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Two guys trying to get a hug from Taylor Swift C1

Campus Drag Show B1

New cable and phone company in Auburn A4

The Auburn Plainsman A Spirit That Is Not Afraid

THURSDAY, April 8, 2010

Vol. 116, Issue 25 32 Pages

www.theplainsman.com

Goo Goo Dolls bring ‘Better Days’ to Auburn LAURA MAXWELL ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

The Goo Goo Dolls will be headlining the University Program Council-sponsored concert Wednesday, April 28. Doors will open at 7 p.m., and the concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. with the band’s opener, Sister Hazel. The Rocket Summer has been touring with the Goo Goo Dolls and will open for the band as well. Tickets will be available April

21. There will be stations on the Haley Concourse, Lowder and Miller Gorrie Center. Tickets are free, but in order to get one students need to have their student IDs in hand. Tickets will be given to about 8,000 students. Students will need to bring their IDs along with their tickets in order to get into the concert. “It’s going to be in the Coliseum, as usual,” said Paul Bagley, the director of major entertainment for UPC.

He said there will be at least 1,000 people allowed on the floor. “We’re not going to have the chairs anymore,” Bagley said. “There’s going to be a lot more floor space—more of a concert feel.” The spots on the floor will be first come, first serve. Those individuals will be provided with wristbands. Everyone else will be in seats. “Something the Goo Goo Dolls do is they like to give back,”

said Sharne’ Rice, president of UPC. “So we’re asking students to bring a canned good to the concert, and it will be given to East Alabama Food Bank.” Students can drop the cans off in bins by the door on the way in, Rice said. “Previously we’ve tried to do more things that are new,” Bagley said. “We were going with new stuff, and now I’m trying to go with stuff that may be a little bit older, but stuff that’s good for

Auburn,” Bagley said. He explained he didn’t come up with the bands off the top of his head. There were major entertainment surveys given out to about 2,000 students. UPC also had a billboard for major entertainment, kind of like the SGA’s Campaign Complain billboards, where they got suggestions from students on performers they would be inter> Turn to UPC, A2

Muddin’ for Marines Jared Waters / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Crosswalk signs have been put in place as part of Auburn’s “Travel With Care” initiative.

Participants ran, crawled through mud to support Marines of Auburn

City bolsters ‘traveling with care’ DANIEL CHESSER

MIRANDA DOLLARHIDE WRITER

Rod Guajardo/ MANAGING EDITOR

A female participant grabs an orange after finishing the Mud Run course on Saturday.

Off-road trails, waist-high creeks and huge mud pits might sound like obstacles from boot camp from hell, but for the contestants of the Amphibious Warrior Mud Run these challenges were part of the fun. Aubie even got in on the action, crawling through the mud to show his support. Hosted by the Marines of Auburn, the Amphibious Warrior Mud Run consisted of a 5K and 10-mile run which raised money for the Wounded Warrior Project and the Auburn University Marines. Twenty percent of the proceeds go toward the Wounded Warrior

Rod Guajardo / MANAGING EDITOR

Firefighter Jason Eversull hoses down the participants at the end of the obstacle run.

Project, which was created to support service members severely wounded in combat. “We wanted to show our respect and let them know they aren’t forgotten,“ said Gunnery Sgt. John Hunter. The Mud Run raised more than $2,000 for the Wounded Warrior Project and hosted 488 runners from a variety of states, including Auburn, Virginia, North Carolina and Maryland. The day of the run, 170 participants signed up. With 12 students currently enlisted in the Marines, Major Jeff Dyal, Marine officer instructor, said sponsoring the Wounded Warriors Project allowed them to see and understand the price they paid for their fellow country men and women. Hunter said they wanted to host the Mud Run, not only to raise money for the Wounded Warrior Project, but also to create awareness of the Marines’ involvement in the community. “We want people to talk about this,” Hunter said. “ We want it to be a run where kids and the family can have fun.” The Mud Run started at the Auburn intramural fields and wound through three miles of obstacles, including hills, mud and a surprise water balloon ambush sprung by the Auburn Mariners, which is a support group for the Marines of > Turn to MUD, A2

ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR

The kickoff of a new campaign hopes to encourage safety awareness for pedestrians and drivers alike in Auburn. The City of Auburn and Auburn University has teamed up to tackle this issue in light of recent occurrences of people being struck by cars on Magnolia Avenue and College Street. “It has been a long ongoing relationship between the city and between Auburn, the campus, to look at all forms of safety,” said Auburn University President Jay Gogue. “We were concerned in the last year or so. We have had a number of pedestrian accidents and car-related incidents, and so our goal has been to work together to recognize the educational efforts, enforcement efforts and engineering solutions to the problem.” Gogue encourages people to know the rules and comply to traveling safely in Auburn. Mayor Bill Ham, Gogue and Aubie along with other city and University officials gathered under the toilet-papered trees of Toomer’s Corner Monday to introduce the week-long safety campaign. “We are obviously here to talk about an event that really started in June of ’09,” Ham said “And that is utilizing some stimulus funds for pedestrian safety.” The campaign is called “Travel With Care” under the slogan “However you go, go safely.” “This is actually a duplicate, just a revamp of some of our past campaigns,” said Brandy Ezelle, traffic engineer for the City of Auburn. “This is not anything new to us, but we are just getting a lot more publicity out of it this time due to the re> Turn to TRAVEL, A2

INDEX

News A3 Opinions A6

Campus B1 Intrigue C1 Arts & Entertainment C3 Wasting Time C8 Sports D1


The Auburn Plainsman

News, A2

DUI Arrests in the City of Auburn April 1, - April 4, 2010

Thursday, april 8, 2010

CRIME REPORTS March 28, - April 4, 2010 March 28, North Ross Street – Theft of property reported. One black 42” Vizio Plasma TV and one Apple Macbook Pro.

March 30, 500 Block of Webster Road – Theft reported. One black Apple Macbook charger and one white Apple Macbook.

Pablo R. Diaz, 54, of Veracruz, Las Chiapas Lee Road 10 April 1, 11:31 p.m.

March 28, Biggio Drive – Theft reported. One DirectTV receiver, one black 550 18” wheels Trek bicycle, Netflix “Men Who Stare at Goats” DVD and five Xbox 360 games.

March 31, North College StreetTheft of firearms reported. One Beretta .45 caliber semi-automatic pistol.

Anna E. Speigner, 20, of Dothan South Dean Road / McKinley April 2, 2:37 a.m.

March 29, Harbet English Center – Theft of property reported. One Schwinn 27” wheels bicycle with rack ($500).

Stephen K. Hammon, 22, of Fort Payne Ethan Lane April 1, 1:56 a.m.

Rachael L. Robinson, 26, of Denver, Colo. Wire Road April 2, 2:59 a.m. Jinyeong Lee, 37, of Seoul, South Korea Shug Jordan Parkway April 2, 10:49 p.m. Courtney M. Langlois, 20, of Mobile Ross Street at East Thach Avenue April 3, 3:27 a.m. Rolando G. Sarat-Tum, 26, of Quiche, Guatemala Duke Circle / Opelika Road April 3, 3:32 a.m. Willie L. Ligon, 56, of Opelika West Longleaf Drive / Video Warehouse April 3, 5:28 p.m. Thomas W. Putnam, 22, of Winterhaven, Fla. South Debardeleben Street April 4, 2:38 a.m.

Seeking an editorin-chief for the 2010 summer Applications can be picked up in the office of student affairs Student Center Suite 3248

Giraffes need not apply.

April 2, Webster Road.– Burglary and theft reported. One 32” Sony flatscreen TV, one pink Sony Vaio laptop, one Sony Blu-ray player and one Nintendo Wii.

UPC

>From A1

ested in seeing. The concert will last until about 11 p.m. UPC’s Tiger Nights will be held this Friday from 7 p.m.–midnight in the Student Center. The theme is “City Lights, Tiger Nights.” “What we did was we focused on seven main cities in the U.S.,” Rice said. Cities featured will be Miami, Se-

MUD

>From A1

Auburn. Hunter said they also set up a 10mile race for the more adventurous. “People want to have a challenge and we are going to give it to them,” Hunter said. Hunter said that preparation for the Mud Run started earlier this spring. During planning, they met every week at 7 a.m. to work on budgeting, set up a Web site and pushed for spirit points. “This event is good practice in leadership,” Dyal said. “It’s like a mission given to them in the military.” The Mud Run received help from

TRAVEL >From A1

cent incidents.” Ezelle said a grant was received in Sept. 2009 and this campaign was set to be in the spring during nice weather when more people are outside. “We want people to be thinking about safety no matter what mode of transportation they’re using,” said Susan McCallister, associate director of Auburn University Department of Public Safety and Security. McCallister also wants students to think about using alternative transportation such as the transits, night security shuttles and bicycling in a safe manner. “We even have a section on our Web site for other modes of transportation that talks a little bit about skateboards and golf carts,” McCallister said. “Trying to educate people about the shared-use paths on campus.” McCallister said any walkway that is 10 feet or wider is considered a shared-use path.

April 4, Webster Road- Theft reported. One 37” 1080p black Vizio TV, one 17” silver flatscreen TV, one Xbox 360 and one Camouflage Remington 870 Express youth model rifle. April 4, East University Drive – Burglary and theft reported. One 52” Pioneer TV, one 50” TV, one 27” Apple Mac desktop, One Apple Macbook Pro, One Acer laptop, one HP laptop and one JL Audio Subwoofer. - Reports provided by Auburn Department of Public Safety

attle, New Orleans, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, New York and Nashville. “For each city we have themed food, like for New Orleans, we’re doing jambalaya,” Rice said. “We also have themed attractions. Like with Las Vegas we’re doing the casino tables. For New York we’re making street signs where you can have personalized street signs for your name. And, of course, for Nashville there’s the mechanical bull and barbecue sandwiches.” Another freebie that will be of-

fered is personalized Koozies. Participants can get their picture printed on their own personalized Koozie. The artist featured will be F.L.Y., which is known for “Swag Surfin’.” The band will perform at 7 p.m. The band’s opener will be D.J. Coco, an up-and-coming British artist. Tiger Nights is free for students, as long as the student has an ID. The even will also be open to the general public for a $5 fee.

other contributors such as the Marine Corps Recruiting Command and Auburn Firefighters. Hunter said the MCRC was responsible for most of the promotional aspects of the race and the Auburn Firefighters provided a hose for runners to cool off in after finishing the race. According to the Tie Dye Superstars, a team consisting of three Auburn swimmers, Alana Dillette, Jenny von Jouanne and Emile Ewing, and one alumna, Katherine Coldwell, all of the Marines hard work paid off. “When Emilie told me about it I was really excited,” Coldwell said. “I highly recommend it.” The Tie Dye Superstars said it was

challenging but fun and created opportunities for team building. The Marines of Auburn want to continue hosting the Mud Run every year. “We are excited to bring something new to the community,” Hunter said. Hunter said he hopes in the future Auburn will endorse the Marines with other areas in which to race. Encompassing the whole city of Auburn would provide more trails, lakes and terrain to race in, through and around. This year was the first Mud Run, but the Marines hope to make it an annual event. “We want people to look forward to it every year,” Hunter said.

Any non-motorized traffic can use these paths. “We want bicyclist to use those, but use them with caution,” McCallister said. “We don’t want them going 35 mph through a crowded concourse, so it’s basically common sense.” Improvements have been made with the temporary installation of lights and caution signs at every crosswalk on Magnolia Avenue. “We had about six accidents in the fall semester of 2009 and we thought this is happening too much and let’s do some homework on this,” said Ainsley Carry, vice president of Student Affairs. “We thought the lighting could be improved, the signage could be improved and we could do more educational opportunities.” Carry made the point of the large amount of visitors in Auburn on a daily basis who may not be familiar with rules and regulations of a crosswalk. “It comes to our attention that we need to step up an educational piece,” Carry said. “It’s one of the hardest conversations in the world

to meet with a parent or meet with a family whose son or daughter has been injured in a car accident.” Carry said these accidents are avoidable and cell phones or text messaging seemed to be involved in 90 percent of the accidents. According to a press release, during the week of the campaign, members of the Auburn Police Division will increase awareness of traffic and safety regulations, which will include visibility, jaywalking and redlight running. Volunteers will be distributing educational materials and reflective giveaways throughout the week. “(Police Officers) are going to be doing some handouts on the city streets,” Carry said. “Then they are doing these kind of mock citations when they see people crossing the middle of the street inappropriately.” Wednesday, April 7, everyone is encouraged to wear white in observance of those who have been affected by pedestrian, bicycle, transit or vehicular accidents. For more information visit www. travelwithcareauburn.com.

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City encourages safety during Travel With Care People of the Plains: A1 Company creates competition A5

THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 2010

Will Ansick A8

NEWS

A

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Myriad of eggs hunted on Easter BREE BOWEN WRITER

Peter Cottontail hopped down the bunny trail a day early as Auburn and Opelika celebrated Easter Saturday. Opelika Parks and Recreation hosted Easter on the Square in downtown Opelika, a day filled with egg-tivities like face painting, sidewalk chalk drawing, cookie decorating, an egg hunt and a parade around the square. Approximately 2,000 people gathered with friends and family in front of the courthouse to enjoy the celebration. “I’ve been with Opelika Parks and Recreation for 27 years, and when I was a little kid they were doing this,” said Sam Bailey, assistant director for parks and recreation. “It’s been a great venue up here.” More than 25,000 eggs were scattered around the area in different sections for toddlers, preschoolers and first through third graders. A flash light egg hunt was held on Thursday for older children. “I wanted my children to have a good time, especially my daughter,” said Keith Rhyne, joined by his children Katie and Kyle. “It’s the last year she can do it.” Once the signal was made for the start of the hunt, a frenzy of children dressed in pink, yellow and green scampered in chaos until the grass was clear of eggs. Afterward children sat with their parents to sort through the bounty to see which eggs held the best trinket or treat. A few miles away in Auburn, a similar celebration took place in Kiesel Park. The City of Auburn Parks and Recreation hosted its 29th Annual Easter Egg Hunt, sponsored by Wachovia. The egg hunt is one of the largest in Lee County, featuring more than 30,000 eggs. “It’s just a fun day to spend really as a family more than anything else,” said Dan Gibbons, joined by sons Lee and John. Each egg held an age appropriate prize for each of the four age groups, from 3 years old to 12. The prizes ranged from small toys to prize slips, such as coupons for Chick-fil-A. The most coveted of eggs were two golden ones which held $50 savings bonds from Wachovia. They were found by Brian Armbruster, 4, and Luke Burgess, 11. “We encourage everyone to stay after the hunt, because we don’t do some of the events the other communities do,” said Alison Hall, community programs director with Auburn Parks and Recreation. “We want ours to be more of a laid-back family picnic kind of atmosphere.” For the rest of the day, families enjoyed music, picture taking with the Easter bunny and free soft drinks. Hamburgers and hotdogs were provided by The Greater Kiwanis Club of Auburn with proceeds benefiting needy families through the community.

Philip Smith / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Clarence Perry of Opelika helps his son Jaclarence, 5, frost a cookie during the Opelika Easter festivities. In addition to cookies, kids also got goodie bags from the stand.

Philip Smith / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

(Above) Carson Bailey of Opelika paints an Easter egg on Kallie’s, 3, face during Easter on the Square in Opelika Saturday morning. Bailey, an Opelika High School student, volunteered during the event. (Right, from left to right) Alex, 3, and Wyatt, 3, throw bread for the fish in the pond to eat during Auburn Egg’s Hunt at Kiesel Park Saturday morning.

Printed on Recycled Paper


The Auburn Plainsman

News, A4

Thursday, April 8 ,2010

Baja Burrito to replace Flip Flops DANIEL CHESSER ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR

Honors were given to employee of the month and all resolutions were approved Tuesday night at the Auburn City Council meeting. In the Committee of the Whole meeting before the Council meeting, the results for the City of Auburn’s 2010 Citizen Survey were presented to the council. The survey is conducted annually to evaluate citizen satisfaction with the city government and operations, according to auburnalabama.org. “The thing I am most pleased with are the areas citizens wanted to

pay attention to, traffic in neighborhoods, speeding and intersection improvement,” said Mayor Bill Ham. “Those are areas we have spent a lot of expertive hours to duplicate.” The six-page survey was sent to 1,500 random households in Auburn. Of those, 778 were completed and returned. Flow of traffic and maintenance of city streets were the areas residents thought should receive the most emphasis in Auburn for the next two years. These have been the top priorities since 2004. Satisfaction with traffic flow and ease of travel by bicycle is significantly increased in the 2010 survey, according to auburnala-

bama.org. Earline S. Cobb, deputy city clerk, was named employee of the month. Cobb has been working for Auburn for 36 years. “It was quite an honor being selected employee of the month,” Cobb said. “I have served the city for a number of years and just appreciate being recognized for what is really my job.” Service pins and plaques were also rewarded to honor Todd White, of the economic development department, Ralph Hovey and David Ponder, both of the public works department. Bill Sherling was nominated to fill the vacancy on the library board.

The position is a fouryear term. It was previously occupied by William L. Alford, who has served two full terms. Under Boards and Commissions, Joel Tremaine and Charles Hendrix were nominated to fill the vacancies on the Historic Preservation Commission. A Korean automotive supplier is expanding its operations in Auburn. Pyongsan America, Inc., has invested $5 million in expansion and create 100 additional jobs during the next two years. “We are thrilled to be able to offer Pyongsan a solution for growth in Auburn,” Ham said in a press release. “Under the leadership of Chairman Bang

Soo Lee, and President Francis Yoon, Pyongsan has grown to employ over 100 employees, and plan to double the number of jobs over the next few years. This is great news for our citizens and evidence of our success of our strategy to build a diverse industrial base in Auburn.” The remainder of the resolutions were passed without objections. The resolutions included granting liquor licenses for Baja Burrito Company and China Palace, both on South College. Drainage and utility easements for the Bent Creek West Sewer Phase II Project and the intersection of East Glenn Avenue at Mike Hubbard Boule-

vard were accepted. Contracts for sanitary sewer construction with Glass Garden LLC., sidewalk construction in Ellington Place subdivision and parking deck maintenance repairs project were also approved. In the “Other Business” portion of the meeting, Councilman Arthur L. Dowdell of Ward 1 brought up his concern about the ethnic diversity of construction workers in his district. “A lot of Mexicans was doing a lot of the dealings over in our community,” Dowdell said. “I think several community leaders wanted to see more blacks have subcontracts in North Auburn projects.”

Stimulus funds make building Exit 50 possible BEN BARTLEY COPY EDITOR

A long-planned Auburn interchange has officially been given the go-ahead for construction. Exit 50, known as the Auburn Technology Park Exchange, has been part of the city of Auburn’s plan for years, but lack of funds delayed construction. “Just recently funds were put back from the federal government to the state for major highway projects,” said City Man-

ager Charlie Duggan. “It was essentially put on hold back in September with us not knowing when or if it would get funded.” That September delay was caused by the expiration of the Alabama Highway bill, which led to Alabama losing about $170 million in highway funds, Duggan said. Jeff Ramsey, director of Auburn Public Works, said the funding for the interchange came from a combination of contributors. “(The money) is split be-

tween the special earmark for transportation bills, the money from the Department of Transport and some money we get from the federal government with a little bit of match money from us, about $300,000 or $295,000,” Ramsey said. Ramsey also said he believed money from the federal stimulus package was used, and without that money, the project would not be completed this year. Money issues momentarily solved, Ramsey said

the main function of the interchange would be to increase traffic flow. “This goes back to when the South College exit was designed and built,” Ramsey said. “Obviously, Auburn is a growing community. We depend on a lot of traffic between here and Montgomery. A lot of people use the interstate. And so, in order to keep the good level of service at the South College interstate, we needed another interchange to separate some of that traffic.”

The city had another interchange slotted for Auburn since 2004, 2005 and even earlier in the longrange plan, Duggan said. “We had an interchange slotted, another interchange for Auburn, and the long-range plan is to create an outer loop for the city of Auburn,” Duggan said. Duggan said the “outer loop” effect created by the interchange would be similar to the loop-like structure of Shug Jordan Parkway and East Univer-

sity Drive. Both Ramsey and Duggan said Auburn was a growing city and needed the extra interchange to help traffic flow smoothly. “If you look at the city of Opelika, there are five interchanges and in that city there is half the population,” Duggan said. “But there are only two interchanges here in Auburn serving twice the population.” Duggan said he expects construction to mobilize toward the end of May.

Auburn Weekly Gas Monitor

P O O C S E H T Quilters Trunk Show Monarch Estates April 8 at 2 p.m.

Lee County TEA Party Opelika Park April 10 noon to 2 p.m.

Week of April 8 This week’s prices Location Chevron - University Walmart - South College Chevron - South College BP - Gay & Samford Circle K - Gay Shell - Glenn & Gay Chevron - Glenn & College Shell - Wire Chevron - Wire Exxon - Wire

Average Gas Price Last Week’s Average

Regular

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$2.899 $2.729 $2.799 $2.849 $2.749 $2.749 $2.999 $2.769 $2.899 $2.899

$2.999 $2.849 $2.999 $3.049 $2.889 $2.889 $3.149 $2.909 $3.049 $2.999

$2.825 $2.716

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$3.143 $3.034

TAO The Martial Art of Drumming Opelika Center for the Performing Arts April 10 at 7:30 p.m.

Seeking an editor-in-chief for the 2010 summer Applications can be picked up in the office of student affairs Student Center Suite 3248

Penguins need not apply.


The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, April 8, 2010

News, A5

Knology ends 50-year cable monopoly DANIEL CHESSER ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR

Cable TV customers of Auburn will gain the knowledge of competition between their service providers. Auburn was introduced to cable television in 1959 and has had only one choice in service, said Mayor Bill Ham. Knology is moving into the area and will put an end to the 50-year reign of a market monopolized by Charter Communications. A groundbreaking ceremony was held Thursday April 1 at the Knology office in the Tutton Hill development off Hamilton Road. “We are thrilled Knology is willing to bring high-end Internet and all the capability that come with their services to the local area,” Ham said. “And bring some competition for our citizens. They have been begging for this for years and years.” Ham said he gets the most questions and comments about whether an additional cable company is going to provide competition in the market. “We think we are partnering with a very good company,” Ham said. “Small enough to provide excellent service and still has incredible integrity.” The vote for progressive

Emily Adams/ ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

(From left to right) Chad Wachter, vice president of Knology, Gene Dulaney, City Council member, M. Todd Holt, president of Knology, Mayor Bill Ham, Tom Worden, City Council member, and Royce Ard, general manager of Knology, at the groundbreaking ceremony of Knology. Knology will offer Auburn residents an alternative for cable and internet service.

movement on this project was unanimous in City Council, Ham said. “We already have one cable provider,” said City Manager Charlie Duggan. “But we think by an introduction to another that everyone’s service is going to improve and rates will go down. That is certainly what we are hoping for.” However, service is not going to be here tomorrow, but rather in time as Knology spreads its wires

throughout Auburn, Duggan said. “The product that they’re offering, they’re all about high-speed and also customer service,” Duggan said. “Those are two of the things I know citizens have been very interested in.” Duggan also said Knology’s data offerings for broadband service are excellent and they have two call centers located domestically.

“We are going to provide advanced services that will meet everybody’s needs,” said Bill King, network manger for Knology. “It won’t be anything below the current desire of the people.” Knology’s headquarters are in West Point, Ga. The company claims it is the leading provider of interactive communications and entertainment services. The company also founded the Internet ser-

vice provider, Mindspring. Knology offers more than 200 digital channels, local and long-distance calling and high-speed Internet access. “As a resident of Auburn for 12 years I can tell you this is just a phenomenal and wonderful place to live, but it is about to be even more wonderful when Knology comes to town,” said Todd Holt, president and CFO of Knology.

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Anticipation about the new business venture is shared between Auburn and Knology. “We are excited to be moving in and the plan we are going to put in is state of the art basically,” said Paul Lujam, network supervisor for Knology. “We are not going fiber to the home, but fiber to the curb with a node plus eighty.” A node plus eighty means only one amp feeding 80 homes with service, Lujam said. “It is going to be a lot easier to maintain, a lot quicker to upgrade, so the future is going to be pretty bright for people in this area,” Lujam said. Lujam also said modem speeds will be top notch with the installation of new equipment. “We are going to invest about $15 million in the next three years to build out a broadband network,” said Royce Ard, general manager for Knology. Representatives at Charter Communications were not available for comment. “I am actually pretty excited about Knology coming in,” said Bradley Green, senior in radio, television and film. “I may be in the Auburn area after I graduate. Charter has been a pain in the past, and I look forward to having some choice.”

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The Auburn Plainsman

COMMENTARY The Auburn Plainsman Editorial Board Lindsey Davidson

A6 Thursday, April 8, 2010 Staff Column

Ladies: pale is the new tan

Editor

Cliff McCollum

Rod Guajardo

Opinions Editor

Managing Editor

Ellison Langford

Abby Albright

Ben Bartley

News Editor

Sports Editor

Copy Editor

Michelle Wilder

Kevin Saucier

Callie Garrett

Campus Editor

Multimedia Editor

Intrigue Editor

Our View

Toughen ‘Travel with Care’ When we first saw one of the “tickets” being handed out to pedestrians on Magnolia this week, we all had a good laugh. “Seriously?” was heard throughout the office, and jovial joking soon gave way to anger and indignation. Is this a joke? What good will handing out meaningless tickets to passers-by do? It turns Magnolia into a vehicle-filled version of the Concourse—they might as well be standing out there with blank pieces of paper saying, “Here, please throw this away.” While we applaud the City’s and the University’s quick action here, we can’t help but think their combined efforts are more than a bit misguided. We had reports of “tickets” being handed to students without any explanation whatsoever. One student told us he thought he had won something. Does this sound like an effective use of time, money and effort to combat this issue? Would we fare better if attentions were focused elsewhere? Tickets that have no firm, tangible consequences attached with them are a waste of the paper they are printed on, money provided in part from the government’s economic recovery package.

If you honestly want to encourage safe pedestrian behavior, take some advice we’ve given you before: issue real tickets. Let one student get hit with a $138 jaywalking ticket and we sincerely doubt you’ll need any more. And, if the behavior still continues, those fees and fines will no doubt prove a great boon to the budget necessary to run the “Travel with Care” program. The city could even raise the fees to a seemingly astronomical number like $300. Such penalties are not uncommon in large cities—why not bring some of that zeal here? The Web site and information offered by the “Travel with Care” program are great, but we doubt students will take the time to actually find said Web site. The structural and aesthetic changes made to Magnolia, while severe, will no doubt help save a life or two. Sadly, a simple yellow piece of paper with safety tips on the back is not enough to hold or even pique the interest of the average student. Bold change is needed. Strong enforcement and constant vigilance should be the guiding principles in a continued endeavor to keep our citizenry safe. Let loose the full force of the law. End these travesty “tickets” and treat this issue with the dignity it demands.

Tenure changes a welcomed writ It seems odd to have to say this, but Alabama school districts now have the power to fire teachers convicted of major felonies or sex offenses. Until last week, due to Alabama’s strong teacher tenure laws, school districts were unable to take such actions and those felonious faculty were allowed to stay on the payroll. We’re mainly upset it has taken this state this long to pass such a bill. What does it say about our state that we actually have to even pass such a bill? For too long, teacher tenure has been taken for granted. While every teacher doesn’t abuse the system, some use the protection of tenure to slack off from their responsibilities in the classroom, knowing full well their institution would be hard pressed to find a way to fire them. The intent behind tenure was originally a noble one. Afraid of persecution from angry parents or school boards for teaching controversial material like evolution or “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” tenure was seen as a way to insulate the classroom from the sway of public opinion. If teachers could live free from the fear of firing, they could plan lessons and activities perfectly designed to engage and excite young minds. Those great intents gave way to pow-

erful unions and iron-clad contracts, allowing the type of abuse we have in Alabama today. While these reforms are small steps in the right direction, more revisions are needed. The methods through which tenure is achieved need to be closely examined. At the high school level, tenure is given by some districts by just working at a school for three years and passing a basic review process. If teachers are going to be afforded protection from firing, shouldn’t they be required to do more than just stay in one place for an extended amount of time? The problem with instituting the necessary amendments to the tenure issues is the strong opposition bound to come from teachers and their unions. Giving up the long-standing protections teachers have enjoyed for nearly a century will prove difficult, but these reforms must happen if we want to have schools filled with effective, engaged teachers. The system must be reformed and revived so that it can survive. The status quo in our schools is not where we need to be, so we need solutions and suggestions that up-end normalcy. True tenure reform is a beginning.

Walking around campus, it is easy to want to conform to the ways of other students. Wearing the same types of clothing, shoes and hairstyles is hard to avoid. But one thing I notice is how tan every girl is at the beginning of spring. It makes me wonder if everyone else has somehow been slipping off to a tropical island while I am bundled up during the frigid winter weather. I mean, when it gets even the slightest bit warm outside, out come the bare legs. And might I say, they are not the same pale color as mine that have not seen the sun for about six months. Last time I checked, skin does not get darker from being covered up in winter clothes. Being golden brown at the start of short-wearing weather can only mean one of two things: you are either addicted to a tanning bed or you have a natural dark complexion.

Michelle Wilder campus@theplainsman.com

If it’s the latter, then good for you. If not, shame on you for subjecting your skin to dangerous, concentrated ultraviolet rays that put you at a high risk for developing malignant melanoma. In fact, studies have shown that a person who lies in a tanning bed more than 10 times a year is seven times more likely to develop malignant melanoma than a person who does not use tanning beds. The Centers for Disease Control also says tanning beds can cause serious eye problems such as damage to the retina and corneal infections. So although your skin

may look tan and ready for a bathing suit, the machine darkening your skin is doing more damage than you think. The benefits of having darker skin for a few summer months should not outweigh the costs of damaging your body in the long run. Tanning beds are unhealthy. The ultraviolet rays in them penetrate deeply, which can develop cancer and eye problems, increase your risk of premature aging and damage your immune system. Unless you want to look like a piece of leather stretched over a skeleton and have numerous skin issues when you get older, ditch the visits to the tanning bed. Whoever said everyone has to have a golden skin tone? Embrace pale. It’s a good color on you. Michelle Wilder is campus editor of The Auburn Plainsman. You can reach her at 844-9109.

Sweatshirts? In 80 degrees? I love the spring and summer. I love getting to wear shorts, tank tops and flipflops. But every year it never fails: as soon as it gets warm outside, it gets freezing inside. It’s frustrating because even when its 80 degrees outside I have to bring a jacket to class. It bothers me carrying extra weight in my already burdensome backpack for such a dumb reason. And having a sweatshirt on doesn’t keep your legs from getting cold—and I’m not about to wear sweatpants in the blistering Alabama heat. I understand the air conditioner is turned on in the summer. That’s fine. But why is the temperature turned down so low? Why can the temperature not stay about the same inside throughout the year? It baffles me. It doesn’t make sense for me to be sweating outside, but have goose bumps inside. This is a constant struggle I have with my parents when I’m at home. They’re warm-natured, and like to keep the house at about 70 degrees. That doesn’t work.

Laura Maxwell news@theplainsman.com

Call me high-maintenance, but it has to be at about 73 degrees for me to be comfortable. I truly can tell a difference between temperatures. I don’t feel that I should have to wear a sweatshirt inside. And when I was packing to go home for Easter, sweatshirts were the last thing on my mind. Needless to say, I was shivering the whole weekend. If only I’d had a Snuggie. Problem solved. But seriously, this is something that bothers me year-round. I don’t have a problem controlling the temperature in my own apartment. Why can the school not do the same? Can the faculty members not feel how unreasonably cold it is? Do they not care that there students are shaking during class?

I’m not saying it needs to be a particular temperature that suits my personal preferences. But there have been times when I’ve walked into a classroom that was set to about 58 degrees. There is absolutely no reason for that, and I highly doubt that anyone finds that to be a comfortable temperature. I agree that it’s better for it to be too cold than too hot. But both extremes are distracting when you’re trying to pay attention in class. If my body is convulsing to keep me from getting frost bite, I’m not focusing on what the teacher is saying. My survival is more important to me than learning oxidation numbers. It’s not that I don’t try to pay attention. If I could will myself to be comfortable, I would. But that just doesn’t happen. The point is that it’s finally spring, and it would be nice if it would feel like it inside, too. Laura Maxwell is assistant news editor of The Auburn Plainsman. You can reach her at 844-9109.

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Our Policy The opinions of The Auburn Plainsman staff are restricted to these pages. These unsigned editorials are the majority opinion of the twelve-member editorial board and are the official opinion of the newspaper. The opinions expressed in columns and letters represent the views and opinions of their individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the Auburn University student body, faculty, administration or Board of Trustees.

HOW TO CONTACT US Auburn Student Center Suite 1111H Auburn, Ala. 36849 844-4130 or editor@theplainsman.com

The Auburn Plainsman welcomes letters from students as well as from faculty, administrators, alumni and those not affiliated with the University. Letters must be submitted before 4:30 p.m. on the Monday for publication. Letters must include the author’s name, address and phone number for verification, though the name of the author may be withheld upon request. Submission may be edited for grammar and/or length.


A7

COMMENTARY

Thursday, APril 8, 2010

UPC gets seal of approval and they have to find a way to please the entire student body with one band in one genre. This year the Goo Goo Dolls are coming to Auburn. Let me just say, I am thrilled. And Sister Hazel is opening up for them. Usually UPC focuses specially on the upcoming bands and the newer names. But this year we get a free trip back to high school. Cheers to you: UPC and Paul Bagley. I haven’t been a fan of all the bands that have visited Auburn in my time, but I can say I will be one of the first in line at this concert. There is approximately

Lindsey Davidson editor@theplainsman.com

The music scene in Auburn is steadily growing. The local bands are beginning to come out of hiding and slowing replacing the piercing sound of the Velco Pygmies with something more enjoyable to listen to on a Saturday night. As far as the larger names go, we sadly have to depend on UPC to bring one band a semester to the campus,

1,000 allotted spaces available on the floor in front of the stage to give it a real concert feel in the Coliseum. They aren’t the next big band nor the new, hot thing, but they are a ’90s classic that everyone enjoys singing along with. Bagley put it into a great perspective when he said he wanted to bring a band that the whole Auburn community could enjoy and not single out one group of people. UPC did surveys, questionnaires and asked for input from their recent concerts to come to this decision. They made a good choice. Obviously, not everyone is going to be pleased. You

can’t bow to everyone. But as a whole for the general student body, this was a great choice. The budget and contract time that the band will be playing hasn’t been released yet, but we will let you know next week in a interview with Bagley about the selection process of bands. It’s a way for you to know what goes on behind the scenes. For this year, the work behind the scenes seemed to work. I’m looking forward to the concert, UPC. Lindsey Davidson is editor of The Auburn Plainsman. You can reach her at 844-9021.

“A lot of Mexicans was doing a lot of the dealings over in our community. I think several community leaders wanted to see more blacks have subcontracts in North Auburn projects.” -Arthur Dowdell, city councilman, on the ethnicity of construction workers in his district

Last week’s question: “Was the April Fool’s Issue a success?” >Yes: 39 percent > No: 41 percent > The news was fake?: 20 percent

This week’s question: “Should jaywalkers be ticketed?” >Yes > No Go to www.theplainsman.com to vote.

Your View

Alumna raises concerns with new Student Activity Center Editor, The Auburn Plainsman I regret to inform you that my vote for the new Student Activity Center is in no way “yes.” If there are so many students using the current Student Act at localized times of the day then may the authorities consider extending the operating hours. Also which facilities of the current Act are used extensively? After reading The Plainsman, it appears my understanding was the exercise equipment is under the most demand. One would rationalize how it’s possible that there are waiting times for the equipment at concentrated times like the morning and late afternoon. For me, I have yet to use the facility for any event. Let’s see I’m sure, actually, quite certain, that I am already, have been and will be, paying student fees towards its services, an “amenity” along with athletics that does not benefit me. Although I understand my contribution is crucial for the whole of the student population. The student population I support is the present one of which I am a tiny part of. This Referendum will not benefit me, nor my student population to whom I belong. A campus subject that most certainly alters my quality of life is The Plainsman. Irony at its best? How ironic that the campus newspaper, something I look forward to, is NOT, let me emphasize “not” included in my student fees. If I can choose which party my $7.50 goes to well I pick The Plainsman.

So, may I vote for the option of where and who will receive my financial support? After hearing of the gray news about the decline of The Plainsman I was shocked. First of all, how can something like this occur considering that the students seeking [education for] a career in the writing fields greatly benefit [boon] from this, above me and any other readers of the campus news. Secondly, who else will the students on campus turn to for literature on professors, events, & oh yeah the sports section! The reasons for concern of The Plainsman’s fading are unique to each reader. Ultimately it boils down to 1984 whence the newspaper, Plainsman, was no longer included in Auburn Student fees. What occurrences edited the financial support of The Plainsman? Or better yet who wrangled this recision of funds for The Plainsman? The fact that print of news is in a rut baffles me. I grew up in a time when this thing, system which utilizes the high data transfer ports connecting users with a guide for composing thoughts relayed through communication, known as the internet wasn’t so trusted & readers weren’t so gullible to internetted means. Enough with “the times they are a changin’.” Our species relies on seeing is believing and a documented story is priceless to/for history. They sayers ridding of printed news is ludicrous. What’s next to diminish printed journals? Articles of all forms? Magazines? Catalogues? Books? Our society will waste ink pens by not using one until it is empty and can not put forth $1.50 to The New York Times’ ink and paper. Besides the history and tradition newspaper represents I enjoy the Auburn campus newspaper The Plainsman. It would be unfortunate for the student body to support a building they may never see while all along the status of that building will not receive such a grandiose report worthy of all War Eagle[d] Plains-Men. Rebecca Anthony AU Alumna

Magnolia’s Future helen northcutt

Staff Column

Wisdom, life lessons from Burger King drive-thru window

Cliff McCollum opinion@theplainsman.com

Almost one year ago, I was inadvertently introduced to a series of sentence fragments that would forever alter the course of my life. I was going through the drive-thru at the Burger King in Opelika with my friend Bobby, eagerly awaiting our order of fries and Coke-flavored Icees. As we pulled up to the window to pay for our purchases, we were met by a heavy-set woman with long DayGlo colored fingernails who mumbled the price incoherently and grabbed the $20 from my hand the minute I stuck it

out of the window. She quickly tapped several buttons on the register, eventually hitting the magic one that allowed the register to open to produce our change. As she handed me my change and our order, she uttered those lifechanging and mystifying fragments: “ ’Preciate it. Have a day.” Bobby and I thanked her and I rolled up my window as we started to speed out of the parking lot. “What did she just say?” I asked Bobby. “Did she really just say...” “ ‘Preciate it. Have a day,’” Bobby replied. “That’s what she said.” I hardly knew where to begin. As an undergraduate English major, I have to watch myself to keep my inner pedantic grammarian in check.

I’m a threat to take the trusty red pen and correct copy mistakes I see out in the world at large. When presented with such a lovely example of authentic sentence fragments as a part of real world dialogue, my inner English teacher jumped for joy. “Have a day,” I replied, trailing off as I reached the end. “What kind of day am I supposed to have? There’s no adjective there.” Was I supposed to have a good day filled with joy, happiness and gratuitous action scenes filled with explosions? Was I fated to have a horrible day filled with enough angst and grief to make 19th-century German literature seem exuberant and buoyant by comparison? Where was my adjective, that delightful, necessary word to give

that noun “day” a sense of direction and purpose? “Maybe that’s just it,” Bobby said. “Maybe she just means have a day. Make your own day, you know?” When Bob’s right, he’s right. “ ’Preciate it. Have a day.” has become a bit of a personal mantra, a way to bolster my spirits and prepare myself for whatever day may lie ahead of me. Good or bad, I should “ ’preciate” the life I have, the living I’m allowed to continue. There is no adjective there because we are empowered to adjectivize our own days. We have to take power of our own lives and mold our actions to create the world in which we want to live. If you want to have a happy day, choose to be happy. Make choices and

decisions you think will make you happy. If you are determined to have a bad day, go all out and wallow in self pity and sorrow until you’ve created your own Sylvia Plath scenario. Just don’t put your head in that oven— it’s not worth it. So often we render ourselves powerless by not taking control of lives. You can’t be passive when it comes to you; you must be an advocate and lobbyist for your own best interests. I don’t know what sort of life experiences led that noble Burger King employee to impart that wisdom to Bobby and me, but we will be forever indebted to her. To this day, we generally end our phone conversations and meetings with those two simple sentence fragments, reminding ourselves we can have

whatever kind of day we want to have. In life, there will always be what I like to call “peripheral people,” the random background actors in your life that will occasionally bless you with words of hope or wisdom. These peripheral people can be anyone or everyone, so you must have constant vigilance in looking for them. If you don’t wake up and pay attention, you may miss the unadorned brilliance of an error-laced non sequitur or throwaway factoid. Keep an eye out and an ear open for your peripheral people. You’ll appreciate it and have a day. Cliff McCollum is opinions editor of The Auburn Plainsman. You can reach him at 844-9109.


The Auburn Plainsman

News, A8

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Tenure no longer protects felonious teachers JESSICA SHADDIX WRITER

A bill removing teachers who have been convicted of major felonies was signed into law last Wednesday by Gov. Bob Riley. The bill was filed in response to a Washington County teacher who was convicted of child enticement, but was still receiving pay while serving a prison sentence. The bill affects K-12 schools, not colleges. In order to prevent similar situations from oc-

curring, the bill also says schools will “provide for the immediate cancellation of the employment contract of a teacher on continuing service status, a principal, or a contract principal and the immediate termination of employment of a non-probationary employee who is convicted of a felony or sex offense involving a child.” Principal Jason Wright of Auburn Junior High School said he thinks this bill is well overdue. “We do not need to have convicted felons working on a daily basis with our

children,” Wright said. Jacque Williams, a Pine Level Elementary School teacher in Autauga County, said she also thinks the bill is a good idea. “I think school systems will be better for removing teachers who are not responsible role models for our children,” Williams said. Wright said the Washington County situation pointed out a flaw in the state’s tenure system. Wright said he hopes this bill will address tenure-related issues. Williams also said she

thinks the bill will begin the process of weeding out teachers who slack on the job, but remain employed because of the tenure system. “Because our school systems have tenure, sometimes teachers who aren’t doing their job are getting paid,” Williams said. “While at the same time, teachers who could do a better job are unemployed because schools aren’t hiring new teachers.” However the bill is not limited to sex-related offenses, Wright said. “The new law covers

Class-A felonies such as murder, first-degree rape, first-degree arson, firstdegree robbery and firstdegree burglary,” Wright said. The law goes into effect immediately and impacts anyone holding a certificate, regardless of place of employment. “Even though it seems somewhat harsh to weed out teachers, it’s something that is long overdue,” Williams said. “Our children deserve the best education they can get, and if that means removing some teachers and equip-

ping schools with more effective teachers, then that’s what’s best.” Elizabeth Cook, a former teacher in the Alabama school system, said she’s excited to see Alabama Legislature begin to take action in this particular area. “I don’t think we should pay somebody just because they’re tenured,” Cook said. “There should be limitations on it. There are so many people who have their teaching position just because they’ve been in the school system for three years.”

Ellison Langford / NEWS EDITOR

Will Ansick likes runs around the pond behind Health Plus.

Ansick tackles ‘world’s toughest footrace’ ELLISON LANGFORD NEWS EDITOR

He gets bored running more than 15 miles on a road. So he decided to run 135 miles in Death Valley. Will Ansick, senior in health administration, is the youngest Alabama resident to be accepted as a runner in the Badwater Ultramarathon. He’s 23. “They only take 90 runners from around the world every year,” Ansick said. “It’s been something I’ve been shooting for for a couple years.” While Ansick played soccer and wrestled in high school, he did not focus on running until about six years ago when he got to college, and he “got fat.” “I guess one of the things that really attracted me to (running) is, with a team, there’s always someone that can hide and get by by their team pulling up for them,” Ansick said. “When you’re running, whether it’s triathlons or duathlons or marathons, it’s you, by yourself, against the elements and the other racers.” Ansick met his wife Emily through running. He said they love marathons so much they named their now 19-month-old son “Miles.” To gain acceptance into Badwater, Ansick had to have run at least two races of 100-miles within a certain time frame within the last two years. He said there are other qualifications, but what helped him is having acted as a pacer for a Badwater runner during the last few years. “Leading up to my first 100-miler I had a lot of anxieties, a lot of doubts,” Ansick said. “Even though I trained my butt off for it (it was still kind of scary).” Ansick said he is also feeling some nerves looking toward Badwater. During the race temperatures can blaze up to 130 degrees, and the pavement can get so hot it melts the racers sneakers. Ansick said he thinks he can complete the race in 33 to 40 hours. He said racers typically drink a bottle of fluid every mile. His favorite running drink is grape-flavored Motor Tabs. Ansick said racers complete the race through a combination of running and walking the 135 miles. “During that week (I got accepted) I was going back and forth the whole time,” Ansick said. “Because it was something I really want to do, but I almost hope I didn’t get accepted so that I wouldn’t have to go out there just because it’s so scary. But at the same time it’s really exciting.”

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Class of the Week: Aviation Management B4

THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 2010

Ask a Professor: Why are dogs noses always wet? B6

Eggstravaganza B8

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Auburn Gay-Straight Alliance hosts second annual ‘What a Drag’ ERIC AUSTIN WRITER

Philip Smith / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Left to Right: Camille von Trapp, Jennifer Angleina Dazzle and Kitty St. James perform at the second annual “What a Drag,” hosted by GayStraight Alliance Saturday night.

Women in short skirts, high heels and skintight leggings paraded down the runway in the Student Center ballroom Saturday night as cheering onlookers showered the models with dollar bills. Soon after, stylish rappers and a long-haired dude in the style of Carlos Santana and Jesus were rocking out. The party went on well into the night and, by the end, the Auburn Gay-Straight Alliance hoped it had made its point. “We feel that transgendered individuals need the same protections as the rest of us,” said Bryan Stisher of AGSA. The second annual “What a Drag” event sought to bring attention to Auburn’s transgendered students who are currently not protected under Auburn’s non-discrimination policy. “It was a huge effort by the entire organization,” said Katie Rowe, AGSA president. “We all just banded together and said let’s get this going.” The night featured AGSA members and others dressed in drag performing musical numbers. The performers took stage names including “Sir Walter Riley,” “Francesca Diamond” and “Butch Cassidy.” The evening was meant to poke fun at the stereotypical ideas of gender roles AGSA feels the University administration is endorsing by excluding gender identity from the non-discrimination clause. “It’s about expressing yourself,” said Braxton Tanner, an AGSA member. “It’s about getting others out of their comfort

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zone to get them to understand something. This breaks down the wall.” Self-expression was a major theme of the evening, as performers “went for it” in every sense. Perhaps producing the most head turns was the professional dancer “The Grand Duchess,” Cotaliya von Trapp. Trapp hiphopped her way through songs, pulling off several splits that one attendee described as “epic.” Trapp seeks to inspire a new perspective of entertainment through her performances. “I want people to understand that entertainment is entertainment,” Trapp said. “No matter what race, or gender, or any other category, anyone can express themselves.” While the performances were the highlight of the evening, AGSA also pushed the attendees to sign a petition they intend to deliver to President Jay Gogue and other administrators stating their case. “We want to make an impact,” Rowe said. “This year we have a petition to show the higher-ups. They think if we already have sexual orientation protected, it’s enough. Unfortunately, it’s not.” Auburn added sexual orientation to the policy in 2007 when AGSA and other like-minded organizations lobbied the administration. However, the administration felt gender identity was not a necessary distinction to be addressed. AGSA feels otherwise. Trapp has lived in the Auburn area for three years and recognizes that the culture on campus is not always friendly toward the LGBT community, particularly the transgendered population.


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MICHELLE WILDER Editor MAXWELL NEWFIELD Associate Editor

To reach the staff, call 844-9104 or e-mail campus@theplainsman.com

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JIMMY JOHN’S SANDWICH DELIVERY!

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Dean of Agriculture uproots from position JENNIFER BECKETT

Guthrie said. “We had to get done in time to catch WRITER the school bus. We did whatever we could do to Auburn’s College of Ag- make a living.� riculture will say goodGuthrie’s mother helped bye to its dedicated dean, on the farm when her Richard Guthrie, in May. sons were at school and Since giving up his semi- her husband worked elseretirement where, but and returning she was reto the Universponsible for sity to serve many other as interim household dean in 2005, tasks too, Guthrie has Guthrie said. also served “She did as director of a whole lot the Alabama of cooking, Agricultural canning and GUTHRIE Experiment freezing and Station for the also worked last five years. in the garden,� Guthrie “Most of his efforts have said. “She didn’t have a been related to the Experi- job, but she worked really ment Station, associated hard all her life.� research and coordinatGuthrie graduated from ing programs within the Auburn and worked for Extension service,� said the U.S. Department of Dale Coleman, professor Agriculture in the Soil and and coordinator of un- Conservation Service for dergraduate programs in 20 years. animal science. “However, He returned to Auburn he has always valued the University in 1983 to beacademic side and recog- come a professor and head nizes accomplishments of of the Agronomy and Soils students and faculty.� Department. Growing up on a small “Managerial training, farm in Union Springs, like learning how to manGuthrie has had a rich ag- age and supervise personricultural background. nel in government, helped Guthrie’s family owned me realize that I might dairy and beef cattle and like (a dean’s position),� raised broilers for a period Guthrie said. “I became of several years. a manager in the govern“My brother, dad and ment at a reasonably high I had to get up early and level, and the faculty here milk cows every morning,� recognized that I had a

LAURA MAXWELL ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

During the SGA Senate meeting Monday evening, Sen. Vanessa Tarpos announced the Safety Walk will take place April 19. The walk takes place every semester. Tarpos said senators will be divided into six groups. They will work with the police department and

go to designated areas on campus to check the blue emergency lights and look for poorly lit areas. Tarpos said the senators will be filling out a report on the information they gather during the walk. Senators will be submitting their reports to Melvin Owens, the director of public safety and security at Auburn University. The Senate also approved three new appointments:

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for leadership in various areas as I have set the stage within the department to become who we are today in teaching, research and extension programming,� Greene said. Guthrie said he has spent his time at Auburn attending meetings with faculty, other deans, farmers, cattleman, forest landowners and state officials. “A big part of this job is building relationships,� Guthrie said. “Also, we have faculty in the College of Agriculture who are committed to getting to know and working closely with students.� Those relationships are what Guthrie said he will miss most. “My plans (after retirement) are to do a whole lot less of what I’ve been doing and to relax,� Guthrie said. “I have a membership at a fishing club, and I enjoy playing golf. I’ll spend more time with my grandson, Will, who is almost 2 years old.� Guthrie and Greene are working together to find a deserving candidate to replace Guthrie as the dean of the College of Agriculture. “I hope that when the next history of the College of Ag is written, they’ll say I was a good dean and director,� Guthrie said. “I want my time here to be remembered as a good period in Auburn’s history.�

Kirby Turgnage, chaplain; Matthew McGough, secretary of the budget and finance committee; and Kelsey Chauvin, senator of veterinary medicine. Senators were reminded that Verizon Wireless Applications are due this Friday. Positions for cabinet will be posted at the end of the week. The SGA is still looking for a speaker for Academic

Integrity Week. President Kurt Sasser acknowledged the launching of the safety campaign which began Monday morning. Sasser also reminded those in attendance to vote for “All Auburn, All Orange� T-shirts April 5 April 9. During the invocation, senators were reminded to act with humility and mercy.

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Ph.D. and had done well in my government job and might have the potential to manage aspects at the University.â&#x20AC;? Two years later, Guthrie became dean of the College of Agriculture. In 1988, he was named associate dean of international agriculture programs until his first official retirement in 2003, according to the Auburn University Web site. His contributions to agriculture have not gone unnoticed among colleagues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He has a deep connection to agriculture because he grew up in agriculture and understands the joys and plights of family farming,â&#x20AC;? Coleman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The core of his decision making has been whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best for agriculture and whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best for Auburn.â&#x20AC;? Guthrieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent induction into the Agriculture Hall of Fame reflects just how many people recognize his contributions, Coleman said. Wayne Greene, professor and head of the animal science department, came to Auburn a few weeks before Guthrie returned as dean in 2005 and has been in direct contact with him ever since. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dr. Guthrie is my immediate supervisor within the College of Agriculture and the Experiment Station, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve looked to him

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The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, APril 8, 2010

Camp

Tigers take to skies in professional aviation managemen MAXWELL NEWFIELD ASSOCIATE CAMPUS EDITOR

Every major at Auburn University can prepare someone for a successful and rewarding career, but only one can teach someone to fly the Goodyear blimp. The professional flight management degree prepares students for careers in every variety of flight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the professional flight management degree, students can come to Auburn to obtain a 4-year accredited business degree and also learn how to fly,â&#x20AC;? said Joe Hanna, aviation and supply chain management department chairman and professor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Upon graduation, students typically have their private, instrument, commercial and multi-engine pilot licenses.â&#x20AC;? Unfortunately for students hoping to release their inner Maverick, Goose or Iceman as soon as possible, the professional flight management program begins on the ground. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know how physics has a lecture and a lab associated with it? Well itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the same sort of idea with flight,â&#x20AC;? said Dale Watson, director of aviation education. All aspiring pilots begin their education in ground school, where the fundamental concepts of flight are taught. Upon mastering the basics of ground school, students can expect to fly up to three or four times a week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From the very first lesson you have the

controls in your hands while the instruc- ety. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From a business standpoint, flying tors are there to guide you,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. smaller aircraft from smaller airfields â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very hands-on start.â&#x20AC;? offers time savings and efficiency that Watson said the program for the first is not available through commercial air level of pilot certification, private pilot, is travel,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can visit more designed to take two semesters, but most business contacts in less time in more students receive their certification in a places and still be home at night with semester and a half. After receiving their your family.â&#x20AC;? initial certification, professional flight Of course, the majority of students who management students pursue certifica- receive flight education from Auburn will tions in instrument reading (so they can enter the professional piloting world. fly in less than optimal conditions), comâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Upon graduation, students of the promercial flight, multi-engine flight and fessional flight management program flight instruction. have the capability to become pilots for The professional flight regional commercial aircourses are open to all lines, fly for freight carriCheck majors. There are no preers, or pursue a career in requisites for the courses, online for business aviation,â&#x20AC;? Hanna except for ground school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auburn profesvideo coverage said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students in many sional flight management of this story. different majors either graduates currently fly for pursue a minor in profesFedEx, JetBlue, Delta and sional flight or simply take even serve as pilot of the a couple of our courses and learn how to Goodyear blimp.â&#x20AC;? fly,â&#x20AC;? Hanna said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many of these students Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right: the Goodyear blimp. simply want to get their private pilot liâ&#x20AC;&#x153;The reason you see (the blimp) on our cense or obtain an instrument rating so campus more than others is Marty Chanthey can fly as a hobby.â&#x20AC;? dler is an alumni and he comes around Watson said a background in flight is every chance he gets,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He is â&#x20AC;&#x153;a big distinctionâ&#x20AC;? on a rĂŠsumĂŠ. one of many outstanding program alumâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no small deal,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(A ni who serve on our department advisory background in flight) shows a clearly board.â&#x20AC;? demonstrated ability to learn to do a very Chandler has many alumni to comcomplicated thing and succeed at it.â&#x20AC;? pete with for the distinction of serving on Watson said students in any major will the advisory board. The Auburn Univerbenefit from flight education as there sity flight program was established in the are pilot jobs available throughout soci- late 1930â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when the University started a

training program to teach civilians to fly in World War II. The professional flight management program is now the second oldest in the country and well-respected within the aviation community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It comes from a combination of long heritage and a history of successful graduates,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are lots of Auburn graduates doing good things in aerospace which creates a positive reputation.â&#x20AC;? Students who want to become part of Auburnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s storied aviation program will have to pay the price, not only with their textbook, but with their checkbook. Airplanes cost between $130-$200 to rent per hour and Watson estimated students could spend $8,000-$9,000 on a private pilot certification, in addition to the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class enrollment fee. For Watson, the price of the course is worth it, considering the education the aspiring pilot will receive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are other places to learn to fly,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can become a pilot at your local airport. But the University aviation program provides a more solid foundation and a deeper comprehension of flight education.â&#x20AC;? But whatever the price, Watson said flying an airplane is an experience unlike any other. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first solo flight is a nervous experience for all concerned,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But it is a day the new pilot will remember and cherish for the rest of their life.â&#x20AC;?

Auburn aviation program fast facts Auburn University operates a fleet of 15 airplanes, most of which are single engine Cessna 172. There are currently 115 flight students, 85 percent of whom are professional flight students. Professional flight alumni currently fly for companies such as Delta, Jet Blue and FedEx. Auburn University planes can be rented for private flight for $130 $200 an hour.

Ask a flight instructo Tyler Clarkson graduated from the professional flight management program in 2008. Clarkson now works as a flight instructor in the aviation education program.

mercial (certification). We have a good in of students who come through hereâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;go students too. Most people who come aviation at Auburn, they know this is w they want to do and they work hard.

How did you get involved with the Auburn flight program? I had always heard of the Auburn Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flight program growing up. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m from Houston, Texas, and my father graduated from Tuscaloosa in engineering. Ever since I was a kid, I knew I wanted to fly and from the due process of visiting different colleges. I chose Auburn for the campus and the atmosphere and the flight program because it has a good name in the airline industry. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the first or second oldest in the United States. So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how I chose this program. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any friends that went through it; I just knew it had a good name in the airline industry and I wanted that to back me up for the future.

Has your experience with flight turn out to be what you expected when y were young? Yes and no. Ever since I was a kid, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ways thought military aviation, military av tion, and I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do military aviation. I did know too much about commercial aviat These are 172s. In commer aviation youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top Gunâ&#x20AC;? experience cause youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re carrying peo and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be s with them as much as you c When I came to college th what I learned, when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re an aircraft you need to be safe and professional as p sible. People think a good p is someone who can do ba CLARKSON rolls, hammerheads and sh What was your experience like other aircrafts down. A good going through the flight prolot is a safe pilot, which is a knowledgea gram? I was pro-flight. I enjoyed it thoroughly. If pilot and when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the aircraft, you itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something you do and you love, you will not trying to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top Gun.â&#x20AC;? You are alw soak up the knowledge so quick and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thinking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the engine goes out, where the way it was for me in pro-flight. I enjoy I safely put this aircraft?â&#x20AC;? So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how coming out here. I enjoyed the business experience has changed. It went from, y classes but if you think about if you wake know how a teenager wants to be all Mar up early in the morning and go flying and and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top Gun,â&#x20AC;? to being safe and kno youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re flying in the air by 8 oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock you re- edgeable. alize there are some people sitting in class Is it safe say that overall, you have right now, trying to stay awake, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re flying around on this beautiful morning, so I joyed your experience at Auburn? Oh yeah, very pleased. It surprised loved it a lot. how much I learned through the progr What do you do now that you have here and how much, even after teach how much you can still learn. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wh graduated? I am a full-time flight instructor. I fly from encourage my students to continue th one to five times a day, depending on weath- training more and more because yes, I kn er of course. I teach ground school, I teach this stuff going through the program lab and I have about ten students. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m getting when you start teaching it, it only makes t them through private, instrument and com- knowledge concrete.

Photos by Philip Smith / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

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The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, APril 8, 2010

Campus, B5

Tigers take to skies in professional aviation management MAXWELL NEWFIELD ASSOCIATE CAMPUS EDITOR

Every major at Auburn University can prepare someone for a successful and rewarding career, but only one can teach someone to fly the Goodyear blimp. The professional flight management degree prepares students for careers in every variety of flight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the professional flight management degree, students can come to Auburn to obtain a 4-year accredited business degree and also learn how to fly,â&#x20AC;? said Joe Hanna, aviation and supply chain management department chairman and professor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Upon graduation, students typically have their private, instrument, commercial and multi-engine pilot licenses.â&#x20AC;? Unfortunately for students hoping to release their inner Maverick, Goose or Iceman as soon as possible, the professional flight management program begins on the ground. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know how physics has a lecture and a lab associated with it? Well itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the same sort of idea with flight,â&#x20AC;? said Dale Watson, director of aviation education. All aspiring pilots begin their education in ground school, where the fundamental concepts of flight are taught. Upon mastering the basics of ground school, students can expect to fly up to three or four times a week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From the very first lesson you have the

controls in your hands while the instruc- ety. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From a business standpoint, flying tors are there to guide you,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. smaller aircraft from smaller airfields â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very hands-on start.â&#x20AC;? offers time savings and efficiency that Watson said the program for the first is not available through commercial air level of pilot certification, private pilot, is travel,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can visit more designed to take two semesters, but most business contacts in less time in more students receive their certification in a places and still be home at night with semester and a half. After receiving their your family.â&#x20AC;? initial certification, professional flight Of course, the majority of students who management students pursue certifica- receive flight education from Auburn will tions in instrument reading (so they can enter the professional piloting world. fly in less than optimal conditions), comâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Upon graduation, students of the promercial flight, multi-engine flight and fessional flight management program flight instruction. have the capability to become pilots for The professional flight regional commercial aircourses are open to all lines, fly for freight carriCheck majors. There are no preers, or pursue a career in requisites for the courses, online for business aviation,â&#x20AC;? Hanna except for ground school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auburn profesvideo coverage said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students in many sional flight management of this story. different majors either graduates currently fly for pursue a minor in profesFedEx, JetBlue, Delta and sional flight or simply take even serve as pilot of the a couple of our courses and learn how to Goodyear blimp.â&#x20AC;? fly,â&#x20AC;? Hanna said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many of these students Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right: the Goodyear blimp. simply want to get their private pilot liâ&#x20AC;&#x153;The reason you see (the blimp) on our cense or obtain an instrument rating so campus more than others is Marty Chanthey can fly as a hobby.â&#x20AC;? dler is an alumni and he comes around Watson said a background in flight is every chance he gets,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He is â&#x20AC;&#x153;a big distinctionâ&#x20AC;? on a rĂŠsumĂŠ. one of many outstanding program alumâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no small deal,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(A ni who serve on our department advisory background in flight) shows a clearly board.â&#x20AC;? demonstrated ability to learn to do a very Chandler has many alumni to comcomplicated thing and succeed at it.â&#x20AC;? pete with for the distinction of serving on Watson said students in any major will the advisory board. The Auburn Univerbenefit from flight education as there sity flight program was established in the are pilot jobs available throughout soci- late 1930â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when the University started a

training program to teach civilians to fly in World War II. The professional flight management program is now the second oldest in the country and well-respected within the aviation community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It comes from a combination of long heritage and a history of successful graduates,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are lots of Auburn graduates doing good things in aerospace which creates a positive reputation.â&#x20AC;? Students who want to become part of Auburnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s storied aviation program will have to pay the price, not only with their textbook, but with their checkbook. Airplanes cost between $130-$200 to rent per hour and Watson estimated students could spend $8,000-$9,000 on a private pilot certification, in addition to the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class enrollment fee. For Watson, the price of the course is worth it, considering the education the aspiring pilot will receive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are other places to learn to fly,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can become a pilot at your local airport. But the University aviation program provides a more solid foundation and a deeper comprehension of flight education.â&#x20AC;? But whatever the price, Watson said flying an airplane is an experience unlike any other. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first solo flight is a nervous experience for all concerned,â&#x20AC;? Watson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But it is a day the new pilot will remember and cherish for the rest of their life.â&#x20AC;?

Auburn aviation program fast facts Auburn University operates a fleet of 15 airplanes, most of which are single engine Cessna 172. There are currently 115 flight students, 85 percent of whom are professional flight students. Professional flight alumni currently fly for companies such as Delta, Jet Blue and FedEx. Auburn University planes can be rented for private flight for $130 $200 an hour.

Ask a flight instructor Tyler Clarkson graduated from the professional flight management program in 2008. Clarkson now works as a flight instructor in the aviation education program.

mercial (certification). We have a good influx of students who come through hereâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;good students too. Most people who come into aviation at Auburn, they know this is what they want to do and they work hard.

How did you get involved with the Auburn flight program? I had always heard of the Auburn Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flight program growing up. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m from Houston, Texas, and my father graduated from Tuscaloosa in engineering. Ever since I was a kid, I knew I wanted to fly and from the due process of visiting different colleges. I chose Auburn for the campus and the atmosphere and the flight program because it has a good name in the airline industry. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the first or second oldest in the United States. So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how I chose this program. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any friends that went through it; I just knew it had a good name in the airline industry and I wanted that to back me up for the future.

Has your experience with flight turned out to be what you expected when you were young? Yes and no. Ever since I was a kid, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always thought military aviation, military aviation, and I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do military aviation. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know too much about commercial aviation. These are 172s. In commercial aviation youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to get the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top Gunâ&#x20AC;? experience because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re carrying people and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be safe with them as much as you can. When I came to college thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I learned, when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in an aircraft you need to be as safe and professional as possible. People think a good pilot is someone who can do barrel CLARKSON What was your experience like rolls, hammerheads and shoot going through the flight proother aircrafts down. A good pigram? lot is a safe pilot, which is a knowledgeable I was pro-flight. I enjoyed it thoroughly. If pilot and when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the aircraft, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something you do and you love, you will not trying to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top Gun.â&#x20AC;? You are always soak up the knowledge so quick and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thinking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the engine goes out, where can the way it was for me in pro-flight. I enjoy I safely put this aircraft?â&#x20AC;? So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how my coming out here. I enjoyed the business experience has changed. It went from, you classes but if you think about if you wake know how a teenager wants to be all Marine up early in the morning and go flying and and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top Gun,â&#x20AC;? to being safe and knowlyouâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re flying in the air by 8 oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock you re- edgeable. alize there are some people sitting in class right now, trying to stay awake, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Is it safe say that overall, you have enflying around on this beautiful morning, so I joyed your experience at Auburn? loved it a lot. Oh yeah, very pleased. It surprised me how much I learned through the program What do you do now that you have here and how much, even after teaching, graduated? how much you can still learn. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I I am a full-time flight instructor. I fly from encourage my students to continue their one to five times a day, depending on weath- training more and more because yes, I knew er of course. I teach ground school, I teach this stuff going through the program but lab and I have about ten students. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m getting when you start teaching it, it only makes that them through private, instrument and com- knowledge concrete.

Photos by Philip Smith / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

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New members, one time only. Enjoy 7 consecutive days of Sunbed tanning. Sunless sessions expire within 60 days of purchase. Plus or dark sessions additional charge. See salon for complete details. Expires 4/30/10.

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The Auburn Plainsman

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Recession revitalizes computer science, software engineering BETHANY DONALDSON

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen this three times in computer science,â&#x20AC;? Chapman said. WRITER â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the mid-1980s, when PCs beWhile other programs at colleges came available to the public, anothacross the nation have seen a decline er in the late â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s with the Internet in the past two years, computer sci- and now after the economy has botence programs have seen a 14 per- tomed out.â&#x20AC;? cent increase nation-wide. A major reason for this increase Richard Chapman, professor in is because of the multitude of techcomputer science, said enrollment nical jobs available to students in computer science programs gen- graduating with a computer science erally follows patdegree, said James terns of the econoCross, professor in my, and Auburn is computer science,. on the high end of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jobs are across When people the curve. the entire specsee opportunity in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;When people trum,â&#x20AC;? Cross said. see opportunity in a field, they flock to it. â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything from enfield, they flock to it,â&#x20AC;? try level work to Chapman said. very technical, it Richard Chapman, could be a network Barrett Hoover, professor in computer administrator or junior in mechanical science software engineering, said he technichose engineering cian.â&#x20AC;? because he sees the need for engiTechwebâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s article said U.S. employneers. ers complained about falling U.S. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Engineering applies to every part student enrollment in computer sciof our lives now,â&#x20AC;? Hoover said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ev- ence. erything that is designed is designed The article stated people can be by an engineer. Engineering is a field optimistic about the field of comthat will continue to grow.â&#x20AC;? puter science, as more and more stuAn article published in 2009 by dents are seeking advanced degrees Techweb stated enrollment of U.S. in computer science. students in computer science had In December 2009, an article pubincreased for the first time since the lished by The New York Times stated dot com bust. a re-vamping of high school comput-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

er courses will increase enrollment in the programs. According to the article, too many high schools focus on using the softwareâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not how it works. Robert Reich, professor at University of California, stated in the article that new technology would be the focus of most jobs in the modern economy. The Auburn computer science program has seen increases similar to the recent national trends. Chapman said Auburn attracts students because of the many options available in computer science and software engineering. Auburn also has a wireless engineering program, an opportunity students may not find elsewhere in the nation. The degree is available to those hoping to work with mobile software development, such as cell phone technology, Chapman said. Enrollment in the program dropped from 900 to 300 after the dot com bust, and it has begun to increase in the last year, Champan said. Hoover said he thinks the increase in the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popularity can be attributed to computers permeation of popular society. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is an obvious choice for our generation because we have grown up around computers,â&#x20AC;? Hoover said.

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Ask a Professor Q: Why are dogsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; noses always wet? Dogs noses are not always wet; they may always just seem that way. Indeed, dog noses lack the typical glands associated with sweat in people and as such, canine noses are often dry. Sometimes the nose is not wet, but runny, much the same as in people. This may be an indication of a virus infection or allergies. However, the more common state of the canine nose is moist. If the nose is wet, it may be due to licking. Dogs lack the type of sweat glands that dissipate heat in people, which is one reason why they pant so much (to release body heat). The act of licking the nose followed by evaporation may be one way that dogs cool themselves, much like licking their feet. Dogs with short noses (such as Pugs or Boxers) may not be able to reach their nose as easily and thus may be more likely to have a dry nose, or even a crusty nose. Although it has been suggested that licking may enhance the canine sense of smell, the nerves facilitating the excellent canine sense of smell are inside, not outside the nose. Of course, the nose may be wet simply because the dog generally has its nose to the ground, and thus can pick up the moisture of dew. One final observation about the wet nose is that it generally is a cold nose. So perhaps we notice the wet nose in our dogs more? -Dawn M. Boothe, DVM, Ph.D., professor and director of Clinical Pharmacology

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Thursday, April 8, 2010

The Auburn Plainsman

Campus, B7

Campus Calendar Campus events calendar is provided by University-chartered organizations. Submit written events to The Plainsman office between 7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., prior to the Monday before publication. Limit 30 words. May be edited for pertinent content. Thursday, April 8 Fine Art Juried Student Exhibition & Joyce & Roger Lethander Awards in Art 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Biggin Gallery, 101 Biggin Hall Book Talk—Kathryn Braund 3 p.m. - 4 p.m., Special

Employment For Sale -Real Estate -Mobile Homes -Miscellaneous For Rent -Homes -Mobile Homes -Apartments

Line Ads First 15 Words $6 $0.40 per The deadline to place a classified ad is 3:00 p.m. the Friday preceding the Thursday of publication. The Auburn Plainsman reserves the right to refuse any ad it considers misleading or in poor taste. No Work at Home ads will be accepted.

Collections and Archives Department, RBD Library Biggio Center Professional Development Seminar 3 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., 2222 Student Center Friday, April 9 Fine Art Juried Student Exhibition & Joyce &

Wanted -Roommates -Items Service

Border Classifieds Local Rate: $11.00 per column inch National Rate: $16.00 per column inch Other than logos, no artwork is accepted. Minimum ad size is 1 column x 4 inches. Maximum ad size is 1 column x 8 inches. Space reservation deadline for border classified is 3:00 p.m. the Friday prior to publication. No advertising discounts apply.

is seeking two outgoing, enthusiastic students to lease apartments. Hourly Need Extra Income! +commission is the BEST Unemployed? Credit in the business! No prior Problems,foreclosures, experience needed. E-mail change your situation resume to missy@tpco. NOW! Earn $ 800 quickly com or apply @ the leasand easily. FREE TRAIN- ing ofc. ING! 1(866) 468-5891; prosperitynow2010@ gmail.com

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Faculty Recital: Kathleen Allen, Soprano 7:30 p.m. - 9 p.m., Goodwin Music Building Recital Hall City Lights - Tiger Nights 7 p.m. - 11:59 p.m., SC

Saturday, April 10 DogPatch 5:30 p.m. - 11 p.m., OTS House 1585 Wire Road, Auburn Monday, April 12 College of Ag Dean/ AAES Director Candidate interviews 1:45 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.,

207 Comer Hall Luther Strange for Attorney General 5 p.m. - 6 p.m., Student Center

Lunch & Learn Series: “Invisible Voices: Celebrating, Minorities in Architecture, Design & Construction” 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m., 2310 Student Center

Wednesday, April 14 Poetry Reading 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m., Auburn University Bookstore

Comedy Show featuring Kevin Hart 7:30 p.m. - 9 p.m., Student Activities Center

Beverly Apartments & Duplexes

Lost & Found -Items -Pets

UNIVERSITY VILLAGE

STUDENTS- FULL OR PART TIMES Big 10 Tires is a Southeast independent tire retailer with over 80 locations from Atlanta to Orlando, through the Florida panhandle and all of Alabama. We currently have a 2nd Assistant Manager/Sales & Installation position available at our Auburn, Alabama location. Professional with automotive/ retail experience. Competitive wages, insurance, 401 K, vacation and more Apply in person to 1347 South College Street, forward resume in confidence to jobs@big10tires.com or fax to 251-666-9116.

Roger Lethander Awards in Art 8 a.m. - 4 p.m., Biggin Gallery, 101 Biggin Hall

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

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The Data Warehouse Developer’s Handbook is a comprehensive overview of data warehousing, data marts, decision support architecture,and their utilization to attaining business objectives. http:www.datawarehousedevelopershandbook.com 2 male room mates needed. $400/month. Townhouse located off North Dean Rd in private subdivision five minutes from campus. Tiger transit stop available. Living areas furnished, covered parking, pool. Rent includes washer/dryer, all utilities, cable, internet included except electric shared 3 ways. Contact moultcw@auburn.edu or 615-319-9577

Pet Friendly Are you and your pet Tired of crowded apartment living? We have 1,2,3 and 4 bedroom houses on large lots in quiet, safe neighborhoods with fishing & hiking trails. They are competitively priced! Call Ernest at 703-7771 4 bedroom 2/ba-brick house/Total electric/W/D DW/Hard, Wood Floors/ Central H&A/ Patio/Fenced Back Yard, Near AU/300 Each. Blake Real Estate 5246807 or 887-1822 3 Bedroom-2 bath houseW/D-D/W Central Heat & Air. fenced yard-pationear AU-300 eachBlake Real Estate 524-6807-887-1822 Quiet 3/BR/2BA House, 2 BR duplex, 2 BR T House On 5 Acre lake. 1 to 2 Adults Preferred Call 334-887-9573. Available August 2010. Spacious 3 bedroom 3 bath Twinhome. All appliances included. Dogs welcome. Fenced backyard. $1,125 334-750-9792

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Duplex sublease, or rent immed. $675/m! 3Bd/2Ba on Harmon, AU. New Floor. Clean. All appl. 329-8385

3 bedrooms/3 bathroom duplex $325/room Large living area, patio, all appliances, washer/ dryer. Tiger Transit. 706-718-3860

1 bedroom apt-total electric-W/D-D/W very quiet-$295 month-Water, sewage, garbage, furnished-524-6807 or 887-1822 Blake Real Estate

3 bedrooms/3bathroom duplex $325/room Large living area; patio; all appliances, washer/ dryer. Tiger Transit. 706-718-3860 3 bedroom apt. Total electric-W/D-D/W Water, sewage, garbage, furnished-$450 monthly very quiet. Blake Real Estate 524-6807-887-1822 EAGLES LANDING, HOUSES NOT APARTMENTS!! 4 BD/4 BATH HOUSES WITH WASHER/DRYERS, ALL KITCHEN APPLIANCES, BACK PATIOS, LARGE FRONT PORCHES, FREE YARD MAINTENANCE, BACK DOOR GARBAGE PICK UP, FREE WATER, ON TIGER TRANSIT AND MUCH MORE! RENT AMOUNT BASED ON NUMBER OF TENANTS. $100 OFF THE FIRST MONTHS RENT. CALL FAYE OR CINDY AT PRESTIGE PROPERTIES. THIS IS ONLY APPLICABLE FOR HOUSES OWNED BY TAYLOR PROPERTIES. 334-887-5274. EMAIL US AT EAGLESLANDINGSOUTH@GMAIL. COM, VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW. EAGLESLANDING. INFO

Full Size Washers & Dryers 2 Bedroom Furnished or Unfurnished Rent $530.00 per month Maximum of 2 people $265.00 ea. Transit Available 2 Bedroom Rent $550.00 per month Maximum of 2 people or Family. $275.00 ea.

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The Auburn Plainsman

Campus, B8

Thursday, April 8, 2010

‘Eggstravaganza’ Poultry Science students sponsored eggthemed events for College of Agriculture MARNIE JUSTER WRITER

The “egg-celent” students of the Department of Poultry Science and members of the Poultry Science Club sponsored their second annual Eggstravaganza last Thursday. The event consisted of dinner, an egg hunt and the Egg-Stravagant Olympics. “The idea came from a similar event that I started while working in the College of Agricultural Sciences at Southern  Illinois University,” said Amanda Martin, co-adviser of the Poultry Science Club. “I gave the idea to the Poultry Science Club and let them run with it. The purpose of the event is to provide a fun-filled evening for College of Agriculture faculty, students, staff and their families. It is just nice to get everyone together for great food and entertainment.” Donald Conner, head

of the poultry science department, said the event was intended to instill an atmosphere of fun and relaxation in the College of Agriculture. “We try to give back to the college and just have a fun event,” Conner said. “We want some publicity for poultry science out of it, but it’s just something we can do for the whole college.” When dinner began, Ag Heritage Park was crowded with students, faculty, staff and their families. The buffet included Country’s Barbecue potato salad, beans, barbecue chicken sandwiches and beverages . “The chicken is actually stuff that they smoked down on the farm,” said Leslie Rose, research assistant and poultry science graduate student. “We’ve got a big smoker out there, and we have the smoked bird sale every year. Those are some of the ones that they had, and they just

shred them and mix them with barbecue sauce.” Poultry Science Club members use the profit from the fall and spring smoked chicken sales to put on the Eggstravaganza and other events. “We have to help out with some things to keep our scholarships,” said Matthew Bailey, senior club member. Overall, member attendance increased this year. “The Eggstravaganza is a very good opportunity for students to get out of the classroom,” said Wayne Greene, head of the animal sciences department. “It’s after office hours for the faculty and staff to also join in. Families bring their children to do Easter egg hunts and to do some Egg Olympic events in a competition that’s outside of the classroom reducing the stress of taking tests and studying hard.” As Greene said, many of the students, faculty and staff brought their families

On the Concourse What do you think about the new safety signs on Magnolia Street?

Carolyn Rush / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Lee Simmons watches his daughter Kimberly open her eggs during the Eggstravaganza.

along to do the egg hunt and participate in the EggStravagant Olympics with them while getting an opportunity to experience the unique event. Faculty member DQ Fields attended with his family. “The kids don’t want

to leave,” said Fields after an entire afternoon spent searching for the decorative trophies. After the egg hunt, the games for the adults began. Teams of four were created prior to the event to compete in the EggStravagant Olympics. This

year the Egg-Stravagant Olympics featured the blind egg hunt, orange pass, egg in spoon and watermelon roll. The Olympics were the last event this year, but Martin said egg searchers can expect the same type of revelry next year.

“Considering I have to cross Magnolia every day it’s probably a good thing, but it’s bad that it took someone getting hit for them to get put up.”

“I think they’re helpful because it enhances the safety of the street.”

- Rachel Edgar, senior in industrial systems engineering

- Justin Smith, sophomore in biomedical sciences

Auburn. are you?

i am

Glomerata yearbook

getare your you?

Lowder C-Zone•AU Student Center• Roosevelt Concourse

April 12th - 16th, 2010

For more information, contact Chayla M. Handley at cmh0004@auburn.edu.


Learn how to properly make your computer operate faster C5

THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 2010

Submit your pet’s photos for the Humane Society’s calendar contest C7

The best and worst parts of Auburn’s music scene C3

INTRIGUE

C

www.theplainsman.com

Students swiftly seeking hugs Michael and Ryan created ‘A Hug From Taylor Swift’ campaign, successfully making Swift swoon CALLIE GARRETT INTRIGUE EDITOR

Two Auburn students seeking a hug from Taylor Swift have created a Web site and uploaded videos targeting the Grammy award winning singer-songwriter, shockingly receiving a response from Swift via YouTube. Swift’s video response requested a challenge for the two men, Michael and Ryan. They successfully completed their first challenge, helping an old lady across the street, and now Swift has is-

sued challenge No. 2: creatively incorporate the number 13 in their next video. The initial response from Swift to the Web site, A Hug From Taylor Swift, came as a complete shock to Michael Wekall and Ryan Leander. “We were both completelyy shocked and still are to this day,” said Wekall, senior in history. “When we started, I think we thought it was a possibility that we would get this to happen, but

Photo contributed by Michael Wekall

> Turn to SWIFT, C2

Headache helpers heal

Headaches can be cured by various tactics, changing habits SARAH PHILLIPS ASSISTANT INTRIGUE EDITOR

Whether it’s from lack of sleep, too much stress or rainy weather, people are plagued with headaches. With the combination of poor diets and heavy procrastination, students’ heads seem to be pounding more than ever, but the answers to ending them may be easier said than done. Dr. Frederick Kam, executive and medical director of the Auburn University Medical Clinic, said headaches are one of the most common ailments. “There are those that are sinus related, (or caused by) allergies or cysts,” Kam said. “You can have headaches related to eye strain. People often get them from staring at computer screens.” Laura Macedonia, junior in pre-vet, said she gets headaches frequently. “(They’re worst) anytime I’m really stressed out about school,” Macedonia said. Kam said stress and poor eating habits are often the easiest headaches to relieve. “If you can find the under-

lying cause, then you can end them,” Kam said. “Take care of the cause.” But if the pain cannot easily be resolved, Kam said he suggests taking medications such as Tylenol, Motrin or Advil. For migraines, he said Aleve would work best. Instead of running to her medicine cabinet, Macedonia said she goes to bed. “I try to sleep it off,” Macedonia said. “If that doesn’t work, I take some aspirin.” Although Macedonia will occasionally pop a headache reliever, she finds the most effective way to get rid of her pain doesn’t involve medicine. “Drinking a lot of water and sleeping is best for me,” Macedonia said. Rachel Greer, senior in elementary education, also avoids medicine until she feels it’s necessary. “I’ll eat and nap,” Greer said. “Exercise is also good for me.” But if the pain gets to be too much, or she realizes her headache is really a migraine, Greer turns to a more powerful resource. “I can’t function without Excedrin for migraines,”

Philip Smith/ ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Greer said. Unlike Greer, many people live with headaches that are more than just a natural nuisance. “There are a number of people with migraine headaches that are misdiagnosed,” Kam said. “They’ll say, ‘It’s just sinuses,’ or ‘It’s just the weather,’ but it’s often neurological.” Many people also blame caffeine for their daily cranial aches, but Greer said she feels the opposite works for her. “I don’t drink caffeine,” Greer said. “But the caffeine in Excedrin is what helps me. I’m pretty convinced.” Macedonia agrees caffeine only helps a headache, not enables one. “I know that some aspirin is made with caffeine,” Macedonia said. “That’s more of a part of the solution.” Kam agrees and disagrees with Greer and Macedonia. “It can help a headache,” Kam said. “Maybe a migraine or a tension headache. But if you’re a regular caffeine user you can experience caffeine withdrawal.”

Jared Waters / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Many species, such as ducks, show same sex affection, causing people to question if animals can be either gay or lesbian.

Can animals be gay? Affection animals show toward others of same sex may not be sexual BREE BOWEN WRITER

For as long as scientists have been studying animals, any behavior observed that could be deemed “homosexual” has usually been overlooked and thought of as practice for when it comes time to actually mate. Until now. Recently, biologists have begun to look at same-sex animal relationships in a more serious manner. “Here’s the problem: we know that animals engage in same sex mounting, so we call it homosexual,” said Linda Wolfe, physical anthropologist with a specialization in primates at East Carolina University. “But the deal is with humans it’s the eroticism that’s behind the behavior. We don’t know about the eroticism behind

homosexual behavior in animals, so you can’t say they’re homosexual.” Recent studies in Oahu on albatross, large seabirds, have shown out of 125 nests at one location, 39 belonged to femalefemale pairs. Albastross can live for 60 or 70 years, and typically mate with the same bird throughout their lifetime. As a result, biologists claim the birds have the lowest “divorce rate” of any bird. The studies showed that many female birds would copulate with a male, but do everything else a “couple” would do, such as incubating the egg and preening feathers, with another female. “Everything animals do is instinctual,” said Ted Albert, veterinarian at South College Vet Clinic. “A male dog will hump another male dog, but that’s not sexual activity, that’s a dominance issue.” Biologists who studied the albatross said that terms such as “lesbian” or “straight” are strictly human terms and should not be assigned to the birds. Even though the birds are doing everything a normal couple would do, they are not actually attempting to have sex. “When there is same-sex at> Turn to ANIMALS, C2

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The Auburn Plainsman

Intrigue, C2

ANIMALS >From C1

tempted mating going on in some species, it is showing dominance a lot of times, but I think there are other species that are more highly evolved that may actually show homosexual tendencies,” said Hannah Gunter, junior in wildlife sciences. Albatross, however, are not the only species observed to have “homosexual” behaviors. Same-sex sexual and non-sexual mating activity has been recorded in more than 450 different species, including penguins, dolphins, bears, gorillas, owls, guppies

and flamingos. While “practice” seems like a logical explanation for this same-sex sexual activity, Wolfe thinks otherwise. In studies of the Japanese Macaque, a type of primate, Wolfe observed female-female pairs mounting each other, playful head bopping and even looking in each other’s eyes. “These are adult females,” Wolfe said. “They don’t need the practice— they have offspring.” Whether instinctual, dominance-relate, terms like “homosexual” or “gay” will not be assigned to non-humans any time soon.

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Interview courtesy proves success SARAH PHILLIPS ASSISTANT INTRIGUE EDITOR

With only five weeks left until graduation for seniors, interviews are more important than ever. But before someone can get his or her perfect job, they need to be aware of a few common myths dealing with interviews. First, regardless if a job offer is received, a thankyou note is always necessary. Janet Johnson, principal at Auburn Early Education Center, said group interviews often give an applicant time to stand out. "When there is a group panel for an interview committee, then the person being interviewed should follow up with a note to each member of the committee,” Johnson said. “That is what will set the applicant apart from others. Usually the person only follows up with the one person they interviewed with." Joyce Morgan, associate superintendent for Auburn City Schools, said she thinks thank-you notes have become underrated.

SWIFT >From C1

when she came out with that video and challenged us, it was beyond my wildest imagination. It is pretty cool to say that you get to play a game with Taylor Swift, with hundreds of thousands of people watching.” Leander, senior in biblical studies, said the first time he heard there was a response from Taylor Swift he said he basically had a wave of emotions, everything from laughing to crying and laughing again. Swift said in her YouTube video that Wekall and Leander went completely over and beyond what she expected of them for their first challenge. She said she and her band watched their video of helping an old lady across the street over and over, amazed by the dedication. “Challenge No. 1 experience was amazing,” Leander said. “Everyone helping out with videos from

“I think it shows respect for the (interviewer),” Morgan said. “I have received very few thank-you notes and I have been interviewing for 30-plus years.” Also, interviews should always be approached as a learning opportunity. Jake Brantley, senior in electrical engineering and music, said he had never thought about taking notes at an interview. “I never have (taken antley said. notes),” Brantley “But I don’t uld think it would bbe a problem.” A l though Brantley was inexd perienced with notee he taking, new said he knew certain things mentioned in an interview should always be remembered. “(I’d write down) company philosophy, mission statements and job descriptions,” Brantley said. Another important thing to remember when looking for a job is to know

when to apply. Most college students have heard to start applying early and to be sure to have a guarantee by spring, but many businesses are actually looking for work at all times of the year, including summer. “In the business of education, often times applicants are hired during the summer months,” Johnson said. “This is quite different from other businesses, but it is important for those sstudents seeking jobs to c o n tinue to conttact the different businesse nesses and to check online for any possible openings.” It is true that before applying to a job an applicant should make sure they’re an appropriate fit for the position, but being the most qualified candidate does not always guarantee a job offer.

“The interview process is a very complex process,” Johnson said. “The committee has to base their decision on what's written on paper, which is often times limiting as well as the interview itself. Many times candidates who have a relationship with the organization already may have a slight advantage in getting the job.” Morgan said she believes that many businesses will soon be moving toward performance-based interviews. “People go into paid internships to get observed,” Morgan said. “You see their comings and goings. Upon receiving a job offer, it’s important to remember that compromises and negotiations are always allowed. It is also important to speak up in the beginning about the desired job responsibilities and positions before work actually begins. “If it’s your first job, you don’t have much negotiating power,” Morgan said. “I’d have an offer in my hands before I started asking questions.”

around the world and then having everyone at Toomer's Corner was just awesome. It meant a lot to me that people would show up to support us and I really enjoyed meeting the people there and then on top of that having Aubie come and be a part of it as well! It was all around a blast and I wouldn't have changed a thing.” The feedback they have received from A Hug From Taylor Swift has escalated since the day they received a response video from Swift. “We have had people from all over the world join our group; we have had radio interviews in North Dakota and Michigan,” Wekall said. “It has just been very surreal and so much fun.” Nicole LaMontagne, senior in public relations, said she is friends with Wekall and Leander and offered to help them with any media publicity they may need. She has been helping out with the campaign by promoting A Hug

From Taylor Swift in various ways. “I have written an article about A Hug from Taylor Swift on my Auburn Family blog, tweeted Taylor on Twitter, tweeted and Facebooked about their efforts and contacted Star 94 (a popular radio station in Atlanta),” LaMontagne said. “Also, my roommate and I have contacted the Ellen Show, Regis and Kelly, Oprah and Good Morning America. We are all hoping that one of these will pull through!” The Auburn family has pulled together throughout this challenge receiving help from PR majors and Web site designers. “Our friend David helped build the Web site,” Wekall said. “I am the video person. I love to shoot and edit videos, and so that is why this whole idea really came about. It is something that I would love to do the rest of my life.” Those interested want to know if Swift is going to issue this perfect hug

when Wekall and Leander complete all challenges. “I don't know exactly when the hug might happen but so long as we are completing the challenges I think we are going to get the hug,” Wekall said. “I'm thinking it might happen at one of her concerts since she is on tour right now, but honestly I have no idea when and how it is going to happen.” Leander said he doesn’t plan for his hug to be anything like what they showed in their first video, but possibly something in between the two extremes. “I am aiming for one not too short and not too long to avoid awkwardness, but I will treasure the moment and just have to play it by ear,” Leander said. The second challenge was issued from Swift April 1. Michael and Ryan continue to brainstorm on how to incorporate the number 13 for their second challenge, while hosting a contest for others to submit videos of their ideas.

Random

What is your favorite Taylor Swift song? None of them What is your favorite beer? Yuengling How do you get rid of a headache? Drink Yuengling. What was your first pet’s name? Snowy

Joshua Chu freshman, undeclared

ABOUT JOE: Age: 27 Hometown: Lancaster Greatest fear: Being burned alive Hobbies: Sports as a whole Random fact: I was born in Hawaii. Availability: In a relationship



What did your last text message received say? “I love you.” It was from my girlfriend. What was the last movie you watched? The Express Are you left or right handed? Predominantly right. But I use my left hand for things. Do you have a tattoo? Yes

Have you ever used self tanner? No. I don’t need to. Who is your celebrity crush? LeAnn Rimes What is your favorite ice cream? Raspberry

How many states have you lived in? Four Who do you want to win the NCAA National Championship Game? Neither, but I’ll go for Butler because I really dislike Duke.

What was the last thing you cooked? Roast beef




ARTS

ENTERTAINMENT

Intrigue, C3

The Best and the Worst Three local bands weigh in on the best, worst parts of the Auburn music scene

The Quiet Words

Ernest Goes to Jazz

Joseph Wolnski

Bottle Up and Explode Caleb Thomas

Jonathan Harms

“The best part of Auburn's music scene is knowing there will always be a ton of people at shows. From my perspective as a listener, I feel like there are many good bands in Auburn that I like to go see.”

“What I don't like is that there aren't a lot of places to play where you don't have to charge people at the door. We played at The Independent once, but everywhere else charges fans. We sometimes play at house parties, but those almost always get called for noise complaints. It's pretty hard to find a place to play.”

“The best part is probably the downtown area. I just like the way everything is built up and compact down there.”

“I wish there were more bands. It’s not a very big town and there’s not too much you can expect. I think if the University still had a jazz program, there would probably be a bigger pool of players.”

Photo submitted by Joseph Wolnski

Photo submitted by Jonathan Harms

The Quiet Words is a relatively new band to Auburn, having only formed last semester. Joseph Wolnski, junior in computer science, writes songs for the band, something he has been doing for years. The band’s first show took place in a backyard on Toomer Street, and they have since continued performing, making appearances at the Independent and Nomad Supply in Birmingham, Wolnski’s old stomping ground. The band describes its sound as folk rock with a bit of a flair.

Ernest Goes to Jazz started in January 2009 with five guys trying to play jazz every night. The band started playing around bars in Auburn and was once the house band for Amsterdam Cafe. The band still performs, but now with a few of the original members replaced. The band calls its sound folk rock and lists Miles Davis and Cannonball Adderley as influences. All the members are jazz-trained musicians who come from the Auburn-Opelika area.

“I feel like the best part of it is the intimacy. It’s all your friends who come to the shows and their friends. You see a lot of the same people at shows who are really passionate about discovering new music. I think we’re on a wave of some new, good bands.” “We have 26,000 students, but most of the bands around are cover bands. I think a lot of young people around here have forgotten that it’s good to be youthful and experiment. I feel like The Independent is the only place in town really fostering the creative spirit, and I don’t know what Auburn would be without it.”

Photo submitted by Caleb Thomas Bottle up and Explode is a pop influenced five piece garage rock band from Auburn. They're currently self recording their debut EP to be released this summer. More at their Web site bottleupandexplode.bandcamp. com.

Interviews and band biographies by Crystal Cole / STAFF REPORTER

Review: 2K Sports goes yard with MLB 2K10 PHILIP SMITH ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

If you’re like me and have been a baseball fan all of your life, you might recall spending blissful hours playing those old Sega-based baseball games from the ’90s. Someone has finally produced a game to surpass the 16-bit glory of my beloved Genesis days. In my childhood years, a good game meant it had either Griffey or Clemens’ face on the front of the cartridge. In the year 2010, MLB 2K10 will be the only name that matters. This is the

perfect game. From the seamless game play and awe-inspiring graphics, to the company giving out $1 million to the first person to pitch a perfect game, there is no doubt in my mind that this game will become a classic. I got the game the day it came out, have been playing it for a solid month and have innumerable praises and only a few small complaints. 2K10 is everything that its predecessor, MLB 2K9, was not. 2K9 was frustratingly glitchy and aesthetically disgusting. This year’s version has its glitches, but they aren’t the kinds

that make me want to throw my Xbox controller through my flat-screen. For example, no playercontrolled outfielder in 2K9 could ever make a catch, while the computer had no problem running laps around the field before laying out for a sick web-gem, robbing you of a double through the gap. 2K10 players will occasionally make a ridiculous catch, but it’s never anything superhuman. The graphics and commentary are amazing. It’s like being able to watch the Braves in HD three times a day, every day. Überkudos go to the broadcasters and writers

that spent so much time thinking out every possible play-by-play situation to make this game as real as it could be. The MyPlayer feature benefited from the recent patch, which fixed many errors. The feature gives the game an interesting, entertaining perspective of the game, but the schedule still seems to be a bit glitched. I finished my first season with the Mississippi Braves, but can’t proceed to the next season. The game play is smooth but challenging. The computer will score off any mistake you make and you will hang your head in

shame every time DBack’s pitcher, Ian Kennedy, embarrasses you with his knuckle curve. Tommy Hanson will burn every one of your batters with a high and tight, third strike 97 mph fastball. Albert Pujols will make your entire pitching staff cry, so go ahead and mash the right stick to draw the intentional walk with the bases loaded. You’re better off that way. Despite the challenges, you can always have a trick or two up your sleeve. From breaking up double plays at second and plowing through catchers at the plate, to using the defensive swing feature to

get your perfect pitch and the power swing to drive the 3-2 offering over the fence for a walk-off bomb, you will always have the upper hand. This game is perfect and has set an astronomically high standard for every baseball game to come. I recommend forgetting about pitching the $1 million perfect game, though. You should instead write e-mails and letters to 2K asking why baseball’s prodigy, Jason Heyward, isn’t in the Braves lineup. Seriously, 2K? The kid is 20 years old and has already been compared to Mantle and Aaron. Get your act together!

Special Events at Momma G’s Monday

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The Auburn Plainsman

Intrigue, C4

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Kerry’s recipe this week:



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Thursday, April 8, 2010

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Italian Barbecued Chicken Ingredients

Your Auburn Alumni Association is here to help you prepare for graduation. For everything a graduate needs, go to:

2 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves garlic, grated ¼ cup onion, minced ½ cup Balsamic vinegar 1/3 cup brown sugar 1 cup ketchup 1 teaspoon dried oregano ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon fresh black pepper 4 chicken breasts, on the bone

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Directions For the barbecue sauce: In a saucepan over medium heat, coat with the olive oil. Add the garlic and onion. Saute for five minutes. Add the Balsamic vinegar and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium low and simmer for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the brown sugar, ketchup, oregano, salt and pepper and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Preheat grill. Place the chicken breasts on grill. Cook for eight minutes and turn the chicken. Baste with the barbecue sauce every few minutes, turning the chicken as well. Cook for a total of 35 to 40 minutes.

www.theplainsman.com

Serves: 4


The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, April 8, 2010

How to

Make your comp uter faste r

ROD GUAJARDO MANAGING EDITOR

Intrigue, C5

ng the termining and purchasi ine d an ing cry , ch ng ma mi Screa amount of ram your otions em l ica typ st are he g hig nin ur its mo needs to run at having students can feel after potential. e and a third their computers freez After buying ram from . dly cte came pe th ex d un crash party, Chaloupka sai proit for l tal ins ll wi With applications and pus repair shop memory 0. grams requiring more $5 of a flat rate ple becomfrom computers, the sim er With Apple machines ut mp co a g e for kin oic ma ch to steps ing a more popular ce can an rm rfo used pe es ak pe iqu at hn n ru e tec machine students, th cintosh comvary depending on the Ma to speed up . nt from and operating system puters are a bit differe PC nt de stu , ka up alo Ch Todd that of PCs. runshop manager, has been uter Matt Caudle, computer er mp Cent ning the on-campus co specialist for the Haley ened in mco ple Ap d repair shop since it op sai re, sto Book tra ex no to . 1997 puters need little e ep ke to g rin Chaloupka has seen th pe service or tam mum xim ma at worst of the worst in co es ing them runn t us puter malfunctions, bu performance speed. st mo out the same techniques for “If your hard drive runs chines r,” we slo t ge l it’l all Windows-based ma of free space . of le ru od go “A brought into the shop d. Caudle sai can t 10% of “Something easy they thumb is to keep abou ey th “if d, sai ka free.” up y alo cit pa Ch do,” the hard drive ca s, one operple Ap e th of have anti-virus program payt The benefi are a lot es do it t tha is that’s expired, one they take tem ating sys e, fre t’s tha ge fra on de d ing for an of things, such as disk the ” . in off lly em ca th ati of one mentation, autom d. sai le ud Having several different Ca background, ll slow in anti-virus programs wi William Woodall, senior on all are ey th as wn rks do wo s machine software engineering, e files, uters in fighting to scan the sam and repairs Apple comp e. Chaloupka said. his spare tim space the Having sufficient free Woodall said some of x fi sy ea er oth an is ions ry lut so and memo quickest and easiest maur yo up er d ut ee sp mp n co ca t tha to help your Apple rme nu n ru t no chine, Chaloupka said. to run faster is inW a ing e nn ru e sam “If they ’re ous applications at th need dows XP machine, they e. tim r,” b pages 512 MB of ram or bette “If you have lots of we are ey th “If them,” on ash fl Chaloupka said. ve open that ha ey th , ine ch ma sta metimes flash, running a Vi ram Woodall said, “so of GB 1 of um nim mi s or even a Gneed a chine Youtube video ma 7 s ow ind W a rt to take it’s if and mail Web site, can sta of 2 GB power ing ess oc they need a minimum up a lot of pr er work ut mp co ur of ram.” yo ke and ma w. ww as ch su Jared Waters / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR es, sit Web a little harder.” l in decrucial.com, are usefu

Mark Toppen, junior in political science, gets frustrated using a computer in the library.

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With multiple campus sites or through GPC online, Georgia Perimeter College is the perfect place to log some extra class time and knock out that Chem course that’s been haunting you or just get ahead to close the gap between you and graduation. GPC courses approved by your institution are transferrable, so don’t even sweat that detail. Just remember, before you hit your favorite summer hangout, make sure you’re registered by the April 1 deadline to make the summer class cut!

WHAT WILL YOUR SUMMER BE ALL ABOUT? FIND OUT AT GEORGIA PERIMETER COLLEGE.

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Two Years That Will Change Your Life


The T he Aub Auburn Plainsman

Intrigue, C6

Guy’s Guide: Advice for upcoming graduates JILLIAN CLAIR STAFF REPORTER

Before a college graduate faces the real world, he or she must first successfully make it through graduation and all that comes with it. Claire Jackson, senior in accounting, said there are several things she thinks may be overlooked by her graduating friends. “Make sure to address invitations to friends and family at the very least three to four weeks prior to graduation,” Jackson said. “The sooner the better.” Jackson emphasized every graduating male should look his best on graduation day. A white collared shirt looks best under a cap and gown, and it is even nicer to wear a shirt that is colorcoordinated with the tassel, Jackson said. “Wear dark shoes and socks to coordinate with the black graduation gown,” Jackson said. “And if you don't have time to iron your gown, make sure to hang it in the bathroom while you shower to steam out the wrinkles.” Ryan Brooks, senior in accounting, said he is planning to dress his best. “I'm definitely planning to dress up,” Brooks said. “It's important to wear pants and shoes that when they come out of the bottom they won't clash, so I'm probably going to wear black pants and black shoes.” Simple black and white

ys a color combos are always safe choice. etting On graduation day, getting to the ceremony early to get a seat with friends is recommended, said Dale Coleman, professor of animal sciences and co-chair of the graduation committee. Also, Coleman said students should make sure their tassel matches their classmates. “Every once in a while you find out that everyone around you is wearing a golden tassel, and you're the only one sitting there wearing a purple one, and you start wondering what's going on,” Coleman said. “There are extra tassels on the floor, so you can get that corrected if it's incorrect.” After the ceremony, Jackson said it is important to find family and friends quickly. “Find a creative place to meet up with your friends and family after the ceremony,” Jackson said. “Everyone usually meets at the eagle outside of the Coliseum so it may be easier to regroup in a less chaotic place.” Brooks said he is planning to get his cap and gown as early as possible. “If you go get it around the last day close to graduation, it's going to be really chaotic, and it would be much more likely there's an error or something that they can get it taken care of ahead of time if you don't wait till the last minute to go,” Brooks said. Graduation gowns must

be turned in immediately after the ceremony, so make sure to res take pictures b e f o re h a n d , Jackson said. Gowns may be returned to the Student Activities Center. Graduates should also be prepared for receiving gifts, as those are often sent in response to a graduation invitation. “If you receive any graduation gifts, be sure to write and send a thank you note within one week of receiving the gift,” Jackson said. Coleman said that aside from the serious things to remember on graduation day, there are a few other things students often forget. “Remember that the front of Samford Hall has better light in the morning,” Coleman said. “So if you're getting graduation pictures in front of Samford Hall, be there in the morning,” Coleman also said it is important for graduates to remember to thank those who supported them up until this point, like parents, grandparents and other family members. “Don't get so wrapped up in the moment that you forget to thank those that got you here,” Coleman said. Cap and gowns are available to be picked up in the Haley Center lobby May 12 and 13 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and May 15 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Beer drinkers hop up to talk about flavors MICHELLE TESLIK WRITER

Google “beer terminology” and the results will pull hundreds of beer dictionaries associated with beer flavors. Two well-known beer flavors are “light” and “dark.” Ask a frequent beer drinker which one they prefer and they will likely answer right away. Ben Clayton, junior in psychology, prefers light beer. “I like India pale ales,” Clayton said. “They aren’t as bitter as plain pale ales.” Clayton said he likes the hoppy flavor of the pale ales and the slightly fruity taste. “I like my beer to taste really hoppy,” said Caroline Huffman, senior in economics. Huffman said her friend’s family owns Schlafly Brewery in St. Louis. “I’d have to say it’s probably the best beer in the world,” Huffman said. “I’ll drink any of their beer, light or dark.” Schlafly Beer brews a variety beers, drawing an interesting crowd. “When I turned 21, I started trying every beer I could,” Clayton said. “I learned that I don’t like the heaviness of dark beers.” Clayton said his favorite beer drinking situation is watching a basketball game and drinking a pale ale on draught. “My favorite beer of all time would have to be Bell’s Two Hearted Ale,” Clayton said. “It’s perfect, it’s smooth and it’s wonderful.” Dan Horn, an employee of The Bank Vault, a bar in downtown Auburn, prefers dark beers. “If you can’t shine a light through it,” Horn said, “that’s the way I like it.” Horn said the dark beers have a better taste spectrum. “You don’t have to

put fruit in it to make it taste better,” Horn said. “It also reminds me of coffee, which I like.” Dan recalled his first discovery of the flavor of dark beers back in the summer of 2006. “I was living with a roommate who knew a lot about beer,” Horn said. “We’d go to Georgia to buy a bunch of bottles of different kinds of beer and we’d all sit around having a beer tasting and that’s when I decided I liked dark beers.” Horn worked for Mellow Mushroom in Auburn and learned more about beers while working there. “They have well over a hundred beers including what’s on tap,” Horn said. “Darks are by far my favorite.” Casey Carrigan, manager of Momma Goldberg’s Deli on Magnolia, noticed patterns in their beer sales. “We sell more light beer during the summer,” Carrigan said. “When it’s hot people want something refreshing and light.” Carrigan said in the winter they generally sell more dark beers. “People want something more filling,” Carrigan said. “They want to feel warm.” Carrigan also noticed patterns in who was buying beer. “The young kids buy the light beers because it’s cheaper,” Carrigan said. “Older customers appreciate the taste more and will buy the dark beers.” Huffman said she prefers light beer for vacations and dark beer when she’s in pub like atmospheres, which she said is rare. Beer drinkers can choose light or dark beers for their own reasons, but can they all agree on which music to listen to while drinking? “Backstreet Boys,” Huffman said. “With a little air guitar.” Cheers.

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The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Intrigue, C7

Dangers of the ‘Dirty Dozen’ cals on them should be avoided at all costs. Some diseases linked to POPs include malaria, cancer and other mutations. “I’ve never bought organic,” said Chelsea Biele, junior in business. “It just seems like a waste of money and I barely have enough as it is. I still have to pay rent, buy gas, books and all those things.” ASHLEY MARKS Biele said since there are no signs or warnings WRITER at any super markets, she continued to buy normal With a cheap college produce. budget, buying organic “It’s pretty scary that fruits and vegetables is the grocery stores don’t probably not a top priority. even have any signs hangHowever, there are cer- ing up,” Biele said. “If these tain produce items for germs are so dangerous, which buying organic is someone should make it always advisable. more apparent.” The Environmental ProHowever, since 2001, the tection Agency helped U.S., in cooperation with release a list in 2001 of 12 other governments, has Persistent Organic Pollut- been working to outlaw, ants know reduce as the “Dirty or elimiD o z e n” nate the that can be “Dirty found on D o z e n” I’ve never most pror o m bought organic. It just fuse. duce and are linked seems like a waste of Johnto some dis- money and I barely s o n eases. said she P e a c h e s have enough as it is. I knows are the most still have to pay rent, about chemically risks buy gas, books and all the dangerous, and befollowed by those things.” lieves in apples, bell the impeppers, celportance Chelsea Biele, of buying ery, nectarjunior in business o r g a n ines, strawberries, ic, but cherries, somekale, grapes, times it pears, lettuce and carrots. is not reasonable to do so. When buying these "The health benefits of items in the grocery store, the increased fruit and it is better to spend the vegetable consumption little extra cash and go or- outweighs any potential ganic. downside of pesticides in “In a perfect world, I the food," Johnson said. would like to see us eat- "As a poor Ph.D. student, ing organic as I believe it my refrigerator is packed results in more sustain- with fruits and vegetables, able agriculture,” said Ann but not organic." Johnson, nutrition graduJohnson said it is more ate teaching assistant at important to eat the recAuburn. ommended 5-9 servings of POPs are toxic chemi- fruit and vegetables a day. cals that can be transport"I am used to eating ored product to product by ganics because I'm used wind and water, making to it, but I'm not sure that them easily spread as most many other college kids food is shipped and dif- know how important it is," ficult to contain or eradi- said Lee Davis, senior in cate them from the envi- health administration and ronment. promotion. The EPA advises that For more information, produce with these chemi- visit http://chm.pops.int/

12 common produce items considered harmful by the EPA

Photo submitted by Stacee Strength, public relations director of Lee County Humane Society

The cover photo winner of last year’s Best Friends Calendar contest was Cam, an orange and white Persian.

Pets pose for photo contest BRIAN DESARRO ASSOCIATE INTRIGUE EDITOR

It’s time to primp your pooch, fluff your feline and brush your bunny because the Lee County Humane Society is accepting photo entries for the 2011 Best Friends Calendar. Entries, accepted April first through May 28 for $10 each, will be voted on during the summer to see which pet can capture the most votes and become the 2011 “Cover Pet.” “We have people enter pictures of their pet and take a small entry fee,” said Stacee Strength, public relations director of Lee County Humane Society. “Over the course of the summer, we accept votes for $1 and the winner will be featured on the cover of the calendar.” The money raised will benefit the

shelter’s welfare fund, which is used to purchase medical tests, vaccinations, enrichment needs and preventative treatments for more than 6,000 animals each year. This year, Strength said they are changing it up by adding a “Best in Show” category which will be chosen for its artistic merits, as well as offering an alternative $20 entry fee that will garner the contestant 15 extra votes. Strength said entries can be of any pet, not just shelter-adopted animals, and can even be entered in memory of a pet. “The only thing we ask is that there are no people in the photo and no advertisement,” Strength said. “We really want to keep the calendar just about pets.” Strength said that some people strategize to ensure their photo will win. “The people who had the most

votes last year really encouraged all their friends to take advantage of the online voting,” Strength said. “Also, it’s better to choose just one picture to enter that has your pet or all of your pets in it and concentrate on that one picture rather than having three or four.” To enter, forms can be picked up at the shelter or at leecountyhumane.org and can be submitted in person, through mail or through e-mail. Submitted photos should be a 4x6, high-resolution digital photo. Last year, the contest had over 75 entries and raised approximately $8,500. Strength said they hope to have even more entries and raise even more money with this year’s contest. Voting on this year’s submissions will begin June 21 and end Sept. 11 at the shelter’s Woofstock celebration.

Safe, sexy sunless self-tanning ASHLEE WOOD WRITER

While Auburn’s pools are inundated with people soaking up the sunlight, student schedules, like Whitney Gibbs’, don’t allow for daily bronzing sessions. “I’m studying to be a nurse and, because I’m a senior, I never have time to go to the pool anymore,” Gibbs said. “I would love to lay out, but instead I go to the tanning bed. I go to Palm Beach Tan sometimes and it really works.” Various means of artificial coloration include tanning beds, gels, wipes, foams, mousses, lotions, sprays and innovative pills. Although natural sun exposure is a significant source of vitamin D, selftanning products satisfy those that crave instant gratification. Sunless self-tanners, with the exceptions of tanning beds, can give skin a tanned look without exposing it to harmful ultraviolet rays, according to the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Tanning beds are increasingly popular with people who want a natural looking tan, Gibbs said. “I really think tanning beds work because they

Emily Adams / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Hannah Zondlak, freshman in hotel and restaurant management, applies a sunless tanner before heading to class.

use a form of real sunlight,” Gibbs said. “I see the results very fast and it doesn’t look like a fake orange tan.” Although tanning beds are a fast solution, physicians suggest alternative methods. “We suggest that our patients use any of the lotion self tanners,” said Tracy Firluf, nurse at Hailey, Brody, Casey & Wray Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery in Atlanta. “They are really safe. The fastest way to get a tan is by getting a spray tan at the salon. It works and it is very safe.” Firluf said the cheapest

and overall most popular method is using lotion. “We recommend the Jergens Slow Glow or the L’Oreal Gradual Tan because those are both lotions that don’t have a stain in them, and they gradually build up a nice tan,” Firluf said. Suzanne Smiley, senior in political science, said she thinks Jergens Natural Glow Revitalizing Daily Moisturizer is the overall, all-around best self-tanner. “I have tried three products and this one is becoming very popular,” Smiley said. “It’s also the cheapest. It looks natural

and it isn’t streaky at all.” Many self-tanning lotions contain a staining ingredient in them that make skin appear as if there are brown lines painted on drier areas. “The thing with the lotions is you get a lot of streaking if you don’t apply it right,” Firluf said. “You have to keep applying it to hold a tan.” Depending on if patients want a gradual build-up or instant results, Firluf thinks people should be careful with damaging the skin in harsh UV rays. “Any of the lotions are a lot safer than getting into a tanning bed, which we definitely do not recommend,” Firluf said. The risk of melanoma increases by 300 percent for occasional users and 800 percent for those using tanning beds more than 10 times a year. Even though sunless tanning lotions take more time to become noticeable, some companies have created fresh-scented products to replace the unusual loud scent of perfumes. “I think it’s a good idea for people to use self tanners before the summer starts,” Smiley said. “You should go ahead and get tan before wearing your bathing suit. You don’t want to look as white as a ghost in a bathing suit.”


The Auburn Plainsman

Intrigue, C8

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Wasting Time CROSSWORD 35 Veer off-course 36 Right off the __ 37 Nitpicks 38 Bolshoi rival 40 Tree trunk 41 NASA counterpart 42 Kill a bill 43 Tell 45 Begin again 47 Piano performance 48 “Kidnapped” monogram 49 Petty officer 50 Farewell 53 Over there 54 Love madly 58 Some models 61 Used sparingly 62 Ambler of Clapton 63 Bandleader Count __ 64 Smelting waste 65 Belg. neighbor 66 Scornful smile 67 Fish story

ACROSS 1 Sunblock ingredient 5 Poker stakes 10 Liniment 14 Crossed out 15 Air-conditions 16 “Only Time” singer 17 Mountain pass info

18 Choir director’s need (2 wds.) 20 Overhaul 22 __ Scala 23 Ms. Zellweger 24 Wild shrub 26 Lubricate 27 Tightrope walker 30 Dress features 34 Safari worker

DOWN 1 Jury member 2 Wheel part 3 Red meat 4 Counselors 5 Not hesitate 6 Nutty confection 7 Quinine water 8 He directed Marlon

9 FICA number 10 Happened to 11 Prolific auth. 12 Old harp 13 Invent 19 Complain 21 Toothpaste buy 25 Felt pens 26 Artists’ lifeworks 27 Dogpatch resident 28 Desist 29 Sitar tunes 30 Arafat’s org. 31 “Das Boot” craft (hyph.) 32 Island nation 33 Car metal 35 B’way posting 39 Addam’s Family cousin 40 Least able to see 42 Worth 44 Its cap. is Quito 46 Moat 47 __ Milsap of country music 49 City in Idaho 50 Word from the pews 51 Meet defiantly 52 __ __ for keeps 53 China’s dollar 55 Tex. neighbor 56 Genuine 57 Sharpen 59 TD Passers 60 Sun. homily

Horoscopes Aquarius: You aren’t crazy; the squirrels are staring at you.

Aries: When you get pulled over tomorrow, don’t call the officer “Sweet Cheeks.” It will not go well.

Leo: You will meet the love of your life at a karaoke bar tonight. She will have a wooden leg and three teeth.

Cancer: Expect problems when a doorway to another dimension opens up in your bathroom Saturday.

Sagittarius: Jupiter’s alignment tells you this would a bad time to start smoking crack. Wait a month.

Pisces: Bathe. Smelling like fish is not appealing.

Libra: Your symbol is the scales... because you need to lose 10 pounds, fatty.

Gemini: Pluto is in ascendence. We’re not sure what this means, but we thought you should know.

Scorpio: Start fashioning clothing out of twist-ties. We’ll tell you why next week.

Capricorn: Confusion will set in Monday when your hiccups are mistaken for a seldom heard Ethiopian dialect.

Virgo: Press A-A-B-Left-Left-Right-Start to unlock your secret “Unlimited Life” function.

Taurus: Stay inside all day and watch re-runs of Match Game 1975 on the Game Show Network.

Written by Cliff McCollum / OPINIONS EDITOR

OCTO Instructions •

(c) 2009, Doug Gardner — Patent Pending

Place the numbers 1 to 8 in each of the octagons such that the numbers are not repeated in any row, column or diagonal. The numbers along the edges, top and bottom are the sums for the numbers in the diagonal that begins or ends at that number. The number in each diamond is the sum of the numbers of each of the four faces that border that diamond. The numbers that border the diamonds do not have to be unique. Number of numbers provided in this Octo = 61

Check www.theplainsman. com for the answers. For more OCTOs, go to home.comcast. net~douglasdgardner/site.

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Yoga D4

THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 2010

LIFESPORTS D3

Athlete of the Week: Anna Thompson Softball D1

SPORTS

D

www.theplainsman.com

Philip Smith /ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Senior pitcher Anna Thompson pitches during Saturday’s first game against No. 8 Alabama. Thompson recorded her 1,000th career strike out in the second game.

Thompson reaches milestone CRYSTAL COLE STAFF REPORTER

Don’t touch Anna Thompson’s balls. The senior pitcher for the softball team said someone touching the ball before she gets to the mound is her biggest superstition. This weekend, No. 8 Alabama may have swept the series, but Thompson struck out her 1,000 career batter. “I’m glad I was blessed to have a talent where I could actually

Tourney should stay at 65

PATRICK DEVER sports@theplainsman.com

After watching the NCAA basketball tournament championship Monday night, I was left without the feeling of there being a national champion. Duke won the game, but I feel like Butler won the tournament. The tournament that had 65 teams. Talk has been circulating around the NCAA about expanding the tournament to include 96 teams. Why would the NCAA want to do that? College basketball already suffers enough by beginning the season while football season is still going on. > Turn to DEVER, D2

do that, but this is a team sport,” Thompson said. “Everything I do when I go out there is for the team and it’s doing my job, so if I got that many strike outs, I’ve been doing something right.” Thompson is just the eighth player in SEC history to reach the millennium mark. Coach Tina Deese said the achievement came as no surprise to her, since Thompson had to jump into a leadership role early. “We knew when she stepped foot on the field that there was something special about her,

that she was probably going to draw those numbers, just because she came out with a bang in her freshman year,” Deese said. “We lost a pitcher that year, so she was put in a position where she had to start several games and she really stepped up.” Thompson already held the career strikeout record for Auburn when she hit 796. She also holds the record for most strikeouts in a game, 18, which she recorded against Middle Tennessee in 2009. The senior said she started

playing softball when she moved across town and didn’t have many friends. “It was the middle of the summer, so my dad signed me up for softball to meet some new people,” Thompson said. “It was over that summer we realized I had an affinity for the sport and then eventually figured out I could pitch.” In high school, Thompson set a state and national record with 2,322 strikeouts. She also set a state record for strikeouts in a single season with 657 in 2006, breaking the record she previ-

ously held. She was named Gatorade Player of the Year for Alabama in 2005 and 2006. Deese said she has enjoyed watching Thompson grow as an athlete, since the SEC is a tough conference for pitchers. “It’s a hitter’s conference and you really do have to have a mature head on your shoulders,” Deese said. “There are as many kids with as much talent probably, but what’s between your ears makes a big difference.” > Turn to THOMPSON, D2

Baseball blows out Georgia State JAKE MASTROIANNI WRITER

The Auburn Tigers (19-10, 5-4 SEC) smashed 24 hits against the Georgia State Panthers (14-15, 2-4 CAA) Tuesday night, going on to win 22-5. Trent Mummey made his return to the diamond after sitting out seven weeks with an injury. He went 2-for-2 with four RBIs, including a three-run home run. “It was probably one of the happiest moments of my life,” Mummey said. “Right before the game, the coaches told me they were probably going to get me in to pinch hit or possibly in the DH role. Baseball is just a humbling sport.” The Tigers offense, which leads the SEC with a team batting average of .339, continually pounded the seven pitchers Georgia State put on the mound. “I think every spot in our lineup you got a chance of getting an RBI because all the guys are always on base,” said Justin Hargett, junior second baseman. “We have such a dominate offense I think I’ll always have a chance to get RBIs.” Hargett finished the game going 4-for-5 with five RBIs. Every Georgia State pitcher gave up at least one run. Auburn had 13 batters get a hit, and eight had multiple hits. “Tonight I feel like we played a good baseball game,” said Scott Foxhall, assistant coach. “It was the second game in a row we didn’t have any errors. We also had some quality at bats.” Foxhall was sitting in for head coach John

Pawlowski who is serving a one game sus- making the Auburn lead 11-5. pension after starting pitcher Grant Dayton “It definitely boosts the confidence a little was tossed from Sunday’s game against Ala- bit,” Hargett said. “I just got to keep it going. bama for hitting a batter. This was a good game, but I have to put it beAuburn took advantage of an early error by hind me now and just keep going and try to Georgia State and scored a run in the first in- keep putting quality at bats up.” ning with a two-out RBI from third baseman Every Tiger batted in the seventh, adding Dan Gamache. five more runs. The scoring was capped with State quickly answered in the top of the a three-run home run by Justin Bryant, who second with a run of its own. has homered in his last three games. After a leadoff walk, Bradley Logan scored With such a huge lead, Auburn was able on a single by Carl Moniz to tie the game at to get some players some at bats late in the one. game. Mummey took full advantage and The Tigers struck back with three in the crushed a three run homer in the eighth. bottom of third. Justin Fradejas started off “I think it was pretty exciting (seeing Trent the inning with a double and then Brian play),” Foxhall said. “It was a big step for our Fletcher brought him in with his 10th home team. We are a better team with Trent Mumrun of the season. mey. He had a good night and hopefully this Two batters later Tony Caldwell added a will be a stepping stone for him and we can solo homer to make the score get him back in with a lit4-1. tle more action in the next Hunter Morris drove in his few games, because we Check 34th run of the season with a two will be a more dangerous online for team with him available.” out RBI single in the bottom of the fourth. The 22 runs Auburn photos Auburn pitcher Dexter Price scored was the most since and recap. it beat Mercer 22-6 in 2007. failed to make it out of the fifth. After recording two quick Sean Ray picked up the outs, he gave up two singles and walked two, victory after coming in relief of Price in the which led to two runs in the inning for State, fifth. getting within one of the Tigers. He pitched 2 1/3 innings, giving up only Price pitched 4 2/3 innings, allowing three one earned run and striking out two. earned runs on seven hits while walking four Morris and Gamache both finished off the and striking out one. night with three hits. The Tigers put the game out of reach in the Auburn faced South Alabama Wednesday bottom of the sixth with a three run inning. night and will host the No. 7 LSU Tigers this Mummey drove in a run with a pinch hit weekend. sacrifice fly. Hargett drove in his second and Friday’s game will start at 7 p.m., Saturthird runs of the game with a two out single, day’s game is at 2 p.m. and Sunday at 1 p.m.

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The Auburn Plainsman

Sports, D2

DEVER >From D1

The regular season is also usually looked over until February when people are looking up statistics for teams they think will be playing in late March. With the expansion to 96 teams, the tournament would lose the lore it has held since the previous expansions in 1985 to 64 and 2001 to 65. They say the tournament will keep the three-week format, but would add another round. The top 32 seeds would also get byes, negating any chance for a first-round upset of a No. 1 or a No. 2. The NCAA would also have to move away from the iconic 64-team bracket that everyone associates with the tournament. One reason the NCAA might give for expansion would be that UCLA, Arizona, North

Carolina and UConn didn’t make the 2010 tournament, the first time since the 1966, when the tournament only had a maximum of 25 teams. Those four teams have also combined to win 19 national championships, with 11 coming from the Bruins. Post-season play should be a privilege, not a right. If the teams didn’t deserve to be in the tournament, they shouldn’t have the chance to play in it. I watch the tournament so I can see the big teams like Syracuse, UCLA, North Carolina and UConn get upset by teams like Butler, St. Mary’s and Northern Iowa. Adding an extra game to the lower seeded teams adds the risk of injury and fatigue to hurt them in the later rounds. The lower seeds would have to play seven games to win a championship, something only the teams that play the play-in game could do now

(which has yet to happen). NCAA basketball should not follow in the footsteps of NCAA football. Football has so many bowls, nobody can name all 33. More than half of college football teams get to play in a bowl, basically every team with a winning record. Another expansion makes coaching searches tougher too. A coach looking to make a move to a bigger program would have to take his team into the second or third round of the expanded tournament to have a legitimate chance of making an impression on another school. Coaches, however, seem to like the idea of an expanded tournament so they can pad their resumes with NCAA tournament appearances. In the long run, the expansion of the tournament will help the power conferences to control the NCAA.

Thursday, April 8, 2010

THOMPSON >From D1

Thompson has taken home many honors over the years, including SEC Freshman of the Week, SEC All-Freshman Team and second-team All-SEC 2008 As of last season, Thompson ranks first in batting average against, .179, fourth in wins, 42, third in appearances, 111, third in complete games, 43, third in innings pitched, 545.2, fourth in shutouts, 12, and first in strikeouts per seven innings, 10.2. “I feel honored to be in the Auburn record books with a lot of absolutely wonderful athletes before me,” Thompson said. “I got the honor of playing with people like Holly Curry who really set a great example my freshman year, and I hope in some way I’m living up to what her expectations were for me.” Deese said Thompson was born with leadership tendencies. “She came in with that, you know it wasn’t something that I

Men’s Golf heads to Ky.

had to teach her or I had to work with her on,” Deese said. “She comes by it naturally which is kind of strange.” The pitcher excels in the classroom as well as on the field, pursuing a double major in accounting and finance. Last year, she was named to the SEC Academic Honor Roll and ESPN The Magazine CoSIDA Academic All-District Second Team. Deese said she has enjoyed working with Thompson and has enjoyed all of their time together. “She’s always come through and she’s always been there for her teammates,” Deese said. “She’s really worn the blue and orange with a lot of pride.” As a senior, Thompson said this season reminds her that she is about to end a part of her life that has lasted 14 years. “There are parts of me that are saying my body’s breaking down a little bit and it’s time to be done,” Thompson said. “Still in my heart, it’s hard to say goodbye to it.”

The Auburn Plainsman SPORTS STAFF

ABBY ALBRIGHT Editor

BLAKE HAMILTON

unbelievable rounds, we held our own. Kyle (KopASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR sick) and Will (McCurdy) Mental preparation is are continuing to imthe name of the game as press with their form this the Auburn Men’s Golf spring.” team prepares for the Coming into the final Bluegrass Invitational day of competition, the April 10-11 in Lexington, top-10 teams’ tightness of Ky. ranking began to take its The Tigers finished sev- toll as Auburn shot par to enth at the Hootie at Bulls drop to seventh place. Bay in Charleston, S.C., LSU finished on top, last weekend. Auburn followed by Wake Forest, opened the first day of the Virginia, Augusta State tournament strong, tying and Duke. with leader LSU in the “We had a good tournafront nine at 2-under par. ment, we just beat our“A lot of it is putting,” selves,” Zickler said. “We said redhad a coushirt freshple of freak man David putts here Zickler. If we play and there “ We ’ v e and a coubeen told our best and we’re ple of bad all year that the toughest menholes and we’re the that’s the tally, there aren’t best putonly thing ting team many teams that that cost us nationally, can beat us.” the tournaand I bement. If we lieve that. play our David Zickler, best We’re defiand freshman we’re nitely one the of the best toughest ball-striking m e n t a l l y, teams, but we just need to there aren’t many teams improve on a weekly ba- out there that can beat sis on putting and pitch- us.” ing around the green we Auburn heads to Lexshould be fine.” ington this weekend to Auburn entered the participate in the Blueback nine with East Ten- grass Invitational, a tournessee State and NC State nament hosted by the as sophomore Will Mc- University of Kentucky. Curdy made a par-5 eagle Other teams competing on No. 10, the course’s include the University of longest hole. The Tigers Akron, Austin Peay, Samclosed the day tied for ford, Ball State and Mifourth, three strokes be- ami. hind the leader, LSU. In Clinard said this weekindividual performances, end’s tournament, as with sophomore Kyle Kopsick competitions in the few tied for fifth, while Mc- weeks past, are all in prepCurdy tied for eighth. aration for the SEC ChamAuburn dropped to pionship at the Frederica sixth on day two, though Club in Sea Island, Ga. the top eight teams were “I think we have a good separated by a mere six chance at the SEC,” Clinstrokes. ard said. “If we take care “It’s not too often that of ourselves we have a you find the top eight great chance to win any teams in a tournament golf tournament we play only separated by six in. Our guys are capable strokes after 36 holes of of winning a golf tournagolf,” said Auburn coach ment and we’re going to Nick Clinard. “Aside from need all of them to win an a couple of team who shot SEC championship.”

50

PATRICK DEVER Associate Editor

BLAKE HAMILTON Assistant Editor

To reach the staff, call 844-9109.

The Scoop Baseball 4/9 vs. LSU @ 7 p.m. W. Tennis 4/9 vs. Ole Miss @ 2:30 p.m. Softball 4/10 vs. Tennessee @ 1 p.m. & 3:30 p.m. Baseball 4/10 vs. LSU @ 2 p.m. W. Tennis 4/9 vs. Mississippi State @ 1 p.m. Baseball 4/11 vs. LSU @ 1 p.m. Softball 4/11 vs. Tennessee @ 1 p.m.

50


LIFESPORTS

Friendly, but fierce

SPORTS, D3

Intramural softball, soccer lets students re-live glory days on the field while enjoying spring weather, engaging in competition, fellowship BLAKE HAMILTON

Henley, sophomore in political science. “I like to come out and ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR play because of the competition and to support my orgaSpring has sprung on The nization, obviously, but also Plains, and warm-weather because it lets me re-live my intramural sports are out in glory days a little bit.” force. Tuesday night saw the Another advantage of intrathird week of student softball murals is that players of any and soccer teams in play, as skill level can compete. Such various student organizations was the case with Elizabeth went head to head. Williams, sophomore in public Baby’s Daddies, a coed team relations playing for WEGP. with a female pitcher, lost a “This is my first time playing close bout with the Pillsbury intramurals,” Williams said. “I Bro-Boys 15-14. think it’s a lot of fun to come “It’s just alout and play ways a good with my friends. time when It’s also the first I enjoy just you come we’ve had to enout here and practicing with my joy the spring play,” said Baweather, so coed team. It helps by’s Daddies’ that’s cool too.” Adam Fur- that I used to play. I Some players rer, senior in was kind of a big deal.” such as WEGP’s physical eduBrad Cink, juBrittney Lantrip, nior in industrication. “I like sophomore, al engineering, to come out biomedical sciences have taken adhere and hang out with my vantage of the classmates. multiple sports It’s a good challenge and gives Auburn offers to students. us good fellowship.” “My organization encourSome teams took the oppor- aged me to play, so that’s why tunity to practice while watch- I came out,” Cink said. “I’ve ing other teams and enjoying always liked the various intrathe cool night air. mural programs here at Au“It’s a lot of fun to get out here burn. I did the track meet my and play,” said Brittney Lant- freshman year and I’ve played rip, sophomore in biomedical basketball too.” sciences. “We’re not even playOn the opposite end of the ing tonight, but I enjoy just fields, soccer teams Psygo practicing with my coed team, and Mean Green duked it out the Diamond Studs. It’s a great in a fast-paced game. Psygo is opportunity to bond with my comprised of graduate level sorority sisters. It also helps psychology students like Ben that I used to play. I was kind Carter, who served as the of a big deal.” team’s coach Tuesday night. Another pair of softball “Soccer is great because teams in play was the War people of all skill levels can Eagle Girls and Plainsmen and play,” Carter said. “It’s also fun I’d Hit That. Despite strong de- for me to get back out here and fensive performances in the play like I used to a long time outfield by such WEGP players ago in high school. It’s cool as Drew Steverson, sophomore how we all got together. We in aerospace engineering, I’d just sent out e-mails to see if Hit That came out on top with any other grad students were a score of 13-8. interested in playing and peo“We get some great group ple started coming out.” bonding time when we play,” Aggressive players such as Steverson said. “It’s a good Mean Green’s Julia Ryczak, chance to get close. You see freshman in science and matha competitive side of your ematics, led her team’s charge friends that you might not see down the pitch, but it was ultiotherwise, but you also get to mately Psygo that came out on see the goofy side.” top, winning 9-4. Some students who play “I play intramurals because intramurals are former high it’s a great way to relax,” said school athletes who wish to Mean Green’s Ben Nemic, gradcontinue to hone their skills. uate student in hotel and res“This is a great program that taurant management. “I really Auburn has set up for us stu- enjoy playing sports that I have dents,” said WEGP player CJ no idea how to play.”

Emily Adams / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Kasey Castro, sophomore in human development / family studies, hits the ball for I’d Hit That, which beat WEGP 13-8.

Emily Adams / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Emily Adams / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Julia Ryczak, freshman in science and mathematics, dribbles for Mean Green, which lost to Psygo 9-4.

B.T. Valdes, sophomore in economics, shoots for a goal at the intramural fields Tuesday night.

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The Auburn Plainsman

Sports, D4

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Ancient fitness with modern twist JILLIAN CLAIR STAFF REPORTER

In Room 207 of the Student Activities Center, Auburn students, faculty and staff flock to yoga classes for flexibility, relaxation and centeredness, at no cost to them. “I began teaching yoga for the Campus Recreation Lifetime Wellness and Fitness Program in 2009,” said Pam Wiggins, a certified yoga instructor. “We started with three classes in the morning, and to date, we have added five more classes and three instructors.” Wiggins said the University offers other classes as a part of the fitness program that focus on the other components of fitness, cardiovascular and muscular endurance as well as strength. However, yoga fulfills the flexibility component of the fitness program while also including the other two components, Wiggins said. “Most exercisers want the aerobic effect or the muscular strength rather than increased range of motion,” Wiggins said. “Yoga offers that and much more. Muscular strength

and endurance come from the different poses, or ‘asanas’ that one holds.” All three yoga instructors at Auburn are YogaFit certified instructors, Wiggins said. According to www.yogafit.com, YogaFit is an abbreviation for “Yoga for the Fitness Industry,” and was developed by Beth Shaw in 1994. YogaFit omits the sanskrit names for poses and the ohming and chanting generally associated with traditional yoga, making it less mysterious and intimidating. YogaFit is based on the ancient fitness science of hatha yoga, and it blends balance, strength, flexibility and power. Wiggins’ class includes upbeat music, laughter and conversation. Brian Wells, faculty member at the space research institute at the University, started doing yoga 10 years ago. He joined the yoga program at Auburn last year when it began. “Often, people will start off in hatha yoga because it’s very physical,” Wells said. “All the yogas are focused on the union of the mind, body and spirit.” Wells said each type of yoga has a focus, and people have to learn to incor-

porate the other components to get the most out of the experience. “As you develop in hatha yoga, you have to learn how to focus and get the mental component,” Wells said. “Otherwise you find yourself not holding the postures properly. You get to this point where your body is progressed enough, and your mind is really the challenge.” Yoga is a complement to all other athletic and exercise activities one can do, Wells said. “You’re also less likely to get hurt if you’re flexible,” Wells said. “They should have more of the athletic department working with yoga, because that would perhaps cut down their injury rates because the muscles are loose.” Above all, yoga is simple and versatile, Wells said. “Yoga is one of the activities that you don’t need anything,” Wells said. “You can do yoga anywhere. I’ve actually done it on an airplane before.” Chelsea Hodgkins, freshman in political science, started doing yoga regularly when she came to Auburn in the fall. “It calms me down,” Hodgkins said. “It’s nice to be able to take an hour for

Jillian Clair / STAFF REPORTER

Yoga instructor Pam Wiggins leads her class in different yoga positions.

yourself, and it’s greatly increased my flexibility and got me in shape. I’ve lost 15 pounds since I’ve been here.” In high school, Hodgkins played soccer, and she still runs. She said yoga is a different type of workout than any sport she has ever played. “In my mind, it targets different parts of your body,” Hodgkins said.

“Running does good stuff for your legs and everything, but yoga is kind of like an all-over training system. Everybody should do it.” Athletes in other sports benefit greatly from yoga, Hodgkins said. “I’ve had friends who have been on the track team and have shed minutes off their time because the more flexible you are, I

guess the faster you’re able to go,” Hodgkins said. She said she had done yoga classes before coming to Auburn, but Wiggins’ class is the best. “I love Pam,” Hodgkins said. “She’s funny, and she’s a really good instructor. She knows what she’s doing, and you definitely feel it when you walk out. She’s the best yoga instructor I’ve ever had.”


The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Sports, D5

Women’s Golf places 12th at N.C. tournament NICOLE EMMETT WRITER

The No. 3 Auburn Women’s Golf team finished in 12th place at the Bryan National Collegiate after a third-round score of 300. The team’s tournament total was 36-over-par, 900 at the last competition of the regular season. “If you look at the leader board, it doesn’t look like we played that great,” said coach Kim Evans. “I thought we showed improvement every day which made it a great tournament.” The strongest performances of the weekend came from freshman Carlie Yadloczky and sophomore Haley Wilson. “They played well by making goals each day and working hard to achieve them,” Evans said. Yadloczky said she became sick, possibly from dehydration, on the first day. However, by day two, she was once again healthy and focused. “I had a couple bad shots the last couple of holes,” Yadloczky said. “I think I did well by hitting most of the fairways and green.” Yadloczky found herself in a 3-over round until the final two holes, but returned with backto-back birdies to end at 1-over

Philip Smith / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Senior Candace Schepperle hits the ball during the Auburn Invitational March 7.

and finish in eighth place. “I am going to play the best I can in next week’s SEC Tournament and hope that it gets me in the top 10 again,” Yadloczky said. Wilson said she was also pleased with her solid and consistent performance throughout the three days. Her score was the second highest of the Tigers.

“I worked on staying patient and focusing on the shot at hand,” Wilson said. “I tried to not get ahead of myself and stay in the moment.” Wilson posted a 1-over, 73 in the final round of the tournament. After starting the weekend with a 76, she tallied a second-round of 74 before dropping her score again to close out the weekend with a 223 (+7) tourna-

The Auburn Plainsman 2010 Fall staff applications available in Tichenor 233 and Student Center Suite 1111

ment total. “We had a good week as a team,” Wilson said. “Everyone contributed with solid performances.” Sophomore Patricia Sanz scored a 4-over-par, 76 the final day, earning her the third best score for the Tigers. Sanz also lowered her score in three-consecutive rounds, finishing with a 17-over, 233 mark.

The native of Madrid, Spain, finished in a tie for 67th. Of the 18 participating teams, Florida State claimed first place with a 9-over-par, 873. Co-host Wake Forest followed with an 874 (+10). Ohio State, Vanderbilt and Duke completed the top-five with 22-over-par, 886s. Wake Forest’s Cheyenne Woods landed in the top-spot with a 5-under, 211 weekend performance. Tennessee’s Nathalie Mansson (-3), Virginia’s Brittany Altomare (-2), Duke’s Lindy Duncan (-2) and Florida State’s Macarena Silva (-1) rounded out the top five, respectively. The Tigers will return to the green April 16-18 to defend their conference title at the SEC Tournament. The tournament will take place at the North River Yacht Club in Tuscaloosa. Yadloczky and Wilson said they are confident their team’s hard work will pay off in the next few weeks. “Our goal remains to get prepared for each tournament as it comes,” Evans said. The Bryan National Collegiate took place at the par-72, 6,323yard Players Course at the Bryan Park Golf and Enrichment Center as North Carolina-Greensboro and Wake Forest co-hosted the event.

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The Auburn Plainsman

Sports, D6

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Philip Smith / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Freshman infielder Kelsey Cartwright hits the ball during the first game of Saturday’s doubleheader against No. 6 Alabama at Jane B. Moore Field. The Tigers fell to the Tide 5-1, 9-1 and 10-2.

Softball swept, looks to learn from mistakes ANNA SCHIERHOLZ WRITER

Auburn Softball fell in three straight home games against the No. 8 Crimson Tide of Alabama this weekend, 5-1, 9-1 and 10-2. Auburn dropped to 2015, 5-9 SEC, while Alabama moved to 27-9, 10-4 SEC. “Alabama is a great team,” said Anna Thompson, senior pitcher for the Tigers. “We have learned a lot from what happened this weekend.” In Friday’s game, sophomore Angel Bunner (6-6) took the loss as Alabama capitalized on

two homeruns. The Tigers stranded seven baserunners. In the third inning, with two members of the Tide on base, Bunner intentionally walked Alabama’s Charlotte Morgan, loading the bases for Whitney Larsen. Larsen hit a grand slam, giving the Tide a 4-0 lead. Sophomore pitcher Jenee Loree came in to finish the inning successfully, but gave up a lead-off homerun to Alabama’s Jazlyn Lunceford in the sixth. The Tigers battled back to score in the sixth, when sophomore Amber Harri-

son doubled with juniors Caitlin Stangl and Kyndall White on base. Auburn couldn’t stir up more offense and lost, 5-1. In Saturday’s doubleheader, similar offensive problems plagued the Tigers, as they scored three runs to Alabama’s 19. In the first game, Auburn’s Thompson (11-6) started, going just 3 2/3 innings and taking the loss for the Tigers. The Tide took advantage of three Auburn errors to score four runs, while Auburn’s White scored the solo run in the game with a home run in the fourth.

White continued her offensive authority Saturday in the second game, knocking the first pitch of the bottom of the first out of the park. But, the lead didn’t last long. Jenee Loree (2-3) started the game, allowing five runs, all earned, and going 2 2/3 innings before Thompson came in. Alabama raked in the runs with multiple home runs and hits, driving the deficit to 7-1 in the sixth. Auburn started to make a late-game rally, taking advantage of a Tide error in the bottom of the

sixth to plate a run, but Alabama retired the final batter to finish the game, winning 10-2. “We understand this past weekend is over,” Thompson said. “Now, we just have to take the lessons we learned and move forward.” The Tigers play Tennessee this weekend in a three-game series at Jane B. Moore Field in Auburn. Saturday’s doubleheader and Sunday’s game both start at 1 p.m. Thompson said she is optimistic for the rest of the season. “We have a relatively

young team and many of them haven’t been in this situation before,” Thompson said. “The next few weeks will be a learning experience for us all.” She said she is using the next couple practices to prepare for the rest of the season. She also said the schedule for the rest of the season will be difficult, but she is confident. “We have the potential to do very well with the last part of the season,” Thompson said. “It is going to take everyone buying into that and working towards the same goal (to win.)”


Thursday, April 8, 2010

The Auburn Plainsman

Sports, D7

Volleyball spikes teams in Atlanta ASHLEY MARKS WRITER

Clayton’s coaching passion DAVIS POTTER

level,” Clayton said. “But in track, it all matters with how the far the WRITER implement went. If you threw a certain distance, it was all equal, so that Church league basketball and Di- kind of helped get more recognition vision I track and field usually don’t for a Division I level as far as recruitgo together. ing.” However, for assistant head track Colleges began recognizing Clayand field coach Jerry Clayton, an in- ton’s abilities on the field. terest in the former helped pave the He decided to stay in-state and way to his current posiaccepted a scholarship tion in the latter. to the University of Il“I started coaching linois. church league basketball Clayton was a twoI think when I was about time NCAA qualifier in a freshman or sophothe shot put as a memmore in high school,” ber of the Illini. Clayton said. “So I guess Clayton’s passion has coaching has always turned into an occupabeen in my blood.” tion, as he has more While Clayton got an than 25 years of coachearly start in coaching, ing experience under CLAYTON his passion for track and his belt. field began at his high Clayton spent five school in Rushville, Ill., where he seasons as the head coach at Southalso played football in addition to west Texas State, leading the Bobcompeting in track and field. cats to four Southland Conference Clayton, who is in his 11th season championships. He also served as at Auburn, said he leaned more to- an assistant coach at his alma mater ward track and field because of its and the University of Florida before level playing field. landing at Auburn. “I come from a very small high Clayton said the experience he school, so if you didn’t play for the has gained throughout the years has larger teams (in football) it’s hard to helped him become the coach he is get notoriety to go to the Division I today.

“I know things that I feel work and things that I feel really do not work,” Clayton said. While every aspect of coaching is important, Clayton said getting his athletes to perform when it counts gives him the most pride. “A lot of people can get people to perform, but to me, the highest pinnacle of the sport is getting the athlete to perform at the most critical and most important championship,” Clayton said. And Clayton has done just that at Auburn. Two of Clayton’s pupils, Donald Thomas (indoor high jump) and Jacob Dunkleberger (hammer throw), captured national championships in 2007. Seven of Clayton’s athletes were selected as All-Americans the same year. Six track and field athletes advanced to the NCAA Outdoor Championships in 2008, a year in which Clayton was named USTFCCCA Men’s Assistant Coach of the Year. The success looks to keep coming, as Clayton said he isn’t leaving Auburn anytime soon, if at all. “(Auburn) is a great environment to work,” Clayton said. “You don’t ever say never, but I’m not going out and looking for stuff. It’s a great situation.”

Jumping with Jerry What is your favorite career coaching moment? Winning national championships as a team. Individually, every national champion that I’ve had because of what it meant for them.

What is your favorite Auburn tradition? Tiger Walk

What would you be doing if you weren’t coaching? Teaching in some capacity. Working with young people.

What’s the last movie you saw in theaters? “Avatar”

What is your favorite restaurant in Auburn? Laredo’s

What is your favorite type of music? I like all kinds of music. I guess I’ll have to go with hard rock.

BlackBerry or iPhone? BlackBerry, because I don’t have an iPhone.

Who is your favorite athlete of all time? Former U.S. Track and Field athlete Al Feuerbach

Who is the most famous person you’ve ever met? Former President George W. Bush

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MIX & MATCH MAINTENANCE SPECIAL

What book are you currently reading? “Transfer of Training in Sports” by Anatoliy Bondarchuk

In recent years, the Auburn Volleyball team has struggled during the regular season, but this off-season the team is working hard to change that. This past weekend, the team traveled to Atlanta for the to Atlanta Collegiate Invitational tournament. The Tigers took on Clemson University, Georgia Tech University, College of Charleston and the University of Georgia. The team began the tournament on Easter with impressive wins against Clemson, Georgia Tech and Charleston. Defeating the three teams moved Auburn to the final match vs. SEC rival UGA where the Tigers were unfortunately defeated by the Bulldogs in a close and hard fought match. Coming off a 16-15 record in 2009, coach Wade Benson said he has seen great progress since the start of the team’s spring season. The team’s advancement to the final round of the tournament was a good display of their efforts. Benson was proud of the team for its ability to stay calm and finish strong. “When you’re down a couple games and you’re able to not panic, that’s a tough thing,” Benson said. “We did a great job (of not panicking) and were able to pick up our game and come out on top.” Sophomore Kelly Fidero was proud of her team for making it so far in the tournament and is excited for the team’s upcoming season. She said her focus is to

help bring success to the program. “We did a lot of good things,” Fidero said. “Our blocking was really good and we worked really hard.” Benson said the team jumped a mental hurdle and impressed him with its effort and dedicated work ethic. Like Fidero, redshirt freshman Sarah Wroblickly had a big weekend at the net. Wroblicky has made an immediate impact on the team, and Benson is a big believer in her. “Sarah did extremely well for being a redshirt freshman she had a lot of big plays,” Benson said. Wroblicky, the defensive specialist, thought the defense did well and said the team blocked extremely well. “I thought we played pretty solid the whole tournament,” Wroblickly said. “At the end it just came down to fighting for it and I feel like we backed off a little, but overall I think we played really well.” Although the team was not as successful as it wanted to be in the regular season, Fidero is confident that everyone on the team is determined and focused to improve for this coming season. “I want to help build this program and get it where it needs to be,” Fidero said. “We’re capable of winning and our focus is to give our team the success it deserves.” Fidero said the team is working hard on and off the court to get the recognition she knows they are capable of. The volleyball team has one more weekend of matches to keep its hot-streak going when it travels to Nashville to compete in its final tournament of the spring April 10.


Sports, D8

The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, April 8, 2010

Philip Smith / ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Tiger Track Classic 2010

Left - Senior Felix Kiboiywo leads a Middle Tennessee State runner Saturday at the Tiger Track Classic. Above - Sophomore Ryan Fleck took second place in the high jump Saturday.


April 8