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The Auburn Plainsman MAGNOLIA APTS.

MAGNOLIA APTS.

Thursday, September 1, 2011

ROOSTERS REMOVE EXISTING WALK AS SHOWN REMOVE EXISTING WALK AND BOLLARDS AS NECESSARY

COX STREET

A Spirit That Is Not Afraid www.theplainsman.com

Vol. 118, Issue 2, 20 Pages

Housing extends visitation

ADD MEDIAN AROUND CROSSWALK WITH LOW EVERGREEN SHRUBS. MAINTAIN LINE OF SIGHT FOR PEDESTRIANS IN MEDIAN REFUGE AREA APTS. NEW WALK

MOUNTABLE CURB AT CORNER

Robert E. Lee

NEW WALKS

OVERHEAD MOUNT ELECTRONIC SIGN ANNOUNCING ENTRANCE TO PEDESTRIAN AREA

Assistant Campus Editor 68

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WEST MAGNOLIA AVENUE

WEST M

AGN OLI

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BOLLARDS C AL C. P O IN T

PROVIDE BUS TURN-OUT (NO MEDIAN) PAINTED STRIPE ISLANDS

SOUTH DONAHUE DRIVE

INFILL WITH LOW EVERGREEN SHRUBS

- PROPOSED WALKS - REMOVE WALKS

EXISTING TREE, TYP.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS NEW WALKS B 22

BUSINESS SCHOOL PORTALS (NOT PART OF 'PEDESTRIAN SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS' PROJECT

wall

- EXISTING WALKS

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY CENTER

NEW ADDITION TO EXISTING WALK, CONTINUE PATTERN AS SHOWN

A SP HA LT P AR K IN G L OT

Don’t turn out the lights yet. Before the school year started, Ainsley Carry, vice president of Student Affairs, approved new visitation hours for on-campus housing. Quad and Hill residence halls had their hours extended from 10 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday and until 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday. New hours for the Village are from 10–2 a.m. daily. A spring survey conducted by Residence Life showed that students wanted a change to hours more similar to other universi-

Contributed

- PROPOSED TREES

» See Housing, A2

Diagram of improvements being done on West Magnolia Avenue. Similar improvements are effecting East Magnolia as well. AUBURN UNIVERSITY - EXISTING TREES PEDESTRIAN SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS

SGA, city of Auburn work to improve Magnolia Avenue

- REQUIRED DECORATIVE FENCE

- BOLLARD

WEST MAGNOLIA AVENUE

S. DONAHUE DR. TO N. COLLEGE ST. EXHIBIT A - VERSION I

Miranda Dollarhide Editor

After years of wear and tear, Magnolia Avenue is finally getting its long-overdue facelift. The city of Auburn and Auburn University are collaborating to improve the safety and appearance of Magnolia Avenue with new crosswalks, solar-reflectant lights and added landscaping. Kevin Cowper, assistant city manger, said the idea to improve Magnolia materialized after the city started noticing an increase in pedestrian accidents. “I think the project is one of improving the appearance of the roadways … but more important

than that, it’s going to improve pedestrian safety.” After the city noticed a safety problem, Chris Osterlund, executive vice president of SGA, said the city decided to contact Auburn University because Auburn students were the ones being effected by the accidents. “They want to not affect the roads as much on the University side and not put up barriers or gaudy things, but ultimately they want people to be safe,” Osterlund said. “What their hope is, from a University standpoint, is to get people to use these sidewalks and crosswalks while they are

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traversing the street.” In the past, Magnolia’s crosswalks were indicated with striped white paint. Cowper said they will keep the striped paint for added visibility, but will add patterned concrete to indicate where to walk. They will also reinstall all of the solarreflectant lights to shine at night. In addition to safety, the city wants to improve the appearance of Magnolia. “You’ve probably also seen at the end of Magnolia between Donahue and College, there’s some small landscape islands just to enhance the appearance of the road,” Cowper said.

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AU Police stakes out in AUSC Elizabeth Bonner

One thing the city will be installing is something that hasn’t been seen on Auburn roads before. They will install digital signs over the road. “These will be big signs that will be mounted on poles that come out over the roadway,” Cowper said. “It will warn that this is a pedestrian area—drive carefully. Something like that.” Cowper said the majority of the project should be fully opened by Aug. 31 and all of the lanes on Magnolia will be reopened, but they still have more

According to a College Prowler survey, 84 percent of Auburn University students feel safe and secure on campus, but only 15 percent say the police are “extremely present and willing to assist students.” The new Auburn police substation in the Student Center plans to change that. “Although the Auburn campus is relatively safe in comparison with many other institutions, every incremental step we can take to improve student safety is worth it,” said Ainsley Carry,

» See Magnolia, A2

» See Police, A2

Staff Writer

Student Activity Center implements group fitness fee Liz Conn Managing editor

For group fitness classes at the Student Activities Center, students must pay to play. This semester introduces the GroupFit Pass, which costs $10 per semester and is required to attend any of the Student Act’s formerly free group fitness classes. The new fee will help fund certification from the American Council on Exercise for the class instructors and personal trainers, said Pam Wiggins, group fitness coordinator. “We’re not asking that Auburn University or Campus Recreation pay all of it, but we would like to subsidize it,” Wiggins said. “So with that small $10 a semester, we’re able to get our stu-

dents certified.” Of the Act’s 24 instructors, 20 are students. Although they have already received basic training— and some even have specialty certification in their respective areas—ACE certification is becoming the industry norm, said Bill Jackson, associate director of lifetime wellness and fitness. “Gold’s Gym and all those places are starting to are require that nationally accredited group fitness certification, not just a specialty certification,” Jackson said. “That’s just the way the industry’s going.” Jackson said benchmarking other programs showed that some universities charge a fee for every class attended. “If you go to a yoga class today

it’s 5 bucks—if you go Wednesday it’s another 5 bucks,” he said. “We felt $10 a semester for people to participate in our group fitness program was very reasonable.” At the University of Georgia, students choose from tiered passes, ranging from a single-use pass for $6 to an all-access pass for $125 per semester. Jackson said while some SEC schools provide free classes, Auburn generally has more class offerings, with 71 classes each week. An exception is the University of Florida, which offers 125 free classes each week. In addition to certification, a process that takes two to three months and costs about $230 per person, the $10 fee will help pay for the instructors’ continuing ed-

Maria Iampietro / Photo Editor

Students who pay the new $10 group fitness fee at the Student Act get stickers on their TigerCards. ucation classes. Wiggins said the money will not fund construction of the Recreation and Wellness Center, slat-

Inside  Campus » A1  |  Community » A7  |  Opinions » A11  |  Classifieds » A12  |  Sports » B1  |  Intrigue » B5

ed for completion in spring 2013, nor will it fund higher pay for em» See Student Act, A2

Recycled paper


Campus A2

The Auburn Plainsman

DUI Arrests in the City of Auburn Aug. 27 – Aug. , 2011

Crime Reports for Aug. 26 – Aug. 29, 2011

■ Lynn M Gynther, 53, of Columbia, S.C. Orchard Circle Aug. 28, 7:37 p.m.

Aug. 26 — Shelton Mill Theft of property reported. One licence place.

■ Leonardo Reyes Sanchez, 34, of Jalesco East Glenn Avenue at Debardeleben St. Aug. 28, 5:29 p.m.

Aug. 26 — Lee Road 57 Theft of property reported. Three flat screen TVs, one laptop, one Wii game console.

■ Christopher Lane Pike, 26, of Thomasville, Ga. South College Street Aug. 27, 5:59 a.m.

Aug. 26 — Lee Road 57 Theft of property reported. One TV, one laptop, one National Championship ring, one football.

■ Cody Lee Abernathy, 21, of Wetumpka South College Street Aug. 27, 4:28 a.m.

Aug. 27 — Payne St. Theft of property. One car tag.

■ Margaret Ritchie Wright, 20, of Mobile West Magnolia Aug. 27, 1:06 a.m. ■ Erica Taylor Hall, 20, of Marietta, Ga. North Ross Street at East Glenn Aug. 27, 1:10 a.m. ■ Madison Lynn Jones, 22, of Atlanta North Ross Street at East Glenn Aug. 27, 1:10 a.m.

» From A1

work to do. “The project will continue probably through next week,” Cowper said. “Some of the striping I was talking about, reinstalling pedestrian crossing signs, the landscaping that we’ll be doing in the small medians, that will all occur in two or three weeks.” The digital sign will be installed during winter break. “You’ll be looking at a December time frame for the signs,” Cowper said. Osterlund said once all of the improvements are finished, facilities will monitor how it’s working. “Hopefully they won’t have to do anymore,” Os-

Aug. 28 — Opelika Road Theft of property reported. Two pairs of jeans and one Polo hat. Aug. 28— East Magnolia Auto theft reported. Green Volkswagen. Aug. 28 — Lee Road 137 Theft of property. Bunk bed frame. Aug. 29 — East Glenn Theft of property. Wii game controller.

Aug. 28 — Bibb Avenue

Aug. 29 — Kent Drive

Housing ties. Interest in changing the hours had been displayed for months, according to Director of Residence Life Becky Bell. “It was important to review our guest policy because residents were requesting a review,” Bell said. “The increased hours, while probably not increased enough for some residents, are a start to an ongoing review process.” The Village residence halls were allowed more lenient hours because of their private living spaces. “There are differences

terlund said. “On the complete opposite side of the spectrum, if it continues to be an issue, and students or University affiliates aren’t using the crosswalks, they may have to resort to channelization, and that requires putting up railing on the University side.” Putting up railing would make it impossible for students to cross the street without hopping the rail. Osterlund said none of their plans after the project is finished are set in stone. “I think it will definitely encourage pedestrians to use the proper crossing places as well as remind drivers to be more conscientious of pedestrian traffic,” Osterlund said.

Breaking and entering of a vehicle reported. Bright green leather wallet, credit cards, checkbook, DL, SS and electronic weed-eater.

Aug. 27 — Lee Road 137 Theft of property. Twenty-one bicycle.

» From A1

Magnolia

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Student Act » From A1

ployees. “It’s to improve the quality of our program,” Wiggins said. “In order to sustain a quality program, you have

Theft of property reported. One TV, two laptops, Under Armour backpack, three Under Armour pullovers. Aug. 29— East Glenn Theft of property reported. Tape measure, debit card, flip phone, book bag, brown leather wallet, sunglasses, fluke voltmeter. Aug. 29 — Webster Road Theft of property reported. Three laptops, two portable hard drive, one gaming system, one 32-inch flat screen.

— Reports provided by Auburn Department of Public Safety

between the Hill and Quad residence halls and the Village halls,” Bell said. “In the Village, residents have individual rooms in addition to common space for the suites, so having guests in a Village room does not have the same impact on a roommate as having a guest in a shared room.” Bell noted the increased hours will have a positive effect on residents as they now have additional time to study or meet with friends who do not live in their hall. The only concern expressed on the survey was a possible noise increase throughout the halls, but

according to Bell, there have been no complaints. Auburn now has visitation hours comparable to the University of Alabama, but remains strict compared to BirminghamSouthern College, which has 24-hour visitation in select halls. Teague Hall resident Stephen Fristoe, freshman in actuarial science, explained how the increased hours will help him become acquainted with other students. “The new hours are great to have, meaning we have more time to get to know people, and it is important to get to know peo-

ple around campus,” Fristoe said. The former visitation policy was from noon until midnight daily, something many students found inconvenient considering after hours, group activities were restricted to outside of their designated hall. Teague Hall resident assistant Spencer Pursley, junior in building science, found the changes something the residents deserved. “I think it’s a step in the right direction,” Pursley said. “ It’s what the residents asked for because before the rule really was strict.”

to have professional development.” Olivia Franklin, junior in architecture, said she does not think certification will make much of a difference. “I’ve been going for the past two years,” Frank-

lin said. “The classes were good then, and they’re good now. I’m out-of-state, so it seems like they could find $10 in the money I’m paying.” Jackson said certification will help instructors pro-

vide the safest classes possible. “We have to be concerned about the safety of our participants and to make sure they’re getting the type of fitness activity they deserve,” Jackson said.

Police

been dreaming of for a long time,” said Carswell. “We knew that we needed to be closer to the people of Auburn—physically closer.“ According to Carswell, most SEC schools have their own police department, but the Auburn Police Department is responsible for law enforcement on campus as well as throughout the city. This can cause a duplication of effort. “Getting this office is just a way of strengthening that effort,” Carswell said. The appeal of this station is convenience. The police want students to have a central place to turn to in case of trouble on campus. “The whole idea behind it is that we just want to be accessible and convenient for the students, faculty and staff,” said Tom Stofer, captain of the Auburn Police Department. “It’s a central location people are aware of so that when they need help they

know where to come to get assistance.” Students haven’t begun to utilize the station like its creators were anticipating, but many still aren’t aware of it. “It hasn’t been used a lot,” Carswell said. “We’ve yet to reach the people that we want to reach with this resource. Summer was a little slower, but thank goodness it’s not every day that everybody needs a police officer. The success of it isn’t measured by the number of people that come in and out of it, but by the number of people who have this access when they need it.” Brittany Kear, freshman in pre-nursing, said she ate lunch a few feet away from the station last Friday, but still didn’t know it existed. “I didn’t know about it, but it’s a good idea,” Kear said. “In case there’s an emergency, they’re right here. It makes me feel safer on campus.”

» From A1

vice president of Student Affairs. Tommy Carswell, captain of the Auburn Police Department, thinks the substation will create a more visible police presence on campus than there has been in the past. “We hope it makes people on campus feel safer by knowing that we’re right there,” Carswell said. “While we’ve always had officers on campus, no one knew exactly where they were at a given time. It moves an officer from a random location to a specific location where people know that he or she will be there.” The substation opened this summer. Auburn Police Assistant Chief Paul Register worked closely with Carry and his staff to turn this long-standing idea into reality. “It’s something we’d

In the article “Resident assistants work to improve residence life“ of the Aug. 25 issue of The Auburn Plainsman, David Adkison’s name was printed as “David Atkison.” The correct spelling is “Adkison.” We regret the error. In the “Funds needed for firefighting” article of the Aug. 25 edition, it was incorrectly stated that residents currently pay a $25 fire fee per month. The fee is yearly, not monthly. We regret the error.

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Thursday, September 1, 2011

Campus A3

The Auburn Plainsman

New pianos hit right note Megan Smith Writer

Students in the Department of Music are using new keys to play for success. Every major and minor in the program is required to work with pianos, and students now have 19 new pianos to play. The $175,000 to buy the pianos came from the College of Liberal Arts’ equipment budget and allowed the department to buy 15 Knabe upright pianos and four baby grand pianos. The college also received a grant to purchase various other instruments. “This has been our banner year to purchase in-

struments,” said Sara Baird, chair of the music department, “to replace instruments that were unusable because of their age.” The new pianos replaced those in the practice rooms that were 40–50 years old. Baird said the pianos were “extremely well-used and beyond repair.” “The old pianos were terrible,” said Thomas Harbin, senior in piano performance. “It was only when Dr. Baird became director that the music program started getting better. She got things together.” Two of the baby grand pianos were placed in faculty offices, and the other two in

practice rooms accessible to piano performance majors. Some of the old pianos were kept as well. “I prefer to practice on the new ones,” said Christina Kettering, sophomore in piano performance and English. “They threw out the really bad ones.” Kettering and other students in the program are supposed to practice at least three hours a day. “It gets really hectic around noon,” Kettering said. “Then it gets hard to find a good room.” Before the pianos were purchased, Kettering said she couldn’t tell if her playing was bad, or if it was

SGA Senate Meeting ■ Dining expansion is a top priority among the SGA. A new dining hall is in the works to open in conjunction with South Donahue Residence Hall, which will replace Sewell Residence Hall. ■ Tidy Tiger, a new campaign formed to help promote awareness regarding excess trash on game days, will be promoted around campus at upcoming football games. ■ A system to increase convenience for oncampus housing during the break between summer and fall semesters is being reviewed in hopes of providing a more effective movein date.

the piano, but she usually blamed the piano. “I call the new ones ‘ego pianos,’” Kettering said. “They’re ego boosters. Everything you play sounds

good. The old ones, everything sounds bad.” Auburn went through a formal bidding process to buy the pianos. Atlanta’s PianoWorks

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won the bid and acquired the pianos for the University. The older pianos are being sold by the surplus department.

our New Mem b

! ers

August 29, 2011

Rebecca Croomes / Assistant Photo Editor

Julia Tucker, junior in piano performance and economics, hones her skills on one of the new pianos in a practice room at Goodwin Hall.

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Campus A4

The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Graphic novels provide alternative to traditional textbooks Chelsea Harvey Campus Editor

Comic books aren’t just for kids anymore. Dave Ketchen, eminent scholar and professor of management, is in the process of co-authoring his fourth graphic novel textbook, expected to be released next summer. His previous three books covered business topics including management, franchising and family business. The difference between these and regular textbooks is that they are written in comic book format, with art, characters and storylines that illustrate business concepts. “There’s a lot of really cool stuff that goes on now that didn’t go on, let’s say, 20 years ago,” Ketchen said. “But textbooks have stayed the same. They’re just as boring today as they were 20 years ago. So we kind of asked ourselves, ‘Is there a way to come up with a textbook that would be more interesting that students would actually look forward to reading?’” A number of different people have been a part of the graphic novel’s pro-

duction, including several artists and coauthors. However, Ketchen’s consistent collaborator on all of the books has been Jeremy Short, associate professor of management at the University of Oklahoma. Short and Ketchen were responsible for all the creative points in the graphic novels, including characters and storylines. Short met Ketchen in the late 1990s at Louisiana State University, before Ketchen came to Auburn. Short was Ketchen’s doctoral student at the time. The two began work on the graphic novels in 2009. Short said he wanted to partner with Ketchen because of Ketchen’s prestigious reputation and large contribution to the College of Business’ collection of research articles. “So one of the things that we wanted to do with these books, and one of the huge reasons why I wanted to get Dave involved early—besides he’s just a great and really fast writer—is he’s just a well-known researcher,” Short said. “It adds to the legitimacy that’s important for these kinds of books.”

The first graphic novel the two wrote was titled “Atlas Black: Managing to Succeed” and was published in 2010. The book has a sequel called “Atlas Black: Management Guru.” Both Atlas Black books were co-authored by Talya Bauer, professor of business administration at Portland State University and were illustrated by artist Len Simon. The third book is called “Tales of Garcón: The Franchise Players.” It explores the dynamics of a family business. Although Ketchen and Short continued to work together, this book was coauthored by Jim Combs, professor of management at Florida State University, and illustrated by artist Will Terrell. Short said despite how unusual they are as textbooks, the graphic novels have had a high success rate among students. “Eighty-five percent of students like it more than traditional textbooks or traditional case materials we’ve had,” Short said. “We’ve received several comments from students

Architects create impact on Impact Crater Center Elizabeth Bonner Staff Writer

Auburn University architecture students’ designs will inspire the forthcoming Alabama Impact Crater and Science Center. The center will be built in Wetumpka over the impact site of an ancient meteor. David King, professor of geology, was the first scientist to successfully determine that the mysterious horseshoe-shaped feature is an impact crater. “I did not discover the crater, but I brought international recognition that it is an impact crater via my publications,” King said. The crater has become a geological landmark and visitor attraction for Alabama. However, its fourmile diameter makes it difficult for visitors to receive a complete tour. Partnered with the Elmore County Crater Commission, Auburn University architecture students participated in a design competition for a new

museum and science center which will serve as the commission’s central facility for educating the public. “This was an interesting challenge,” said Justin Miller, assistant professor of architecture. “The crater is a big landform that is really difficult to apprehend in its entirety. The students had to come up with an interpretive center to describe the crater without having a very clear representation of it.” The designs for the center include a museum, auditorium, event space, observatory, research facility, gift shop and café. “I tried to put myself in the shoes of what it would be like coming in the meteor from space to the Earth, how it would feel with the meteor coming to the impact,” said Ryan Zimmerman, senior in interior architecture and winner of the competition. “I tried to capture that feel in my design.” Samantha O’Leary, junior in architecture and third-place winner, took a

different approach. “My angle was taking advantage of the site,” O’Leary said. “There are all these views of the crater, and each one changes every time you move around the site.” The students spent a semester working on the project, which they said was demanding. “For the last week of the project, I brought in a blow-up mattress, a bag of clothes, a dock kit and an alarm clock, and I lived in the community planning room,” said Samuel Maddox, junior in interior architecture who took fourth place in the competition. “I slept about two hours a night.” Still, the students felt the end result was worth the effort. “It was really cool designing the whole project because some of our ideas could be used to actually be built,” Zimmerman said. “We spend all our time designing on paper and modeling on the computer, but this actually has an end result.”

Rebecca Croomes / Assistant Photo Editor

The two installments of the Atlas Black series have been combined into one volume. just saying that they love it.” Neil Danville, senior in entrepreneurship and family business, took two courses with Ketchen in which the graphic novels were assigned as textbooks. “I thought they helped a lot because in the beginning when you get a book, any student’s not going to want to read it and they dread reading it,” Danville said. “I just thought it was a way of disguising the material that would be in a traditional book, but once I got

to reading it, you get caught up in the material as well as the story that’s going on in the comic book, so it really is engaging and I really did get a lot from it.” Short said he has used the books in the classroom both exclusively and as supplements. He said the books can be used both inside and outside the classroom. “Part of our inspiration, too, would be the idea that these books could be used by just anybody who is in-

terested in business,” Short said. “So you wouldn’t necessarily have to be a business student at all.” Ketchen said he thinks the real strength of the graphic novels is that they contain elements that traditional textbooks lack. “I think they add a third dimension to the concepts,” Ketchen said. “I think if you use a traditional textbook, you’re sort of living in a twodimensional world. But this can really bring the concepts to life.”

Game Day Parking ■ Coliseum C zone lot must be emptied by 6 a.m. the day before home game. ■ RO/C zone lot (north section only) must be emptied by 8 p.m. day before home game. ■ RW zone, Stadium Parking Deck, C zone on Heisman Drive and first through third levels of South Quad parking deck must be emptied by 10 p.m. the day before home game. ■ Alternate parking is available in Alternate R1 parking lot on the corner of Donahue and Lem Morrison or Alternate R2 parking lot on South Donahue.

Historic research field celebrates hundredth birthday Nick Bowman Assistant Copy Editor

The second-oldest cotton research field in the world has reached a century of continuous experimentation. The rotation sits behind the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Arts on South College Street and has served Auburn University since the 1880s. Responsible for managing the rotation is Charles Mitchell, extension specialist and professor of agronomy and soils. Mitchell said in 1911 the state legislature awarded the Alabama Polytechnic Institute funds to create a research station. Using those funds, Auburn began the experiments on the land of J.A. Cullars. “Each plot out there represents a different treatment that’s been continued

for 100 years,” Mitchell said. The history of the rotation goes back further than 1911. “In the 1890s, there was a professor of biology here named George Atkinson,” Mitchell said. “One of the problems for farmers in the South was that about this time of year, cotton would develop a kind of cotton rust. The leaves would turn orange then brown and fall off. Nobody knew what caused it.” Mitchell said Atkinson began researching different disease organisms involved in cotton rust, but discovered that all of these organisms grew on cotton as a result of the rust. The bacteria and fungi were symptoms of an unknown disease. “Atkinson came in and started throwing some stuff out there,” Mitchell said. “He found out that if he put out this mineral called kai-

nit, that suddenly the rust went away.” Mitchell said kainit is a potassium-bearing mineral. This experiment led to the discovery of a potassium deficiency in Southern soil. Another consequence of Atkinson’s experiments was a drastic increase in the study and use of fertilizer, which eventually motivated Auburn to purchase the land from Cullars and begin the century of research. “If you go down to that experiment, you’ll see one plot that’s got rust, same with the soybeans,” Mitchell said. “You can’t see that anywhere else in the world because people have been fertilizing for 100 years.” Involved in the planting and farming of the rotation since 1996 has been Dennis Delaney, researcher of agronomy and soils.

“We’ve had a lot of visitors come through,” Delaney said. “It’s the one place that we can really take people and show them fertilizer-deficient symptoms. Most farmers don’t see the obvious symptoms like we do.” The Cullars Rotation isn’t a simple historical perspective of agriculture in Alabama. The rotation continues to prove its agricultural significance. “About the time that I got here, we went to conservation tillage, or no till,” Delaney said. “The yields have steadily increased over the years.” Mitchell said the lack of tillage helps to conserve minerals in the soil and prevent erosion. “Those plots have not had a plow put in them since 1997,” Mitchell said. “It helps to conserve the soil because minerals don’t

Maria Iampietro / Photo Editor

Cullars Rotation is the second-oldest cotton experiment in the world. The oldest cotton research field, Old Rotation, is also a part of the Auburn campus. wash away if they’re not disturbed.” Mitchell said since tilling has stopped, the rotation has set record crop yields. “The reason we’re able to get such good production

is because we’re leaving the residue on the surface,” Mitchell said. “The soil is actually improving.” The rotation was added in 2003 to the National Register of Historic Places.


Thursday, September 1, 2011

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A7 Community It would take an Act of Congress www.theplainsman.com

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Community

Anna Claire Conrad Staff Writer

These are no ordinary church bells ringing at the Auburn Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Church. The low-key, intimate atmosphere of the church building provides the ideal setting for the Sundilla Acoustic Concert Series. “Our goal with these performances is to bring artists to town that under other circumstances would not come to Auburn,” said Bailey Jones, freelance journalist and organizer of the event. Friday, Sundilla hosted a performance by Birmingham’s Act of Congress. Band members include vocalist and fiddle player Connie Skellie, vocalist and guitarist Chris Griffin, bass player Tim Carroll and lead vocalist and mandolin player Adam Wright. Griffin said this was the band’s first professional trip to the Plains, although they had recently played a show in Opelika. Lead singer Adam Wright welcomed the audience to the venue with a loud “War Eagle.” The band opened with one of its original songs from the album “Declaration.” As the night went

Maria Iampietro / Photo Editor

Act of Congress took the stage Friday as part of the Sundilla Acoustic Concert Series at Auburn Unitarian Universalist Fellowship at 450 Thach Ave. Next in the series will be Smithfield Fair, playing Sept. 23. on, they played covers of popular songs such as Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep,” Coldplay’s “Clocks” and The Postal Service’s “Such

Great Heights.” One of the night’s most popular songs was “Five Minutes of Fame,” which satirically details the ad-

venture of a redneck shower-singer with dreams of high-class Hollywood living. The crowd cheered for an encore and thanked the

band with a standing ovation. Act of Congress has a style that » See Sundilla, A8

Ha i r spr a y Alison McFerrin News Editor

Contributed

The Lespri Endonptabl, or “The Indomitable Spirit,” exhibit at the JCSM is a great resource for students participating in the Auburn Connects! Common Book Program.

Haitian art helps make connection Rebecca Croomes Assistant Photo Editor

Dancing monkeys and villagers plowing bountiful fields are not the usual images associated with Haiti. Ever since the Jan. 12, 2010, earthquake, it’s easy to think of Haiti as a shattered society, but the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art and the Auburn Connects! Common Book Program desire to change this perception by displaying a gallery of Haitian paintings, which opened Saturday. “Haiti is very close to us geographically, and I think it’s important to understand the cultures and the histories of our neighbors,” said Constance Relihan, associate provost of undergraduate studies. “We all need to be globally aware.” Relihan is one of the founders of the Auburn Connects! Common Book Program. This year’s book, “Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, A Man Who Could Cure the World” by Tracy Kidder, concentrates on Haiti and one man’s efforts to make a difference. Relihan said students who are

It’s good to be reminded that any culture is much more than its current economic situation.” —Constance Relihan associate provost of Undergraduate studies

assigned to read the book during class or are participating in the program will experience a new way of reading after seeing the exhibit. Lespri Endonptabl, or “The Indomitable Spirit,” is an exhibition of paintings and sculptures from Haiti from1945 to 1990. The collection is being borrowed from the Huntington Museum of Art in West Virginia. “If you think about the earthquake aftermath of Haiti, what you often see is images of people in trouble, people in poverty, people in difficulty, and it’s good to be reminded that any culture » See Haiti, A8

Where the breakdown of social construct meets hip dance moves, all you need is a whole lot of beauty product to hold it together. Auburn Area Community Theatre is having auditions for its first musical, “Hairspray,” and the choice of this production wasn’t made just because of its popularity or potential for encompassing a large cast. “We chose this particular play because of its racial balance,” said Barbara Stauffer-Brewi, managing director. “In order to even be able to do Hairspray, you have to sign on the contract … that you won’t swap out characters—that you’ll maintain the racial balance.” Stauffer-Brewi said participation in the AACT by AfricanAmericans has been historically low. They hope to begin to change this with the production. “Any time you have a part of your community missing in what you’re doing, it diminishes you,” Stauffer-Brewi said. “We want to broaden and reach out.” Recruitment is in the job description for artistic board member Malcolm Webster, who has been involved in community theatre for years.

“I think part of it goes to stereotypes,” Webster said. “A lot of African-Americans don’t do theatre … A lot of times you might have a person who’s interested in theatre—who’s a young black person—who doesn’t do that because that’s not talked about or encouraged.” A myriad of roles are available, from principal roles like Tracy and Link, to positions in the dance choir and musicians. There will be a place for everyone in this production—if you at least know your right foot from your left. “You don’t have to have had training in dance,” said choreographer Kelly Davino, junior in theatre. “We’re going to find something for you to do.” Including everyone, Webster said, is what community theatre is all about. “With this show, you’re bringing more people in than we’ve ever had before,” Webster said. “You might not realize that person standing there is a star waiting to be born.” Auditions will be Sept. 6–7 from 6–8 p.m at the Jan Dempsey Community Arts Center. Participants should prepare to sing a 30-second to one-minute a capella segment of any song that will show their range. They should also dress to dance.

Of course, there may be a special role for someone with the right qualifications. “I would love to be able to do ‘Hairspray’ as it has traditionally been done, with Tracy’s mother Edna being in drag,” StaufferBrewi said. “If we can’t, we can’t— I’ll cast it some other way—but I would really like to do that.” Webster said they have also been contacting black churches, the Auburn University Black Student Union and the National Panhellenic Council to solicit participation. “I think it’s going to be very interesting for the community,” Stauffer-Brewi said. Even if you’ve never acted before, getting up on stage may open new horizons, Davino said. “It really helps you to understand other people, other cultures, other societies,” Davino said. And being in theatre means being on an even playing field, even if you are untrained. “There is a bond among theatre people—thespians—that transcends their socio-economic (status), their race, their place in society,” Stauffer-Brewi said. “In the theatre, everybody stands on equal ground.” For more information visit www.auburnact.org.

Public safety’s wish is granted Shanetta Pendleton Staff Writer

Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard secured $20,000 in grants for the Auburn Police and Fire Divisions. “Auburn’s policemen and firefighters deserve our support in every way we can give it,” Hubbard said. “It’s my job to see that hardearned taxpayer dollars are returned to our community and put to good use. I can think of no better way to do that than giving our police and fire departments more tools to protect us.” The equipment purchased with these grants will benefit students along with permanent residents. The Auburn Police Department, which also services the University, received $10,000 that it will use to purchase four sets of night-vision goggles. The equip-

ment will be used to investigate criminal activity and help the department with search-and-rescue efforts. “If there’s a crime at night, the night-vision goggles are useful because they will help us identify the suspect,” said Police Chief Tommy Dawson. “Also if a student is lost, these could be used to locate them immediately.” Hubbard said he was especially pleased the grant would be beneficial for campus safety. “Having night-vision monoculars will enhance officers’ ability to keep students safe when they are most vulnerable,” Hubbard said. The remaining $10,000 given to the Auburn Fire Department will be used to purchase another Holmatro extrication tool, or the Jaws of Life, and the power pack

needed to operate it. “If someone is involved in a car accident and we have to pry the door open or get the hood off, this equipment allows us to do that,” said Auburn Fire Chief Lee Lamar. In addition to the $20,000 secured for Auburn, Hubbard secured another $20,000 grant for Opelika. Opelika Police Chief Tommy Mangham said the Opelika Police Department will be using $9,700 to purchase an identification card printer and laminating tools. According to Fire Chief Terry Adkins, $8,500 will be used by the Opelika Fire Department to purchase LED flashlights for all fire personnel, and the remaining $1,800 will be used to purchase new camera equipment for the Community Relations Department.


Community A8

Doughnut maker succeeds by learning from mistakes Bianca Seward Writer

Before the spring of 2009, Bill Springer had never made a doughnut in his life, let alone run a doughnut shop. Four days before opening Daylight Doughnuts, the Springer family churned out doughnut after doughnut, hoping to perfect the signature pastry. For the North Alabama native, being an Auburn fan wasn’t always easy amidst the predominantly Tide

Sundilla » From A7

makes it hard to classify it in one genre. “I would not categorize our music under the Christian label,” Wright said. “Since we are all believers, that moral foundation comes out in our work in a welcoming way.” Auburn students in attendance said they thoroughly enjoyed the concert. “I liked the part when they came off the stage and sang a cappella best,” said Carrie Bray, sophomore in pre-medicine. “It showed their raw talent.” Courtney Meadows, sophomore in biomedical sciences, said she listened to the band’s music online before attending. “Their live performance is just as great as their recorded music,” Meadows

The Auburn Plainsman territory. “My brother thought about Alabama, but Daddy would have ripped his head off,” Springer said. “An Auburn family stays an Auburn family.” Springer was raised on the Alabama and Tennessee state line. He grew up working on the family farm and ventured farther south to Auburn University, seeking a degree in agriculture and economics. Springer is now father to three Auburn graduates, the youngest of which finished last year. He and his wife, Vickie, have been married 28 years. “I really don’t know how she’s put up with me for so long,” Springer said. All members of the Springer family help with the store, including out-oftown in-laws. Lucy Michael, Springer’s mother-in-law, travels from North Alabama to help out said. “It proves how talented they really are.” Both Meadows and Bray said they would definitely come back to Sundilla for another concert. “I think there’s an acoustic movement going on,” Wright said. “There’s something real about acoustic music being played live, more real than what plays on the radio.” The Sundilla Concert Series will host another performance Sept. 23 at the same venue by the band Smithfield Fair. “They’re a Celtic trio from Louisiana that has been around for more than 20 years,” Jones said. “I’m anticipating a good crowd.” For more information on the Sundilla Acoustic Concert Series and Act of Congress, visit www.sundilla. org or ‘like’ the Facebook page.

with the store. She recently retired from her career as a seamstress. “I don’t do much but ice doughnuts and other odd jobs in the back,” Michael said. “It’s very different from sewing, but I enjoy working with family.” Before the doughnut business, Springer devoted five years working as a Gideon in the prison ministry, passing out Bibles in the mid-‘80s. During this time, Springer said he discovered insight on how to be successful in life. Springer said he trusts mistakes to lead him to success. “Mistakes mean you’re trying,” Springer said. “If we had stayed just a doughnut shop, we would have been shut down in our first year. So we started experimenting on sandwiches and burgers and anything else our customers were interested in ... It’s important to

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Alex Sager / Associate Photo Editor

Bill Springer, owner of Daylight Donuts, said taking care of customers is high-priority. me to see returning faces.” True to his word, Springer makes a mess behind the counter remaking a customer’s iced mocha as he gives her a helpful tip on making the difficult left turn out of the parking lot.

Haiti

» From A7 is much more than its current economic situation,” Relihan said. Karissa Womack, junior in English, participated in setting up the exhibit as part of her internship at the museum. She said she thinks the vivid colors and expressions of joy will mend the disconnect students have with Haiti. “Despite whatever personal tragedies and things of that nature that the peasantry actually live in … it’s joyful, and it’s beautiful, and it’s happy,” Womack said. Womack attributes the happiness and inspiration Haitians have to the local religion of Vodou, a combination of island religion and Catholicism. A large part of the exhibit was designed to teach visi-

And that’s just the way he wants his business to run. Newly employed Lauren Shepherd of Savannah, Ga., began working at the doughnut shop to try to establish residency in Alabama.

tors about Vodou’s vital role in Haitian identity. Other works, Womack said, allow students to imagine what Haiti was like before the earthquake. The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption in the Hatian capital of Portau-Prince was destroyed in the disaster, but lives on in oil paint. Volunteers like Charlotte Laroux are available to take visitors on a tour of the exhibit. Laroux said she thinks she has been awarded a great opportunity. “I immediately loved (the exhibit),” Laroux said. “It’s such a rare opportunity to see art from Haiti.” Laroux, like Relihan and Womack, said the exhibit was fascinating in the context of the disaster. Lespri Endonptabl will be featured at the JCSM until Oct. 29.

“I really like working here because even though it is a family-run store, I don’t feel excluded,” Shepherd said. “I’ve only been here a few weeks, and they really took me under their wing to show me the ropes.”

AU Campus Safety urges spectators to take the following precautions during football season: 1. Dress for the heat. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing to reflect the heat. 2. Drink plenty of water and non-alcoholic and decaffeinated fluids. Hydrate with water several days before you expect to be exposed to the heat, as well as during and after heat exposure. 3. Wear sunscreen. Sunburn can significantly retard the skin’s ability to shed excess heat. 4. Know the signs of heat stress. Get help if you suspect you or someone near you is suffering from heat stress. The symptoms include heavy sweating; weakness or fatigue; cold, pale, clammy skin; irritability; dizziness; fainting and vomiting. Game-day staff and emergency responders are prepared to respond if necessary. Cooling stations staffed with medical personnel are available in the concourse area.

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Opinions

A9 www.theplainsman.com

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Our View

Group fitness fee is just one of many Ten dollars doesn’t sound like much. Admittedly, to most it isn’t. But we’re college students. We’re the eaters of ramen and the scroungers of sofa change. Ten dollars is something for us, and now we’re $10 shorter. Charging for the use of group fitness classes is an abrupt change from previous semesters, and the fee is intended to cover the $230 cost of each instructor’s certification. The point of this certification, from the perspective of the University, is to give back to the instructors who donate their time and effort to the group fitness program. They want their instructors to be able to professionally use the skills they have acquired while teaching at Auburn, and the certification makes the transition cheaper and easier

for instructors. At first, this all makes perfect sense. But when you dig into it, after you’re done digging into your empty pockets, the program is requiring participants to foot the bill for what amounts to a charitable act on the part of the University. Instructors are already required to go through a lengthy, two-semester process of instruction to teach a class. When they finish, they’re comfortably competent, the University isn’t liable for any injuries, and no one can make an accusation of negligence. No warning, other than a tab on the Campus Recreation website posted on Aug. 3, was given to students prior to fall semester. On that page it says the charge is in place, not that it’s under review or open to comment.

Then there’s the pay. Instructors start at minimum wage and earn more based on how long they’ve been teaching. The highest-paid student instructor on staff makes $15 an hour after teaching two years. Students working for the University can’t be considered well-off, but we’re all in the same hole. However, they’re walking away with a certification paid for by other students. Certification is a good thing, as is giving our students as many skills as possible to compete in the real world, but we feel that this is just another cost on top of a sizeable heap of costs that the student body must bear. Auburn students are already required to chip in $200 per semester for the new Recreation and Wellness Center. We understand the University can’t

build a new facility without generating the revenue to account for construction costs, but still, it’s another fee for the heap. Counter to this argument is the fact that many other SEC schools charge for the use of their facilities, some much more than others. The University of Georgia charges ten times that of Auburn. We’re frustrated. If it’s not additional class fees, it’s a meal plan. If it’s not a meal plan, it’s a tuition increase. If it’s not a tuition increase, it’s an iClicker. It seems like we can’t go one semester without shelling out more than we did the year before. At what point does another $10 break us? When we’re asked for tens or hundreds of thousands, another $10 doesn’t sound like much.

Community quote of the week

We felt $10 a semester for people to participate in our group fitness program was very reasonable.” —William Jackson “Student Activities Center implements group fitness fee” a1

The Plainsman Poll

Vote at www.theplainsman.com

Editor’s view

The Plainsman can offer more than just news mirana Dollarhide editor@ theplainsman. com

Some things at Auburn are expected. Rolling Toomers after a victory, yelling “War Eagle” at any public event and picking up The Plainsman every Thursday. The Plainsman is a part of what makes Auburn, Auburn. These pages are created every week by a hardworking group of student journalists who are dedicated to bringing you the news. With that said, creating a publication that can be read by 25,000 students, a local com-

munity and the online world is one of the most badass things I’ve ever done. Here are four reasons you should volunteer to write for the Plainsman. 1. You get to be part of Auburn history. Imagine 100 years from now—you will most likely be dead, unless you’re a vampire or hobbit— but somewhere in the Ralph Brown Draughon Library archive, an Auburn Plainsman will exist with your name and story. Some eager journalism student will be writing a story on what Auburn life was like in the 21st century, and you will be their guide. 2. You get substantial experience for your resume. Building your resume in college

isn’t difficult. With a myriad of clubs and organizations, pushing your resume into the two-page mark will happen faster than you can say, “I’m in.” Will being a member of the board-game society get you that first job? Probably not. Unless you’re applying to work at Mattel. However, working for a paper where you learned to work under pressure, on deadlines and for a major university may do the trick. 3. You get paid. Finding a job in this economy is not easy, especially on campus. We pay every two weeks. 4. You’ll make life-long connections. In the job market, I’ve heard it’s not what you know, but who you know. As a

Plainsman reporter, you meet all kinds of people. Little do you know now, some of those people you meet are going to be CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, famous athletes or possibly president. The connections you make now could be ones that last forever. Working for The Plainsman can be one of the greatest things you do at Auburn. Stop by The Plainsman office, Suite 1111 in the Student Center, every Wednesday at 7 p.m. to volunteer. If writing isn’t your thing, but you still want to contribute, send us your ideas at editor@theplainsman.com or leave us a message on our Facebook wall at www.facebook.com/theplainsman.

Staff Columns

Mainstream media missing the serious issues Chelsea harvey campus@theplainsman. com

Here’s a news flash: reporting is not what it used to be. OK, so I might be exaggerating. I’ll admit, I haven’t done enough research to know for sure whether reporting in the 1800s was more relevant than it is today. But what I do know is that when I turn on the 11 o’clock news, I do not want to see Lady Gaga’s face staring back at me. I want to see some real news. It could be that I’m just a purist when it comes to hard news. My point here is that it’s a big world out there, and I’m pretty sure there are enough important glob-

al events going on that we shouldn’t run stories on who’s getting divorced in Hollywood. I’m sorry, Fox News, CNN and all the rest of you, but I didn’t give a damn about the royal wedding last spring when there was Egypt and Libya to think about. And frankly, I couldn’t care less that Steve Jobs resigned—not when hurricanes are battering the eastern United States, Chinese miners have been trapped underground for days and Gadhafi is still missing in action. The concerning point is this: the media report what the people care about. So if the media are reporting “news” that NOBODY (in my humble opinion) should care about, then what does that say about us? It says that we have lost interest in global affairs. And in an increasingly intercon-

nected global society, this, to me, is the most disturbing thing of all. I just can’t help but feel the kind of society that cares about what’s going on halfway around the world is the kind of society that embraces diversity, advocates tolerance of all cultures and beliefs, helps out its neighbors when they are in trouble and generally—try not to gag—works to make the world a better place. So, on that note, it is my hope that the future media will take a less shallow and more global-minded approach to reporting, reflecting the interests of a public that actually cares about the world outside the entertainment industry. As college students, we find ourselves in the exciting role of the newest generation of world-changers. Taking an interest in the things that matter is our responsibility.

YAL recruiting dishonestly Recently on campus, I stumbled across a large display of the U.S. national debt, an advertisement for Young Americans for Liberty. Although I had previously heard of the group in passing, I was uncertain about what they actually represented, so I chose to ask them. This proved an alarmingly poor method to learn about the organization. I was blatantly lied to about the ideology and purpose of the club. In fact, despite a recruiter vouching for the club as a “nonpartisan” group that was “separate from political parties,” less than five minutes on Google demonstrated those quotes are anything but genuine. YAL was formed as a Libertarian advocacy group, and some of the Auburn chapter’s free literature—namely, “The Economics of Freedom: What Your Professors Won’t Tell You”—attests to that. I read the book’s introduction, and I knew that I had been misled about the nature of the club. What’s particularly infuriating about this is I felt insulted that a group demanding greater political culpability would use dishonesty as a recruitment tool. If you trick people into supporting your cause, how are you acting any differently from the “typical” politicians belittled by your recruiters? Effective politics demand honesty, and the first step toward honesty is admitting to your own biases. I merely ask that in the future, the YAL stands by what it actually represents. Matt Greenemeier senior, anthropology

Public safety personnel adds valuable asset to the Auburn community Alison McFerrin News@theplainsman.com

As carefree college students, it can be easy to assign a stigma to local law enforcement and public safety officials. After all, seeing those flashing red-andblue lights in your rearview mirror rarely means you’re about to have a positive or uplifting experience. But the truth is, these public servants work tirelessly to fulfill their duty: ensur-

ing the safety of Auburn residents and students. Maybe we think since police officers and firefighters get a paycheck, that is enough appreciation. But public safety officials often go beyond the call of duty, and can you put a price on that feeling of security? Public safety is an issue throughout the city of Auburn as well as on campus. The new police substation on campus, located next to the Tiger Transit office, is staffed from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. to handle student complaints and campus safety issues. This makes it even easier for students to benefit from the available services. And the City of Auburn will soon have

more of the equipment it needs to get the job done, thanks to a grant secured by Alabama Rep. Mike Hubbard. Night-vision goggles and the Jaws of Life don’t come cheap, you know. This equipment and the new substation are wonderful, much-needed resources. But the services we need come from the men and women behind the equipment. These are the men and women who respond when someone pulls a dorm fire alarm at three in the morning. These are the officers who are there every time you get in a fender-bender, when you come back to your car to find the window broken and your possessions miss-

ing, or when your car stalls on North College Street. These are the people that respond to bomb threats and kidnappings and lost children. These people are here for us, and we should respond in kind. Public safety and law enforcement are often tasked with doing jobs that are going to make people angry—and it’s understandable, because who can afford to drop $50 or more on a parking ticket? But they press on, providing the services that keep our society running safely and finding new and innovative ways to protect and serve. They deserve our appreciation.

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Community A10

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Sports Thursday, September 1, 2011

Soccer preview

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» Page B4

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B1

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Sports

Tiger’s youth cause for concern Brandon Miller sports@ theplainsman.com

Since winning the National Championship, things have gotten quiet on the Plains thanks to Ohio State, Miami (Fla.), LSU and other schools with issues off the field. It seemed like Auburn was back to being the quiet, above-average team we’ve all learned to love. Well, somewhat. Despite being ranked 19th and 23rd in preseason polls, experts are questioning Auburn’s ability to win. While I don’t believe Auburn will fail to become bowl eligible— like some are predicting—I think it may be a long year for the Tigers. Although lack of experience isn’t anything new to Auburn, the Tigers are missing 17 starters from last year, which makes me believe this may be the year it catches up with the team. I think naming Barrett Trotter the starting quarterback was the first step toward building a successful season. Trotter arguably knows the offense better than anyone else on the team, and that’s crucial when Gus Malzahn is calling the plays. Michael Dyer and Onterio McCalebb returning to the backfield will keep the ball moving. Don’t forget, Dyer was only one of 27 players last year to rush for 1,000 yards. Interestingly, McCalebb has been listed above Dyer at running back, but coach Gene Chizik is saying it’s not something fans should look too deeply into. The receiving corps will also boost offensive statistics, despite having new starters. Keep in mind, Emory Blake and Quindarius Carr saw the field a lot last year. The issue of inexperience is most apparent concerning the offensive line and defense in general. Auburn only has Brandon Mosley returning to the offensive line. With that said, Chizik and company did a great job recruiting, so if there’s one group that’s going to surprise fans, I believe it will be the offensive line. The defense, which only has three returning starters, is going to need the experienced players » See Column B2

Plainsman Archives

Several Tigers bring down a South Carolina player at the SEC Championship in the Georgia Dome Dec. 4, 2010.

Defending the title Although expectations for this season’s Tigers are low, the team remains confident

Crystal Cole Sports Editor

A lot can be said about the team Auburn had last season, but people aren’t as quick to talk about what will happen this year. Even though his team is ranked No. 23 in the Associated Press poll, coach Gene Chizik is hopeful about this season. “My thing with my players is they have to stay focused on what we are asking them to do in this building, and that’s been our mantra since I’ve been here,” Chizik said. “Really, to be honest with you, I’m not really aware of what is swirling around out there, whether they think we’re going to be 14–0 again or 0–14. What our main focus is with our players and trying to impart on our players is pay attention to what you can control, and the things they can control are right in this building.” Many analysts compare Auburn’s newest starting quarterback, Barrett Trotter, to last season’s Heisman Trophy winner Cam Newton, but Chizik said he doesn’t cross that line. “We’ve talked about it briefly,

and my words were simply this: ‘You’re Barrett Trotter, don’t try to be somebody else,’” Chizik said. “He doesn’t need to try to be Cam Newton. He doesn’t need to try to be Chris Todd or Jason Campbell. He needs to be Barrett Trotter. Really and truly, that’s about the length of the discussion. I think he understands that, and they all know that.” Looking ahead, the Tigers face Utah State at home Saturday. While the out-of-conference game is an easy win in most fan’s eyes, Chizik views the game as a challenging learning opportunity. “We’re excited that it’s here,” Chizik said. “We’ve had a really good fall camp. I’m sure that you guys have seen the twodeep now with what we’ve come up with. Again, it’s going to be really interesting. It’s going to be a lot of fun. I think we counted it up, and we’re going to have anywhere between 25–30 players playing Saturday that have never played a college game, which ought to get extremely interest» See Football B2

Todd Van Emst / Auburn Media Relations

Barrett Trotter, Auburn’s starting quarterback this year, makes a pass against Arkansas State last season.

New spirit contract generates more interest Christina Santee Associate Sports Editor

Although block seating in Jordan-Hare Stadium has always been available to Auburn’s Greek life and qualifying organizations, the release of the new 2011–2012 SGA Spirit Contract may cause those who usually turn down the opportunity to rethink their decisions. “The way we’re doing it is brand new,” said Mary Ryan, SGA secretary of traditions. Ryan said eligibility has worked the same way in previous years, but the opportunities for block seating haven’t been as publicized. The new contract is hoped to generate enough excitement to get more groups interested and involved in the race for spirit points. “Anybody who’s in the spirit program is qualified to receive block seating if they reach enough spirit points,” Ryan said. “Everybody starts at zero in April and as the year continues to April

(of the following year), the rank based on spirit points determines those at the top.” Organizations in the top portion of the rankings are eligible to receive block seating if they so choose. “If the organization is in the top part, but they wish not to have block seating, then they don’t have to get it,” Ryan said. The size of an organization’s block is determined by several factors. Factors include the organization’s actual ranking based on the total number of spirit points accumulated, its involvement in and support of University-based events, as well as the size of the group itself. “You have to fill the seats as well, and if you don’t, then you have spirit points deducted,” said Ryan, who is also in a campus sorority. “Normally, the sororities just think it’s a lot of hassle and don’t want to worry about filling the seats and making sure the sisters are there (in time).”

Christen Harned / Assistant Photo Editor

The bleachers inside Jordan-Hare Stadium await fans at Saturday’s game against Utah State. Those who opt for block seating are required to be seated in their designated area in JordanHare exactly 45 minutes before the start of a game. “It’s a pretty large deduction, so a lot of people just don’t want to hassle with it,” Ryan said.

A deduction won’t affect an organization’s other activities, but a total of three deductions will forfeit any eligibility a sorority, fraternity or other organization might have to compete for block seating the following year. Other organizations that regu-

larly receive block seating include the Honors College and Ignited. No sorority will be participating in block seating this year. Further information and a copy of the 2011–2012 SGA Spirit Contract can be found at www.auburn.edu/sga/programs/spirit/.


Sports B2

The Auburn Plainsman

Column » From B1

to step up quickly and the younger players to learn even more quickly. While Auburn starts the season against Utah State, it is hoped one of the team’s easy wins, No. 20 Mississippi State, comes to town for an early-season challenge

the following week. If lack of experience does in fact catch up with Auburn and worst comes to worst, I believe Auburn could finish the year 4–8. If Auburn can win all four games in September, two of which should be easy victories, we could be looking at an eight-win season, nine at best.

AP Top 25 Week 1 1. Oklahoma 2. Alabama 3. Oregon 4. LSU 5. Boise State 6. Florida State 7. Stanford 8. Texas A&M 9. Oklahoma State 10. Nebraska 11. Wisconsin 12. South Carolina 13. Virginia Tech 14. TCU 15. Arkansas 16. Notre Dame 17. Michigan State 18. Ohio State 19. Georgia 20. Mississippi State 21. Missouri 22. Florida 23. Auburn 24. West Virginia 25. USC

Football

» From B1 ing.” The depth chart was released earlier this week, leaving many fans wondering why junior Onterrio McCalebb was starting above sophomore Michael Dyer. Chizik said the two are not in any competition and that he feels good about the decision. “I wouldn’t read anything into that at all,” Chizik said. “You know how we run our offense with Michael and

(0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) (0-0) Onterio, and you’re even seeing some of the freshmen. You’re going to see Anthony Morgan. Again, you’re going to see a lot of faces at tailback as well, so I wouldn’t read anything into that.” Chizik also said the transition for the new players has been made easy thanks to the attitudes of the veterans. “What I’ve found—certainly with this group that we have, with the 25 guys that we brought in—they came in with a lot of humility even though they were

Thursday, September 1, 2011

New season, new look Brandon Miller

Assistant Sports Editor

As Auburn takes the field Saturday against Utah State, the starters won’t be the only new things on the field for the Tigers. During the offseason, there were several uniform alterations made for 2011. “There have been numerous performancebased enhancements made to the uniform that includes the material that is not noticeable,” said Scott Carr, senior associate athletic director. There are three major changes to this year’s uniform. Players’ names on the back of each jersey are still the same font, but the name itself will be smaller. Carr said the fabric being used for this year’s jerseys stretches and expands more, so the names needed to be made smaller. Another noticeable change is the stripe on the side of the pants. “The stripe is still the highly recruited,” Chizik said. “I think they understood once they got here, all that goes away, and they are just the low guy on the totem pole, and they have to work to have a job.” After last season’s National Championship run and the low expectations made by national media, the team could very well be under a lot of pressure. Chizik said he tries to keep his team focused on individual games, rather than what people think. “There is always pressure when you’re in the SEC, and

same in that there is an orange stripe with navy blue on both sides,” Carr said. “However, this year the stripes are not sewn on top of the pants. Instead, they are part of the pants and made from the same material.” The pants now have five panels as opposed to last year’s 10, which allows for a tighter panel on the back of the leg to give more support to the hamstring, Carr said. It also allows for a horseshoe panel that gives more support to the back of the knee and provides a better solution than bulky knee braces. Carr also mentioned these changes make the blue stripe close to 2 inches shorter because of additional hems around the knee. “The third change was to add ‘War Eagle’ on the waistline of the pants,” Carr said. “It will be covered by the jerseys most of the time.” The decision to make alterations was made by

Auburn has a very traditional uniform, so we do not discuss aesthetic changes… even if other schools do.” —Scott Carr Associate Athletic DirecTor

Auburn’s athletic department and was for performance-enhancement reasons only. “Auburn has a very traditional uniform, so we do not discuss aesthetic changes to our uniforms even if other schools do,” Carr said. “We do discuss performance enhancements to our uniforms though.” Carr also said a discussion about the possibility of having orange jerseys did not come up. “The jerseys are still navy blue with white nu-

ably more internally from each guy individually and what he expects himself to We only talk about do than anybody. So as a whole we don’t really talk expectations in about that. terms of what “We don’t talk about ours are.” expectations in terms of —Gene Chizik what everybody else’s expectation is. We only talk Head Football Coach about expectations in terms of what ours are.” there is always pressure Chizik said he feels his when you are at a place like team has had great fall Auburn because the expec- camps and is pleased with tation of everybody is for what he has seen thus far. you to win,” Chizik said. However, he said he feels “It comes with the territo- this week’s preparations ry. The pressure is on prob- are still important.

merals, white and orange stripes on the sleeves and a name on the back,” Carr said. “The pants continue to be white with blue and orange stripes on the side.” The changes made to the material used for the pants and jerseys were able to cut the weight of the Tigers’ uniforms by 20 percent. The material also “breathes better” and is the same weight wet as it is dry, two things which Carr said are huge improvements from the previous material. “The jerseys are more elastic, which should make them tighter and more difficult for opponents to grab,” Carr said. While the updated uniforms are as new as some of the Tigers who will see playing time this year, the changes have gotten praise in the locker room. “Our players love the performance of the new uniforms and have made comments that they are the best uniforms they have ever worn,” Carr said.

“We’ve made a lot of strides probably in the last 10 days or so in my opinion, so we’re just about where we need to be and where we thought we would be,” Chizik said. “Again, understanding we still need another whole week of work to be prepared to play in this game Saturday.” Kickoff for Saturday’s game is slated for 11 a.m. and marks the first meeting between the two schools. The game will be televised on ESPN2. Auburn has won 20 of its last 25 season openers.

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Thursday, September 1, 2011

Nold continues to ‘ace’ role of coach Christina Santee associate sports editor

After his hiring was announced by Athletics Director Jay Jacobs in April, volleyball coach Rick Nold is having no problem making himself comfortable at the University after leaving Jacksonville State University following nine seasons. “I know a lot of people with ties to Auburn, so when the position became available, I had a lot of interest being in-state and learning the traditions here,” Nold said. “It was just an exciting opportunity that I had to go after.” For Nold, transferring to Auburn was a positive change. He said it’s easy for recruits and visitors to see what a nice place Auburn is. “It’s a great place with great people,” Nold said. “I love it.” Nold, 41, majored in sports administration at the University of Louisville in Kentucky, where his love for volleyball grew. “I was probably 20 years old when I started coaching—just helping out with teams,” Nold said. “Then I had gone out to California in 1992 and I was playing a lot at that time. Obviously, that could have been a path I could have taken then, but I felt like coaching was just a better option for me. “I like competing with the girls and teaching them new things and seeing how

they respond to that.” In high school, Nold played basketball, football and ran track. “ ( Vo l l e y b a l l ) j u s t matched me,” Nold said. “As I started playing a lot, I had some success and as I started coaching, I felt like I was able to teach the sport well, and people responded to that. So, I guess I just felt like it was the way to go.” Nold’s experiences of playing and teaching the sport have helped him lead his teams to success. “He’s a good coach and he knows the game,” said assistant coach Floyd Deaton. “He’s been around great players, and he’s a great player himself. He understands that there’s more to life than just volleyball and the little things that make (a team) better.” For Nold, there are specific characteristics he looks for in a good team player. “There’s definitely the athleticism part of it that we look for,” Nold said. “Just somebody who’s competitive and likes to work hard and wants to be a part of a winning program.” A three-time conference coach of the year, Nold’s success in leading his players to victory could be attributed to the effort he puts into practicing and perfecting what skills his team already possesses. “A lot of it is just learning

Sports B3

The Auburn Plainsman

how to focus if we’re working on skills,” Nold said. “There’s a conditioning side to it. We work at a lot of different skills to try and improve those areas for them. “Everybody does something a little different, but then again there’s the strengthening aspect of it. “We do conditioning at our practices, and all that ties together to train them to become a better athlete.” Nold’s favorite part of a game is usually the most stressful. “The tightest, most competitive portions of (the match)—I think that’s when you learn a lot about yourself and other people,” Nold said. Volleyball practice began Aug. 8 for the Tigers in preparation for their season that kicked off last week. “We want to compete for championships, and that’s something that we’re always going to talk about,” Nold said. “We had a great season last year. “Specifically, service is a big thing for us. That’s where the game starts, and if we can improve in those areas then I think we can make a big jump on last year.” Nold said being comfortable working together is a priority for the team members and coaching staff. “He’s really thoughtful,” said junior elementary education major Sarah Wroblicky. “He’s a real-

Getting to know Nold

ly good coach and is really supportive. “With our old coach, if you messed up you would look over and think, ‘Oh, shoot. Am I going to get pulled out?’ (With Nold) he doesn’t get mad, and he’ll just say, ‘Next ball.’ He’s kind of like a backbone—like a father figure.” Although only in his first season, Nold’s team and surrounding peers have only good things to say. They appreciate what he’s bringing to the team and the amount of effort he puts into coaching. “I like the fact that he’s easygoing, but he demands certain things,” Deaton said. “He wants the girls to play hard and play with a lot of energy, but when they’re not playing volleyball, to be students.” For those hoping to make it big as a professional one day, Nold has some strong advice when it comes to success and self-motivation. “My advice would be to do well in school because there’s a very small percentage who are,” Nold said. “I think with anything you’re doing, whether it’s as an athlete or a professional in an area of business, I think you just have to make sure you’re putting everything you have into it and you’re always trying to improve. You should have high expectations and want to be the best.”

Ticket system fails students’ demands Christina Santee Associate Sports Editor

With Auburn’s 2011 season-opener against Utah State this Saturday, students who weren’t able to snag a season package are trying to find a way into Jordan-Hare Stadium in time to see the Tigers in action. According to the Auburn Ticket Office, 14,500 fullseason student tickets and 1,000 mini-season student tickets were made available to eligible students. Tickets were made available to students based on the number of semester hours they’ve completed at Auburn University. The full-season package includes tickets to all home games, including face-offs against Utah State University, Mississippi State University, Florida Atlantic University, the University of Florida, the University of Mississippi, Samford University and the University of Alabama. The mini-season package includes one lower-level reserved ticket to six home games including Utah

State, Mississippi State, Florida Atlantic, Florida, Ole Miss and Samford. The Alabama game is the only home game not included in the mini-season package. According to the Auburn Ticket Office, student season tickets are sold out, and no more will be made available to students for either home or away games. Although a good number of Auburn students willingly choose to sell their tickets to those eager to attend, prices can become inflated and the quantity still limited. Ken Porter, junior in journalism, said the University was unsuccessful in making an appropriate number of tickets available to students for the coming football season. “I think they should expand the student section, so every student can get tickets,” Porter said. “We are the ones who are paying to go here.” Porter, a transfer student from Alabama, suggested a different route the ticket office could take in regards to

student ticket distribution. “The ticket office here should set up a program like Alabama does,” Porter said. “While I was there, everyone was able to get tickets, but if you sold your ticket or didn’t use it you got penalized. If you got so many points by the end of the year, you couldn’t get tickets for the following year.” Porter isn’t the only one who is disappointed with Auburn’s ticketing system. “My personal opinion is that there isn’t enough student tickets available for the people that actually attend Auburn University,” said Jay Spence, senior in business management. “I think that more tickets should be issued to students so that they can show their school spirit instead of having to order a ticket online or risk getting taken advantage of by a ticket scalper.” Kimberly Carroll, senior in communication, feels the University is doing the best it can. “I think that student af-

fairs makes enough tickets,” Carroll said. “They actually tend to oversell the student section every year.” The Auburn Tigers’ success generated an increased amount of hype last season, causing even more fans to attend games. According to Carroll, the student section overflowed several times last year. “Many freshmen complain that they did not get tickets or that they got a miniseason, but I think it’s a rite of passage,” Carroll said. “If every freshman were able to get tickets, there would not be enough seats for season-ticket holders in the student section.” Underclassmen typically miss out on a full season. “I had a miniseason as a freshman and though I was not entirely happy, it just made me appreciate it that much more the next year when I was able to get season tickets,” Carroll said. “I honestly do not think it is the best idea to make more student tickets available unless the student-section seating expands.”

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Sports B4

The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Soccer finds winning ways Kristen Oliver Writer

The Auburn women’s soccer team improved its record to 2–1 with wins against Middle Tennessee State University and Kennesaw State University this weekend. Auburn beat MTSU 4–1 in Friday’s game at the Auburn Soccer Complex. Junior forward Mary Coffed scored two goals and assisted another. Coffed’s first goal was assisted by freshman forward Tatiana Coleman. Later in the half, Coffed scored again, splitting a pair of defenders and sliding the ball inside the post just before the 24-minute mark. She served a corner kick in the last five seconds of the first half to assist junior Julie King’s header. Two days later, Auburn had another big win, this time against KSU. “We wanted for this game to be a little better organized offensively in the box,” said coach Karen Hoppa. Coleman led the offense in Sunday’s game against Kennesaw State with three goals. “I’m really excited about it because they were my first three goals of my college career,” Coleman said. “The first goal was off my left foot, which is not my strong foot, so I was excited about that.” Her first goal came in the sixth minute from an assist by senior midfielder Katy Frierson. Frierson assisted Coleman’s second goal with a short corner kick. “We have this corner kick we’ve been working on,” Frierson said. “I was just trying to kick it into the frame of the goal, and there

Rebecca Croomes / Assistant Photo Editor

Junior forward Mary Coffed makes a pass against Kennesaw State last season. was so much chaos going on that hopefully someone would get a touch. Everyone kind of dummied it, and it just went in.” Coleman scored her second goal in the first minute of the second half after a poor clear from KSU’s keeper left the ball at her feet. Coleman’s third goal, rounding out her hat trick, was in the 68th minute. “To see Tatiana score three goals was huge for us,” Frierson said. “I saw the ball and kind of attacked it and placed it right on,” Coleman said of her last goal. Auburn, which managed to shut out KSU, had just eight total shots on goal. The Tigers’ next home game is Sept. 2 against Duke University at 7 p.m. Duke finished out the 2010 season 11–8–4, almost exactly the same as Auburn’s 11–8–2 last year. Duke is currently one victory ahead of Auburn in the win column. During the 2011 season, Duke has beaten Army, South Carolina, Houston and Notre Dame, all by a two-point margin. Auburn lost to Wake Forest 4–1 to begin the season. However, Hoppa saw an

improvement in the Tigers’ play between the two games they played this past weekend. “We wanted to be better defensively,” Hoppa said. “I definitely think we achieved that. We were very solid defensively.” After letting in a late goal in Friday’s game, she was focused on getting the team to stay strong defensively. Hoppa said she was pleased with the shutout. According to Frierson, the Tigers have high hopes for this year. “We had a good win Friday, but to do what we want to do this year we need to take care of these games,” Frierson said. Hoppa described their plans for further improvement before the game against Duke. “We’ve got to be better at our possession,” Hoppa said. “Our first half we gave away too many balls, and we’ve got to be better with our finishing percentages as well.” Coleman described her faith in the team after the shutout Sunday. “I’m just really confident,” Coleman said. “That’s the word—confident—in this team.”

Maria Iampietro / Photo Editor

Senior outside hitter Kelly Fidero scores for the Tigers against Alabama A&M.

Volleyball defeats Alabama A&M in first home match Lewis Buckalew Writer

The Auburn women’s volleyball team had a successful start to the 2011 season. This past week, the Tigers competed in the Active Ankle Challenge hosted in Gainesville, Fla., and hosted Alabama A&M for the first home game of the season. Auburn succeeded at the Active Ankle Challenge where they were pitted against both North Carolina and Boston College. The Tigers’ first match was against North Carolina on Friday. The first set went back and forth before North Carolina eventually pulled ahead. After North Carolina controlled the second set, Auburn took an early lead in the third set, but ultimately fell. The Tar Heels came away with a 3–0 victory. The Tigers’ second

match in the Active Ankle Challenge was against Boston College, whose coach, Chris Campbell, was previously an assistant coach at Auburn. The Tigers maintained full control of each set against Boston College with a short point struggle early in the second set. The Tigers held Boston College to a negative hit percentage, which led to the Tigers’ 3–0 victory. During the Active Ankle Challenge, several Auburn athletes broke records for kills, digs and assists, including sophomore outside hitter Vesela Zapryanova, sophomore middle blocker Chloe Rowand and junior outside hitter Brittney Rhude. The Tigers entered their home opener on Tuesday with a 1–1 record. Auburn faced Alabama A&M, which had a 3–1 record entering the match. With the avid support of Tigers fans, the team completed the first set with a

score of 25–12. After being held to zero kills in the first set, Alabama A&M made an effort in the second set to come back. However, the Tigers once again emerged victorious with a second set score of 25–14. The third set ended with a final score of 25-16, sweeping Alabama A&M with an overall set score of 3–0. Auburn travels to Murfreesboro, Tenn., for the MT Blue Raider Bash on the campus of Middle Tennessee State. The Tigers begin Friday against Florida International. Auburn’s women’s volleyball now stands with a 2–1 record after their two recent victories against Boston College and Alabama A&M. This is a good start for the Tigers, as the new leadership of first-year coach Rick Nold is evident in the team’s cooperation.

AU cross-country to battle the Trojans this Saturday Sarah Cook Writer

The Tigers and the Trojans are set to meet Saturday at Troy University for their first cross-country meet. Auburn has several returning runners and a few newcomers to complete the team roster. “Coming back on the men’s side, Niklas Buhner from Germany is back,” said coach Mark Carroll. “Niklas joined us last year in the spring, so he didn’t have a cross-country season last year.” The men’s team has a variety of seniors and freshmen. “We have Jeff Sanders, who last year was away on

international studies, and he’s back,” Carroll said. “Jeff is a senior in cross-country, and Niklas will only be a freshman in cross-country, which is great. He’s really young.” Senior Joby Peake is the team captain for the men. Other returning runners include Jason Miller, Samuel Mueller and Andrew Scott. “All had big summers of training from what they tell me,” Carroll said. “So, all in all, I think we will be in good shape on the men’s side.” On the women’s side, the Tigers have more newcomers than returners. “We have Elizabeth Briasco back this year and

Erika Kolakowski,” Caroll said. “They will be joined by some of our signees, Samantha Berger from Colorado and Molly Pezzulo from upstate New York and a few other young ladies. We are a young team on that side.” Nine of the women on the cross-country team this year are freshmen. “We are in a bit of the rebuilding phase with the women, but we’ve worked hard, and I think we’ll have a good first step and a few good years to come,” Carroll said. The Trojans closed the 2010–11 season by sending three runners, Enock Kirui, Sylvia Chirchir and Agnes Kapsoiyo, to the NCAA

South Regional meet in Birmingham. They’ve been preparing for the upcoming season with workouts and daily practices in attempt to have another successful season. “Now that they’re back in school again we’ve been doing some workouts and getting after it,” said Jill Lancaster, Troy University director of track and field and cross-country. “They did really well last season and we’re looking to see how they do again.” Some returning runners for the Trojans include Allison and Morgan Paulson, Kapsoiyo and Kirui. “We have the twins Morgan and Allison leading the

women on along with Agnes,” Lancaster said. “Agnes came on really strong last season and did really well, so the three of them are going to do a great job again, I’m sure.” Troy has also added several freshmen to the crosscountry team. “We’ve had some underclassmen come along as well that are pushing the returners in practice right now, and they’re looking good, too, so we’re really excited,” Lancaster said. Along with new recruits, Troy has a new assistant coach, Casey McDermott. “I’m excited about their work ethic, too,” McDermott said. “So far at practice the incoming class is

really jumping on board and working hard.” The SEC, which is known for being extremely competitive, appears to be just as competitive in 2011. “The SEC always has some very, very good teams” Carroll sad. “Arkansas in particular, I think, will be a forced to be reckoned with. The University of Florida is always pretty good. Georgia is pretty solid.” Both teams are working on their times and preparing for later meets. “I really think going forward that we focus on our team,” Carroll said. “Every day is important in the process of getting ready for those pre-SEC meets.”


Intrigue Thursday, September 1, 2011

An earthquake in AU?

Fashion preview

» Page B6

» Page B7

B5

www.theplainsman.com

Intrigue

Balconies bloom apartment-sized harvest Kate Jones Assistant Intrigue Editor

When time starts to move fast and life gets busier, some people use personal gardening as a way to slow down and get back to the roots. “It’s just a really fun and easy thing to do,” said Catherine Priester, junior in environmental science. “It is a good way to save money, so it’s the best of both worlds if you like having fresh vegetables, and you don’t mind putting in a little bit of work.”

Priester planted her first garden in the spring of last year, but it didn’t produce anything because the spot didn’t get enough sun. “This year I’ve done containers in my front yard so you can move them to where the sun is most available, and if you rent, you don’t have to dig up your landlord’s yard, which is kind of a problem in some places,” Priester said. “I mean, if you have a tiny apartment and all you have is a little balcony or porch, you can plant in them and it’s really easy.”

Wheeler Foshee, professor of vegetable production in the College of Agriculture, said growing in containers is obviously different from planting in the ground, but it can be done according to what you plan to grow. Foshee said to plant squash this time of year. A rectangular planter potted with a couple of squash plants and placed outside of an apartment would be effective, he said. Raye May / Intrigue Editor

» See Garden, B6

Students use gardening to de-stress from classes and studying.

The new baby diet Dieters inject pregnancy hormones to lose weight Elle Welch Associate Intrigue Editor

Maria Iampietro / Photo Editor

Justin Fulton, 23, listens to DJ Icky Bob through headphones at a silent disco at Bourbon Street Saturday night.

Dancing to the sound of silence Headphones are the latest bar accessory Jennifer Leonard Writer

With a full light display and a pair of headphones for each guest, silent disco was the feature at Bourbon Street Bar Aug. 25. Silent Events is a traveling production company that hosts parties where the music is played through headphones rather than through speakers. It allows guests to not only dance and listen to music, but also talk with other guests not wearing headphones. Ryan Dowd, owner of Silent Events, said he was trying to create an atmosphere where guests were dancing to what appeared to be silence. Each guest receives his or her own set of headphones for the evening upon arriving and can adjust the volume to as loud or quiet as he or she prefers. Silent Events has approximately 120 shows per year, and they come to Auburn roughly every six to eight weeks. Dowd said that they began

Maria Iampietro / Photo Editor

DJ Icky Bob picks individual songs for listeners to enjoy on their headphones at the silent disco. in Europe on a wildlife reserve. They were unable to make noise past a certain time because they would disrupt the animals. They put on headphones so they would be able to continue dancing and partying without anyone else hearing. This sparked the idea of a business. Dowd said they brought it back to the United States, starting first in Manchester, Tenn., and branched out to other areas in the U.S. shortly after. Carla Irene, senior in wild-

life sciences and pre-veterinary studies, said that she felt it was different from a regular disc jockey because everyone was able to have the option of what they wanted to do while they were there. “It was a unique experience that everyone should try at least once,” Irene said. The only part that Irene said she did not care for was that there was only electronica music to listen to. Jamie Whitehead, sophomore in education, also conveyed that she would have liked more op-

tions for the music due to the repetition, but liked how the lights were set up for dancing. “It is a great atmosphere and conveniently located. It is a good place for a night out with friends,” Whitehead said. It seemed a little silly at first to dance in silence, but as more people started to show up, it became more fun, Whitehead said. To get more information on where to see them next, check out their website at www.silentevents.com or check with Bourbon St. bar to see when silent disco will be returning next.

Human chorionic gonadotropin is the newest buzz in dieting. HCG is a hormone produced during pregnancy by the developing embryo. The hormone attracts fat cells and converts them into nutrients for the embryo, which in turn speeds up the mother’s metabolism. Since 1950, millions have lost weight using the HCG diet, according to hcgdiet.com. Phyllis Mescon and daughter Caroline Mescon of Chattanooga, Tenn., have both received the injection form of the hormone, coupling it with a 500-calorie daily diet. The hormone can also be administered via liquid drops or pills, according to the Mescons. Phyllis heard about the diet from a friend and said after hearing about HCG she began seeing it in the media more frequently. “I was definitely attracted to the promotion that highlighted the benefits of the HCG diet, specifically that taking HCG would allow me to lose 20 pounds in four weeks without being hungry,” Phyllis said. Phyllis kept to a 500-calorie daily diet. “I would eat about four large strawberries for breakfast, two Melba toast crackers for a midday snack, lettuce and chicken for lunch,” Phyllis said. “Two Melba toast crackers for an afternoon snack and cabbage with a protein like chicken or shrimp.” Phyllis expressed her concerns about a 500-calorie-a-day diet, but she said it changed the way she thought about food and what she was putting into her body. Phyllis has not experienced any side effects and has kept the weight off for several months by maintaining a healthy diet. » See Dieting, B6

Band of fraternity brothers creates rock, soul cover band Melody Kitchens Online Editor

Consisting of four fraternity brothers with a love for playing music, The Odettas have been on Auburn’s music scene for more than a year. “I think it’s common among all of us in the band that we just love music in general,” said keyboardist Matt Dean, junior in biomedical sciences. “We love listening to it and playing it.” When the band first started jamming together for fun, they

soon realized they wanted to do more with the music. “We first went to Bourbon Street Bar, a Thursday in the middle of summer 2010,” said drummer William Heilpern, junior in finance. “We ended up bringing out a huge crowd from Tuscaloosa and Montgomery, and that’s where it started.” After their first show, The Odettas began playing at bars and fraternity parties throughout Auburn and ventured as far as Tuscaloosa and Birmingham.

The band covers songs by groups such as the Grateful Dead, The Allman Brothers Band, Phish, Otis Redding, Bob Dylan, The Rolling Stones and others. The Odettas said one of their favorite things about playing in Auburn is being able to put on a show for their friends. “Friends from here and other schools come in town and watch us play,” Heilpern said. “It’s like a reuniting. That’s what I enjoy most about it.” Those friends look forward to

seeing the band’s energy on stage, knowing The Odettas will pick songs that most students love. “I always love watching them play because they have so much fun and everyone loves to sing along,” said Mollie Kindahl, senior in elementary education. The group said they enjoy playing with other local bands and singers, connecting the Auburn family even more. “Auburn has a lot of really » See Odettas, B6

I always love watching them play because they have so much fun and everyone loves to sing along.” —Mollie Kindahl Senior, elementary education


Intrigue B6

The Auburn Plainsman

Southwestern Corn Salad

Kerry’s recipe of the week

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Chance of tremors unlikely in Auburn Graham Carr

Ingredients: 4 ears fresh corn ¼ cup fresh lime juice 1 tablespoon lime zest 1 cup extra virgin olive oil salt and pepper, to taste 1 cup tomatoes, diced ½ cup red onion, diced 1 15.5 oz can black beans, drained and rinsed 1 avocado, diced

Writer

Directions: On an outdoor grill or stove grill pan, grill the corn on all sides for about 10 minutes or until softened. Remove from grill and cut corn from cob. In a large bowl combine the lime juice, lime zest, olive oil, salt and pepper. Whisk together. Add the corn, tomatoes, red onion, black beans and avocado. Toss until all ingredients are coated in dressing. Refrigerate immediately and serve cold. Serves: 4

Contributed by Kerry Fannon

Joe Random Jamie Miller Junior, public relations ──

Dieting » From B5

Caroline wanted to shed some of the weight she had put on in college before spending the summer in New York. The college lifestyle caused her to struggle with food portions, and after she saw her mother’s results

Garden » From B5

According to Foshee, cabbage and leaf lettuce also work well in containers. Even though it’s late in the summer, several vegetables can still be planted for harvest. “You know in Alabama, we can nearly grow vegetables year-round, particularly from central Alabama, south,” Foshee said. “So yeah, you can plant squash still, and you can in 45 days be picking squash.” Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, collards, turnips, mustard and Irish potatoes

What is your favorite color? Lime green

What is your favorite movie? Finding Nemo

What is something you fear? I’m afraid of the dark.

Do you collect anything? Sunglasses

What is an odd habit you have? I sleep with a stuffed tiger.

What is your favorite thing to wear? Flip flops

What is something random about you? I have a fear of corners.

What is your favorite food? Macaroni and cheese

she decided to try it. “I found the injections to be the easiest route because they are painless and quick,” Caroline said. “The needles are the size of diabetic needles, so they are tiny.” Caroline’s daily diet was much like her mother’s, but she grew tired of how bland it was.

“For breakfast I would have half of a grapefruit and for lunch three egg whites,” Caroline said. In contrast to her mother, Caroline does not think the diet is healthy, but said it does produce results. She said you have to be strict or you can end up gaining extra weight. She received criticism from

friends, but liked the results she was seeing. Caroline said she would recommend this diet to others as long as they are cautious and dedicated. After Caroline stops the injections and 500-calorie-a-day-diet, she is excited to be able to exercise again and is going to practice portion control.

can be planted now. According to Foshee, cabbage, broccoli and collards can even survive in the cold. In Priester’s garden now are three tomato plants in her southern-facing front yard, where they receive the most sun. She has compost hidden in the back to use as fertilizer. “I started my tomato plants a little bit late, so they are still little green tomatoes right now, but I feel like it’s going to be hot long enough where I can have tomatoes in September at least,” Priester said. To Foshee, the novelty

and the freshness of growing one’s own vegetables outweigh the immediate financial savings. “The novelty aspect is like, ‘Hey, I grew this vegetable and I’m going to get to eat it,’” Foshee said. “There is something really cool about that.” Foshee said he has met a lot of students who are interested in where their food comes from, and they are interested in growing something themselves. Ashley Culpepper, junior in agriculture communications, is a student in Foshee’s vegetable production class. Culpepper said after the

class she hopes to apply what she has learned. “My grandparents have a garden, and my parents have a little garden in the back, so anything I learned I can use with that,” Culpepper said. For those wanting to start a garden, but are unsure where to begin, Priester said start with herbs. Herbs use small containers that can easily sit in a window and require only occasional watering. “You don’t have to worry really much about bugs, and you can start using them really fast,” Priester said. “You can grow some rosemary or basil really

After the earthquake that hit Virginia last week, many couldn’t help but wonder what the possiblity of a tremor in Auburn would be. Luckily for the Auburn area, this scenario is unlikely, according to Lorraine Wolf, professor of geology. However, it is possible, she said. “The Earth’s crust here is riddled with old, ancient faults that formed when the continent was building,” Wolf said. “These faults aren’t active like the San Andreas Fault or the faults in the Pacific Northwest, and it is no longer an activeplate boundary, but occasionally forces from plate boundaries from far away accumulate enough stress in the Earth’s crust that fractures will happen on those old faults.” Taylor Machen, junior in geography, said he is surprised the threat level is not higher since Auburn is close to the Appalachian Mountains. “I’m glad that the threat level is not as bad as I thought,” Machen said. “If we had something like they had in Virginia this past week, or if we had earthquakes as much as California, I do not know how I would react.” The threat level is low enough that Bill James, Auburn’s public safety director, said he does not feel an earthquake reaction plan is necessary. However, James said the response to an earthquake would be similar to other natural disasters. “Depending on what kind of damage there was, there could be a police response, fire response and a building inspection division response,” James said. “The building inspection quickly and start using it in your recipes.” Foshee said with first gardens, there are a lot of failures because most people aren’t sure exactly what to do. “Start small,” Foshee said, “and don’t give up because chances are you may have some failures, but you learn and keep going. That’s part of gardening. Gardening is like farming—it’s tough— but there’s a lot of good information out there.” For more information on agriculture and gardening, including­ when to plant, visit Auburn’s extension service website: http:// www.aces.edu

division would assess any damaged buildings. Fire would provide any type of rescue that might be needed. Police, depending on the amount of damage, may have to secure properties and traffic direction.” Wolf said the last significant earthquake in Alabama was in 2003 in Fort Payne. The earthquake registered a magnitude of 4.7. “The one in Fort Payne was associated with an elongated trend of seismicity in the east Alabama or east Tennessee seismic zone,” Wolf said. “Sometimes it is called the Southern Appalachia seismic zone. Northern Alabama is on the southern tip of that.” Wolf said the New Madrid Fault is the closest major seismic zone. This fault, near Memphis, Tenn., produces a major earthquake every 400– 500 years that would be felt around much of the Southeast if it occurred again. According to Wolf, if the New Madrid Fault produced an earthquake, Auburn would most likely feel it. “That’s a fundamental difference in the East Coast and the West Coast,” Wolf said. “In the East Coast the waves from the earthquake travel very far. “They are felt much further away than the same size earthquake in California. It has to do with the nature of the Earth’s crust there. “Over there, crust is more broken up and pieces of it have been slapped onto the side of the continent. “Ours is more strong and old, and that allows for the waves to travel farther.”

Odettas » From B6

good live music,” Roney said. “We’re really honored to be playing in Auburn alongside bands like The Good Doctor, The Chronic Blues, The Bama Gamblers, etc.” The Odettas said they recognize this chance does not come around often. “Not everyone has the chance to do it, so if you can while you’re young, you might as well do it,” said vocalist and guitarist Ray Nichols, recent Auburn graduate in history.

Don’t be the odd man out...

...join or renew your membership in the Student Alumni Association today!

Find us online at www.aualum.org/saa or call 334-844-2960 or go to the Auburn Alumni Center at 317 S. College Street to get your membership kit. Members plan programs and services to connect students today with alumni tomorrow. Join SAA and you are joining one of the largest organizations on campus.


Thursday, September 1, 2011

Intrigue B7

The Auburn Plainsman

Have your money, eat it too Eating habits have students divided on how to save the most money Kate Jones Assistant Intrigue Editor

An empty stomach doesn’t have to lead to an empty wallet. Jillian Lewandowski, senior in human development and family studies, finds grocery shopping saves her the most money. Lewandowski said since being in college, she has noticed she could spend up to $20 on a meal at a nicer restaurant when drinks and sides are factored in. “But if I was to go to the grocery store and try to replicate the same meal— say I had chicken and rice, but have several pieces of chicken and have enough rice to last me as leftovers— it costs a lot less than $20 or so, and I get more meals out of it,” Lewandowski said. Andrew Eshelman, se-

nior in finance and economics, agreed grocery shopping is cheaper and said you can control what you buy. “You can make a meal for $2 or $3 rather than paying 10 bucks for a meal that you could have made in 20 or 30 minutes,” Eshelman said. “It’s just the time that people don’t want to put in, that’s the main thing.” To save money at the grocery store, Lewandowski looks for sales, and at a store like Kroger, uses the Kroger Plus card to save more on particular items. Eshelman and his roommates save by buying in bulk, and make the food last longer by freezing it. “We buy in bulk and go together as roommates to split it up,” Eshelman said. “Really once you boil it down per person, you get way more money shopping at Sam’s or Costco.” Eshelman said another positive aspect of buying in bulk is they can buy more for a cheaper price. “If you go by per-unit price, whatever that is, it’s way cheaper to buy in bulk,” Eshelman said. “I spent $66 at Sam’s last time I went,

Raye May / Intrigue Editor

Fresh autumn vegetables at grocery stores are healthier than fast food and won’t break the bank. and I really think if I had spent that $66 somewhere else, say at Kroger or Publix, I wouldn’t have gotten nearly as much food to last as long.” Blake Menke, senior in public relations, has found eating out to be cheaper than grocery shopping. “When I was a freshman, I had the on-campus required eating plan so I was

in the habit of not buying groceries and just buying meals on campus,” Menke said. “When I moved to my apartment last year, I realized that to buy a week of groceries was about $50 to $60, and when I would eat out I would spend about $40 a week at most.” To save money on eating out, Menke said she will sometimes buy a kid’s

meal or order off the dollar menu. With grocery store prices rising, budgeting is even more important. Eshelman said if food prices increase, then fast food prices will increase as well. “It’s just a matter of budgeting correctly and figuring out how many times you can afford to go out to

eat or maybe go to the Village so you don’t have to spend money,” Eshelman said. Menke said she tries not to spend money on groceries to prepare an entire meal. “Now I buy as little groceries as possible and eat the stereotypical college kid meals of ramen noodles and PB&J.”

Old styles return for new generation Raye May Intrigue Editor

Fashion has taken many twists and turns throughout the years, and it often repeats itself. Now, the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s are back for round two. The trends can be seen in department stores everywhere, from big names like Wet Seal and Forever 21, to smaller indepentent companies. Behind the Glass in downtown Auburn is one such store. “It started probably two years ago,” said Chloe Popwell, general manager and junior in apparel merchandise. “I remember when big tops and skinny jeans got really big. Those are still current.” Popwell said the sloppier side of the ‘80s fashion is sticking around, and though the neons are going out, they are not gone yet. “One thing that’s still big with neons are the sheer tops with bright, lacy bandeaus underneath, like Madonna,” Popwell said. Kendall Wangman, junior in journalism and Behind the Glass employee,

Raye May / Intrigue Editor

The clip-in hair feathers at Behind the Glass come in many vintage styles and colors. said the grungier side of ‘80s fashion is still big. “Workwear and menswear for women is in,” Wangman said. Despite some lingering popularity, however, Popwell feels the ‘80s era of fashion is coming to an end. “I think it’s kind of going out,” Popwell said. “The ‘60s and ‘70s are coming back in with wide-leg, flare jeans,

crop tops and wedges. I think the ‘70s will be really big for spring.” Popwell believes the shift in style came about because people wanted a big change in wardrobe. “Trends always recycle,” Popwell said. “And there’s this contrast between what was happening with the really fitted stuff and tight tops. People wanted a se-

vere change­—that’s the reason for all the huge tops now.” Annie Jackson, Behind the Glass manager, agreed with Popwell. “I feel like the ‘80s fashion trend is dying down,” Jackson said. “People aren’t wearing so many layers and long tanks. Big and boxy is so in.” Jackson said that music

and television greatly influence style changes, most notably women like Katy Perry, Beyoncé and the Kardashian sisters in recent years. “For a while people were obsessed with Hollywood skinny,” said Jackson. “Then people like Khloe Kardashian and Beyoncé, these really full-figured women, became empowered.” The recent change in clothing trends has also brought about new trends in hair styles, namely “hair feathers.” “I think it’s a late ‘60s, early ‘70s kind of thing,” Wangman said. “People are going through a free-spirit kind of thing, and our generation is going through a revival of expressing yourself and not caring what others think.” The hair feathers sold at Behind the Glass are temporary clip-ins, though more permanent accessories are avaliable. “They can last up to three months if you take care of them,” said Lyndsey Fukai, stylist at Dimensions Salon on East Magnolia Avenue. “You can wash them,

curl them, flat-iron them, and they’ll last as long as you’re not ripping through your hair.” Fukai said the feathers are a good alternative to dying your hair wild colors, and they will not damage hair. The trend has been around for some time, but has come to Auburn through Dimensions only in the last two months. “Last year one of my best friends from Canada came home with one,” Fukai said. “She said we should get them here … and we finally got around to it.” Fukai said hair feathers are surprisingly popular, especially among sororities. “I think they think it’s something really different,” Fukai said. “It started with indie kids, but now it’s trickled over to the mainstream.” Jackson said she believes the shift in fashion trends has to do with a movement of self-love in society today. “It’s about being comfortable in your own skin,” Jackson said. “That’s why fashion is changing.”


Intrigue B8

The Auburn Plainsman

Thursday, September 1, 2011


09.01.11