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Whole Life

Living in Balance and Harmony

Sunday, Nov. 13, 2011


Getting Personal

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THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

“I just love being a personal trainer and enjoy getting to know all I can about the body and how it works.”

PHOTO BY HANNAH SHARPE/The Pilot


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

PAGE 3

BY F.W. MANNING II Staff Writer

It may be hard to believe after seeing her in action, but at one time Gloria Crabtree-Megyas, of Pinehurst, did not believe she had what it took to stand in front of a group of people and lead them in an exercise session. “All my life I’ve been interested in exercising,” says Crabtree-Megyas. “I was always interested in going to exercise classes, and one time I had an instructor say to me, ‘You should go train. I think you would make a good instructor,’ and I said, ‘There is no way you are going to get me in front of anybody to do this.’” It just so happens, she was completely mistaken. As a certified personal trainer and fitness instructor, standing up in front of people as an exercise trainer is how she has spent a good chunk of her time for the past 15 years. Currently, she is a personal trainer for close to 25 women, working out of Great Shape for Women, which is her own fitness studio located in Southern Pines. “I started out small at the time, going more into group classes,” she says, “because there was not much demand for personal trainers in this area. Then, when I got into the group and started working in gyms, I saw that there actually was a demand here. “So I went in, slowly doing this certification, then another, and attended workshops and learning seminars. Now, I just love being a personal trainer and enjoy getting to know all I can about the body and how it works.” Her list of credentials is an impressive one. She has been certified by the International Association of Certified Professional Fitness Trainers, Interactive Fitness Trainers of America and National Strength Professional Association.

‘Total Body Workouts’ When asked what service she provides her students, Crabtree-Megyas describes it broadly as “total body workouts.” “Here (at Great Shape), No. 1, it is ladies only,” she says. “If someone is interested in bodybuilding — that’s not my expertise. Mine is to make the women I work with stronger and healthier, while also making it fun so they will always do this. “If I go out and give them a tough, hard workout,

HANNAH SHARPE/The Pilot

Gloria Crabtree-Megyas teaches a class in her fitness studio, Great Shape for Women, in Southern Pines. they may possibly see quick results, but they would also be much more likely to get hurt and eventually drop out. Therefore, the workouts I provide are more functional in focus. One of my major goals as a trainer of older-aged women is to help them work to stay mobile, active and flexible.”

Small-Group Training The average age of the students she works with is in their early-to-mid 60s. She trains her students by working with them in specified small-group classes, incorporating muscular strength, muscle endurance,

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flexibility and cardio into their weekly workout regimen. “I do very little actual one-on-one training here,” Crabtree-Megyas says. “This is more small group training — with four to six women who come in per session — and we have a certain routine depending on what we do each session. I try to group my students into similar fitness levels so that each group can maintain its own productive pace as training progresses.

see PERSONAL, page 4


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THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011 like, ‘Oh I enjoyed that,’ or ‘Man, that class was fun,’ then I have achieved my goal, because that is what will keep them going in fitness forever.”

Personal From Page 3 “The routines are based on the nature of the group I am working with, and I construct it in a way that ensures we get all the muscles worked by doing functional moves. I always say my goal when they come into a class — whether it’s group exercise or training class — is to show students how to make it easier, not harder, and also help find that fine line of what is comfortable.”

Functional Strength

HANNAH SHARPE/The Pilot

Gloria Crabtree-Megyas demonstrates a stretch for her fitness class students.

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Balance and mobility are two of Crabtree-Megyas’ primary focuses as she works with her students each week. “I place a great amount of emphasis on functional strength with specific attention placed on balance during every training session. The reason being that as people age, their balance tends to decrease over time, especially if measures are not taken to maintain that ability. Mobility is another primary emphasis especially in terms of having the necessary strength to do those typical everyday functions, like lifting grocery bags or reaching for a can up in the pantry.” Two other facets of training she hopes her students achieve are functionality and fun. “What I hear from a lot of these ladies is things like they enjoy working in their gardens on a regular basis, and they feel like that is something they would not be able to do if they were not training with me and doing their exercise program. Also, if they walk out of a class and are

‘Exercise in Disguise’ Speaking of fun, in addition to her aforementioned certifications, CrabtreeMegyas is also an official Zumba fitness instructor. “Zumba is a Latin-based-dance exercise,” she said. “The excitement of Zumba is it is dance, and because of that you don’t think about exercise when you do it. Zumba actually says it is exercise in disguise, and I love that, because you are constantly moving. You are doing something different, but we do it enough to where we learn to dance to this song. “So it’s almost like if you are off somewhere and you hear this song, you are going to be thinking about some Zumba moves. It is fun, too. It is just a fun dance class — and I have people who I train that just do Zumba three times a week, and they don’t do anything else.” However, exercise is not all fun and games, which is one reason she feels people have plenty to gain from working with a personal trainer. “One of the biggest benefits attainable for people working with a personal trainer is actually learning how to properly exercise, which, in turn, drastically reduces the risk of injury. Also, if a person has limitations, working with a trainer helps them learn that they can do something. “I hear a lot of people say, ‘Oh, I cannot do this,’ or ‘I cannot do that anymore.’ Well, that is what I am here for, to show those people that, yes, they can do it.”

Contact F.W. Manning II at frankwm2@gmail.com.

About This Issue Supplement Design/Layout Martha J. Henderson, Special Sections Editor

For advertising information, contact Pat Taylor at (910) 693-2505 or email advertise@thepilot.com

Contributing Writers F.W. Manning II, Amy Scanlin, Dixie Connolly, Chris Mastaler Contributing Photographers Glenn M. Sides, Hannah Sharpe

145 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines, NC 28387 (910) 692-7271 • thepilot.com


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

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Eco-Friendly Winter Survival Tips The winter season is right around the corner, soon to usher in cold temperatures, snow and ice for many people across the country. There are plenty of people who revel in the idea of frolicking over snowcapped hills or skating on a frozen pond, but many others hope winter passes them by rather quickly. Much of the focus each winter is on staying warm and surviving this often harsh season at whatever the cost. But there are ways to survive winter while helping the environment. Lighting: Thanks to daylight saving time, many areas of the country experience nightfall around 5 p.m. during the winter months. That means people are more likely to turn on artificial lighting to illuminate homes and surroundings. The International Dark-Sky Association says that artificial lights can waste energy and confuse nocturnal animals. If you must use nighttime lighting, select a low-wattage bulb and point it downward. Motion sensor lights save energy and also will turn on intermittently, not enough to

disturb animals. Reconsider winter traction techniques. Before you throw down chemical ice melt products, think about safer alternatives. Regular table salt will melt ice and may not be as

harmful to the surrounding environment. Sand can offer improved traction when scattered on walkways, and it’s nontoxic. Select a real tree. When holiday

decorating, choose a real tree. These trees are harvested from tree farms that replenish stock as soon as trees are felled. They can be recycled into mulch, and real trees are also biodegradable. Keep houseplants thriving. Houseplants serve as natural air deodorizers and provide fresh oxygen inside a home. The EPA and its Science Advisory Board have consistently ranked indoor air pollution among the top five environmental risks to public health. Considering most people spend the majority of their time indoors when the weather is cold, breathing poor air can result in illness. Houseplants are an allnatural way to filter out offensive air without relying on powered air purifiers or chemical air fresheners. Weatherproof the home. Do yourself — and the environment — a favor by weatherproofing your home. Add a storm door, check weatherstripping or caulking for drafts, seal entry points for cable, phone and water lines with foam

insulation, and also be sure attic and other spaces of the home are thoroughly insulated. This will prevent wasting energy on heating, which is harmful to your budget and the environment. Don’t warm up the car. Many cars can do a cold-start and get on the road without the need for idling in the driveway. Instead of wasting gasoline and pouring engine emissions into the air unnecessarily, just get in and drive. If you’re sensitive to a cold car, try to park it in the garage during the winter. Carpool. Individuals who used to bike or walk to work when it was nice outside may be tempted to take the car when it’s cold. Maximize energy savings by carpooling with like-minded individuals. Invite people over. Instead of turning up the heat when the indoor temperature drops, invite friends and family for an impromptu party. Research indicates that each guest is the equivalent of a 175-watt heater! Not only will you have fun, you’ll feel toasty, too. Surviving the winter in an environmentally friendly way really isn’t that difficult when you employ some simple strategies.

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THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

Eating Right for the Metabolism Fight BY AMY SCANLIN Special to The Pilot

You try to eat right, you exercise as much as you can and yet, each decade, that pesky old metabolism lowers and, in return, the numbers on your bathroom scale rise. If changes to the diet or exercise levels are not made, starting at about age 30, we can expect to see gains of around 10 pounds per decade — and this holds true for those who started out with a healthy lifestyle, too. Think back to your “fighting weight” … are you 10, 20, 30 pounds more than you were then?

Fitness Level A big part of that scale’s reading is your fitness level, cardiovascular, strength and flexibility. Getting a good cardiovascular workout that is safe and effective burns calories. Here’s more good news — even after exercise, your metabolism stays up for a

period of time — burning even more! The more muscle mass you have, gained through some form of strength training, the higher your metabolism. Can you think of a better reason to hit the weight room or power yoga mat? Lastly, flexibility is so important to keep the body in good working order and so wonderful for the mental benefits, too. Why, can’t you just visualize yourself making the right choices and achieving your goals of better health?

Nutritional Intake The other big part of the scale’s number is your nutritional intake. Even with the exercise, we’ve got to get nutrition right. Exercise can only get us so far because there are only so many hours in the week available to us for working out and burning extra calories, and overdoing that workout can be detrimental to our health, just like doing no exercise at all.

If you find yourself needing more and more exercise to conquer the scale, that’s a sign that it’s time to make some improvements to your diet and take some of the heat off of your feet. The frustrating thing for many of us is that we have already made the easy changes to our diet — we choose low-fat dairy, we choose low-fat meats, we eat whole grain bread. And, yet, that weight keeps coming. Now what? What’s the next step in making new and effective decisions?

The Choice Is Yours There are many directions a healthier diet can take you and, thankfully, the choice can be yours — some go the plant-based diet route, others cut back on sugar or portion size, and still others take a hard

see METABOLISM, page 7

“Can’t you just visualize yourself making the right choices and achieving your goals of better health?”


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

Metabolism From Page 6 look at their daily food intake and see that they aren’t quite as healthy an eater as they thought. “It was about becoming an advocate for my own health,” says Karen Pilson, who co-owns Nature’s Own grocery and 195 Restaurant in Southern Pines with her husband, Milton, of her quest, starting

THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C. back in high school, to make more informed food choices. For 24 years, Nature’s Own has been raising awareness and helping the community to make smart food choices. Pilson has had many a question on how to eat healthier and keep the pounds off, and some of her favorite and simplest advice is to get more sleep, stay hydrated, and eat early and eat often — grazing throughout the day with small nutrient-dense meals and snacks that keep the metabolism revved all day. “The more nutrient dense the food, the more satisfied you’ll be,” she says. Pilson recommends high-fiber foods to stay fuller longer, plenty of protein (and not necessarily animal protein) and staying away from hydrogenated oils, sugar and highfructose corn syrup. She also stays away from artificial sweeteners, which can cause the body to crave more calories and sugar.

Think Outside the Box Mark Elliott, owner of Elliott’s on Linden, the Sly Fox Pub and Rue 32, adds we need to change our mind-set about portion sizes. As Americans, we place value on the amount of food we see on our plate and not necessarily the quality. We are “over-portioned,” he says.

PAGE 7 Along with smaller portion sizes, he recommends eating more slowly. “Our body’s fullness receptors are about 20-30 minutes behind,” he says. Meaning, you are actually full before you realize it because your body has not yet registered that it has had enough food. Elliott’s on Linden promotes “Meatless Mondays” with both vegetarian and vegan options on their menu, and it has been a wonderful addition for their patrons. Thinking outside the box and developing hearty, healthy meals around vegetables is a great opportunity to make things interesting in the kitchen. “Going meatless makes for low-calorie meals, a more varied diet with lower cholesterol, and it gives the body a rest,” Elliott says. “Many have commented that they really like the variety — vegetable pot pie, vegetarian lasagna and even chili sans-con-carne.” There are lots of opportunities to eat healthier and lower calories without sacrificing taste or the things you love. Eating less, finding substitutes for certain ingredients or a new menu altogether will help you to grow as your own personal chef, take responsibility for your food choices and, in turn, the number on your scale. The Sandhills is fortunate that there are many healthfocused lectures, cooking classes and, of course, registered dietitians to help you improve your food choices. It’s not too late to make this your healthiest decade yet!

Amy Scanlin, M.S., is a freelance writer who specializes in fitness and medical writing. She lives in Pinehurst.


Having Your Baby …

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THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

BY DIXIE CONNOLLY Special to The Pilot

For most American women, childbirth is a medical event complete with numerous and unnecessary medical interventions, resulting in the delivery of their baby by medical staff rather than the act of intuitively birthing their baby. Only 2 percent of babies born in the U.S. are born without the use of drugs. Natural childbirth is making a comeback though, as more and more natural childbirth educators, practitioners and expectant mothers and fathers are taking back this sacred rite of passage and spreading the news of the numerous benefits associated with childbirth free of unnecessary interventions. Mothers who a have a natural labor and birth experience the benefits of freedom of movement, lower cesarean rates, faster recoveries and an easier time establishing breast-feeding. On the other hand, a laboring woman who accepts an epidural will be confined to bed, hooked up to an IV, have continuous monitoring of her blood pressure as well as continuous electronic fetal monitoring, a probable catheter, a higher risk of needing pitocin to augment slowed labor (a side effect of epidurals) and a higher risk of cesarean (another risk associated with epidurals), especially if she is a first-time mother.

commonly referred to as the “love hormones.” Placing the baby in the mother’s arms during this influx of hormones allows the two to associate this feeling of euphoria with one another, solidifying their bond from the very beginning. Nonmedicated babies are in a very active and alert state for 40 to 60 minutes immediately following birth. During this time, a nonmedicated baby will look directly into his or her mother’s eyes, root or search for the mother’s breast and feed, and explore his or her parents’ faces and chests while being held. In fact, Dr. Lennart Righard conducted a study showing that newly born, nonmedicated babies could actually crawl from the mother’s abdomen to her breast and self-attach without any assistance, whereas medicated babies are characterized as being sedated, lethargic and have a poor or decreased sucking reflex.

Immediate Separation

Freedom of Movement Freedom of movement allows a laboring woman to find the position that is most comfortable for her at every stage of labor, thus minimizing the pain she experiences. Freedom of movement also allows for noninvasive alternatives to common labor problems such as a cervical lip (the uneven or uninformed dilation of the cervix), babies presenting in a posterior position (when the baby is facing the mother’s stomach rather than her back), or slow labor progression. In the U.S. today, these problems are commonly solved by administering pitocin followed by the high likelihood of cesarean. However, these very problems can be solved simply by the mother changing position, walking, squatting, lunging or by lowering herself onto her hands and knees.

Immediate Mother-Baby Bonding Women who give birth naturally require less time to heal than those who have had medically intrusive procedures, such as an episiotomy or cesarean surgery. Furthermore, women who birth without the use of narcotics do not have to wait for the side effects to wear off. All of this aids natural childbirth mothers in establishing immediate mother-baby bonding and breast-feeding. Babies born naturally have less need of fetal extraction by forceps or vacuum, a reduced need of immediate or prolonged separation from the mother following birth, an easier time suckling at the breast and fewer preterm births. No drugs used during labor have ever been proven

y l l a r Natu

safe for babies, and all drugs administered to the mother during labor for pain relief reach the unborn baby. This includes drugs used in epidurals. Fetal scalp analysis has shown that drugs used during labor can reach the baby within as little as one to three minutes. Furthermore, babies born to mothers who have received an epidural have a greater chance of being extracted by forceps or vacuum due to the fact that the mother has no sensation of feeling in her pelvis to help guide her in pushing out her child.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

Babies who are birthed naturally can be placed upon their mother’s chest immediately following birth. This allows the bonding process to begin straight away and aids greatly in establishing successful breast-feeding.

“Love Hormones” Immediately following a natural birth, mother and baby experience a physiological change, resulting in highly concentrated levels of adrenaline and oxtytocin,

Moreover, babies born to medicated mothers are more likely to be separated from their mothers immediately following birth for problems stemming directly from pain medication used during labor. For example, epidurals commonly cause a fever in the mother, which is generally interpreted as a sign of infection, leading to intravenous antibiotic treatment of the mother and baby, and the consequential need for the baby to be monitored by medical staff after birth. Also, babies born via cesarean section have higher rates of respiratory distress and illness, again resulting in their immediate separation from mother and their need to be observed for a time after birth. Babies who are born through medical induction for convenience of parents or care givers have more problems associated with preterm babies than those whose mothers start labor spontaneously. These complications include respiratory illness or distress, lower apgar scores, jaundice and fetal distress. A baby should be allowed to be born on his or her birth date and not a due date that was calculated using a calendar wheel. It is now known that the fetal brain signals the start of labor. It is not wise to interfere with this process when it not medically necessary. Clearly, there are numerous benefits to experiencing a natural childbirth both for the mother and baby. Fathers and other family members also benefit when the mother and baby are allowed to work together toward birth without unnecessary interventions. There are 45 other countries with infant mortality

see BABY, page 9


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

Baby

PAGE 9 to the more natural practice of childbirth.

Dixie Connolly had a completely natural labor and birth with her first child, Isabella, in March 2009. She is a natural childbirth rates lower than that of the U.S., despite the educator and doula in the Bradley Method of Natural Childbirth. Connolly became fact that our country spends more money certified through the American Academy annually on maternal and natal health care of Husbandthan any other country. The Certified cesarean rate in Childbirth after the U.S. is more her natural than 30 percent childbirth despite the World experience Health with her Organization sughusband acting gesting an optias her labor mal cesarean rate coach. She of 5 to 10 percent, currently with not one teaches country being natural higher than 15 childbirth percent. The classes to countries with expectant better rankings couples in than America Moore employ more County, as CONTRIBUTED midwives and less well as in n or medical wb nnolly with their ne Co Fayetteville ph se Jo d intervention. an xie Di ral birth tu na r he and at Fort r te af , lla Plainly, our daughter, Isabe Bragg. Her client country’s stance of success rate with natural childbirth is 100 treating pregnancy and the process of percent. For more information, visit her childbirth as a medical condition or illness website at www.bradleybirth.com?C571. is not working. Perhaps it is time we return

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PAGE 10

THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

Pet Supplies for the Environmentally Conscious If you’re making “green” changes in and around the house, you may want to extend Earth-friendly living to your pet as well. Why shouldn’t going green go to the dogs … or cats, for that matter? By adopting Earthfriendly pet practices, you can minimize negative impacts on the planet and enjoy your pet that much more.

Bathroom Break

a self-flushing and cleaning mechanism to put an end to traditional littler boxes. It hooks up to your water supply and an electrical outlet. Similar to a septic system for a house, the Doggie Dooley Toilet is a unit that is installed in the yard. Place pet waste inside, and natural enzymes and bacteria break down the waste and leach it into the soil naturally. This way waste doesn’t end up soiling the yard or washing away into storm sewers.

Pet waste is a problem. If not properly disposed, it can harbor parasites and be a health issue. Sleeping Quarters Also, pet waste is simply Look for pet beds that unsightly. Innovative CONTRIBUTED are made from recyclaproducts help put an end or ble materials. Many get to potty patrol. For Having a pet spayed their fluffy feel from example, toilet and septic the t ven neutered can help pre recycled plastic that is systems for dogs and cats ion lat pu side effects of overpo turned into pillow eliminate the need to t. en nm viro en from harming the stuffing. Or better yet, really handle waste. make your own pet beds from The Cat Genie uses washable litter beads that drain liquid and clothing or blankets you normally would

have disposed of. In fact, your pet may enjoy having your scent on these items and the idea of familiar surroundings.

Food Many pet foods are made from a lot of fillers and scrap materials. These include reconstituted animal by-products, otherwise known as low-grade wastes from the beef and poultry industries. Instead, choose organic and natural pet foods that rely on meats from animals raised humanely. These foods are not treated with artificial preservatives.

Sustainable Goods Choose pet products made from sustainable materials. For example, you can purchase collars and leashes made from hemp or organic cotton. The same can be said for chew toys and scratching posts. Avoid plastic products, or ones that are not made from recyclable materials.

Chemical-Free Cleaning The trend in household cleaning is to

move away from chemical-laden cleaning products. The same can be said for keeping your pet fresh and cleaning up the house after him or her. Read labels for environmentally safe shampoos, detanglers and pet cleaning products.

Spay or Neuter Protecting pet populations by preventing unmonitored reproduction can reduce animals’ impact on the planet. Stray cats can damage wildlife and deplete bird populations. Dogs running rampant are also troublesome. Making the investment to sterilize your pet can ward off trouble from overabundance.

Previously Owned Pets Adopting a pet helps reduce overcrowding in shelters and the destruction of unwanted animals. Love knows no pedigree, so choose a shelter pet that can use a good family. This also helps reduce pet store dependence on puppy mills, which tend to raise pets in poor conditions


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

Protect Yourself All Year Round BY CHRIS MASTALER Special to The Pilot

Skin cancer can develop anywhere on the skin. Ask someone for help when checking your skin, especially in hard-to-see places. If you notice a mole different from the others or that changes, enlarges, itches or bleeds (even if it is small), you should see a dermatologist. “Adults over age 40, especially men, have the highest annual exposure to ultra-violet (UV) radiation, which is responsible for 90 percent of non-melanoma skin cancers and approximately 65 percent of melanoma cases. Each year in the U.S., approximately 5,700 men die of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer,” the Skin Cancer Foundation reported in October 2011. You are probably in the habit of packing sunscreen for a day at the beach or pool. But the sun is up there 365 days a year, and you need protection much of that time to reduce your lifetime sun-exposure total. Everyday exposure counts. You do not have to actively sunbathe to get a damaging dose of the sun. Find out how best to protect yourself no matter what the season. Practice these sun-protection basics all year round to give your skin the best chance of long-term health. The following paragraphs are

most important: Wear durable sun-protective apparel, e.g., shirts, shorts, slacks, etc., that are made of “all-natural” or “organic” materials, such as cotton, hemp, silk, corn, birch, alpaca, linen, etc. These materials block 97 percent of the sun’s ultra-violet rays versus polyester, rayon blends, etc., which are not all-natural materials. Note: Sunscreens that are at least 15 percent sun protection factor (SPF) for most adults is considered satisfactory for most people. Those who have lighter complexions and babies should wear 30 percent or higher, since their fairer skin is more sensitive to the sun’s more harmful UVA and UVB rays. Wearing all-natural clothing made from organic cotton, etc., wearing wide-brimmed hats and applying a good sunscreen daily in all seasons is most important in lessening your chances of getting skin cancer. Also, make certain to see your dermatologist once a year for a professional evaluation and for any places that may have been missed in your examination.

Chris Mastaler, of Pinehurst, is the owner of the website www.ecogreensunproducts.com. Find out more information on protecting yourself with sunscreen at her website.

PAGE 11


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THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

As Seen on TV

Tried and True Methods Better Than New-Fangled Products

BY AMY SCANLIN Special to The Pilot

ealth care costs. The economy. So many troubling issues with seemingly so few clear solutions. It’s upsetting enough to make me want to rip open a bag of lime-infused tortilla chips and have a margarita. But, do you know what else is troubling? Jiggly arms, bulging waistlines and the fact that we’ve been eating the wrong kind of cookies to lose weight! Granted these troubles

H

aren’t on the same scale as those our nation’s leaders must deal with … but then again, I have noticed some jiggly arms in Congress. Thankfully, as seen on TV, there are products that appear to solve many (but not all) of our most pressing problems. Jiggly arms — shake ’em toned! Bulging waistline — just replace your normal meals with a cookie (funny, I thought eating cookies is what got us into this mess in the first place, but no matter). And, finally unsightly cellulite — be gone! Use some cream and your skin will magically be smooth, just like that. You can find everything you need, and don’t need, on TV. From face cream that makes you look young again to closet hangers that keep those annoying pokey shoulders at bay. From belts that miraculously whittle away your waistline to $2 bills for the low-low-price of $16! It’s easy! It’s fast! It’s a miracle or your money back! Another thing I saw on TV, however, was a news segment on a study in the Journal of American College of Cardiology that shows cutting out TV can lead to not only better

health but also longevity. Apparently while you are watching TV looking for the next big thing, your sofa spud behavior is actually doing harm over and above what was originally thought. Guess what else I saw on TV? Another study on getting the requisite six to eight hours of sleep. If you routinely don’t, it’s bad for your health and your waistline! Ha! So, if you are looking for a good fitness regimen, get some sleep. There are many examples of fitness and health information on TV, and some seem to spark our interest while others we ignore again and again. Why do the easy fixes of lotions and potions get our attention while the good oldfashioned, albeit, sometimes boring, real miracle cures get ignored? Rarely do you overhear, “Have you tried this exercise thing — I wonder if it works?” But comparing notes on weight-loss products can

see METHODS, page 13


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

Methods From Page 12 be heard in the aisles of superstores nationwide. If you really want to lose weight, the formula is simple and has been proven time and time again — eat less, exercise more. It’s calories in versus calories out — it works — and it’s free! Oh sure, losing weight at that pesky rate of a pound a week feels slow and monotonous when compared to testimonials on melting away our jiggle in no time flat. But, guess what? People eventually stop using these new-fangled weight-loss products, just like the tried and true methods. If you can’t bother to use a dumbbell on a regular basis, why purchase yet another piece of equipment? And, even if these seemingly delicious weightloss bars did work, can you stop at just one? And, if you can stop at just one, well … why not just eat less in the first place? Now I’m not saying moving more

and eating less will be easy to start and stick with, but it can be done without purchasing anything new. Heck, you may even already have a piece of gym equipment right under that big pile of shirts waiting to be ironed. (Have you ever noticed those handle bars make great clothes hangers?) First, decide “I’m going to do this.” Then — do it. Check with your doctor and make sure you are healthy. Get a personal trainer or even a friend to whom you will be accountable and get started. Walk a little more to burn excess calories in your day, add some strength training for not only toning but increasing your metabolism, and seek out a qualified nutritionist to make sure your food choices are mostly healthy ones. Oh sure, all this exercise and eating right may not solve many of our nation’s problems, but if we all moved a bit more and ate a bit less, we could have an impact on our health, our health care costs and, in turn, our

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economy! Add a new element of fitness to your patriotism. Dust off your sneakers and give these tried and true methods a chance. You’ll find success — as seen on TV! Yes, we can!

Amy Scanlin, M.S. is a freelance writer who specializes in fitness and medical writing. She lives in Pinehurst.

PAGE 13


PAGE 14

THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

Hands-On Work

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

GLENN M. SIDES/The Pilot

Massage therapist Wanda Jackson works on a client in her Aberdeen salon, Spirit in the Sky Therapeutic Massage. Jackson says massage is her passion.

Massage Therapy Is Labor of Love For Jackson BY F.W. MANNING II Staff Writer

For Wanda Jackson, known simply as “Miss Wanda” by most of her clients, being a licensed massage therapist is a labor of love and one she is feels lucky to share with her daughter Korinda. “There is no denying that massage is

my passion,” admits Jackson. “I have always worked in a hands-on setting and could not do anything for a living that I don’t truly like. With massage, it actually gives you something back. As a therapist, I like it when people tell me

see MASSAGE, page 15


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

THE PILOT — SOUTHERN PINES, N.C.

Hands-On Work

Massage

Jackson has been a massage therapist From Page 14 for 12 years. Before that, she worked as a hospital technician. “I always did hands-on work,” she says. that I have made them feel ‘so much “At hospitals, nursing homes — wherever better,’ and that is why they came back. — I have just always done hands-on stuff. Now I like that, nearly as much as So while I was working at FirstHealth working with my daughter (Korinda (Moore Regional Hospital) as a tech, one Jackson).” of the therapists told me about going to These days, it seems there are about as school to do massage, and that was how I many menu options when it comes to first got interested in the field.” picking out a massage as there are when Korinda, also a licensed massage placing an order at a coffee shop or sushi therapist, began working with her bar. mother at Spirit in the Sky a At Spirit in the Sky little more than a year ago. Therapeutic Massage and Spa, “Growing up, I liked to Jackson, who owns and watch my mother work and it operates the Aberdeen-based inspired me,” says Korinda. “I business, along with Korinda, always wanted to do offers a gamut of variations something to give back by on what she describes as the helping people with their three main types of massage. wellness, and that is how I got “I specialize in therapeutic, interested in massage and sports and deep-tissue wound up working with my treatment,” Jackson says, mother. “with each type having its own “With massage therapy, you particular set of health are giving back, and you also benefits. Swedish is the most get to see the positive results Korinda Jackson basic therapeutic massage from of your work firsthand, type, but a lot of people like while building lasting reladeep tissue — and I roll them tionships with your clients at out on some deep tissue — I the same time. So, for me, it is give it to them. I also like to add some a very rewarding field to work in.” hot stones to my deep tissue and sports massages because heat loosens those Positive Feedback muscles up.” For Wanda Jackson, the large amount Along with hot stone, another of the of direct positive feedback she receives many massages Jackson specializes in is makes her work feel worthwhile. aromatherapy. “When my clients tell me personally “With aromatherapy, we work with how much it means to them to receive aromatic essential oils derived from their massage and they got some real plants,” Jackson says, “and each oil has benefit from it — that means so much to different ways of affecting the body — me. In fact, it is the most rewarding part some are relaxants, some are for pain of my job, and if they leave out of here relief, some help soothe or sedate while saying they feel so much better as a others stimulate. result of their treatment, then that means “We have a list of all the different oils so much to me.” and we let the client pick out what they One client whose life Jackson has had a want, depending on the physical and particularly positive impact on is mental mood or state they want to Pinecrest High School graduate Brandon achieve through therapy.” Ringgold, of Aberdeen.

“With massage therapy, you are giving back and you also get to see the positive results.”

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PAGE 15

Positive Outlook on Life

to work with him, providing two years’ worth of intensive treatment. “I did his for free just so I could work with him,” says Jackson, “and feel like I was doing something to help him — and I did. He used to have a great deal of muscle spasms, due to the nature of his injury, but over the two years I worked with him, we were able to limit that. “Throughout our time together, he always thanked me after every session, saying, ‘Miss Wanda, please let me know if there is anything I can do to help or pay you back,’ and I would respond by saying ‘Get out of here.’ Because being able to help him in his recovery effort and getting to see the results and how it impacted his life was payment enough.” While he is no longer a regular client, Ringgold remains in close contact with Jackson and tries to stop by to see her when he needs to talk or unwind. “I have no doubt that having Miss Wanda in my life was crucial to the way I was able to recover physically,” says Ringgold, “and rehabilitate to the level I have. She also helped me keep my positive outlook on life. It is something I had before the injury and also maintained throughout my ordeal, and she helped me secure it with her amazing therapy.”

Although Ringgold did not have any insurance nor could he afford the treatment rates, Jackson did not hesitate

Contact F.W. Manning II@frankwm2@gmail.com.

Ringgold, who was named the Patriot football team’s defensive MVP his junior season and the team MVP as a senior, suffered a serious injury in 2007. The accident occurred on the gridiron, during the University of North Carolina A&T football team’s annual spring game, when he hurt his neck while making a tackle “The accident occurred during our (A&T) spring game my junior year,” remembers Ringgold. “I shattered my C5 vertebrae (in my neck) and fractured my C4 and C6. As of now, I am about as close to fully recovered as I can get. I do have some pain in my neck area from time to time, but I can’t complain. “The initial benefits from my very first massage were substantial to my flexibility,” says Ringgold. “After the accident, my muscles got real tight and my body was very tense, but once Miss Wanda helped me with different therapies, my body felt much better. It has always been mellow here when you come to visit Miss Wanda. I think of her as a momma kind of. She talks with me as we discuss my current situations and stresses and just makes it calm for me. She is a great, easy-going woman.”

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Whole Life 2011