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Linda Jones and her hackney pony

Megan Sibiga and her Haflinger “Quick de Lick�

We love to see what you and your ponies or small equines are doing! Email your photos to us at theplaidhorse@aol.com

Donna Yanik driving a pair of welsh ponies


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S FEATURE

n d Seme e Month ny of th f Cryopreserve ion Driver o P . .. Champ Page 12 . Utilization o .. – World d 6 r 1 Horse o f e f g ta a P zy S Driving u e S h . T .. g Page 18 eds . Braidin 6 – 29 .. ry and Classifi 2 s e g a to P ... Direc Page 30 Pages 3 2 – 34 .. .T Pages 3 6 – 37 .. he Look of Eag . les W Page 39 ... Mark ho’s Winning W e Pages 4 hat 0 – 46 .. t Place . Showc ase of C hampion s

The Paisley Pony Publisher

Cindy Taylor theplaidhorse@aol.com cindy@theplaidhorse.com

Office Manager & Billing Services

Barbara Delano - 732-489-3591 Barbara@theplaidhorse.com

*Alyssa Walsh alyssa@thepaisleypony.com *Cindy Taylor theplaidhorse@aol.com

Web Site & Newsletter Glenn Wilson

Contributing Writers

Art Department

Julie Goodnight E. Hunter Taylor, Esquire Tamara LaTorre

Office Manager & bILLING

Bill Collecting

Glenn Wilson ridgemountwelshponies@gmail.com Barbara Delano Barbara@theplaidhorse.com

Cisco “The snarky Jack Russell”

Editing & Proofing

sales Manager

Ruth Larson

Advertising Sales

Joe, Buddy, Hank, Jacob, Linus, Batsto, Buster, Luna, ET & Elvis.

Glenn Wilson

*Kim Rupp Kim@thepaisleypony.com *Amanda Micciche Amanda@theplaid horse.com

Welcome to the wonderful world

of ponies and small equines. The one place to look for everything pony! All pony types, breeds & disciplines are encouraged to be a part of this new magazine. Do you have something you would like to submit or suggest? Give us a call or send us an email. We love to hear from our readers and advertisers! 732-684-4565 or theplaidhorse@aol.com Our goal is to have all pony breeds and disciplines represented in each issue!

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Celebrating the Magic of Ponies & Smaller Equines The Paisley Pony PO Box 332 New Lisbon, NJ 08064

Ph: 732-684-4565 Ph: 732-489-3591 Fax: 609-283-0214 www.thepaisleypony.com


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Pony of the Month Miss Crystal Snow

I would like to nominate my 5 yr old son Eric’s pony “Miss Crystal Snow” for the Pony Of The Month. Crystal is a 21 yr young POA mare. A world champion in her youth and a fierce competitor in all around on the POA circuit. She was retired to the nursery to raise some of our breeds most beautiful babies. We had the opportunity to bring Crystal to our home in hopes to raise more gorgeous babies. Come spring my son’s show pony had fallen ill and unable to continue in the ring. We decided to pull Crystal out of the broodmare pasture after many years off and see if she and Eric would make a team. The first few rides were a little rough as the two of them learned about each other. Only two full weeks until their first show together. Crystal took care of Eric..... they did showmanship,halter, horsemanship and western pleasure in the 12 and under walk/trot division. Eric stayed on his pony the entire show...walking through crowds and even in the dark as the show went on. They were in large classes with lots of other children and even adults in their schooling class. Crystal carried him in and out of the traffic like a lady and kept one eye on her little rider at all times. They ended the long day with High Point in their division. We could not have asked for a better pony for our son. He adores her and she loves him back unconditionally. She has taught him to be a better horseman and has given me peace of mind with our precious cargo. When not in the show ring you can find the two of them splashing through the water that runs through our property and loping the riding ring. Eric enjoys riding hunt seat the most and we can thank Crystal for teaching him to post and giving him the confidence. This great mare will always have a place in our home and we hope she teaches children for years to come. Submitted by: Brittany Zimmermann Florida Do you have a special pony or smaller equine who you think deserves to be recognized as our “Pony of the Month”? Email your submission to us at theplaidhorse@aol.com for consideration.


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Alyssa Clancy & Brady

This is my Shetland Pony - Mr. Ed that I got from my parents on my 5th birthday. He was an amazing little pony that taught every kid in the neighborhood how to ride and drive. I had him until he was 24 and I lost him to Cushings. Debbie Benson Wyndam Hills Welsh Carlton, OR


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Braiding the Driving Horse By: Jessica Axelsson You’ve decided on an outfit, your carriage is cleaned, harness is polished, and horse is bathed, but you’ll still be up all night worrying about how your braids will look in the morning! Hopefully with the following tips and instruction you’ll be able to get some sleep before the next big show! Every discipline has their “in fashion” for braiding; hunter’s show in small crimped braids, quarter horse shows prefer small square braids and jumpers rarely braid at all, but for driving, button braids are the way to go. Button braids are medium to large sized round braids, which, when done correctly look like little balls and are neat and tidy for any turnout.

Tools you will need There are a few key things to know before heading out to the barn to practice. First, your horse’s mane can be longer then for traditional hunter braids, 4-6 inches instead of the shorter 4-inch maximum. Two, the most important thing in any braiding is that you section the hair evenly all the way down the neck. Many people will try to match the amount of hair they section for a braid but it is by far more important that your parts are evenly spaced as it gives the illusion that the braids are the same size. If the amount of hair is significantly different you can add well-matched yarn to the smaller braids to make the thickness match. Third, when you pull your horses mane save a small amount of hair to take to the craft store with you, this way you can get the best matching yarn possible! Also in regard to yarn, pull a small

piece of the yarn between your hands; if it breaks easily find a stronger yarn in the same color. The yarn will have a good deal of tension on it during the braiding process and the last thing you want is to break the yarn and have to start over. Besides yarn you will need scissors, a pull through, a plastic needle, a sponge or braid spray and a clip. The needle, and pull through can be found in any craft store and the clips are easily attained at beauty supply retailers. So now you’re ready to start practicing! The beginning steps are similar to braiding a hunter horse. You will section a piece of hair, usually about 2 inches wide, wet the hair with either water or a spray like Mane ‘N Tail’s Spray ‘N Braid, then braid down. Button braids are larger then hunter braids, so you will generally get 10-14 braids in your horse’s mane. Keep this in mine when sectioning the hair. Once you have braided a section of hair about three quarters of the way down you will add a piece of mane colored yarn into the hair. The yarn will go in the pieces on the left and right and wrap around the back of the middle section of hair. Continue braiding to the bottom of the hair and then tie the braid off at the end with the piece of yarn. You can continue to braid down the neck in the same way, being careful to separate even parts in the mane as opposed to even thicknesses of hair. This step is basically the beginning of a hunter braid.


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Once the mane has been braided down you can begin to pull the braids up. This is where the steps begin to differ from hunter braids. You will need your plastic needle for this step. Begin by threading both pieces of yarn into the needle. Then with both piece of yarn you will thread the needle up through the middle of the braid. Close to the crest but be careful not to accidently stab your horse, even plastic needles hurt! With the first two steps complete you now start to roll the braid up. Keeping both pieces of yarn threaded in the needle you will fold the braid so you can push the needle through a small bit of hair on one side of the bottom of the braid and back up through the middle of the braid, close to the crest. You then repeat the same on the other side. See the following pictures for a better idea!

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Once the braids are sewn up on each side you will remove the needle from the yarn, slip the yarn and tie a half hitch under the braid. Tie an additional half hitch above the braid and finish the braid by tying a knot under the braid to secure it. You have now successfully completed a button braid! Practice this winter for a sharp turnout in the spring! All Photos by: Dan Snyder


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Here is a picture of the braids when the horse, or in this case pony, is finished! Special thanks to my model, Lola (Bayberry’s Life of the Party)!

Deadline for the March/April Issue of The Paisley Pony is March 15th

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PAISLEY PONY DIRECTORY Judges JoAnn T. Robertson Westminster, MD 410-848-1431 “R” USEF, MDHSA Hunter, Equitation aspiring_heights@juno.com

Ponies SE

SOCIETY

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SPIAN H O

Caspian Horse Society of the Americas Quality horses 10-12h. Caspian excell in jumping and cart. Top bloodlines, some imports. To find out more about the caspian email chsaregistrar@aol.com Ph: 512-924-2472 www.caspian.org R

CA

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Directory Cost: $100 w/o logo or $125 with logo for up to 5 lines- listing is for 1 year (4 issues) * 732-684-4565 www.thepaisleypony.com

The National Chincoteague Pony Association The oldest & largest Chincoteague Pony Registry & Breeder in the world.Over 30 years celebrating the Chincoteague Pony. Breeding & Registering Chincoteague Ponies in all arenas.Excelling in Hunter, Dressage, Western or English, Jumper, Sport, Cart,Ponies in all circuits. Gale Park Frederick - 360-671-8338 2595 Jensen Rd. - Bellingham, WA 98226 Gale@pony-chincoteague.com www.pony-chincoteague.com www.pony-chincoteague.org (live pony cam) New Forest Pony Society of North America has been awarded the status of “Daughter Stud Book” by the New Forest Pony Breeding & Cattle Society (NFPB&CS), the Mother Stud Book for the breed of New Forest Ponies in England and Wales. This allows the Society to fulfill all

SUPPLIES

Medallion Legasy - foaled 2011. Reg. Welsh Lg.bay filly. Will mature to 14.1 14.2 hds. Close coupled. Beautiful head. Good bone. Powerful floating gaits. Sweet personality. See pics and pedigree at www.medallionlivestock.com. 818-899-0141 * 916-290-3881

Quality bulk sawdust and wood shavings. 110 Yd. loads. Prompt Service. Call Mike 315-729-1499

Medallion Registered Livestock has young stock to show winning ponies for sale, stallions at stud. Contact Janna or Marilyn at www.medallionregisteredlivestock.com 818-899-0141 * 916-290-3881 New Forest Pony geldings for sale in Ontario. Contact manoravon@sympatico. ca for information. www.facebook.com/ manoravon

NPS America As the first international Area Chapter of the UK’s National Pony Society (NPS), our Mission is to promote, support, and recognize Mountain & Moorland and British Riding ponies in the United States and to foster the welfare of ponies in general. The Mountain & Moorland breeds include the British Shetland, Connemara, Dales, Dartmoor, Exmoor, Fell, Highland, New Forest and Welsh. Join us at www.NPSAmerica.org Wyant’s Winter Springs Why Trot? ~Glide Ride~ on EZgaited Cheshire (near Eugene), Oregon USA 541-998-2803 * Ponies4Grownies@aol.com www.WyantsWinterSprings.com

Classifieds

PONIES

Medallion Evensong. Foaled 2003. Reg. Welsh Lg Grey mare. Show trained. Halter/ Flat/ Hunter. Always in ribbons in Halter/ Flat. Not yet shown in Hunter. Excellent bloodlines. Beautiful, fantastic temperament. See pics and pedigree at www.medallionlivestock.com 818-899-0141 * 916-290-3881

your registration and transfer needs here in the USA. To find out more about the New Forest Pony, come join us and other enthusiasts at www.nfpsna.com Ph: 406.363.7669 Email: nfpsnapris@aol.com

TRANSPORTATION Blue Diamond Stables custom equine transport. USDOT, M/C carrier, shows, direct ships, emergencies, CEM import & export direct to JFK & Chicago. 740-809-8180. Encore Farm - Local scheduled and emergency hauling in the Central NJ area 908-309-7917 Michael Mauro, LLC - Equine Transport Serving the Northeasy for 15 years. NJ Based. Fully licensed & insured. MemberAmerican Horse Carriers Assoc. (201) 341- 3431 Nancy B. Hall - Horse Transportation Local and Long Distance 609-408-2557

SPECIAL Free text classifieds for SALE PONIES ONLY. Limit 3 per farm. 5 lines/35 characters per line. Additional classifieds are $5 each. Photo classifieds are $35 b/w and $45 color


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January/February 2013

Reeces LM Idols Black Hawk owned by Timeless Miniature Horses

Sydney and her Shetland pony Rudy

Highlife’s Bulgari Boy from Xanadu Dressage in Loxahatchee, FL

Hilkens Go For Gold from Xanadu Dressage in Loxahatchee, FL

Sydney & her POA pony

Larks First Class (“Classie”) A registered QH

Would you like to see your pony or small equine featured in The Paisley Pony? Email us at theplaidhorse@aol.com!

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The Look of Eagles

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Packy McGaughan

Reprinted from 2004 Plaid Horse

We learn so much from being around horses, don’t we? Even so, not all of what we learn from them has anything at all to do with horses directly. Sure, we learn how to groom, tack up, ride, un-tack, groom again, and feed our equine companions. But we also learn a lot of other valuable stuff that prepares us for every aspect, every phase of our lives. As a teenager, my first event horse taught me basic first aid techniques (first you stop the bleeding) along with concepts of good nutrition and physical fitness (which I have been ignoring as of late). From my first ponies (which are smarter and meaner than horses) I learned the fine art of manipulation. That is, I learned how to get what I wanted from someone or thing bigger than I without also getting hurt. (This skill proved particularly useful in junior high school where I was considered a geek suitable for pummeling.) Later in life, horses have taught me higher math and creative accounting. Well then. Right. Given all one can learn from horses, does it come as a surprise that, at the age of eleven, I learned about the birds and the bees because of Soozi and Lizzie Brinkley’s pony breeding mom, Jean Brinkley? Now don’t get me wrong, up to that point in life my parents had not been shirking their duties with respect to this issue. Indeed, my father had a habit of discussing the facts of life with us whenever my siblings and I were all together in the car, unable to escape, driving somewhere on vacation or to visit family for Thanksgiving. By way of example, a speech entitled “Incest, A Relative Thing” was delivered as we passed through Wheeling, West Virginia on the way to

visit our grandparents in Ohio over Christmas, 1973. Dad delivered a dissertation entitled “Intercourse: Not Just a Town In Pennsylvania,” as we traveled to State College, PA for a Penn State Football game sometime in the fall of 1974. Dad packed his facts of life speeches with all sorts of useful eye glazing information about zygotes and chromosomes, but it would take years before I really understood why my “jeans” were actually onehalf his even though he was four times my size. While Dad waxed philosophic on the more technical aspects of the human reproductive system, his descriptions waned severely with regard to certain critical information on the proper application and use of that system in everyday situations. As a result, these little talks had all the appeal of Ward Cleaver reading assembly instructions for a brand new Schwinn ten speed to Wally and the Beaver. (“Now listen here James Leslie Parker boys, First insert rod A into socket 2…”) By the time I met Jean Brinkley, I already knew everything there was to know about procreation, but only in the vocabulary and tone used by doctors on rounds at a university teaching hospital. That’s right, I knew nothing about sex. Jean and Dr. Ross Brinkley (a prominent Ob-GYN in our community) owned Marly Farm, located in New Market, Maryland. Jean Brinkley had been breeding welsh ponies for some time and had gotten started in the business after she purchased a two year old 11.2 hand grey Welsh mare for her daughter Lizzie


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called Miles River Moonglow. Yes, THE Miles River Moonglow. Some of you may know Lizzie who now shows in the adult amateur division under her married name, Elizabeth Sponseller. By the mid 1970’s Jean had bred several dozen welsh and welsh-crosses that could be seen in the show ring up and down the east coast. Initially, the only reason I visited Marly Farm was in conjunction with the Frederick Pony Club’s summer riding camp. The Brinkleys had a pool and allowed all 24 of the camp’s filthy campers to soil its waters for two weeks every June. It was on one of these swimming visits that I witnessed equine copulation for the first time. While the other children swam, Jean decided to breed a welsh pony stallion (borrowed from Farnley Farm) to one of her younger “maiden” mares. Such activities typically took place in a paddock adjacent to the barn and located only about 100 yards from the pool. This particular mare, although biologically ready to conceive, made her desire to remain a virgin absolutely clear to anyone within ear shot. To me it sounded like a pony had gotten caught in a bear trap so naturally I went over to investigate. As I peeked into the breeding area, it was obvious why Jean had wanted us kids to stay by the pool. Just after arriving, I watched in amazement as the stallion mounted the unwilling mare, grabbed her crest in his teeth and shook her violently. The mare groaned and finally stood absolutely still even as the stallion’s teeth tore the skin of her crest. For all of the drama, foreplay and noise, as violent as it was, the whole thing was over in 45 seconds flat. Afterward, the sadistic suitor paraded himself around the paddock, apparently quite satisfied with his performance, looking for his next conquest. Prancing and showing himself off, it was hard not to appreciate the look in his eyes, the raw power and confidence he possessed at that moment. Oddly, it is that look that I remember most about that moment. In retrospect, Dad’s explanations of the facts of life lacked a certain three dimensional quality that rendered me ill-equipped to process these images with any, shall we say, “perspective.” He had explained, for example, that all boys go through certain changes in their early teens but aside from a quick reference to my “stones dropping,” he had been vague on specifics. Without any proper reference point, with almost no information that would better guide my conclusions, I did the best I could.

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By all rights, I guess it would have made sense if I had taken on the personality of a pre-pubescent misogynistic sadist with exhibitionist tendencies. But as a boy on the verge of puberty, knowing that my body would soon have a life of its own, I reached one conclusion that proved to be a major disappointment to me later in life. I’ll say this as delicately as possible, what I had just witnessed gave me the wrong impression in one very, very, very BIG way. With a growing sense of physical inadequacy (only slightly abated by the hope that the changes coming my way in life would in fact be huge), I clearly remember thinking, “No matter what, puberty is going to be a bitch.” Unfortunately, farm kids are famous for getting the wrong ideas about sex, mainly due to just these sorts of experiences. And this was not the first time Jean’s pony breeding activities had left a child scarred for life. When Lizzie was six, she saw a similar episode in the breeding shed. Wide eyed, she asked innocently “Mommy, is that what grown-ups do too?” Jean, not realizing that her young daughter could not yet separate the act’s function from the violence of that particular coupling, said simply “Yes, dear, that is what grown ups do.” Hand to God – I am telling the truth when I say that a few days after this episode Lizzie announced that it was her life’s ambition to be a Nun. Learning about the birds and the bees by watching a breeding operation would not be my first recommendation on how to break this news to your kid. Thankfully, most lessons I have learned from horses are not so overtly powerful as that. For example, I can easily draw a logical connection between showing horses and learning the value of preparation, working toward a goal and learning to take criticism. As I find my way through my chosen career, I can see many connections between the skills I gained as a horseman and those upon which I rely in business. And while other hobbies or lifestyles might offer a similar framework through which critical life lessons are shaped, our experience is unique for the simple fact that it involves another sentient creature. One summer not long after the experience described above, Lizzie and Soozi Brinkley asked me to help them with some of the ponies they were showing in hand. Among them was a 14.0 hand three year old gelding by the legendary pony stallion Fox Hollow Singing Star. A singularly attractive specimen, Kahlua had a dark brown dappled coat and flawless conformation, matched by an intelligent eye and “lightening bolt” blaze that went perfectly with his unruly nature. He had been purchased by Soozi the previous winter


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and had been renamed Durban Castle. (Yes, THE Durban Castle.) I helped show Kahlua on the line as a three year old. As his groom I was responsible for making certain that the trickster did not get loose and terrorize the show grounds. It took me two whole shows to learn how to keep him from bolting. The first pony with certifiable attention deficit disorder, Kahlua would walk all over anyone who did not exude the sort of confidence that kept his attention. But his lack of focus notwithstanding, Kahlua possessed a sort of charisma that real horsemen found intoxicating. Having worked with Kahlua almost entirely on her own Soozi showed him in the Large Pony Hunter sections for three years with much success. Brilliant but unreliable, Kahlua would spook at the oddest things and for no other apparent reason than to ruin an otherwise flawless trip. And he would commit these sins with a look of shear joy on his face, as if he knew exactly what he was up to. Because she wanted to win, Soozi learned how to meet the pony half way, negotiate with him, and in some cases, used manipulation to get what she wanted out of him. It makes perfect sense to me now that Soozi is a doctor with a flawless bedside manner, an excellent mother, and I am certain that her dealings with Kahlua helped develop these skills. Soozi sold Durban Castle to Susie Slacum (now hunter judge Susie Barrett) just as she had sold Miles River Moonglow to the diminutive savant years earlier. (Two things about Slacum; First she never missed. Second, I am certain that she is the rider who invented what girls on the circuit now refer to as “Hunter Hair.”) After a successful partnership, Slacum sold Kahlua to the Jacobs family at Deeridge Farm. At Deeridge, I dare say the pony probably met his match in Tom Wright and Geoff Teall. (Yes, the same Tom Wright who now trains her majesty, Strapless.) Now I don’t know if Kahlua finally got religion under Tom’s tutelage or if this was simply a function of aging, but I did see

Packy McGaughan

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him some years later clocking around a very spooky ring with Katie Huber aboard, looking every inch the large pony standard bearer he should have been from the start. His consistency was the only thing that had changed. The mischievous cocky grin was still all over the bastard’s face, just where Soozi Brinkley had left it a decade before. There are certain horsemen, and I think Tom is one of them, who are attracted to difficult but talented horses. As long as the animal has a certain spark and is willing to try, these horsemen will do all they can to understand these special animals, make them successful and, above all, happy. In the process, I would bet that these people learn more about human nature and themselves that through any other endeavor I can think of. Spotting these special horses only requires that you be able to identify that look. More than a simple twinkle in its eye, horses that have it will meet and hold your gaze straight on, as an equal. Jimmy Wofford told me once that he bought his great horse Carawich because the horse stared at him straight on, ears pricked forward, daring Jim to look away first. For the record, I have never seen a horse in Tom’s barn that did not have something like this in its expression. In people we call such a similar mixture of sex appeal and charisma “star quality.” It is the thing that attracts us to each other, inspires us to follow our leaders -and no one without it ever even tried to make a partnership with Durban Castle. They would have been out of their depth, and Kahlua would have know it. In horses we call it The Look of Eagles. And here is the real point to all this. I think that Durban Castle fascinated me because he had the Look of Eagles. And all joking aside, I think I remember the breeding pen incident, not so much for the wrong conclusions I drew from it, but because, as the stallion paraded around the pen, this was in fact, the first time I had ever seen it.

graduated from Duke University and then earned a degree in law at the University of Maryland Law School. He rode with Jack LeGoff at the USET Training center from 1981 through 1982. Currently, he is a lawyer with Thelen, Reid, and Priest in Washington, DC. He lives in Clarksburg. Maryland, near the farm where he grew up. In 1987, Packy rode on the Gold Medal three-day eventing team aboard Tanzer (a horse he started as an amateur owner hunter) and was long listed for the Seoul Olympics. He has ridden jumpers with Ann Kursinski and currently holds a Combined Training Course Designer’s license.


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Alra Blue Radiance 1981 - 11/2012 Rest in peace Radie. May your children continue to make you proud.

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New and improved web-site for foxhunting, horse show and racing photos.

LizCallar@aol.com

d www.lizcallar.com


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MARKET PLACE

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