenix City, and Sylacauga). Receive a living stipend and education award for college. Engage in the community by serving non-profits, schools, American Red Cross, Boys & Girls Clubs, SAFE in Sylacauga, Cora Reid Greene Home for Children, and/or Employers’ Child Care Alliance. Interested applicants should attend an information session on July 27th 9-10 a.m. OR 2-3 p.m. at 510 S. 7th Street Opelika. e-mail: americorps@ ccrc-alabama.org

WANTED Roommates wanted 2 males needed to share 3br furnished apt near AU. Own room + shared bath :$250/ mo + utl. Own room +own bath: $300/mo + utl. Contact Andrew: 310-702-6152; winslow.a@gmail.com Email winslettes@aol.com Please Recycle your Plainsman

WANTED Manuscripts wanted! Prof ’l. editor & writer: thesis/dissertation, APA, MLA. Expert tutor: English, writing, essays, grammar. Email englishttr1@gmail.com

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not know-ingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

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The Auburn Plainsman is not responsible for the content of the ads. Ads that seem too good to be true usually are.

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07.19.2012 edition of The Auburn Plainsman