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The Holidays are Coming! Deadline for our gift packed Holiday Issue is November 8th! Contact your sales representative for holiday specials in The Plaid Horse!


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Page 8 FEATUR ... T ES Page 14 our de Bill ... Polly Purebre Page 20 d ... Pagw 23 Tips of the Tra de ... Rings ide with Page 25 Mckinley ... Budd ys T Pages28 ... Scene ail s from W HJA

IHS Youth t To Know W e G . .. 0 3 e Pag Kruse r Elizabeth Ambassado lights h 3 ... TB Hig Pages 32-3 e Ring d ...Aroun th 5 3 4 3 s e Pag Page 36 ... G eorge H. Mo rris Natural Obstacle Clin ic Page 7 ... W inners from Southeast M Pages 39-41 edal Finals ... Directory Page 44 ... A dvertising R ates

Publisher Cindy Taylor theplaidhorse@aol.com cindy@theplaidhorse.com Office Manager & Billing Services Barbara Delano - 732-489-3591 Barbara@theplaidhorse.com Sales Manager Glenn Wilson National Advertising Sales Representatives: * Nancy Halvey * 914-528-5059 nancy4plaidhorse@verizon.net * Brie Quinn * 856-266-6693 showpony93@yahoo.com * Talia Piacentine talia@theplaidhorse.com * Amanda Micciche * amanda@theplaidhorse.com *Cindy Taylor * 732-684-4565 theplaidhorse@aol.com * Kimberly Misdeo kim@thepaisleypony.com Art Department Glenn Wilson Jenn Valania Contributing Writers Bill Rube * wcr0915@msn.com Tamara LaTorre E. Hunter Taylor, Esq. Karen Cavallo * Buddy * Ruth Larson * Polly Purebred Web Site & Newsletter Glenn Wilson

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On the Cover

This months cover is of Belcort. Top and left photos courtesy of Shawn McMillen ( www.shawnmcmillen.com) and bottom right from Chris Tolar. Read more about Belcort on page 37.

Contributing Photographers Liz Callar * www.lizcallar.com Lili Weik * 540-347-2569 Flying Horse * 303-949-6186 Diana De Rosa * 631-549-5362 Alison Hartwell * 845-635-8527 James Leslie Parker * 561-792-9331 Flashpoint Photography * 859-734-3713 Hoof Print Images * 610-399-1385 Reflections Photography * 845-340-9400 Kym Ketchum * 802-578-2795 O’Neills * Gr8jump@aol.com Pennington Galleries Mark Pedersen * 518-848-4370 Springtree Photography * 610-856-0099 Gallop Prints * 215-249-9472 Shawn McMillen Photography * www.shawnmcmillen.com Jennifer Wood ESI The Digital Place * 858-945-8290 A Great Image! * www.agreatimage.co Cathrin Cammett * 303-579-6191 CJM Photo - 877-256-3686 David Walker Photography * 781-639-2707 DigitalHoofprints.com * 800-279-1983 A & A PHOTOGRAPHY *443-553-3036 David Mullinix Photography *352 -235-2765 Anna Purdy *www.AnnaPurdyPhoto.com

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Deadline for the HOLIDAY issue of The Plaid Horse is NOVEMBER 8th!


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October 2013

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Polly Purebred:

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“You didn’t hear it from me...”

Well

my Dears… It seems even Humpty Dumpty, has gotten into the “Anyone can hang a shingle these days” buzz. Poor Humpty she had a GREAT fall and none of her lawyers could put the pieces of her thieving back together again. Life is not a fairy tale for those that prey and steal from the kindness of others; a prison cell is not exactly the gingerbread house, is it Dear? It seems that sadly our world has seen an upswing in trainers behaving badly. One so-called trainer, and I say so-called because last I checked a trainer should be able to actually train something, is in a lawsuit over a horse she stole…I don’t understand how Miss Einstein thought she could get away with selling a horse for a client and then pocketing the money and not giving the money to the owners? Of course the trainer claims she was owed money….but from what we hear the owners have copies of every bill and cancelled check and payment receipts…and even her Attorney is squirming at this point. Lies, lies, lies….it seems Queen of Lies is at it again, a new barn, a new group of fools to believe her ridiculous tales of her nonexistent riding career. While I would never be one to belittle anyone’s accomplishments, my Dear’s there is a big difference between a weekly lesson and The Open Jumpers…it just is so interesting to see people lie, I mean do these lunatics think people actually believe them? Well the answer is yes…a fool like a bagel is born every minute in New York! And for the new trainer…you made your bed honey, and now you have to lie in it…have fun kicking that thing out when you need to!!

It seems that a certain Midwest trainer has gotten in to some rather hot water again. Apparently he came home from a drunken night out and proceeded to fight with the hot water heater. After flooding the neighboring apartments, the police, paramedics and even firemen banged down his door and he was found with burns and passed out on his couch. He is facing charges of destruction of property and is looking for a place to rent in case any of you Dears needed a tenant for a property? Oh my Dears. Please please ,please don’t make some of the mistakes we saw at Harrisburg this year…it was like a fashion Don’t parade! I mean what is up with this new fad at the shows where girls are walking around with “I Dream of Genie” tops with “Good Times”…bottoms? It looks like a strangled chia pet on your head… please…take two minutes and comb ALL of your hair before you put it up! And another thing…to the one guard…I know Roz from night Court is obviously your idol, but please…this is a horse show not Chernobyl Diaries! Lighten up…and calm down! One horse show family was interrogated by RoboCop for almost 10 minutes! Another sad thing I noticed at Harrisburg this year was so many really nasty comments being made by “spectators.” It is a really sad commentary of our times, with bullying at rampant levels, but when some unaccomplished mess sits at an in gate and makes rude comments about other riders it is just downright disgusting. Especially when the person making those comments couldn’t ride their way out of… thin air! It seems this rude phenomenon was not just at one of our biggest shows but also at a smaller show further south where another stellar example for the need for contraceptives was overheard at the in gate at a jumper show making horrible comments about a rider who was having trouble getting around a low jumper course. To begin with the person making the comments rides like a beach full of mating walruses …and secondly…no I think that describes it pretty well…but this time someone


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Over the Hill Farm Bill Schaub

Hunters/ Ponies/ Equitation

Sales/ Training/ Showing

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specialize in giving junior and amateur riders the necessary skills to compete in a quiet and competent environment that is necessary for continued growth.” Many top quality ponies and horses available

Many top quality ponies and horses available We are conveniently located 20 minutes from both Rollins College and UCF

Sanford, Fl www.othfarm.com wothfarm@aol.com

actually said something to her and her scraggly gang of minions. The Show manager and in gate person actually asked them to leave! Of course they were called all sorts of names…but since none of us can speak rabid walrus…no one knew what the gang of mess was saying. Well My Dears that’s all for now, until next time…keep those eyes and ears open. You never know what you might see and hear. Until next time!

Polly

Melissa VanderVennet and Molly Sewell Assistant Trainers 407-322-1912


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Would you like to be featured in The Plaid Horse? Send us your photos for Who’s Winning What, Around the Ring, OTR and The NEW TB News & Highlights section! Photos should be 300 dpi or higher and please be sure you have photographers permission for usage if it is a professional photo.

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October 2013

Check out Ava Leraris from Tustin Inc, in Hainsport, NJ at the Pennsylvania National Horse Show modeling and promoting our awesome advertiser Kathryn Lily’s bows and belt and showing off the Paisley Pony saddle pad!

Thanks Ava!

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Tips of The Trade This month we asked Sarah Baumgaertner for some “Tips of the Trade” to share with our readers A little about Sarah:

Sarah Baumgaertner has been involved in the horse world since came into this world. She started riding as soon as she could talk. Fortunately for her, her mother had horses as a child and her sister, Amy Christison, was the main reason she got into horses. “My sister, Amy, was the reason I became a ‘barn rat’ early on. I’m talking about the late 1960’s early 70’s. I was exposed to the greatest horsemen in the business.” Sarah began riding with VIc Goines in Ogdensburg, New Jersey. She spent the beginning of her riding career with Joan Rost. Her sister, Amy, was a working student and Sarah just enjoyed being at the barn. “I hung around and rode anything Joan would give me. I was just happy to be there. I guess you could say I was considered a ‘catch rider’ when they realized I could hang on to anything.” During the mid 1970’s, Sarah followed her sister to Quiet Winter Farm and began riding with Carol Thompson, where she gained the bulk of her knowledge. Sarah began as a working student at age 15 and eventually became the farm and road manager at age 24. At Quiet Winter Farm, she spent a great deal of her time in Thoroughbred breeding and Grand Prix jumpers as well as working with young sale horses. Here she was able to help retrain ex racehorses for new careers, all with the help of a great staff. Sarah is currently running and working at Knightsbridge Farm where she has been the road manager for 10 years and an assistant trainer for almost five years. “I became USHJA certified three years ago. I now teach beginner lessons, summer riding camps and take students from local to A rated shows.” Sarah has shared with us some of her grooming knowledge from over the years about her favorite grooming tips for your horse:

GROOMING TIP #1 - You CAN bathe your horse too much. Nothing takes the place of a good grooming 30 minutes a day. Grey or white horses benefit much more from “elbow grease” than bathing them. Think about it... whites and greys are just as dirty as blacks and bays. You just don’t see it on the darker horses. [When you bathe your horse] you are pulling natural oils from their coats each time you bathe. The more you groom your horse, the more natural oils and the less dirt and stains you will have. [The dirt] will actually slide off BECAUSE of the natural oils! Grey horse ring tip.... Have a spray bottle of Quic Silver/70% alcohol mix with you. Best spot cleaner ever. 1 part Quic Silver to 3 parts 70% alcohol and use as a ring fix. NEVER use 99% alcohol. Grey/white horses can have the same shine to their coats as the darker colors as long as you are willing to put in the effort and stop bathing them all of the time! GROOMING TIP # 2 - White Vinegar is the best. [It is] Inexpensive and can be found at your local supermarket. It’s great to use as an after rinse for bathing. In a medium [sized] bucket use 2 cups vinegar and fill the bucket with TEPID water. Rinse your horse after bathing with your preferred shampoo and the vinegar mixture. Use the sweat scraper and dry legs and face accordingly. Do NOT rinse off. This brings horse’s skin PH level back to normal and will cut “soap” residue and issues with scratches and fungus . It’s very useful in manes and tails. If you travel to Florida, it is in all tack stores. No need for all of those tack store shampoos and conditioners; vinegar is a better conditioner and your braider will LOVE you for it... squeaky clean! GROOMING TIP #3 - After bathing, absolutely brush your horses mane over on the correct side. This will help train it over correctly, but only pick out our horse’s tail. We spray the bottom with show sheen to keep it detangled. “Bang” the bottom of your horse’s tail occasionally to help it grow and fill out. FYI: A mixture of cider vinegar and water is a great gnat deterrent as well (Not great for flies). Vinegar [mixed with baking soda] is also a great disinfectant to scrub all of your horses water buckets and feed tubs.


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Ringside with Mckinley Ric Shaffer Photography

Plaid Horse Junior Reporter Hey guys! This month I’m going to

start all of you off with some news. In the past month my pony “Bees” and I traveled to Maryland to show at the Maryland Horse and Pony Show and also went to Virginia to show at the Middleburg Classic. We earned some great ribbons and had a wonderful time. I’m excited to say; this month I leased my pony “Bees” out to a very caring and loving family for the year! This was all a big part of my month. This month’s column is about trainers. I wanted to know what they did on their day off, what was the best advice they were ever given and if they weren’t a trainer what would they be? All of my responses were different from each other. Most of them included working out at the gym and spending time doing what they loved to do besides horses! The first person I asked was of course my trainer Jennifer Alessi. When I asked her what she does on her day off she told me that there is no such thing as a day off. I really liked this answer because if she rarely gets a day off then that shows she is doing what she loves. If she was not a trainer Jen would use her master’s degree and go teach elementary school students. The best bit of advice anyone has ever told her was years ago in 1986, while having a conversation with her trainer Leo Conroy. She said that she wanted to become a professional right after her last junior year. He told her “Don’t do it! Go to school and get an education. You can always come back to this!” 24 years later thanks to her daughter Morgan Alessi, my family and I, and everyone at Beacon Hill, she’s back doing what she loves to do. I also train on occasion with Ben Guanciale. He owns Glenn Ridge Farm in Clarksburg, Maryland. The best advice that he has ever gotten was that you can’t make every horse go the way you think it should go. On Bens day off (which is very rare) he wants to do anything that has to with water. He likes to go to the beach or the lake with his family. If he wasn’t a trainer he would want to own his own restaurant. I think that is pretty cool and requires a lot of dedication. When I asked Patti Clark these questions I really like the answers she gave me because you can tell she has a love for horses by what she does on her day off. When I asked Patti what was the best advice she has ever gotten she answered with “ when a problem arises work off the bottom line, which means fixing the problem, not all the drama that goes along with a problem.” I really liked that advice because it is so true for horseback riders. When most of us run into a problem we might groan or whine, but this is saying don’t do that… just fix the problem. The next question was what do you do on your day off? She answered with “carriage & trail rides with her sweet and beautiful trail & driving horses”. She is also very grateful for the 400 acres of trails she gets to ride on. The last question was if you were not a trainer what would you be? Patti said she would work with Doctors Ringside...continued on page 24

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Ringside...continued on page 24

without Borders. She said she loves what they do. They provide emergency aid where it is needed because she loves helping people solve problems. Patti Clark is the trainer at Ev-Ry Farm in Mt. laurel, New Jersey. Archibald Cox is from California and is the trainer at Brookway Stables. The best advice that anyone has ever given him was to mind your own business, that’s what counts the most. I really liked his advice also because it is true. If you just mind your own business it makes you a better horse person. On his day off he likes to go the gym and work out. Archie said if he was not a trainer then he would want to be a lobbyist. Stacey Schaefer is the trainer at Shadow Ridge Farm in Westminster, Maryland. The best advice she has ever been given was to follow your instincts, they never lie to you. Another piece of good advice was don’t buy your next year’s horse and expect it to work out this year. I think that is very true. You can’t ride something that is meant for next year, you are not ready for it yet. Stacey has no days off and if she wasn’t a trainer she would want to work in the field of radiology. Next I interviewed Cory Golden. Cory lives in New Hope, Pennsylvania. The best advice she was ever given was to follow your instincts, just like Stacey. We need to listen to our instincts, it usually never steers us wrong. Cory rarely has days off. If there is a day off it’s filled with doing paperwork and running errands. Cory told me that training is what she has always wanted to do. But if she could not train she would want to be a Vet tech. Chris Wynn was the last person I interviewed. He owns Breckenridge Manor in Virginia Beach. Chris has been training for 26 years. Pam Baker gave him the best advice. She told him “no guts, no glory.” He feels if you didn’t try to win you did not give it your best. He loves to work out and do cross fit on his days off. Chris told me if he was not a trainer he would love to manage a gym. This month I learned that to be a trainer you have to love the sport. It requires so much dedication because you rarely get a day off. All of these amazing trainers love what they do. All of the riders out there wouldn’t be where we are if we didn’t have these great people helping and teaching us. My trainers believe in me and it makes me want to do the best I can. All of the trainers are the same because they all are connected with horses in their hearts and love doing this profession. Thanks for reading… hope you liked it, see you all next month.


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Buddy’s Tail... Ok...so my first month as a columnist hasn’t been very eventful. I guess my request for treats wasn’t convincing enough. Thats ok though... instead of treats... my hopes for a new friend were answered. It was so boring and lonely here without Buddy...and suddenly one day last month Wilbur appeared! Super exciting for me. He’s a nice guy. He’d probably tell you I was a bit of a bully...but I was just testing my boundaries a bit. We’re good friends now! It’s nice to have a pal to hang out with. In honor of Buddy, I’ve been watching the Red Sox. I’m thinking maybe Buddy sent some magic their way!! They went from last in the division to first this year! They made it to the World Series!! We’ll have to see how they do against the Cardinals ...but however it turns out...I know Buddy will be watching! (Might be because his special pine box has a place of honor in the living room on the coffee table) but more likely if he’s in horsey heaven with a TV, he’ll be rooting them

Lynn’s Animal Rescue ~A Labor of Love ~ 856-979-4564

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on! I’ll be watching too in his honor. I’m a Red Sox fan now too by default! Not much else to say. This columnist thing is harder than I thought. I used to laugh at Buddy when he told me he was busy thinking of what to write about...not as easy as I thought. I’m going to put alot more thought into this next month. To sum up my thoughts for now: 1) Don’t expect anyone to “fix” things for you...you are responsible for you. 2) Surround yourself with friends who lift you up not drag you down. Some people just take and never give back. 3) Look around and see if there are things you can do and people you can help to make the world better- for no other reason than its a good thing to do. 4) Don’t buy into anyone else’s cause unless you believe in it...find things that you believe in and try to make a difference. We all can support different causes. 5) Don’t eat treats that smell bad! Until next time...eat and enjoy life...it’s too short not to!

Hank PS~ I promise to try harder next time! Send me some treats and make it easier for me...eating yummy treats I can tell you about!!!


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Jill tells stories with

a camera. Through still photos and video, she produces personalized books and innovative DVDs. Ben Helprin, “Self-Assignment” columnist for Peterson’s PhotoGraphic magazine, and Jill’s professor in college required her to read “The Little Prince” by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. The book had her thinking outside the box and about what was important in life. Her earliest memories are surrounded by people in the public eye: professional athletes, celebrities and politicians. Her uncle was an NFL executive giving her the first big break in publishing her work which led her through many photographic darkrooms. Being in a position to watch professional photographers work, they inspired her to pick up

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a camera and push harder through her career. She comes from a long history of professional athletes having been married to baseball’s Billy Martin and working for many newspapers including the LA Times and The New York Post. Today Jill operates her sports management company, Billy Martin Productions Inc., and her photo and video company, www.Photoartbyjill.com. with her partner Tim Lynch. She is in her 4th year as House Photographer for The Comcast Center in Mansfield Ma photographing entertainers. This past season she added “Newport Yachting Concert Series” in Newport RI to her work load. Having been an accomplished equestrian, she has an amazing ability to capture the persona of both the horse and rider. Her newest project is her photography studio, large enough to bring a horse inside, located at her barn in Grand Prix Village, adjacent to the Winter Equestrain Festival. Jill began riding at the age of 7. Winning both the New England and Massachusetts Adult Medal Finals, she was reserve champion at the National Adult Ariat Finals and a 2-time National Masters Ariat Award winner under the tutelage of Leo Conroy. She led the country in Ariat points for two consecutive years with her great horse Southern Lights. She continues a love of horses, breeding and raising her young stock. She lives in MA and FL and is married to Paul Valliere. www.photoartbyjill.com

Since 1982 - Kentucky’s Largest Halter Maker 1929 Main Street • Paris, Kentucky 40361 800.729.0592 • Quillin.com • facebook.com/QuillinLeather


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Get To Know Washington International Horse Show Youth Ambassador Elizabeth Kruse By Lauren Fisher/Jennifer Wood Media, Inc. The nation’s leading metropolitan indoor horse show, the 55th annual Washington International Horse Show will be held October 22-27, 2013, at Verizon Center in downtown Washington, D.C.

WIHS is a competition that draws many young competitors and spectators, and for this reason, it is especially important for the show to reach out to the public and educate the surrounding community about the fun and positive influence of activities with horses. Kruse has enjoyed participating in this special venture as an important part of the show’s connection with the local equestrian community.

Diana Hosford

“Ever since I moved to Washington, D.C., I have been in awe of the Washington International Horse Show,” Kruse stated. “I have WIHS posters on my wall, I’ve attended the show every year, and last year I was lucky enough to show in the Children’s Hunter Finals. My strong passion for this horse show is why I wanted to apply for the Youth Ambassador position. I was so honored to be selected and was so happy to receive the call in June! It has been wonderful to be a part of the WIHS team this summer.”

The 2013 Washington International Horse Show (WIHS) is honored to welcome 16-year-old Elizabeth Kruse of McLean, Va., as this year’s Youth Ambassador, serving as a voice for young equestrians in the Washington D.C. metro area. Kruse is one of a group of local students on the WIHS Junior Committee that are dedicated to helping promote the show and equestrian sport to a wider audience. Kruse is a rising junior at Langley High School in McLean, and competes often. She showed at WIHS last year for the first time and competed at the WIHS Regional Horse Show in 2009. Kruse has attended WIHS for many years with her friends and family and was on the WIHS Junior Committee in 2012. Originally from Minnesota, Kruse has been riding for many years and brings knowledge and excitement along with her love of horses and horse sport to the role of WIHS Youth Ambassador.

As the 2013 WIHS Youth Ambassador, Kruse oversees the WIHS Junior Committee, which this year has 20 members, the largest committee to date. As a team, the committee works to give WIHS a youthful perspective as the show develops new and exciting youth-related programs, from young rider events to Barn Night and Kids’ Day. One expanded program that the Junior Committee has helped with this year is the Animal Planet Horseless Horse Show. The event is held during Kids’ Day on Saturday, October 26, from 10 am to 2 pm in front of the Hotel Monaco on F Street. A grassroots idea in 2012, it has been expanded to include a fun course of jumps that kids of any age and size can tackle and shows those unfamiliar to horses what fun jumping can be—even if you don’t have a horse! Kids’ Day, sponsored in part for four years by the EQUUS Foundation, has a number of traditions that sprang from the Junior Committee, including horse shoe painting, offering Georgetown Cupcakes, a pony grooming station, and more. Kruse got to experience a whole new side of the horse show as a member of last year’s Junior Committee and wanted to build on that participation this year. Since the Junior Committee and Youth Ambassador program was created in 2009, interest has greatly grown over the past five years. The


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kids all work together throughout the summer and fall and bring incredible energy, great ideas, and enthusiasm to the projects they take on. “My favorite thing about being part of the Junior Committee is working with so many local equestrians! We have a really talented group of riders, who all share the same ideas about giving back and public service and strive to make the community a better place,” Kruse acknowledged. “The Junior Committee offers a youthful perspective to this established show and helps it to reach people that aren’t involved in the horse show. Since WIHS takes place in the middle of downtown D.C., it truly is a community event, and the Junior Committee helps to draw in the locals and reach a new, younger audience.” This year, Kruse will serve as the fifth WIHS Youth Ambassador following Jamal Brown, Anna Rossi, Shannon Miglarese, and Hanna Powers. As the Junior Committee leader, she has big plans for increasing community involvement. For the fourth year, the Junior Committee will host the equestrian team from the Special Olympics of Maryland. They will also be a part of the “Military Daughters” program, where a daughter of a military family visits WIHS and spends the evening with Junior Committee members. Kruse and Junior Committee member Erin Suidikas will also give a backstage tour to the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington during Thursday’s Barn Night festivities.

Alden Corrigan/Equestrian Life.com

Kruse encourages everyone to attend WIHS and get involved with the show as much as possible. “For me, this show is one of a kind,” she said. “It takes place in our nation’s capital, and the classes are absolutely thrilling for equestrians and non-riders alike. WIHS is the perfect gateway into the horse world, and into the soul of D.C.

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“For other local riders and equestrian fans that are interested in being a part of the Junior Committee, I would tell them to come to the show and meet the Junior Committee,” she continued. “We’ll be there all week and can tell you first-hand that WIHS will be the highlight of your year, and the experience you gain in business, marketing, and media is irreplaceable. Plus, it’s a lot of fun.” The Junior Committee consists of students from public, charter, and private schools in Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. As students graduate and go to college, a new class of members comes on board. The 2013 Junior Committee includes 20 members, 11 of whom are returning members, who will mentor the new class. The 2013 Washington International Horse Show Junior Committee includes: Mary Elizabeth Cordia, Terry Daniels, Jessica Diaz, Miriam Dupree, Emily Lunsford, Olivia McCarren, Caroline McGranahan, Rachel Michael, Alexis Mozeleski, Madeline Poss, Hanna Powers, Natalie Ralston, Gaby Ruff, Casey Schmitz, Jenny Searles, Chace Simmons, Isabel Stettinius, Erin Suidikas, Natale Wachowiak, and Madeline Zehner. About the Washington International Horse Show, wihs.org An equestrian tradition since 1958, the Washington International Horse Show is the country’s leading metropolitan indoor horse show. Top horses and riders from the U.S. and abroad, including Olympic champions, compete for almost half a million in prize money and championship titles. About 500 horses participate in show jumping, hunter and equitation events during the six-day show. Special exhibitions, boutique shopping, Kids’ Day and educational and community events round out this family-friendly show. Washington International Horse Show Association, Ltd. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization headquartered in Washington, D.C.


Thoroughbred News & Highlights Karakorum’s R Wild, from 9/28/13 MidAtlantic Horse Rescue/Canter Mid Atlantic Show in Bel Air, MD. Owned by Amy Bernstiel

Rough Coat Photo

TB Highlights section In honor of “Buddy “

Rough Coat Photo

(pictured at left and below)

Lump Sum (PA bred, by Deposit Ticket), and owner Hannah Ong from this year’s Dressage at Devon, where they competed in the Thoroughbred IBC class. “It was my first time handling a horse in a USDF sport horse in hand class and my horse’s first time in the breed ring, so we were surprised and thrilled to win our class!”

Relic’s Hope and Briana Kenerson at Pimlico in the 3’ Hunter Classic where they placed 3rd

photo by Hoof Print Images

If you have a TB you would like us to include in this section please email us a photo and a brief bit of information to: theplaidhorse@aol.com. If you have an organization or an event that highlights, showcases or promotes TB’s... we’d love to include information on that as well.


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6 Scenes from the Canter PA MidAtlantic Horse Rescue Benefit Show, Bel Air, MD

9 photos courtesy of Rough Coat Photo

1) Jennifer Webster leading Kami Barth on Campside, Leadline Champion 2) Kathi Law and Jewles Relic 3) Marissa Dane and Aint Misbehavin 4) Tyra Wiegers and Helen’s Little Man winner in Hand 5) Marrac Miller and Deescouraging, winner of WT Pleasure 6) Patty Clemens and Master Manipulator (Moose) Cross Rail Jumper Reserve Champion 7) Taylor Cox and Ft Myers, Champion Adopted Horse 8) Olivia Stanley and Positively Macho, Reserve High Point War Horse 9) Kara Evans and Testamonially


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George H. Morris Natural Obstacle Clinic Encourages Riders to Get Out of the Ring - Riders Learn Skills That Can’t be Taught in the Ring

Diane Carney and Greg Franklin hosted a George H. Morris Natural Obstacle Clinic on September 9th and 10th at Canterbury Farm in Hampshire, IL.

“Not many shows in the United States have grass rings and natural obstacles anymore but the best shows in the world do like Spruce Meadows and Aachen, Germany,” stated Morris. “People need to get out of the ring and ride,” emphasized Morris. “Bring the outside into the ring. You can’t teach the same things in a ring that riding out of the ring can.”

George H. Morris teaching at the Natural Obstacle Clinic at Canterbury Farm in Hampshire, IL. The theme of “back to the future” was evident, where the concept of jumping natural jumps on various terrains like foxhunting, builds better riders and teaches horses to jump better, enabling our country to have better international teams in the future.

Lisa Goldman practicing the exercises across the mound. Morris began jumping with a serpentine exercise over the bank, educating horses to jumping on and off the bank. Once horses were comfortable with that, they progressed to the mound, again jumping up, down and across the hill, building confidence in both horses and riders. From there, groups progressed to the grob, consisting of a vertical jump, two strides down the slope to a vertical over a ditch, then two strides up the slope to a vertical. Again horses were introduced slowly, trotting in until they became comfortable.

Riders navigate the bank exercise. The clinic track set by Morris, was inviting and progressive, allowing horses and riders of all levels to learn how to ride the natural obstacles. Morris is an advocate of basic principles of riding and horsemanship. “Dressage is the educated way to dominate the horse,” said Morris. “Proper riding is the same at the walk, trot, canter, galloping and jumping.”

George H. Morris demonstrating proper flat work.

Each group began the session with basic flat work, preparing both the horse’s brain and body for jumping.

Stephen Foran, 2012 EAP winner, jumping the grob. Then it was on to the water jumps, again emphasizing progression. Riders started over a Liverpool with cavalettis, then moved on to a larger black water with a take off gate and a rail, then moved on to the ten foot open water set in the ground with a PVC pole on the landing to teach horses to jump across the tape.


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“There are two kinds of experience,” said Morris. “Experience in the britches and experience in the brain. Experience in the britches is ‘doing it’. Experience in the brain in learning to anticipate what the horse will do. Riders and trainers need both kinds of experience.”

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ABOUT THIS MONTHS COVER

Richard Rhinehart tackles the open water. Auditors of the clinic were right in the mix as well with the spectator tent set in the middle of the field, offering the best views of the entire field. “This clinic was a school similar to one you would do to get ready for Spruce Meadows,” said Carney. “The Canterbury field was built from both Greg’s and my experience showing in Calgary. All the natural obstacles found in the International Ring at Spruce Meadows are in the field at the farm. I appreciate the riders, horses, auditors and all involved that made this clinic a great learning opportunity with George. It’s all about promoting better riding. Riding in the field makes better riders in the ring.” It was a great event on the heels of the 2013 Chicago Hunter Derby, which Morris judged, held at Rush and Carl Weeden’s Annali Farm in Antioch, IL, just one hour away. Morris helped design the course for the 2013 Chicago Hunter Derby with Bobby Murphy of Lexington, KY. One glance at the field would tell you Morris’s concepts were present. The course was built using minimal ground lines and a variety of jumps reminiscent of foxhunting days. Natural coops, stone walls, hickstead fences and brush jumps provided the appropriate test for horses and riders to navigate with the up and downhill terrain.

Belcort is 5 year old by Budweiser x Chasing John and was purchased by Bill Rube at 5 months of age. His career started in Hunter Breeding, winning The PA Hunter Breeders Yearling Futurity, and placing as a 2 and 3 year old at Devon, Warrenton, and the Sallie B. Wheeler Championships. He went on to be Champion in the Baby Green Hunter Division at Warrenton and Champion 3,4,5 year old hunter at the Middleburg Classic with Jason Berry. He continued to win in the Pre-green hunter division with Jason, Jocelyn Martin, Kara Raposa, and Tammy Provost qualifying for the Inaugural Pre Green Incentive Championships in Kentucky this past August. Bill decided to ride (after not having been in the saddle for a year) and competed in the AA hunter 51+ division at the Capital Challenge. They did very well... and as Bill said “one more class and I would have nailed it”.


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The Plaid Horse - October 2013