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Congratulates Mia Green

on moving up to horses and the jumper ring

Pirate Gold, low children’s jumpers

Offers for Sale or Lease

Penelope Cruisin’ small pony hunter

Hillcrest Love Bug medium pony hunter

Paris Black Forrest Medium small pony hunter pony hunter

Glenhaven Golden Idol large pony hunter

Photos © Sportfot.

limited space available for training with stefanie mazer. always a super selection of ponies available for sale and lease during wef.

Stefanie Mazer • (561)346-4228 Forget Me Not Farm, Wellington, Florida


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BRIDGEPORT FARMS

Congratulates TOP SHELF

2017

Mid Circuit Champion Green Hunter 3'6", HITS COACHELLA Owned by Milissa Summer

THE OAKS FARMS ~ SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA JOHN BRAGG 949.338.7095 PHOTO © GRACE G. PHOTOGRAPHY.


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THE YOUNG RIDER STYLE ISSUE

Publisher

PIPER KLEMM, Ph.D.

P. 33 PUBLISHER’S NOTE Piper Klemm

Editor-in-Chief

P. 36 DATAMARS Sissy Wickes

SISSY WICKES

P. 38 USED HORSE STUFF Sissy Wickes

Art Director

P. 40 AMERICAN EQUUS Lenore Phillips

LISA DALY

P. 48 WHAT YOU GET FOR 15K Sissy Wickes

Web Director

BETSY KELLEY Digital Media Director

STEPHANIE ROLOFF Advertising

NANCY HALVEY KATIE COOK LIZ DAVOLL LIBBY SCONZO

CONTACT THE PLAID HORSE

WRITE Piper Klemm, Ph.D., 14 Mechanic St, Canton, New York 13617

CALL 541-905-0192 WEB theplaidhorse.com EMAIL piper@theplaidhorse.com FACEBOOK facebook.com/theplaidhorsemag TWITTER @PlaidHorseMag

P. 54 HORSEMANSHIP QUIZ CHALLENGE Kiersten Pratt P. 58 AETA TOP PICKS Dana Miller & Candace FItzgerald P. 65 HQC CROSSWORD PUZZLE Sissy Wickes P. 70 COVER STORY: GRACE KLEIN P. 82 SURBEY SURGES TO SUCCESS Sissy Wickes

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PINTEREST pinterest.com/theplaidhorse GOOGLE + The Plaid Horse Mag TUMBLR theplaidhorsemag.tumblr.com SNAPCHAT theplaidhorse ISSUU: issuu.com/theplaidhorsemag

ON THE COVER: GRACE KLEIN IN WELLINGTON, FLORIDA. PHOTO © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.


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The Best Horse PUBLISHER’S NOTE:

I don’t get to ride very much. Between constant travel, late nights processing photos, perpetual emails, and trying to keep an ever expanding (incredible!) team running smoothly, I rarely actually swing my leg over. Every time I get to ride, I feel happy and blessed to have friends that invite me to ride their wonderful animals. When I actually do get on, I feel timid, weak, and indecisive. I imagine myself as this brave amateur, but I am not. My body does not listen – I do not spend enough time in the gym between riding occasions and I do not eat healthy enough on the road. My mind does not listen – I see the perfect distance and then panic and pull. I get anxious over head shaking. I worry about the horse moving off my leg and about him not moving off my leg. I have ridden enough bad ones and greenies to know how it can go wrong – and my memory retains those experiences. So, last year, I was elated to have the opportunity to ride not just a good horse, but the best horse. Seriously, Sundae already had the hashtag #Sundaethebesthorse. He has a whole fan club. I had never ridden a horse of this quality. Ever. I had constantly mooned over him and gushed when he won in the 2nd Years and Conformation Hunters during the circuit. PIPER WITH BALMORAL'S SUNDAE AT HITS HORSE SHOWS WEEK IV IN THE DESERT ADULT HUNTERS.


34 • THE PLAID HORSE When I rode Sundae, it was an education that I could not have imagined. I had no spurs and no stick, and he moved off my leg perfectly in a way that never inspired fear. He organized himself in the corner and flowed up to the perfect spot out of the turn. He was straight as an arrow down the lines and into the corners. I truly sat there and focused on myself, the ultimate indulgence in learning. I came around the turns and instead of anticipating the things he might do, I was working on holding my body down to the jump and putting weight into my stirrups. These two rides changed how I watched hunters all last year. Every time I was at a horse show, I would compare each round to how Sundae felt. I noticed many horses not moving off rider’s legs, which I came to see as a training issue and not “laziness.” I saw a lot of horses fail to stay straight, and again saw it through the lens of a training issue, not just rider error in that singular instance. I went back to my own ponies and, as they returned from lease, sent some back for a few more months of training before they went back out on lease again. In 2017, for the rider in me, lightning struck twice: I was able to ride Sundae again. After a whole year of watching and learning, I was so excited and so nervous to see if I had actually learned anything – or if it was a fluke. I arrived to the task at a level below last year – my appendectomy this fall left me with no core strength. I was armed primarily with my mind and my wits. Sundae is known as the best horse for good reason – he was perfection and totally covered up for all of my nerves and weaknesses. I trusted him and he rewarded me by somehow elevating my confidence level to match his. How can I preach that a few rides on a good horse can make such a colossal difference, when I also am always saying excellence is the act of being excellent over and over? Well, we have to start somewhere and improvements are always incremental. My path to excellence in my own riding will be long, wiggly, slow, and frankly, I might never get there. But, no matter the outcome, the thrill of riding the true greats here and there, the opportunity to practice, and the love of the whole process is enough. I am a lifelong supporter of this sport and, in return, this sport gives me an education that will last my life long.

◼ BY PIPER KLEMM, PHD


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WEF, Wellington, FL, January 2017. 1. Exelero 2 and Liubov Kochetova. 2. Marie Hecart’s Temporelle De Fritot and the Dominican Republic’s Rogelio Pellerano. 3. Heather Caristo Williams earned a much needed point for the girls’ team aboard Katrina Henson’s Fidele De La Cour. 4. Margot Hirsch celebrates a successful round in the Adult Amateur Hunters with her horse Lookalike. 5. Shane Sweetnam and The Blue Buckle Group’s Cobolt jump to 4th in the WEF Challenge Cup. 6. Mavis Spence’s mount Quaprice Normande was in the spirit of the Battle of the Sexes, sporting pink everything, including a tiara. 7. Nicole Walker and Falco Van Spievald jump a clear round in the 1.40m Speed Challenge. 8. Lucas Porter and his Sleepy P Ranch’s Diamonte Darco. 9. Mimi Gochman thanks Gochman Sporthorses’ Empire after receiving an 83 in the Junior Hunter 15 & Under Stake. PHOTOS © IRENE ELISE POWLICK.


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2. Wellington Eventing Showcase, Wellington, Florida, February 2017. 1. Boyd Martin, USA. 2. Jennie Brannigan, USA. 3. Ryan Wood, Australia. 4. Elisa Wallace, USA. 5. Buck Davidson, USA. PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.

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Custom Leather Purses & Tote Bags To r i @ To r i A n n a D e s i g n s . c o m 2 07. 6 5 0 .12 6 8

F

Wiscasset, Maine


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Wellington Masters Amateurs, FL, February 2017. 1. Kerry McCahill. 2. Jessica Springsteen. 3. Clementine Talmage. 4. Samantha Johnson. PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.

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ORION FARM CONGRATULATES

Anna Richardson LINDA EVANS • KIM FERRO 413-530-9685 • orionpny@aol.com • Massachusetts • Wellington, Florida ALWAYS A GREAT SELECTION OF NICE HORSES & PONIES AVAILABLE


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Winter Equestrian Festival, $216,000 Grand Prix, Wellington, Florida, February 2017. 1. Keean White. 2. Andy Kocher. 3. Kevin Babington. 4. Todd Minikus. 5. Sergio Alvarez Moya. 6. Jennifer Gates. PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.


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College Prep Invitational, Jim Brandon Equestrian Center, West Palm Beach, FL, January 2017. 1. College Fair. 2. Lauren Woznicka. 3. Gwynneth Babington. 4. Advanced Equitation. 5. Seminar with IHSA Founder Bob Cacchione. 6. Amelia Nash. 7. The Horse Draw. PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.

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Showplace Productions Winter Classic at Ledges Sporting Horses, Roscoe, Illinois, February 2017. 1. Cecilia Bresch. 2. Denim Welhouse. 3. Madison Tegtman. 4. Marian Sykes. 5. Kaitlyn Lancelle Bates. 6. Chloe Butler. 7. Teddi Pritzker. PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.


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ASHLEE BOND WON THE $100,000 FEI WORLD CUP QUALIFIER WEEK IV OF THE HITS COACHELLA DESERT CIRCUIT. PHOTO: BETHANY UNWIN PHOTOGRAPHY.


70 • THE PLAID HORSE Grace Klein is a poised young devoted to her weekly lessons at Seven woman with a shy smile and quiet Oaks. Riding Saddlebreds, she learned demeanor – until she talks about her the basics of riding in a productive horses. In an instant, she is all in – lesson program. After leaving Seven explaining with great detail the nuances Oaks to pursue more of a hunterof each of her jumpers, their strengths based riding program at another barn, and weaknesses, likes, and dislikes. At Grace took some hard falls and as a just thirteen years old, Grace speaks result she did not ride for about a year. with focus and detail about the sport to However with the help and kindness which she is dedicated: show jumping. of Michele Muenzenmay, owner of Dressed in her CWD themed attire and Dunham Woods Farm in Wayne, white britches, she looks like many of Illinois, Grace worked her way “back the well-dressed riders waiting to walk in the saddle again”. Initially, when she the Classic course on Sunday morning. arrived at Dunham Woods, she was It is amazing how far this young lady afraid to ride off of a lead line. Her and young rider has come in just a father Joe recalls thinking that “this few short months. Today, she is a top kid being led around was the one who competitor in the High Children’s had competed before. I don’t know if Jumper division. Just a few short riding will work out again.” But Grace’s months ago Grace was just beginning grit became evident as she persevered. her journey to success. Soon she was riding with confidence PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY. Just about everyone that meets and was part of the gang of barn Grace or talks to her Trainer, Lance kids. Leanne Klein explains, “On the Williamson, asks “How did this happen?” weekends, we would drop her off at “How did Grace skyrocket to such eight o’clock in the morning and pick unbelievable success in just 9 months?” her up at five o’clock at night. She had The answer is clear once you talk to so much fun riding and taking care Grace and get to know her a bit. Grace of the horses all day.” The torch for is a young lady that is devoted, athletic, horses had been rekindled in Grace. determined (her parents may use the Dunham Woods Farm quickly became term “stubborn” every once in a while), a part of Grace’s riding foundation and lets nothing keep her down. She and social life. She combined riding was born with spinal scoliosis and it was diagnosed at the age of 3. with her love for swimming and spent the next few years juggling However, Grace started riding horses at age 4 and never looked back swimming at a Club level with riding at Dunham Woods Farm. or thought that her physical condition created any limits for her. For three years, she took lessons during the school year and Grace grew up in St. Charles, Illinois near Seven Oaks Farm, a even helped to teach in the summer program at the riding club. Grace local barn. At the age of four, she begged her parents to stop at Seven incessantly asked her parents for her own horse. They placated her Oaks, announcing, “I want to ride!” Assuming the impulse was a by saying, “Wait until your tenth birthday,” again believing that she passing fancy, Joe and Leanne Klein stopped at the barn to assuage would migrate away from equestrian interests and toward other their daughter’s wishes. The family was greeted by Toni Knight-Utoff. hobbies. Her Mom, Leanne, laughs, “She had been asking for her Grace pleaded with her parents and own horse since she was four. We Utoff to let her try out riding. Despite kept telling her to wait until she her youth, Grace’s affinity for the sport was ten. Whatever lasts with a child was apparent from this early “trial” ride. from age four to age ten? It seemed Convinced by her training ride and her so far away.” Grace held her parents tenacity Utoff began to train Grace and to their promise and received her the Klein’s equestrian odyssey began. first pony, Whisper, on her tenth For the next few years, Grace was birthday. She describes Whisper as

TPH Young Rider Spotlight:

Grace Klein’s Swift Ride to Success


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“sweet and naughty and fast. She was a hunter, but she was fast!” At age ten Grace was already showing a need for speed. She acquired her first jumper and continued to ride at the same barn (now known as Wayne Equestrian Center) under the training and mentorship of Chery Kindl and her business Partner, Kelly Fencl. However, Grace experienced the challenge of riding a difficult jumper horse. “It was a tough start,” she admits. Looking for assistance, the Kleins contacted Lance Williamson. After working with Grace for a few weeks, Williamson realized that Grace needed to be paired with a different horse. “She was a kid with a lot of talent matched with the wrong horse,” he explained. Williamson matched Grace with a new jumper horse and with his training she started winning and has continued winning ever since. Beginning in late June 2016, Williamson and Grace worked together day after day at Lance Williamson Stables in Gurnee, IL. The one-way trip to Lance Williamson Stables is 75-90 minutes – quite a stark contrast to the 7 minute ride to her former barn. However, every minute Grace spent driving to and from Lance’s Barn and riding for 5-6 hours a day was well worth the effort and dedication. The Kleins then bought Grace’s successful mount, Nabuco, and the winning team began to take shape! Williamson put a very well-crafted, organized, and grueling plan into place from day one to train Grace. He taught her how to “go fast”, how to show, how to walk courses, and how to remember the courses she walked. In addition, Grace received lessons from Williamson’s

training partner Frank Hernandez, a well-known trainer in equestrian circles. Hernandez would work with Grace day after day on her flat work. Both Williamson and Hernandez place a strong emphasis on flat work being the key to Grace’s success in jumping. Through long days on many different mounts Grace persisted in pursuing her dream. Work without stirrups, work on circles, work over gymnastics – all were part of a stringent training program at Lance Williamson Stables. Williamson relies heavily on Hernandez to teach Grace and reinforce detail in all her lessons. The combination of Williamson’s ability to motivate Grace to never give up and Hernandez’ patience and strong attention to detail proved to be the recipe for a winning training team. So what makes Grace such a winning rider? Williamson beams with pride as he explains that he recognized Grace’s natural ability from the start. Williamson has encouraged Grace in all the right directions to make her dreams come true. Williamson praises the young rider. “She practices a lot over many hours on many horses. She never babies herself and will take on as much as we give her.” Williamson goes on to say that Grace’s desire and ability to achieve is the key to her (and any young rider’s) success. Per Williamson, a rider learns to compete but they can’t just compete to be successful. A rider must apply correct technique together with the will to persevere to achieve a winning performance. “There is nothing more powerful than a positive winning attitude,” Williamson states. He finds Grace to be one of the best students ever. “She has the ability to absorb


72 • THE PLAID HORSE information easily, which will lead to her continued success. Grace is developing a feel for what the horse is doing and thinking which allows her to anticipate and plan 2 or 3 jumps ahead. Although nothing is perfect, Grace learns from class after class which contributes to her unbelievable number of wins.” Williamson and Grace both agree that “Team Grace” is also the “secret weapon” to her winning. Grace’s parents are willing to devote every available resource, from their time to their love. Her parents don’t miss a class that Grace is competing in. They film her rides, say silent prayers for her safety, and constantly cheer her on in every way. Williamson shared how he spends many hours developing Grace’s plan after both lessons and show days with the help of his wife, Lisa. “Lisa is in charge of all details involving my schedule and she is able to keep all hands on deck and organized as we develop an on-going training system specific for Grace and each of her horses individually.” Grace is surrounded by this devotion and it reflects in her accomplishments and the amazing young lady she has become. Williamson also attributes her success to the care taken in finding the right equipment for both Grace and each of her horses. Grace’s Scoliosis prevents her from sitting down in the saddle. Rather than thinking of this lack of flexibility as a deterrent, she views it as enabling her to go faster. Grace rides in the CWD Hunter 2Gs Buffalo saddle. Both she and Williamson agree that the organically tanned full buffalo leather is amazing and sticks like glue. The saddle has a “dynamic tree” that flexes with the horse’s motion and the pre-shaped

gullet in the flap keeps Grace’s legs supported and in place and her upper body in balance over the jumps. The CWD saddle is an important piece of equipment that keeps her safe, solid, and comfortable while training or showing. In late June of 2016, Grace began in the “Puddle Jumper” division at 2' on her horses Nabuco and Piper. By July she had moved up to the Children’s Modified Jumpers with consistent first place and weekend Champion wins at the Showplace Summertime series, including numerous wins each Sunday in the always hotly-contested WIHS Jumper Classics. In August, the team left their home state of Illinois to travel to the heart of horse country, Lexington, Kentucky. Against large fields of experienced riders, Grace again sped through the timers to victory with a Championship in the Children’s Jumper Division at the Bluegrass Festival. The young rider blazed through Illinois, Tennessee, and Minnesota that Fall on a consistent winning streak, culminating with an invite and the opportunity to show in the WIHS Finals in Washington, D.C. The WIHS Finals is a coveted competition – a Jumper being invited after competing for only 8 weeks in Children’s Jumper events is remarkable. From tiny 2' jumps to competing in the National Finals, Grace has never lost focus or sight of her dream to stand out in her sport. Since early 2017 Grace has been commuting to Florida to compete. So far she has been successful with this new adventure and commute. She visited the WEF in Wellington for the first time.


theplaidhorse.com • March 2017 • 73 Grace’s Journey Results Grace’s maiden visit to Wellington resulted in her winning the NAL/WIHS/MS on Nabuco and Reserve Champion in the Low Children Jumpers on Madonna. Before leaving Wellington, she competed at the Jim Brandon Equestrian Center and captured several blue ribbons. To date, Grace has been awarded Mid-Circuit Champion of the High Children’s Jumpers and Mid-Circuit Champion of the Medium Children’s Jumpers in the HITS Winter Circuit in Ocala and hopes to continue her success throughout the remaining HITS Winter Circuit. Looking forward into 2017, Grace has set lofty goals for herself. “I want to win both indoor finals!” she says with a smile. She is focused on moving up to the Junior Jumper division in 2018 and aims to eventually participate in the North American Junior and Young Riders Championships. Grace is well on her way to achieve these goals. She has been invited to ride two mounts, Nabuco and Piper, in the LGCT this April in Miami Beach… yet another amazing accomplishment. Given her physical limitations and unwavering dedication to being the best of the best in her sport, Grace Klein is an inspiration to all young riders. It is easy to focus on limitations in any endeavor, but as this remarkable young rider demonstrates, the qualities of perseverance, discipline, commitment, and talent can combine to transcend any barriers to success.

SHOWPLACE SUMMERTIME 7/6/2016 Champion Modified Child Adult Jumpers – Nabuco Reserve Champion Puddle Jumpers – Nabuco Winner $1,500 Puddle Jumper Classic – Nabuco Winner $1,500 Modified Child Adult Jumper Classic – Nabuco LEDGES SUMMERTIME 7/13/2016 Reserve Champion Children Adult Jumpers – Nabuco Winner $1500 WIHS Child Adult Jumpers – Nabuco SHOWPLACE SUMMERTIME 7/20/2016 Champion Children Adult Jumpers – Piper Reserve Champion Children/Adult Jumpers – Nabuco Winner $1500 WIHS Child Adult Jumper – Piper Winner $2,500 NAL Child Adult Jumpers – Piper EQUIFEST II 8/2/2016 Winner WIHS/NAL/M&S Child/Adult Jumper Classic – Piper Reserve Champion Children’s/Adult Jumper – Piper CHICAGO EQUIFEST III 8/10/2016 Champion Child/Adult Jumpers – Nabuco Champion Low Children’s Jumper – Luminous Winner WIHS/NAL/M&S Child/Adult Jumper Classic – Nabuco BLUE GRASS FESTIVAL 8/16/2016 Champion Children’s Jumper – Nabuco KENTUCKY HUNTER-JUMPER ASSOCIATION 8/24/16 Champion Children’s Jumper – Luminous Reserve Champion Children’s Jumper – Nabuco SHOWPLACE FALL CLASSIC 9/13/2016 Champion Low Child/Adult Jumper Zone – Piper Reserve Champion Child/Adult Jumpers – Luminous Winner $1,500 WIHS Children’s/Adult Jumper Championship – Nabuco Winner $500 Children’s/Adult Jumper Zone Championship – Nabuco Winner $1,500 WIHS Children’s/Adult Jumper – Nabuco Winner $1,500 NAL Children’s/Adult Jumper – Luminous Winner $1,500 NAL Children’s/Adult Jumper Zone Championship – Luminous SHOWPLACE FALL CLASSIC 9/21/2016 Champion Low Children Adult Jumper – Madonna Champion Child/Adult Jumper – Luminous Winner $1,500 Low Child Adult Jumper Classic – Madonna Winner $1500 WIHS Child Adult Jumpers – Luminous Winner $1500 M & S Child Adult Jumpers – Luminous MINNESOTA HARVEST H/J 10/4/2016 Champion Low Child/Adult Jumper – Madonna Champion Children’s/Adult Jumper’s – Luminous HARVEST TIME 11/10/2016 Champion Child/Adult Jumper – Piper Reserve Champion Child/Adult Jumper – Madonna Reserve Champion 1.10 Jumper – Nabuco Winner WIHS/NAL Child/Adult Jumper Classic – Luminous OCALA HOLIDAY CLASSIC Start Date of Comp: 12/14/2016 Champion Children’s Jumper High – Nabuco Champion Children’s Jumper Medium – Luminous Winner $2,500 M&S/NAL CH/AD Jumper Classic High – Piper WEF 1 1/11/2017 Winner $1500 Children’s Jumper 14 & U – Luminous Winner $1500 Children’s Jumper Classic 14 & U – Nabuco Reserve Champion Low Children’s Jumper – Madonna Winner NAL/WIHS/MS – Nabuco HITS OCALA WEEK 2 1/24 - 1/29 Champion Children's Jumper Medium – Nabuco Reserve Champion Children's Jumper Medium – Piper Champion Children's Jumper High – Piper Reserve Champion Children's Jumper High – Nabuco Winner $2,500 M&S/NAL Child Jumper Classic High – Piper HITS OCALA WEEK 3 1/31 - 2/5 Champion Children's Jumper High – Nabuco 4th $7500 M&S classic – Nabuco HITS OCALA WEEK 4 2/7 - 2/12 Reserve Champion Children's Jumper Medium – Nabuco HITS OCALA WEEK 5 2/14- 2/19 Winner Children's Jumper High Class – Nabuco Winner Children’s Jumper Medium Class – Nabuco Champion Children's Jumper Medium – Nabuco Champion Children's Jumper High – Nabuco Winner $2,500 M&S/NAL Child Jumper Classic High – Nabuco Mid Circuit Champion High Children's Jumper’s – Nabuco Mid Circuit Champion Children’s Jumper – Nabuco • 86 Classes Won Since 6/1/16 • 36 Champion and Reserve Champion Ribbons won since 6/1/16


74 • THE PLAID HORSE The Equestrian Aid Foundation has touched many lives in our horse community. Founded in 1996 by horsemen for horsemen, the foundation has awarded more than $2.7 million to 153 people facing catastrophic circumstances. Equestrian Aid Foundation, first titled Equestrian Aids Foundation, was originally established to assist members of the horse community stricken with the HIV/AIDS virus. As that health crisis eased, the foundation expanded its mission criteria to include any catastrophic illness or injury. The Foundation offers grant-based support to all horse people in need of medical care, rehabilitation, or assistance with essential expenses. In times of personal

crisis, Equestrian Aid is a tangible life- line for equestrians in need. Former rider, trainer, and now esteemed judge Linda Andrisani was felled by saliva cancer in 2011. Coordinating her radiation treatments with doctors’ appointments for herself and her long time partner and stroke victim, Jack Stedding, forced Linda to give up her main source of income as a judge. This financial burden, along with the expense of her elderly mother’s nursing care, left Linda in dire financial need. Through Board of Trustees member, the late R. Bruce Duchossois, Andrisani became a grant recipient from the Equestrian Aid Foundation. “I could not have gotten through this time without the Foundation,”

Equestrian Aid Foundation: Horsemen Helping Horsemen

HUNTER JUDGE LINDA ANDRISANI.

STEPHANIE RIGGIO BULGER AND KRISTIN VERBITSKY. PHOTO © MEG MCGUIRE

STEPHANIE RIGGIO BULGER, SCOT EVANS, AND LINDSAY MAXWELL. PHOTO © MEG MCGUIRE

EAF RECIPIENTS MERIBETH WHITE, CAROLYN DAVEY, NORA VANEGAS, AND JOE MCCLOSKEY. PHOTO © MEG MCGUIRE

MIMI TASHJIAN AND STEPHANIE RIGGIO BULGER. PHOTO © DOUG MCGLOTHLIN.

A PERFORMANCE DURING AN EAF FUNDRAISING EVENT, ALTHEA, A HYBRID OF EQUINE DANCE AND CIRCUS RIDING. PHOTO © DIANA DE ROSA.


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Andrisani explains. “Medical bills, prescriptions, household expenses, they have been there for us every step of the way.” While Andrisani has resumed judging, Stedding remains unable to work. Again, the Foundation stepped in to help the Show Hunter Hall of Fame trainer. Andrisani states, “Without these funds, I would not be able to get Jack’s medications every month.” The process for application to the Equestrian Aid Foundation is transparent and thorough. Required paperwork includes an explanation of circumstances and financial information to assess the extent of funding required. There is no financial cap on grants and an applicant may apply more than once. EAF endeavors to make the process easy and streamlined for the applicant. As Director of Grant Recipient Services, Janise Gray states, “We are small enough to be personal, but large enough to make a huge difference in the lives of those we are assisting.” Following the death of legendary rider Charlie Weaver in 2010, the Foundation established the Charlie Weaver Endowment Fund to promote sustainability of the Foundation. Proceeds from fundraisers and private donations are directed to general fund and readily available for use. Grant monies are given directly to the equestrian applicants or their representative. EAF receives funds from a few fundraisers each year as well as private donations. In February of 2017 in Wellington, FL, they beautifully staged the unique event “Althea”, a

hybrid of equine dance and circus riding reminiscent of Cirque de Soleil. Described as “an evening of enchantment as humans and horses journey together to find magical powers of healing,” the show was ethereal and impressive. Other EAF fundraisers will be held throughout the year and will be advertised on their website, equestrianaid.com. The Equestrian Aid Foundation was founded by horse people for horse people. As seventeen year Board of Trustees member Mimi Tashjian explains, “ The equestrian community is like a family. There are many hard working, kind, dedicated equestrians who are so busy taking care of their horses and clients, they forget to take care of themselves.” Equestrians by definition are horse centric and optimistic, leaving little room to plan for the unplanned, to consider the unthinkable event that may change their lives. Visit equestrianaid.com to hear the testimonials of many of the Foundation’s recipients. The equestrian world is bound by a shared love of horses. Equestrian Aid Foundation further unites us in the common bond of humanity and compassion. Include EAF in your charitable giving.

BY TPH EDITOR SISSY WICKES

For more information about The Equestrian Aid Foundation visit equestrianaidfoundation.org, call 800-792-6068, or email contact@equestrianaid.org.


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RVIE

Sofia Roberts

tells us about what she is wearing these days...

Your helmet? Samshield Premium Alcantara Your gloves? Roeckl Your favorite breeches? Tailored Sportsman Your hunt coat of choice? Charles Ancona Tall boots? Parlanti As you move up to Jr. Hunters and Children’s Jumpers, you must be transitioning between paddock boots and short boots - what style boots do you prefer? Tall boots for sure!


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SOFIA ROBERTS SHOWING AT THE WORLD EQUESTRIAN CENTER ON HER MEDIUM PONY, ROCK STAR (LEFT) AND ON HER JR. HUNTER, KINGSTON LANE, (RIGHT). PHOTOS © 3RD SHUTTER.

Talk a bit about making the transition between ponies and horses - how is it going? The transition is going really well! I love them both very much, but I’m very excited about showing the horses because it’s something new, exciting, and challenging. Do you have any lucky charms in your wardrobe? I wear a cross necklace that I got from my Mimi for Christmas, and the socks I got at Harrisburg on special occasions.


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5.

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2.

3.

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Palm Beach Masters at Deeridge Farm, Wellington, Florida, February 2017. 1. Chloe Reid. 2. Cian O’Connor. 3. Yuri Mansur Guerios. 4. Ian Millar. 5. Nayel Nassar. PHOTOS © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.


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info@andrewryback.com • www.andrewryback.com • (224) 318-5445


ANSWERS FOR CROSSWORD PUZZLE ON PAGE 65: ACROSS: 3. BUTE 6. LACTIC 10. PHILLIP DUTTON 12. CATCH ME 13. CHAIN 14. ROUNDWORM 15. SARCOID 17. MICROCHIP 19. TEN 20. CHESTNUT 22. TWELVE 23. ROACH 24. RESPIRATORY 25. IRISH KNIT DOWN: 1. PELLET 2. UNITED STATES 4. WITHERS 5. EQUINE HERPES VIRUS 7. FIGURE EIGHT 8. MIGHTY NICE 9. FOUNDER 11. HYOID 16. RIGHT 18. ATLAS 21. SWAY

www.streamhorsetv.com

Calendar of Horse Show Live Streams 80 • THE PLAID HORSE


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Surbey Surges To The Top BY TPH EDITOR SISSY WICKES

CHRIS SURBEY AND THE 15 YEAR OLD HOLSTEINER MARE CHALACORADA SAIL OVER THE LONGINES COMBINATION AT THE PALM BEACH MASTERS AT DEERIDGE FARM IN WELLINGTON, FLORIDA. PHOTO © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.


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YOUNG CANADIAN RIDER CHRIS SURBEY HAS CUT A swathe of success through Wellington, FL during this 2017 show circuit. As one of the top riders for The Southern Family and Spruce Meadows’ talented and extensive string of show jumpers, Surbey has consistently placed well against top riders this winter. Most recently, he rode Linda Southern-Heathcott’s Chalacorada to a ninth place finish in Longine’s FEI World Cup Jumping Wellington. While not yet a household name in the United States, he is a rising star in Canada. Surbey, age 29, was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada to a non-horse oriented family. Chris remembers horses as being “part of the landscape” of his youth. Growing up in rural Calgary, it was not unusual to see horses roaming the open lands and hiking trails. Surbey’s first rides were as a young boy on a hired trail ride horse. What is a passing recreational event for most kids became a penchant for Chris. He implored his parents to take him for lessons at a nearby riding club and begged them to attend every showjumping event at nearby Spruce Meadows. “I think Spruce is really the reason I started watching show jumping,” he explains. In a whimsy of fate, Surbey is today a primary rider for the creators of Spruce Meadows. While taking weekly lessons at the riding club, the young boy participated in a lesson given by local trainer, Gaia Parker. Parker lit the torch in Surbey that still burns

today. Soon, the family was half leasing a horse, then bought into a full lease, and finally arrived at full ownership. As Surbey laughs, “It is a slippery slope there.” Parker and he forged a working relationship that would last for many years. Surbey honed his equestrian skills in the hunter, equitation, and jumper rings in western Canada. Again, a chance meeting at a riding clinic changed the course of Surbey’s equestrian career. Canadian Olympic and Pan American Games medalist Jill Henselwood would coach him to the next level of competition. While continuing his education at the University of Ottawa, Surbey would ride with Henselwood as school commitments permitted. Hitting the books and the saddle, he spent a productive four years with Henselwood and participated in the North American Young Riders Championships in 2007 and 2008. After graduating from university, Surbey turned professional and worked full time for Henselwood’s Juniper Farms. His job included riding, training, and teaching, but his favorite task was working with the young horses. “It was a really cool experience in that I got to ride a lot of Jill’s up and coming horses while she was away competing. I got exposed to riding some really nice horses.” From Juniper Farms, Surbey returned to Calgary as head trainer and rider for the Prather Family. Gaining important managerial, riding, and training experience, the


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young rider resigned after few years in order to pursue his own riding career. “I wanted to focus on having my own horses to ride and less on training and teaching. My friends in Calgary were nice enough to keep me riding and helping them.” In a stroke of good fortune, he was approached by the connections of Spruce Meadows. For the last three years, Surbey has been one of several riders for the acclaimed Southern family. “They have been amazingly supportive to me and my goals and ambitions as a rider.” With Linda Southern-Heathcott and Kelly Koss-Brix managing the successful Spruce Meadows showjumper string, the results have been impressive in both North America and Europe. Unlike most American showjumping barns, Spruce Meadows is not client based. All of the approximately 30 horses under the Spruce Meadows banner are owned by the family. Surbey and his fellow employees are focused on only riding and training- no teaching, no juniors or amateurs to put into the ring. “It is a unique position in that there is no formal training with the job. It is a more European model as a sale and development program. While I like to teach, it is more fun to be able to ride and train my horses.” The stalls at Spruce Meadows both in Wellington and in Canada are filled with horses competing at the top of the sport as well as young, developing horses.

From Slovakia to Switzerland, California to Florida, Surbey and his Spruce Meadows mounts have excelled. Last weekend, the Palm Beach Masters in Wellington, FL featured the best showjumpers in the world in head to head competition. Aboard Chalacorada, a big, impressive mare, Surbey proved his mettle in the big ranks. Describing the mare as “super talented,” the rider also explained her idiosyncracies. “She likes things to be her way; she goes in a hackamore and doesn’t like a lot of pressure. Let her do it her own way and she is happy.” Chalacorada, or Chocolate as she is called in the barn, very happily flew through the timers in the huge Longines FEI World Cup Jumping class. Of the 40 horses who made it through Friday’s qualifying event, only ten jumped clean on Sunday. Surbey rode a very fast jump off, incurring eight faults on the short course, and finishing in ninth place. Chocolate will enjoy some well- deserved turn out and trail riding in the next few weeks as the Spruce Meadows connections decide on her next effort. The young Canadian is thrilled with the seven horses he brought to Wellington and looks forward to returning to prospects he left in Canada for the winter. A young rider on the rise, the quiet, humble Chris Surbey is one to root for in 2017.


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PHOTOS ABOVE: SURBEY GAINING FEI WORLD CUP QUALIFYING POINTS AT THE LOS ANGELES MASTERS IN LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA IN SEPTEMBER 2016. PHOTOS © BETHANY UNWIN PHOTOGRAPHY. PHOTO TO LEFT: SURBEY FURTHERING HIS CANADIAN LEAD IN THE FEI NORTH AMERICAN WESTERN LEAGUE JUMPINGOFF TO 9TH AT THE PALM BEACH MASTERS IN FEBRUARY. PHOTO © ANDREW RYBACK PHOTOGRAPHY.


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BOLD MINSTREL BROKE THE RECORD IN THE OLD MADISON SQUARE GARDEN, WINNING THE INTERNATIONAL PUISSANCE BY CLEARING THE 7'3" WALL.

been anything. Billy had a great relationship with that horse. When asked, he never gave it a thought. He just sent him over - the best horse ever,” remembers Plumb. They had less than two weeks to get to know each other. “It was certainly a catch ride. Minus about 1,200 pounds he probably could’ve won the gold medal instead of 15th and Team Silver.” Steinkraus continued to pester Haggard, beseeching him to loan him the horse for a whirl in the Nations Cup show jumping arena. Finally, he

National Show Hunter Hall of Fame BOLD MINSTREL IS THE ONLY HORSE IN HISTORY TO MEDAL IN THREE Pan American Games and one Olympic Games in two different disciplines: eventing and show jumping. Imagine a horse today achieving this herculean feat. It is inconceivable. For the horse known affectionately as “Fatty,” this was no small achievement. Without an owner with the competitive curiosity to test his own mettle in many disciplines, Bold Minstrel might not have had the opportunity. William “Billy” Haggard was a hunter rider who dabbled in eventing when he befriended members of the United States Equestrian Team. The legendary William Steinkraus, then USET Show Jumping Team Captain, was training in Tyron, NC in 1956 when Haggard told him he was looking for a Games horse and asked him to have a look at one. Bold Minstrel, a stunning 16.3 gray crossbred by Thoroughbred Bold and Bad out of crossbred Wallise Simpson, was then 5 years old. Steinkraus explains, “I told him, ‘If you don’t get him, I’ll get him. He’s a terrific type. I like the way he moves and his jump will develop.’” Haggard began showing him with success in the Green Hunters while also foxhunting and eventing. Quickly rising through the levels, Haggard and “Fatty,” always an appropriate name, joined the USET and finished 9th individually in the 1959 Pan Am Games in Chicago, helping the team win the Silver Medal. With four more years before the next Games, back to the Hunter ring the two went, showing in the Regular Conformation Hunters at 4’, and winning Championships all over the northeast, including a Reserve Championship at the National Horse Show in Madison Square Garden in the early 1960s. At the 1963 Pan Am Games in Brazil, Haggard and Bold Minstrel placed sixth individually and helped win the Team Gold. Steinkraus says he pestered his friend continuously. “I’d say, ‘If you ever get tired of this three-day nonsense, let me make a jumper out of him.’” Haggard was an alternate for the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo, but stayed at home. Flying horses then was not what it is today. J. Michael Plumb’s horse Markham had to be put down on the plane as it flew to Tokyo. Before Plumb had time to worry, a call was made to Haggard asking if he would loan Bold Minstrel to the U.S. Eventing Team. “Billy Haggard was a very good friend of mine, a great sportsman and just the best fellow,” Plumb remembers. “Fatty was a superior animal. He was always way too fat because Billy was a Hunter guy. But, he was phenomenal, all-purpose. He could’ve

gave in and Bold Minstrel again became a USET success story, competing and winning internationally between 1967 and 1970. He made his third appearance at the Pan Am Games in 1967, finishing 9th individually and part of the Silver Medal Show Jumping Team. “He had a very good physique, a very good brain, a lot of heart and an innate jumping ability. The only problem I ever had with him was he made all the decisions. He said, ‘Look, I know more about this than you do’ and I’d say, ‘Yes, but I’ve walked the course and I know what’s coming.’ It took a long time to persuade him.” Nothing made owner Haggard more proud, Steinkraus said, than when Bold Minstrel broke the record in the old Madison Square Garden, winning the International Puissance by clearing the 7'3" wall. In 1970 at the age of 18, Bold Minstrel jumped to a 9th place finish in the World Championships in LaBaule and won the Democrat Challenge Trophy for show jumping at Madison Square Garden. It was then he was retired from competition, only to become Mrs. Haggard’s field hunter. A Thoroughbred cross, known for his ample girth and limitless jumping ability, Bold Minstrel may have been the greatest jumping horse of the 20th century. While his victories are a matter of record and the height of the Puissance wall is measureable, no man can quantify the heart of an amazing animal. A few riders were lucky enough to sit on the horse, all of America was able to behold his greatness.

BY PRUE DRAPER OSBORN


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Profile for The Plaid Horse

The Plaid Horse - March 2017 - The Young Rider Style Issue  

The Plaid Horse - March 2017 - The Young Rider Style Issue

The Plaid Horse - March 2017 - The Young Rider Style Issue  

The Plaid Horse - March 2017 - The Young Rider Style Issue