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PEREGRINE PEREGRINE

Volume 39 Issue 3

Jersey Village High School

7600 Solomon Houston, TX 77040

December ‘10

pages

6-7

During the holiday season, the need for food and supplies increases greatly. Clubs and organizations worked to give struggling families a better holiday by donating food, adopting families and working at food banks. The giving continued within the school’s faculty and staff with kind notes.

‘ t i s the giving

season Aspiring pilot receives permit and plans to acquire license

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Parent-child relationships change during time at home and then school hours

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Juniors coming from different backgrounds develop passion for basketball

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[Capturing Culture]

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Three students place in top ten of art competition with photos, sculpture final product together. “When you see a picture that looks cool all you think of 1,462 entries. Over $70,000 in prizes. Of all the students is ‘Wow, I like that’, but the process of making it is worthy who entered the Culture Shapers art competition, just 10 of a word so much greater than ‘wow’. From the first role of people received recognition in each of the six separate cat- film to the competition, [creating the photo] took me about a month,” Gallagher said. egories. It takes time, money and dedication to create the perfect Krislyn Koehn, junior, Lane Preston, junior, and Meghan Gallagher, senior, all know the feeling of accomplishment photograph, but Gallagher would not have it any other way. “The fact that I got in the top ten already makes me feel that comes with excelling in their categories firsthand. Each like a winner. I will never stop taking photos, and I hope to of their creations made the top ten. Gallagher grew up in a creative family which led to her major in it in college,” Gallagher said. Preston also received attention for his photograph titled interest in music and other types of art. Her special interest in photography permeates her everyday life, finding inspira- Field of Dreams. A wistful monochrome photo, Preston prefers to let the viewer interpret its meaning, describing it tion for her photos in small details others might overlook. “While I was taking my first role of film for the year I was many ways, himself. “I suppose it can be seen as a picture of a kid waking up, thrilled to see this light on the ground. That might sound silly, but looking for the perfect light is a big deal. When I or day dreaming, being transported somewhere that he was saw it I told my mom, ‘Mom, I have to put my face in that, thinking of trying to find an escape, or just a peaceful place,” it’s perfect!’” Gallagher said. Preston said. The idea to create a movie-still style photograph using Inspired by family, friends, and teachers who supply him the light in the role of film and a picture of herself may have with plenty of support and competition to push him to excel, come in a flash, but it took Gallagher much longer to pull the Preston credits his grandfather with instilling his interest in art. “He exposed me to creative thinking and the idea of expressing what I feel through words and images, and it just stuck with me,” Preston said. Like Gallagher, Preston has plans to continue studying art and photography, as well as plans to buy a new camera and help someone in need with the prize money if he wins the competition. Koehn first built her sculpture as part of a class assignment. With a Y-shaped twig for a The fanciful quality of body, wings cut out of leaves and clay shackles, Field of Dreams, created her sculpture, Invisible Chain, depicts the supby Lane Preston, junior, pression of religion in society. helped to win it a spot in “It took less than two weeks [to complete the the Top 10. sculpture]. Most quality projects take at least four. With this sculpture, though, I think its

>> staff writer

On Display

beauty is in its simplicity,” Koehn said. Like Gallagher and Preston, Koehn’s family sparked her passion for art. “My mom did crafts with me as a kid, and she still does. I discovered I was pretty talented at sketching, but in high school I decided to go out on a limb and try sculpture, which opened up a whole new world for me where everything is a medium for expression. I know [my parents] are proud to have watched my growth from crayons and fun foam to clay and glaze,” Koehn said. Koehn also appreciates the mentoring of her art teacher, who helped her to elevate her creations and take them to a new level. “Mrs. (Karen) Dillard taught me what fine art is all about, taking in everything around you and realizing that it has a story to tell and an innately beautiful way of telling it,” Koehn Preparing Looking through the lens, said. Meghan Gallagher, senior, aims to shoot a photo.

photo by Sara Zatopek

SaraZATOPEK

Breaking down the competition

The simultaneous simplicity and creativity of Krislyn Koehn’s sculpture, Invisible Chain, made it stand out among more than 150 others.

Of the 1,462 entries:

334 belonged in the Drawing category

170 belonged in Electronic Media

The judges appreciated the month of effort it took Meghan Gallagher, senior, to complete her self-portrait, awarding her a spot in the Top 10 out of over 300 photographers.

262 belonged in Mixed

Media

217 belonged in Painting 320 belonged in Photography

159 belonged in Sculpture

The prizes:

How judges rank submissions:

1st place in each category receives $5000

Talent of the artist

2nd place in each category receives $2500

Creativity shown Aesthetic appeal of the piece


feature PEREGRINE

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Falcon Flies OrfaPALACIOS

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photos courtesy of CINDY KORENEK

Student aviator pursues pilot’s license

sensation that few enjoy. “This is truly amazing! It is very different, >> staff writer it’s almost kind of weird to sit there and A business relationship in which two think about flying,” Korenek said. families developed a personal friendship Unlike driving a conventional car, the flourished into Cameron Korenek, junior, plane cannot go through highways and developing an interested in aviation. streets, but the changes have to be physically “Cameron was the one in the family adjusted by the driver. to first express an interest in flying, and “Nothing else in this world happens like certainly I helped nurture that interest as that where you have to go up or down by much as I could,” Dave Adams, pilot, said. your own. You’re always aided by something, Korenek had always been interested in hence it is the only three dimensional flying and the idea of huge heavy pieces of activity you’ll have metal staying aloft in the air, but a flight in this day and time with his father’s friend, Adams, gave him and in the event of the final push into deciding to become a an emergency the student pilot. “One day one of my dad’s business only way is down, associates, Dave, took me for a flight, being and gravity and the that he is a pilot, and that’s when it all went plane do not care over the top and I started looking at being if down is a nicely a pilot and then there I was as a student paved runway to a farmer’s grass pilot,” Korenek said. When in full control of the plane, field or to a city Korenek felt a sense of empowerment and a highway,” Korenek said. The time spent in the air opened Korenek’s eyes to a new world, while being in control of a plane worth thousands of dollars allowed him to appreciate his surroundings. “Aviation gives you a whole new perspective on life, with the fact of how things move and work and how you look at the world itself and has given me a whole new respect for items,” Korenek said. While most 16 year olds worry about getting their driver license, Korenek planned on getting his pilot’s license after his 17th birthday. Adams characterizes Korenek in two distinct ways; very goal oriented and quite the perfectionist specially when inSPeCting Checking the fuel tank of the plane, Cameron Korenek, dealing with grades. junior, prepares for flight. Korenek invested many hours of practice to “For example he was prepare for his aviation exam in hopes of gaining his pilot’s license. actually quite distraught with

his high B on his private pilot written exam,” Adams said. As a parent Cindy Korenek, Korenek’s mother, always worried each time her son set out to fly, as she watched him go through his pre-flight check list. “While I am not a fan of flying, I have enjoyed watching Cameron’s interest in aviation become a dream that he is fulfilling to become a private pilot. I think this has added another level that increased his overall belief in himself,” Cindy Korenek said. B r u c e Lavallee, pilot instr uctor, viewed Korenek as not only an excellent student with a good sense of humor but also very detail oriented, motivated and hardworking. He believed being a pilot has helped him perfect those and other skills. “Aviation has a high degree of accountability associated with it. This has allowed him to become a well rounded individual. By having trained in these stressful situations, where a pilot is required to constantly be aware of his environment, he has been able to control situations as necessary and think quickly,” Lavallee said. Korenek devoted hours studying aviation both mentally through books and physically in the air. The heart pumping emotions he felt while flying through the blue skies allowed him to grow in self confidence. “Flying an airplane is one of life’s endeavors, which requires more intestinal fortitude and skill than most realize. It is that very fact that produces such a sense of accomplishment in those who start and finish a private pilot curriculum. I’m glad I could be a small part of his journey,” Adams said.

“ Aviation gives you a whole new perspective on life, with the fact of how things move and work in the world itself .”

Quick Facts:

To become a licensed pilot...

You need a minimum of 40 hours of flight time, which includes night flying and instrument flying, where a student wears a view limited device which only allows him to see inside the airplane.

Complete 10 hours of solo flying time which includes a crosscountry flight (a flight consisting of flying 50 nautical miles.)

Pass a comprehensive written exam. And to finalize the process pass an oral and practical (flight) test with an FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) approved examiner is required.


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feature PEREGRINE

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Stoked about Stoker

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Student takes part in program run by mom JoeyGILBERT

>> staff writer

Every day Trey Stoker, junior, gets up to go to school. He gets ready and hops in the car with his mom. When they arrive at the school most students would say “goodbye” to their moms and see them after school, but not Trey. His mom gets out of the car with him and goes off to teach her own class. Cindy Stoker, JVTV teacher, comes to school to instruct students through their JVTV experience, and she even has the pleasure of teaching her own son. “I couldn’t be happier that he is in this program,” Cindy Stoker said. When Trey Stoker first entered high school he had no intention of joining JVTV. His main focuses were theater and

photo courtesy of TREY STOKER

relaxing Taking a break from the national video convention, Trey and Cindy Stoker spend their day at Disneyland in California.

choir, and his mother never saw it coming. “I never expected it. He has had to make a lot of sacrifices, and never ever did I say that he had to be in here,” Cindy Stoker said. Trey attended a JVTV convention his freshman year with his mother, not expecting to find an interest he would really enjoy. But when he got there, he found out he was wrong. “I went to a convention freshman year and got really interested. Then I took it sophomore year,” Trey Stoker said. With every parent-child relationship, some problems are to be expected. So one can only imagine how it is for them when it is not only a parent-son relationship, but it is also a teacher-student relationship. “[Teaching my son] feels fine now, but at first it was a little weird,” Cindy Stoker said. Trey Stoker joining JVTV came as a shock to Cindy Stoker. She was expecting him to stick to theater and choir. So when she got word that he was joining the program, she was a bit frightened. “I felt like people would feel like I was favoring him. It has become very natural, and we don’t have a lot of drama in here. But I am very aware that I have to be fair, and I have to treat him like everyone else. I yell at him just like I would yell at anyone else,” Cindy Stoker said. But with time comes acceptance, and Trey has been in JVTV for two years now. Most activities have become very natural for the Stokers. School is school and home is home. “We don’t go home talking about JVTV, We have been through a lot and we know how to have a good relationship,” Cindy Stoker said.

photo courtesy of TREY STOKER

All smiles posing for a photograph at the Texas Renaissance

Festival, Trey and Cindy Stoker share a moment for the family photo album and a Facebook post.

work and home collide Life at school with Dads, Mom

photo courtesy of ALLY PIOTROWSKI

Ally and Thomas Piotrowski Thomas Piotrowski is the head athletic trainer and Ally is a junior. ”I love having [my] dad work here. I really appreciate being able to ride with him in the mornings and have a place to go after school,” Ally Piotrowski said.

photo by JOEYBETH GILBERT

Kathy and Daniel Kutsko

Daniel Kutsko is a physics teacher and Kathy is a junior. “It is really cool because it is interesting to know my friends go through what I go through at home,” Kathy Kutsko said.

photo courtesy of DORA VERRAIRES

Gustavo and Dora Verraires

Dora Verraires is a Spanish teacher and Gustavo, who goes by Gus, is a senior. “He has accepted it more and more as he gets older,” Dora Verraires said.


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SOFTBALL SUCCESS

SarahCHO

Player stays strong through struggles, hardships >> staff writer

Wearing a purple shirt and grey sweats, she steps up to home plate. She swings the bat with a look of confidence and the ball soars across the field. As a softball player Yureli Alcantar, sophomore, starts her ninth season with the Pasadena Eagles. Her loyalty to the sports required her to play through injuries, asthma and other obstacles. Four years ago Alcantar participated in a softball game and sprinted to second base when she slid and fell hard on her elbow. Hearing a painful crack, she later learned she broke her ginglymus. “It hurt so badly, I was crying my eyes out,” Alcantar said. “I was

benched from softball for three weeks.” Through this obstacle, however, she became stronger both emotionally and physically. “I now know what to expect and what to watch out for,” Alcantar said. However, after facing broken bones Alcantar faced yet a more difficult challenge after doctors diagnosed her with asthma last year. “When the doctor told me, my first thought was about softball. I was worried if I could continue to play. Thankfully, I was able to play and am able to play today,” Alcantar said. “It’s hard sometimes because I’m short of breath when I run and I constantly have to use my inhaler. But I will never give

up doing what I love.” Despite these physical obstacles,

“ I’ve always wanted to be a softball player when I grow up. I want to spend my life doing what makes me happy.” Alcantar continues to play and love softball, to the extent where she drives to Pasadena to practice and participate in games. “From my house, Pasadena is about 35 minutes,” Alcantar said. “It’s a hassle having to drive so far

four times a week, but playing softball makes it all worth it.” Although negative moments burden Alcantar she endures through her struggles to strive to become the best player on her team. Her coach, teammates, and fans praise Alcantar for all the effort and time she contributes to softball. She plays softball every Sunday and practices every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. “Even though she lives far away, she’s never missed a practice or a game,” Marissa Pena, teammate, said. “I’m glad she’s on our team.” There are often times when Alcantar scores the last winning point for the team.

“I love watching her at the games,” Maria Cardenas, Alc a n t a r ’s m o t h e r, said. “I’m so proud of all the effort she puts in softball.” Alcantar wants to take softball to a higher level and pursue a career in the sport. “I’ve always wanted to be a softball player when I grow up,” Alcantar said. “I want to spend my life doing what makes me happy – hitting the ball, running the bases.” Her confidence allows her to play and overcome any prospective difficulties. “Softball is my life,” Alcantar said. “Simple as that.”


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Top of their game

Sport guides young players through life AmberDAY

“ nobody can stop me, only I can stop myself.” Jonathan Miles

game Day Both Jonathan Miles (above) and Ryan Garcia (right), juniors, play basketball with passion and confidence. Their passion comes from their love of the sport since an early age and their confidence builds with each hour of practice and every game they play with their varsity teammates.

>> staff

Juniors Jonathan Miles and Ryan Garcia call the varsity boys basketball team into a huddle to give their last words of encouragement. “We can win this.” They break and the players disperse into their positions on the court. Both Garcia’s and Mile’s practice from a young age impacted them to become who they are now. “I felt like I had a major role on the team, and I had to keep a higher standard to lead by example,” Miles said. Both Miles and Garcia strive to be the best that they can possibly be. Garcia fulfills his role on the team by gaining trust with his coach and team. “I felt that [Coach Reggie Childress] has a trust in me to be a leader on and off the floor,” Garcia said. Knowing that a team is only as strong as its weakest link, Miles and Garcia promote confidence by supporting each of their teammates as well as encouraging them to be their best. Miles takes the spiritual approach and guides his team with a quick prayer before playing a game. “I try to keep them involved, and I join all the players before the games and lead in a prayer to thank God that we have the ability to play the game unlike others,” Miles said. Garcia leads his team by providing his teammates with the opportunity to discover their solution to their mistakes. “When they do something wrong I let them know that it is okay and what to do different the next time and never put them down or kill their confidence,” Garcia said. Miles and Garcia both contribute hours of time to practice so that they are prepared for the next game. Garcia stays ahead of his competition by prepping himself with a heavy work out once a day. “I run, shoot, lift weights and complete AAU workouts

on Sundays to make sure I’m in shape so that way when the fourth quarter comes I’m never tired or winded,” Garcia said. To stay on top of his game Miles makes basketball his first priority and preps himself with hours of intense workouts. “I usually practice twice a day, for about two to three hours. I sacrifice a lot of my time on and off the court working out, which requires running, shooting, dribbling and lifting weights instead of hanging out with friends,” Miles said. Miles and Garcia share aspects in life that lead them to play basketball. Garcia was pushed by his father to be the best, which gave him the determination and talent he has today. Garcia discovered his love for basketball at six years old. Today Garcia continues to play with the same love for the sport with intentions of playing basketball at a university. “I love this sport a lot because it is such a major roll in my life and I look forward to playing in college. Through out my life my father always pushed me in whatever I did, and when basketball came along he always strived for me to be the best and that has helped me a lot,” Garcia said. On the other hand Miles depended on basketball to escape the unfortunate loss of his father. Miles developed a passion for basket ball at age 10, he gained a new confidence which he still uses today to overcome the aggressiveness of the sport. Bonded with basketball at a young age, Miles increasingly improved his strength and skill which landed him a spot on the varsity basketball team. “My dad died when I was six, and without basketball I wouldn’t have had guidance through life to continue through the hard times. Basketball has taught me that nobody can stop me, only I can stop myself,” said Miles.

Only two varsity sophomore players step up “Playing on varsity basketball is a whole different ball game from Freshman A last year. It’s more of a challenge, obviously, but it’s nothing I’m not up for.” Dylan Golvach, sophomore

Varsity Boys’ Basketball District Schedule Jan.04 2011 7:30 PM Cypress Springs* A-Berry Center Jan.07 2011 7:05 PM Cy-Falls* H-Jersey Village Performance Gymnasium Jan.11 2011 7:00 PM CyFair* A-Cy Fair HS Jan.14 2011 7:00 PM CyWoods* A-Cy Woods Jan.18 2011 7:05 AM Langham Creek* H-Jersey Village Performance Gymnasium Jan.21 2011 7:25 PM CyCreek* A-Cy-Creek HS Jan.25 2011 7:00 PM Cy-Falls* A-Cy-Falls High School Jan.28 2011 7:00 PM Cy-ridge* H-Jersey Village Performance Gymnasium Feb.01 2011 7:00 PM Cyranch* A-Cy ranch HS Feb.04 2011 7:00 PM Cy-Fair* H-Jersey Village Performance Gymnasium Feb.08 2011 7:00 PM CyLakes* A-Cypress Lakes HS Feb.11 2011 7:00 PM Cyridge* A-Cypress ridge HS

“Playing as a sophomore on the varsity team is a great experience and I love the game of basketball.” Madison Lloyd, sophomore

Feb.15 2011 7:00 PM Cyranch* H-Jersey Village Performance Gymnasium photos by ORFA PALACIOS


PEREGRINE

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morning mayhem

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editorial

New placement of breakfast lines interfers with students walk to class

familiar sight fills the commons every morning. Cliques socializing in circles, students talking at lunch tables, assistant principles surrounding the commons, and the hungry standing in extended lines waiting for their breakfast. These long lines are new to the school. The breakfast lines were formally located in the hot lunch lines, where lunch is currently served. Now, the lines are interfering with students trying to walk to their first period class. The traffic flow, in the morning, is now backed up, and makes walking towards classrooms difficult. Moving the breakfast back lines to where they were in previous years should be considered as a solution to reducing traffic and crowding, in the commons, before 7:25. In the past years, the large commons has been the gathering place for many, if not most, students, before school starts. There has also been breakfast served there, open to any hungry person waiting for the school day to start. Before construction revamped the commons, lunch lines, and kitchens, breakfast was served in the hot tray lines. Lines extended into the commons, but did not block the pathway to the instruction part of the building. Now, where the lines currently extend, they are blocking one of the two ways to go from the small commons area, to the main instruction zone of the

school. Breakfast lines start on the left side of the commons, when facing the elevator, and go on for yards, until hitting the tables. These lines of people are a sort of wall for other students, forcing them to push through the rising number of students in line, or for them to walk the span of the commons to get around the mess that are the breakfast lines. Before, there was little, to no traffic. There was no problem, and no complaints. Before, students did not have to shove to get to first period. After the remodeling, however, students have had to use great force to get through the crowded large commons. The easiest fix for this growing problem, would be to move the breakfast lines back to where lunch food is served. The original move of the lines was to make access to breakfast more convenient.The Cypress Fairbanks Independent School District Food Department made this decision after the remodeling. With the locations of where the lines are now, it was thought that lines would move smoother and quicker during the hectic mornings. Moving the breakfast lines back to their previous location would not entail much work. The lunch ladies would have to move locations of where they work in the mornings, and where all the breakfast food is stored. The move would reduce traffic

problems significantly during the already hectic mornings, and the majority of the student body would be able to maneuver more efficiently. This move would not only help students get to their first class on time, but would also give people who do not eat in the mornings, more room to stand and wait for the 7:15 bell. More room for people to stand would reduce how crowded the student body is in the morning. If this action is followed through with, students trying to push through the crowded lines, the people waiting in the lines who are being shoved, and the students who have not had a place to stand during the morning, would all be happy. Moving the breakfast lines back to their previous location, sharing the same kitchen as where hot tray lunches are currently being served would reduce the traffic during the morning that is caused by crowded breakfast lines overflowing into walk ways.

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“I think that the breakfast lines should “[The lines] are pretty irritating, especially when I’m when late to first be moved, because it makes it harder for people to get by in the mornings, period.” and it takes up room in the commons >> Jessica Shoemaker for people to socialize.” senior >> Tram Pham sophomore

“The lines defeat their purpose. They are put there for convenience, but actually they are much slower than the other lines and take up hallway space.” >> Sandy Lam senior

11 >>

Peregrine Staff 2010-2011

editors Emma McKenzie Mikela Melakis sports editor leandra lee feature editors kinsey button tanner stogsdill news editor advertising manager vince flores illustrator emily whittemore staff writers sarah cho Amber Day Taylor Espinosa Henry Garcia Joey Gilbert Alissa Guerra orfa palacios monse portillo Sara zatopek staff adviser margie comstock principal ralph funk

Jersey Village High School Student Publications’ Newspaper Policy

The Peregrine is the official student publication of Jersey Village High School and is published by the Advanced Journalism newspaper class at Jersey Village High School, 7600 Solomon, Houston, Texas 77040 (713-896-3400). It is distributed free to the student body. Subscriptions can be bought for $15, and copies of the paper will be mailed to your residence. Unsigned editorials represent a majority agreement of the staff. The Peregrine is read in advance of publication by the JVHS administration. Advertising is sold by the 1/16, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, and full page. The staff has the right to reject, edit, or cancel any advertisement at any time. The advertising policy is stated on the advertising contract. Advertising is not an endorsement from the staff, the adviser, the administration, or the Cypress Fairbanks Board of Trustees. The Peregrine is a member of the Interscholastic League Press Conference, Quill and Scroll, and the National Scholastic Press Association. The Peregrine is printed by Mirror Publishers, Inc in Texas City, TX. The opinion of readers is held in high regard. Please send all feedback or questions to our address or room 1712. Letters to the editor need to be limited to 150 words. We reserve the right to edit for spelling and grammar. Letters must be signed.


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Image Essay

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Philanthropists perform for charities SINGING SOLO With a spotlight beaming down, Angelea Caton, junior, sings to “Somebody to Love”, while dancing to the music. GETTIN’ PUMPED Walking onto the stage, Patrick Fulgueras, sophomore, raises his drumsticks not only to pump the crowd, but to signal his bandmates, Sarah Shelby, senior, and Shane O’Neal, sophomore, to the stage.

photo by TAYLOR ESPINOSA

photo by KATIE CARVALHO

photo by TAYLOR ESPINOSA

TaylorESPINOSA

>> staff writer

The stage lights shined, the music blared, and the audience full of family, friends, and fellow peers grew restless. Members of Student Council and performers in the show went back and forth backstage, until the lights went dim. It was time to start the show. Student Council hosted its second annual Battle of the Falcons on Friday, December 3, 2010 in which all participating students of the show performed on behalf of their choice of charity organization. All eleven acts of the night competed against one another to win the votes of the audience. With talented students, the performances consisted of singing, dancing, and poetry reciting. However, Words 4 Lost took first place with a collaborative musical performance. Runner up was the poetry performance by Malaysia Uniece, and the third place winner of the night was the Jersey Village drum line. The night ended with a full house of friends and family who came out in support of the performers and to donate to good causes.

IN CHARGE Just two of the many Student Council hosts, Jeffrey Nguyen and Amy Doan, seniors, wave to the audience.

photo by TAYLOR ESPINOSA

WORDS 4 LOST Mic in hand, Jackie Vu, senior, looks out onto the crowd to begin her first song while Thanh Nguyen, senior, amuses the audience.

photo by TAYLOR ESPINOSA

photo by TAYLOR ESPINOSA

VARIETY SHOW Strumming on their acoustic guitars, Connor Knight and Paolo Lacanlale, sophomores, give their version of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”. Dancing with the HOLA club, Sasha Garcia, junior, smiles to the crowd. Following his music sheet, Zach Martinez, sophomore, plays his sax.

photo by KATIE CARVALHO

10 - 11 PEREGRINE3  

News, Features, Columns, Photos from students at Jersey Village High School in Houston, Texas.

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