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Tuesday 19 July 2011

Tel: 021 713 9440 Fax: 021 713 9481

‘Rates are killing our culture’ HANRIE BOSCH

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S the rates issue drags on in the Bo-Kaap, Cape Town stands at risk of losing a valuable piece of its cultural heritage and history. Ward councillor, Dave Bryant, and the Bo-Kaap Civic Association (BKCA) are in the process of lobbying against the Municipal Property Rates Act 6 of 2004, in order for the area to pay lower rates on the grounds that it is culturally historic. But while the legal procedures drag on, the only historically predominant Cape Malay area in South Africa is at risk. Shireen Narkedien has been a tour guide in the area for the past 16 years, and is also a resident in the Bo-Kaap area and, like most other residents, was born in the same house she and her family still occupy. “From a tourism point of view, the area has become just as popular as Table Mountain. And we need to ask ourselves if this area will still be of use to the tourism industry if it is stripped of its cultural heritage. “The area has never been completely Muslim. There have always been other cultures, but recently more foreigners have moved in, and the area is about 70% Muslim now,” she says. Another resident, who refers to herself as “Auntie Vermuelen”, says: “Our homes must go from generation to generation. That is the way it has always been. Both my mother and I were born in this house, and she is now 87 and I am 56, and my children and grandchildren will also stay here one day,” she says. According to another resident, Rieyaat Abrahams, everybody has family in the area, and “foreigners who buy the houses have no respect for our culture and beliefs”. Narkedien agrees with this statement, and adds that there have been a few issues in the past with people not understanding Muslim culture. “Foreigners who have bought

houses in the area, especially close to the mosques, complain when the morning call to prayer starts, and feel that slaughtering sheep is barbaric.” Sedick Sieed is another resident who was born and raised on the cobble stone roads of the Bo-Kaap. “The rates are killing our culture, and turning our ancestral homes and streets into a ghost town. [Our houses are] bought up by foreigners who only spend one or two weeks in them. Other people blatantly sit and drink outside, which is very disrespectful towards us.” Narkedien feels that the only way to protect the heritage of the BoKaap is to get the City to realise that the area brings in money from tourism, and that this historically disadvantaged area cannot survive the current rates increases that have Bo-Kaap residents paying the same rates as areas like Camps Bay and Constantia. “In some cases people in the past paid R3 000 a year for rates, but now they have to pay R15 000.” According to Osman Shaboodien, BKCA chairperson, rates are being calculated according to the “mere valuation of properties in the area”. “We are not saying that we should not pay rates, if you bought a house that is worth R1,5 million then you know you are going to pay higher rates. “But people in this area never bought their houses for that price, and only recently have our property values gone up. Since 2008 our rates have gone up between 500 to 600%.” Shaboodien puts the matter into perspective by saying: “It is the same as if the price of petrol were to go up from R10 to R50 in three years. People will suffer.” “According to the Rates Act we are millionaires, because our property is worth the same as regions like Camps Bay, but historically this has never been a rich or affluent area.” But Bryant disagrees with residents, and says that help is being given to them: “The City of Cape Town does provide a full rate rebate for those whose household income

is less than R3 000 per month, and a new special 50% rate rebate for those whose income is between R3 000 and R4 000 per month.” Bryant also goes on to say that many Bo-Kaap residents have still not made use of rebates available to them. “Of the 931 Bo-Kaap residential units, only 214 are currently receiving rebates on their rates. We would like to see as many people as possible applying for these rebates.” This might alleviate the financial burden that the increasing rates are placing on already cash-strapped residents, but for some it is just not enough to keep their ancestral homes. A couple, who wish to remain anonymous, have been living in the area for the past 23 years, and feel that it might be time to pack up. “Our rates went up from R300 to R1 600; we do not get a rebate and we just can’t afford it. We do not want to move, but recently we have started thinking about it. A lot of people have already sold their homes and pretty soon there will be no culture left in the area, just beautiful buildings.” A Cape Town property website, Legacy Estates, last week had 18 BoKaap homes listed for sale, with seven already sold. Another Cape Town property website, Remax, advertises the historic area to foreign buyers, saying that “Bo-Kaap has in recent times become extremely popular among property investors, and has developed into somewhat of a ‘renovator’s dream’, with many developers buying up and renovating old properties”. According to Hannah Deall, public relations and guest relations coordinator for Cape Town Tourism, a centuries-long history of mixed cultures has made the Cape Malay culture one that is exclusive to the Cape. “A visit to the area is an authentic experience of a historical way of life,” she says. “The Bo-Kaap does indeed contribute to tourism in Cape Town, as the home-grown culture draws

Open Day Wednesday 27 July

GHOST TOWN: Residents fear that the increasing rates will force them to move away, leaving behind their cultural heritage and empty holiday homes for the rich. Photos: Hanrie Bosch many visitors to the area. We do not believe that the cultural and historical Bo-Kaap will disappear, a people’s legacy remains here.” Bryant also feels that the area will never lose its cultural heritage. “The Bo-Kaap, along with its culture and heritage, is an intrinsic part of the City Bowl and of Cape Town as a whole, and I doubt very much that it will ever be lost.” Lorraine Gerrans, the acting director of Environmental Resource Management for the City of Cape Town, says: “One cannot imagine a Cape Town without Bo-Kaap. Clearly Bo-Kaap is very important in terms of its heritage value and the identity of Cape Town, but also in terms of it being valuable in its contribution to heritage tourism.” Shaboodien feels that statements like these are exactly at the heart of the matter. “The Bo-Kaap will indeed lose its culture if the people have to move out; there will be no soul without its people. “It is not the buildings that make the area special, but the people, and the local and national government should realise that before it is too late. “The change of Eastern Boulevard into Nelson Mandela Boulevard is very ironic. It is no use re-

naming the street if you do not have the spirit of Nelson Mandela and take care of your people.” The BKCA is currently in the process of taking the matter to a national level and are looking to talk with the National Treasury about having the Bo-Kaap declared a special rates area on historical grounds. Shaboodien has been fighting for better rates since 2008, and says “it is like fighting against a brick wall”. He does not know if the issue will be resolved in time to save the cultural heritage of the area. But still the rates issue lingers on, and each day as the call to prayer starts just before dawn, fewer and fewer Bo-Kaap residents are there to join in the daily ritual that has been part of the area for centuries. As one resident put it: “This is not just about the rates; this is about keeping our community together. Everyone knows everyone, and if we had to move we would not only lose our homes, but we would lose a part of ourselves ... This is our home.”

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Page 2 People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition

GENERAL

Dedicated Red Cross staff recognised ALMOST 60 employees of the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital have received awards for prolonged years of service to the Western Cape Department of Health. Three of the 56 recipients were recognised for 40

years of service, 17 received 30-year service awards and 25 were rewarded for 20 years of service, exclusively to Red Cross, and 11 for 20 years of service to the Western Cape Department of Health. . STALWART: Jeffrey Isaacs of Mitchell’s Plain (centre), re­ ceives his certificate for long service (40 years) from Western Cape Health MEC, Theuns Botha (right) and the Deputy Director­ General of Emergency Services, Dr Beth Engelbrecht. Isaacs started his career as a mason and labourer at the hospital in Febru­ ary 1971. He was promoted to general assistant in the 1980s, then to a messenger and eventu­ ally senior messenger in the 1990s. He retired in February this year. Photo: Supplied

VETERAN: Shirley Ad­ ams of Mitchell’s Plain (centre) re­ ceives her certificate for long service (40 years) from Western Cape Health MEC, Theuns Botha, (right) and the Deputy Direc­ tor­General of Emer­ gency Services, Dr Beth Engelbrecht. Photo: Supplied

ALL ROUNDER: Martha Brink of Rondebosch, receives her certificate for Long Service (40 years) from Western Cape Health MEC, The­ uns Botha, and the Deputy Director General of Emergency Services, Dr Beth Engelbrecht. Brink started out as student nurse at Tyger­ berg Hospital in 1971. She completed her mid­ wifery training at Frere Hospital where she worked from 1974 to 1975. She then worked at Swartland Hospital from 1976 until 1978 when she moved to Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital. She is currently employed as a specialist paediatric nurse in the cardiac ward. Brink is also a trained midwife and has training and nursing experience in theatre nursing, ICU nursing, trauma nursing and ear nose and throat nursing. Photo: Supplied

Tuesday 19 July 2011

The nasty electricity price shocker I’M beginning to think that Eskom employees and city councillors are too well paid to understand the impact of the electricity price increases. They talk in percentages but we pay in rands, lots of rands. And they have made it extremely difficult to make direct comparisons by changing the tariffs blocks, by using and then discarding daily service charges and changing the rules to use combinations of tariff blocks. It all makes the story about as confusing as a cellphone contract. To get an idea of the impact in real terms, I dug out some of my old electricity accounts so I now have the actual figures in black and white. They may not be completely representative but I’m doing the best I can. So here we go: In a 29-day period over July and August in 2008 I used 745 kWh or units of electricity. Before VAT that cost R425.48. At today’s tariffs the cost would be R815.80. So in three years the bill has almost doubled.Now if you’re a councillor earning about R30 000 a month for a part-time job, that is small potatoes. And if you chair a subcouncil or have risen to an exalted position on the Mayoral Committee, it is petty cash. And at Eskom, where the average salary is nearly R500 000 a year, it must be really difficult to understand why people are complaining. Now let’s look at where the money goes. To do that we need to know what the City pays for the electricity it buys from Eskom. In July 2008, Eskom’s average selling

price was 24.4 cents a unit, but Eskom has wholesale and retail customers and Cape Town, as one of the biggest wholesale customers, pays less than the average. We don’t know how much less, so 24.4 cents a unit is the best figure we have. So, in July 2008, my 745 units netted R181.78 for Eskom, and the City grabbed the other R243.37. Three years later Eskom’s average selling price is 50.37 cents, so its share of a bill for 745 units would be R375.26. The City will get the other R440.54. So the City is still getting more than half the money. We know that Eskom is spending massive amounts on new power stations, but what is the City doing with its share? The City’s distribution and service costs should be rising in line with inflation, but Eskom’s are rising in line with the inflated cost of their over-priced power stations. Last year, when Eskom tariffs went up by 26,3%, the National Energy Regulator said municipalities should increase their tariffs by just 15%. But Cape Town and the other municipalities more or less told Nersa to get knotted, and bumped up prices by 25% and more. Electricity is Cape Town’s biggest source of revenue. The City expects revenue of R8,1 billion from electricity sales this year, nearly twice as much as the R4,6 billion from property rates. So you can see just how profitable it is to use the Eskom increases as an excuse to hike our tariffs over and above what is reasonable. And we pay VAT on top of that!

Springbok support for Table Mountain

It’s time to get sewing

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CLOTEX has opened a technical support centre, the first of its kind in the Western Cape. The Technical Centre is based at MC Thompson in 170 Voortrekker Road, Maitland, and officially opened its doors on 16 August 2010. Clotex says the centre is needed to help small manufacturers and designers finish their

HE mighty Springboks have thrown their weight behind the campaign to have Table Mountain named one of the New Seven Wonders of Nature. “I promise we’ll win the World Cup if you promise to vote for Table Mountain,” said coach Peter de Villiers after members of the Springbok rugby squad pledged their support for Table Mountain and became official ambassadors for the Vote for Table Mountain campaign, on Monday 11 July. Table Mountain is in the running to be named one of the New Seven Wonders of Nature, a global election that predicts over a billion votes worldwide. South Africa’s flat-topped wonder needs to beat 27 other natural sites from around the world such as the Amazon River, the Grand Canyon and the Great Barrier Reef to make it into the final seven. The new Springbok ambassadors include Captain John Smit, Schalk Burger, Tendai “Beast” Mtawarira, Butch James, Bryan Habana, Jean de Villiers, Jaque Fourie, Andries Bekker, Morne Steyn, Jannie du Plessis, Gurthro Steenkamp and coach De Villiers. The Springboks will fly the Table Mountain flag high ahead of the Castle Tri-Nations tournament starting on 23 July in Sydney, Australia. Their support will continue through to the 2011 Rugby World Cup, where they will represent their country, and Table Mountain. “I urge all South Africans to put some time aside to vote for Table

garments professionally. The machinery at the Technical Centre can be booked either via email or telephone. There is fee of R30 for the maintenance of the machinery. For further details, contact Natasha Carelse at Clotex on (021) 637-3648 or fax (021) 637-3647 or email natasha@clotex.co.za.

Prostate cancer support

CHAMPIONS: Springbok captain John Smit shows his support for Table Mountain alongside New Seven Wonders Campaign Manager, Fiona Furey. Photo: Supplied Mountain,” said Smit. An independent impact report, conducted by Grant Thornton, has predicted an R1,4 billion annual tourism bonanza for South Africa if Table Mountain is named one of the New Seven Wonders of Nature. “South Africans have to make sure that our flat-topped wonder makes it into the final seven. It’s a once-in-a lifetime opportunity

to create a legacy, an opportunity that we can’t ignore – there will never be another election like it. Once the final seven are decided, that’s it,” says Sabine Lehmann, chairperson of the Table Mountain Bid Committee. To see a full list of celebrity ambassadors, and to vote for Table Mountain, visit www.votefortablemountain.com or SMS “table” to 34874.

THE Prostate Cancer Support Action group will meet at 17:45 for 18:00 on Tuesday 19 July in the auditorium of the Constantiaberg Medi-Clinic, Burnham Road, Plumstead. Newly-diagnosed patients and their partners or carers from all

over the Cape Metro are welcome to attend, meet prostate cancer survivors, and share details of their experience. Conray Moolman will talk on new drug therapy for advanced prostate cancer. Phone 073 560 3067 for more information.

Help at hand

loneliness, as well as advice on how to positively change your situation. All are welcome and for no cost. The group takes place at College of Cape Town Campus, 31 Broad Road, Wynberg. For further information, contact Glenda at 076 626 1024 or el-shaddaifamily@telkomsa.net.

SINGLE parents seeking constructive advice and support are welcome to join Dr Lesly Uys and the Single Parent Group “In Their Shoes” on July 23 from 09:00 to 11:30. Discussion will focus on the effects of depression, despair and

A SHARK’S hunger can be satisfied with one good meal. The meal can last a long time, because a shark uses little energy to swim. Some sharks hold food in their stomachs without it being digested. If they eat a big meal, it can last three or more months. – (www.thinkquest.org)


NEWS

Tuesday 19 July 2011

People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition Page 3

Cape Town leads by green example HANRIE BOSCH

The City of Cape Town has been crowned runner-up in the Department of Environmental Affairs’ Cleanest Metro Competition for 2009/10. This is the third year in a row that the City has finished in the top three. In 2006/07 Cape Town managed to win the title and in 2007/08 took third place. But all Capetonians can help to make a difference and to bring the title back to Cape Town next year by making well-informed green choices. Jacques du Toit, of the City of Cape Town’s Strategy and Planning Department, says: “The competition is about more than just having a clean city, it is about working smartly with our limited resources. We appeal to residents to start living smartly.” As the runner-up, the city has won R750 000, but no cash changes hands, as the City has to create specific projects in

line with the Department of Environmental Affairs’ Expanded Public Works Programme criteria. And the City has opted to “lead by example” by installing energy-efficient solar water heating and lighting devices in fire stations, nature reserves and areas of its 44 Wale Street building. “The City cannot tell its residents to conserve energy and resources if we are not doing it, so we have opted to install these energy-efficient devices in public areas.” According to Du Toit, nature reserves in the area are extremely cash-strapped and it makes economic sense to install energy-efficient fittings to help them conserve energy and save money. “People will also be able to immediately notice the change, and this will reinforce the City’s attempt to encourage energy-efficient living.” “The more the public embraces these initiatives and go green, the better chance we have of winning the title next year.”

EQUAL RIGHTS: Pupils and pressure group Equal Education camped outside Parliament from Tues­ day 12 July to Wednesday 13 July, braving the cold in an attempt to get Minister of Basic Education, Angie Motshekga, to sign an agreement on norms and standards for schools infrastructure. They say this will allow all public schools to have the same standards in terms of resources, infrastruc­ ture and basic facilities, such as running water and proper toilets. Photo: Jaco Marais

Two arrested for possession of stolen laptop

LEADING THE WAY: Cape Town has been crowned runner­up in the 2009/2010 Cleanest Metro Competition, and energy­efficient devices will be installed around the city. Photo: Hanrie Bosch

Last chance to buy beanies in support of The Beardly Bunch TODAY is the last day to purchase a coupon for two beanies in support of the Beards for Beanies campaign. The Beardly Bunch aims to raise funds for the GOGO Trust, an NGO that supports elderly unemployed people. Steve van Aardt, co-founder of The Beardly Bunch, said: “We would like to encourage people to buy their beanies on Dealify.com

and show your support by buying a beanie for someone in need during these cold and harsh winter months.” The cost of the beanies is R160, and includes packaging and post. All proceeds go towards the GOGO Trust. For more information on The Beardly Bunch, contact Steve van Aardt on 083 409 7047.

Hospice Women’s Day brunch JOIN St Luke’s Hospice for a fund-raising brunch at the Belmont Square Conference Centre, Rondebosch on Tuesday 9 August to celebrate Women’s Day. The brunch will be hosted by Charmaine Noy, Tracey Foulkes and other surprise guest speakers. The event starts at 10:30 and continues until 13:00.

Smooth sailing THE internationally-acclaimed sailor and polar region adventurer, Skip Novak, will be giving a special talk on sailing and adventuring in polar regions and the effects of global warming in the Antarctic, prior to the Cape of Good Hope

Tickets cost R200 per person or R2 000 for a table of 10. Each guest receives a jampacked goodie bag, delicious treats, and a raffle and lucky draw will take place. Visit the website www.stlukes.co.za or contact (021) 797-5335 or email fundraising@stlukes.co.za to make bookings. Bookings close on Wednesday 3 August. SPCA’s AGM on Thursday July 21 at the SPCA, corner of 1st Avenue and First Road in Grassy Park. The talk will start at 13:30, followed by the SPCA AGM at 15:00 and light refreshments will be served. Booking is essential. Contact Claudia on (021) 700-4157/41 for further information.

TWO men between the age of 22 and 24 appeared in the Cape Town Magistrate’s Court yesterday (Monday), for possession of stolen property. According to Warrant Officer Bheki Xulu, spokesperson for the Sea Point Police Station, the men allegedly used a remote control to open a car on Thursday 14 July at about 23:40 in Regent Road, Sea Point. “The men stole a laptop out of the car’s boot, and police were alerted to the incident shortly afterwards. Police blocked all taxis in the Sea Point area and soon found the two men with the stolen laptop.” Xulu is concerned about the use of remote controls to break into cars, and to gain entry into houses and complexes with electric gates. “During the previous week, one man was found inside a car during a break in and he was found in possession of a gate remote for the property. Lately, we are experiencing similar sort of cases

whereby vehicles are broken into without any force being used.” Xulu also adds that in some cases it is not clear whether owners forget to lock their cars, which are then broken in to, or whether criminals have special remote controls and electronic devices. He urges community members to always be on the lookout when closing and opening electric gates, and to ensure that their cars are properly locked by physically checking them. “Car break ins is a problem in the area, and we urge the community to do their part by locking their doors and removing all valuable items from their cars.”


GENERAL

Page 4 People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition

Tuesday 19 July 2011

F1 fillip for economy ANDRE BAKKES

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HE possibility exists that Cape Town could be hosting a Formula 1 Grand Prix within the next two to three years. The economic spin-offs are expected to greatly benefit the entire Western Cape, but the precise location of the race is far from finalised. One of the three possible venues is a Monaco-style race track that will wind its way past 5,3 kilometres of iconic Cape Town landmarks, such as the V&A Waterfront, Cape Town Stadium and Table Bay Harbour. The route will start and end in the stadium, and will wind through the streets of Green Point, Sea Point and Mouille Point. The chairperson of the Green Point Ratepayers’ and Residents’ Association (GPRRA), Bob Goebel, is however, totally against it being held at this venue.“I’m speaking on my own behalf,” he says. The GPRRA will only discuss their official stance this Wednesday. “I object due to three reasons. First, the infrastructure around the stadium, Beach and Bay roads is built to reduce speed to 40km/h because it is a pedestrian-friendly area - up to 12 000 people go to the park on a weekly basis. My second objection comes down to ecology. Twenty thousand litres of fuel gas per race will be spewed into the atmosphere. Thirdly, the noise levels would be amplified up the hill because the whole Green Point is really a giant amphitheatre,” he warns. Peo-

ple’s Post will reveal GPRRA’s formal objections in the near future. The other two bids involve new tracks being built at the airport or near Atlantis on the West Coast. Even though much has to be agreed upon before a race of such magnitude can be held on these shores, CEO of Cape Town Routes Unlimited, Calvyn Gilfellan, says a Formula 1 race in the region can be compared to the World Cup in terms of tourism – the only difference being that the Grand Prix is a yearly event. “It will be more sustainable than the World Cup, and would undoubtedly be a huge injection into the tourist industry,” he says. “Also, like the World Cup, it would present immediate spin-offs. Work would be created, but the flip-side is of course that there would have to be huge investments from the public sector,” continues Gilfellan. “I don’t watch the sport myself, but I know Capetonians are very interested in motorsport.” Regional chairperson of Motorsport SA Western Cape, Joyce Dolinschek, verifies this notion. “I work with interested youngsters every day, and they all want to be the next Sebastian Vettel. It is the pinnacle for all youngsters to aspire to. Our locals love all kinds of motorsport,” she confirms, before adding that it would be “brilliant” for the sport. According to Dolinschek, it would also create a valuable opportunity for 18 to 26year-old “petrol heads” in Cape Town to leave their illegal and dangerous “drifting” fasci-

One of the bids involves a Monaco­style race track in Cape Town’s streets. nation behind once they saw how professionally the sport was run and how many safety precautions went into a race. Councillor Grant Pascoe, Mayoral Committee Member for Tourism, Events and Marketing for the City of Cape Town, applied the brakes ever so slightly when he recently said: “There is a long road ahead before this can be realised. The City has not yet been approached with a proposal to host the Formula 1 Grand Prix in Cape Town. We will only consider the prospect of hosting the event once we have been presented with a proposal. It will then have to go through all council processes, including public participation, to ensure that the views of the local residents are taken into consideration.” People’s Post took to the streets to find out how residents feel about hosting the richest, and loudest, sport in the world, and the idea was met with rea-

Photo: Supplied

sonable enthusiasm. Harry Berry is a local Sea Point resident who says that he is ready for the noise and excitement of a Formula 1 race on his doorstep. “It’s the best thing in the world to bring the Formula 1 here. It is a world-class event that will be very good for the area and for the entire South Africa.” Cedric Stuurman feels that the noise from the event will not matter to the local residents, as there are far more advantages than disadvantages. “A lot of people in Cape Town will enjoy this event, and it will also bring in a lot of tourists.” However, Pat Waddle says that she has some “mixed feelings” about the Formula 1 coming to her doorstep. “I think it is great, but I also think that there will be a lot of opposition due to the noise, but I do not really mind as it will be a great boost for the area and I would definitely go and watch it!”

Residents eager to host world’s loudest sport HANRIE BOSCH

ATLANTIC SEABOARD residents can look forward to driving on Formula 1-standard roads by September 2013 if plans are approved to bring the loudest sport in the world to Cape Town. The proposed Monaco-style racing track will wind its way past 5,3 km of iconic Cape Town landmarks, such as the V&A Waterfront, Cape Town Stadium and Table Bay Harbour. The route will start and end in the Cape Town stadium, and will also make its way through the streets of Green Point, Sea Point and Mouille Point. People’s Post took to the streets to find out how residents feel about hosting the richest, and loudest, sport in the world, and surprisingly the idea was met with overwhelming enthusiasm by local residents. Harry Berry is a local Sea Point resident who says that he is ready for the noise and excitement of a Formula 1 race on his doorstep. “It’s the best thing in the world to bring the Formula 1 here. It is a world-class event that will be very good for the area and for the entire South Africa.

Harry Ber­ ry can’t wait to have the world’s loudest sport on his door­ step. Photos:

Victor Ndala­ ma wants For­ mula 1 to come to Cape Town in order to show the world the city’s beauty.

Constanza Colorito feels that this type of event will do a lot for Cape Town’s in­ ternational status.

Jaco Swanepoel wants more foreign visi­ tors to come to Cape Town in or­ der to get a taste of South Afri­ ca.

Town needs an event like this to showcase its abundance of natural beauty to the world. “It will be a mind-opener for the rest of the world to have such an event here, and I think that everyone here will be up for the noise for a few days in order to show the world what we have.” Councillor Grant Pascoe, Mayoral Committee Member for Tourism, Events and Marketing, said that the City had not yet been approached with a proposal, but that hosting such an event was in line with the City’s goal to establish Cape Town as the events capital of South Africa. “Events of this magnitude bring huge benefits for all Capetonians in the form of tourist rands spent in our city, increased exposure, and investment in the city.”

Constanza Colorito agrees with this statement, and feels that this type of event will do a lot for Cape Town’s international status. “It is very good for Cape Town, as it will bring more tourists and it will boost the economy.” Jaco Swanepoel is also excited to have the world get a taste of South African culture and food. “This area does not differ much from other coastal countries like Monaco and Brazil, and it will give foreign visitors a chance to experience a taste of South African culture and food. This area is beautiful and the world needs to experience it.” Henderson admitted that they were concerned about how residents would react to having the world’s loudest sport on their doorstep. Residents in the area needed

to be taken into consideration before the plans could be taken further. Cedric Stuurman feels that the noise from the event will not matter to the local residents, as there are far more advantages than disadvantages. “A lot of people in Cape Town will enjoy this event, and it will also bring in a lot of tourists, so the noise really will not matter during such a festive event.” However, Pat Waddle says that she has some “mixed feelings” about the Formula 1 coming to her doorstep. “I think it is great, but I also think that there will be a lot of opposition due to the noise, but I do not really mind as it will be a great boost for the area and I would definitely go watch it!”

Hanrie Bosch

“I love the noise of the Harleys when they drive down the road, and I will love to have the roar of Formula One cars in the area.” The Cape Town Grand Prix Bid Company has proposed the innercity street circuit, and is one of three companies that will be presenting their plans to Formula 1 boss, Bernie Ecclestone, in the next few months. Spokesperson, Esther Henderson, said that the Monacostyle racing track was proposed for Cape Town due to its “sexy location”. “This location will immediately identify Cape Town and showcase what we have to offer to the world. It will help to position Cape Town even further as a world-class tourist destination.” Atlantic Seaboard resident, Victor Ndalama, also feels that Cape

City recruiting lifeguards IN the depths of winter, the City of Cape Town is already readying itself for the upcoming summer/festive season – with a special focus on public swimming pools. There are currently 300 temporary vacancies across the City’s 36 public swimming pools. According to the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Community Services, Councillor Tandeka Gqada, the City has a proud record of safety at all its municipal swimming pools. “Trained and competent lifeguards are one of the most critical requirements for safety at our swimming pools. I would like to encourage adults and youths who meet the criteria to apply as soon as possible so as not to lose out on this temporary employment opportunity.” The most important role of a lifeguard is to save people’s lives, but lifeguards also play an important role in teaching others about water safety. The City is starting its lifeguard recruitment process as early as

possible to avoid swimming pools opening late. The process is a rigorous one, as there is further training and testing for the prospective lifeguard candidates. Each lifeguard has to meet requirements according to the qualifying standard as per the Lifesaving South Africa Certificate, and must be: . In possession of a Grade 10 certificate or 18 months’ relevant lifesaving experience. . Physically fit and able-bodied; and . Able to swim 100m within two minutes in a swimming pool. Only suitably-qualified individuals will be considered. Applications opened on 7 July and will close on 22 July. Application forms can be collected at the City of Cape Town, 2nd floor, Concourse Level, Civic Centre. Alternatively, phone (021) 400-2203 for further details. Application forms can also be obtained from the City’s website, www.capetown.gov.za/lifeguards.


NEWS

Tuesday 19 July 2011

People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition Page 5

Section of Old Marine Drive considered for pedestrian plaza HANRIE BOSCH

A PLAN to cordon off a section of Old Marine Drive to create a pedestrian plaza is being discussed as part of the City of Cape Town’s plans to promote and develop public transport and non-motorised transport in the city centre. The plan will see a section of Old Marine Drive, just before the turn-off into Civic Road, being closed off and reserved for IRT buses, non-motorised transport and pedestrians. According to ward councillor, Dave Bryant, this development would do a lot to improve inner city congestion and parking problems. “That entire area is very congested with buses, taxis and pedestrians, and on the other side of the traffic circle you have the taxi rank.” “A pedestrian plaza here would be one more way in which the City can give dignity to people who walk and cycle,” says Elias Tukushe, head of Non-Motorised Transport for the City. “Walking and cycling must be safe and convenient, as these are modes of transport everyone uses, and deserve the same status that we give to motorised transport.”

Maddie Mazaza, director of Transport for the City, said: “The closure of the road and the need to promote public transport and nonmotorised transport is the key priority that the City has adopted in order to improve access and mobility for people and the need to reduce use of the private car.” Bryant also adds that a development like this would do wonders for the environment. “From a green point of view this would cut down on Cape Town’s carbon emissions and fuel consumption.” A recent public participation meeting on the matter also gave positive feedback from the community, except for one foreseen problem, according to Bryant. “The only concerns that were raised were that of parking in the area, but everybody was assured that only about 20 bays would be removed. And these are mostly drop-off zones.” According to the City’s current plans, only 22 short-term parking bays would be removed, while the other 253 parking bays in front of the Civic Centre would still remain in the area. Members of the City Bowl Ratepayers’ Association (CIBRA) also discussed the matter during a re-

Only parking concerns have been raised

JIVING WITH MADIBA: The puppets from ZA News celebrated Madiba’s 93rd birthday at the South African Jewish Museum yesterday. This event also coincided with cartoon legend Jonathan Shapiro’s exhibition, enti­ tled “Jiving with Madiba”. Shapiro is better known as Zapiro. cent meeting, and chairperson, Barry Smith, said: “The committee members felt that such a closure would present few problems. Their main concern was traffic safety, and they hoped that it would be carefully considered and satisfactorily implemented.” Mazaza said that the plans are still a long way from being realised, and it would still be a while before the project would be implemented,

as there are still numerous procedures that need to be followed. She could not give an exact date for the project to be implemented. “Implementation of the plan depends on the outcome of the public participation process and comments from the public. If there are no objections, then a detailed design of the project needs to be undertaken.” She also added

that “average persons travelling and working in the CBD will be able to safely walk to any mode of public transport of their choice and connect to the preferred destinations”, once the plans are implemented.


Page 6 People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition

GENERAL A TALENT TO ASTOUND: Nathan Adriaanse of the Afri­ ka Ablaze Dance Company is bending over backwards to raise enough funds by the end of the week in order to go to Las Vegas in the USA and represent South Africa at a hip hop dance competi­ tion. This weekend Adri­ aanse instructed a handful of interested youngsters in the audacious art of break­ dancing at Wynberg High School in a last­ditch effort to raise the R3 000 short­ fall. Jaws dropped as he pulled one spectacular move after another. Anyone who can help him in his quest to astonish America can con­ tact Glenda Jones on 082 669 1670.

JOYOUS: Some of the children from Parkwood waiting in line to receive food.Photo: Lil­ lian Amos

Feeding Parkwood for over a decade LILLIAN AMOS

T

HE congregation of the Christian Assembly Church, also known as “Almal se kerk”, has been feeding the community of Parkwood for the past 11 years. Bishop Edward Peter Clark, and his wife, Bridgett Clark, started the feeding scheme with the help of the congregation. The scheme is funded by the members of the congregation. Every Sunday, members give an offering, and this money is then used to buy food to feed between 700 and 800 people of the community weekly. Every Thursday, men, women and children form a line that leads out of the gate, to receive a meal. David Williams, who lives a few streets away from the church, has been fetching food at the church for eight years. He says: “I am unemployed and I have two children. My children and I fetch food every week. “It is such a relief to know that at least every Thursday me and my children will get a meal to eat. I am thankful that this church is able to do this for our community.” Asked what his motivation was, Clark says: “It is useless if I stand there on the pulpit every Sunday preaching the word of God when the community around me is struggling to get by and I’m not doing any-

...........................Photo: Andre Bakkes

thing.” The women who work in the kitchen (also members of the congregation) start preparing the food from 07:00 every Thursday morning. Clark says: “I am extremely grateful for these women who give up their time and energy to make food for these people.” The congregation is also planning to launch workshops to help the community deal with socio-economic issues. The programmes will include gangsterism, teen pregnancy, TB and HIV/Aids. Another workshop they want to launch before the festive season is on debt counselling. Clark says: “A lot of people get so caught up in the festive spirit, and they spend way more than what they can afford over this period. We want to teach them how to manage their money properly so that they don’t have unnecessary debt.” Ward councillor, Melanie Arendse, is ecstatic about the progress the church has made over the years. She says: “I wish there were more people like him (Bishop Clark) who can help this poverty-stricken community.” The church is also looking into starting a youth movement in the area. The church is currently working with the funds they get from the congregation, but is asking that anybody who is able to contribute towards the scheme contact Bishop Clark on (021) 705-3419 or 082 703 4744.

Solidarity for the animals CAPE TOWN’S animal welfare organisations have joined forces to create the Western Cape Animal Welfare Forum – an umbrella body that will speak for, advocate and lobby on behalf of the member organisations. At a meeting held at the Animal Rescue Organisation’s Headquarters in Ottery on Thursday 23 June, it was collectively decided by those present to formalise and better regulate the activities of the previously informally constituted Animal Welfare Forum. In doing so, the organisation hopes to create a unified, collective voice for Cape Town’s animals – by those groups dedicated to their well-being and protection. Members of the Animal Welfare Forum include the Cape of Good Hope SPCA (CoGH SPCA), Animal Rescue Organisation (ARO), Animal Anti-Cruelty League (AACL), Animal Welfare Society Stellenbosch (AWSS), Animal Welfare Society Helderberg (AWSH), The Emma Animal Rescue Society (TEARS), The Cart Horse Protection Association, Mdzananda Animal Clinic, Township Animal Rescue (TAR), African Tails, Animal Issues Matter (AIM) and Aniwell. “The forum is made up of like-minded animal welfare organisations, which represent thousands of South Africans whose support

STEELE, a five-year-old neutered, tall border collie, has been missing since 18 May from Table Mountain. He was wearing a blue collar with an ID tag and is micro-chipped. He is a much-loved pet and his family is desperate to get him back home safely. “His disappearance has left a gaping hole in our lives. His four-legged friends have also lost the wag in their tails and are forlorn without him,” they say. If you see a stray dog with similar markings, please call the family, or take him to any vet for a free ID scan (he is very friendly). If seen or found, please call Diane or Gavin on 083 777 8058 or 083 787 9224. A reward is offered for Steele’s safe return.

Groote Schuur Hospital, Observatory

Administration Clerk (Finance) Remuneration: R 94 575 per annum. Service benefits: 13th cheque, employer’s contribution to the pension fund, housing and medical aid allowance. Requirements: Minimum educational qualification: Senior Certificate (or equivalent) with Mathematics or Accountancy as a passed subject or Senior Certificate (or equivalent) with appropriate experience in BAS/SYSPRO and Sundry’s Credit Environment. Competencies (knowledge/skills): • Knowledge of Public Finance Management Act • Knowledge of BAS • Knowledge of supplier reconciliations • Good communication skills (written and verbal) in at least two of three official languages of the Western Cape • Computer literacy (MS Word, Excel). Duties (key result areas/outputs): • Make payments to suppliers for goods and services and make payments on Syspro as well as capturing invoices • Ensure that suppliers charge as per tender or quotation • Request documentation to pay suppliers on time and that invoices are paid within 30 days • Ensure that credits are passed for goods that have been returned and that discounts are taken timeously • Make manual payment on Syspro • Reconcile monthly supplier statements • Follow up payments made to suppliers that are not credited. Enquiries: Mr MI Hamied: 021 404-2253. Please submit your application stating the name of the publication and the date on which you saw the advertisement (candidates may also use this as reference) for the attention of Ms J Joos to the Chief Executive Officer, Groote Schuur Hospital, Private Bag X4, Observatory 7935.

Closing date: 12 August 2011.

Human Communications C92747

Applications must be submitted on a Z83 form, obtainable from any Public Service Department, and should be accompanied by certified copies of qualifications, Curriculum Vitae and the names of three referees. It will be expected of candidates to be available for selection interviews on a date, time and place as determined by the Department. Kindly note that excess personnel will receive preference. The Department of Health is guided by the principles of Employment Equity. Disabled candidates are encouraged to apply and an indication in this regard will be appreciated.

LOST: Steele went missing on Table Moun­ tain on 18 May.

Blisters for bread fun walk

As directed by the Department of Public Service & Administration, applicants must note that further checks will be conducted once they are short-listed and that their appointment is subject to positive outcomes on these checks, which include security clearance, qualification verification, criminal records, credit records and previous employment.

WESTERN CAPE

enables these individual organisations to make a substantial difference in the lives of thousands of animals. “We have come together as one body, as we are jointly concerned about pet over-population and the importance of sterilisation, the desperate need for veterinary care services to impoverished communities, and how to maximise the use of our scarce resources whilst not detracting from each member’s individual identity and brand,” says Animal Welfare Forum chairperson, Dr Yvonne Robson. All the partners agreed to respect one another’s differences and to subscribe to a pre-determined set of principles and standards, which will be regulated and governed by an elected chairperson, who will serve an annual term. It is hoped that by formalising the activities of this umbrella body, other similarlyminded organisations will join and strengthen the forum’s voice and influence. “The Animal Welfare Forum will develop its own identity, aims and objectives, which will dove-tail with the activities of its existing and future partners, and will in no way dilute their identity, brand or wield undue influence over each partner’s core business activity or ethos,” Robson says.

Steele still missing

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT

Tuesday 19 July 2011

THE annual Blisters for Bread Family Fun Walk is happening on Sunday 28 August. The walk has become one of the highlights on the Cape Town calendar, attracting thousands of walkers in support of combating hunger in school learners. Each walker participating will feed 16 children through their R30 entry fee.

Enter online at www.psfa.org.za. The event starts and ends at Green Point Cricket Club, and there are three walking distances: 5km, 10km and 18km. The closing date for individual entries is 14 August and for group entries 7 August. For more details about the event, call (021) 511-7130.

Donate to Tears

needed, valuable items can change the lives of many animals.” Goods can be dropped at Harry Goeman’s Shopping Centre, Bergvliet and the Nieuport Building, Recreation Road, Fish Hoek, or to the Tears office in Lekkerwater Road, Sunnydale, Fish Hoek. If you would like Tears to collect, call Marge Kruyt on (021) 7857014 or email marge@tears.org.za.

THERE will be two auctions, hosted by The Emma Animal Rescue Society (Tears) this year to raise much-needed funds for their shelter. The organisation says it is time to spring clean cupboards and donate unwanted gifts to Tears. “Your no-longer-


GENERAL

PROUDLY South African launched their 93 000 Jobs for Mandela Day campaign on Saturday 16 July. The campaign was launched in association with selected Media 24 titles, which currently comprises 57 community papers, and The Witness and Die Burger newspapers. The 93 000 Jobs for Mandela Day campaign aims to drive job creation through guiding and mobilising state organs, the business sector and citizens on how they can assist in creating 93 000 jobs for Mandela from his 93rd to 94th birthday year. “And how will we do this?” asks Herbert Mkhize, acting CEO of Proudly South African. “Just as we joined hands as a nation to host a successful 2010 FIFA World Cup, so we must join hands as a nation to create jobs for our people in South Africa. South African business, big and small, can make a start by procuring 50% of their daily consumables, products and services locally, while South Africans can start by filling their trolleys with at least 50% of locally-manufactured products and goods at their retail stores.

“We would like to also encourage all South Africans to start demanding to see more locally-produced products on the shelves in the various retail stores.” “In keeping with Madiba’s own approach in “Long Walk to Freedom”, a journey starts with a single step – and small steps in the right direction can create amazing results if we work together.” he says. Companies and South Africans wanting to make an official commitment to the campaign can register for the 93 000 Jobs for Mandela Day campaign via the Proudly SA website and become a friend of the Proudly SA 93 000 Jobs for Mandela Day Facebook page. Proudly South African will be monitoring and communicating progress with regards to this phenomenal job creations drive. Mkhize also reminded South Africans that consumers could also make a difference and support job creation by supporting local businesses. Proudly South African, in association with their selected Media 24 partners, will create a platform that will inform, educate and enable South Africans to actively contribute to job creation.

THESE BOOTS ARE MADE FOR WORK­ ING: Buccaneer School Shoes, a local school shoe manufacturer, donated 175 pairs of steel­toe worker boots to The Salvation Army for distribution to those in need. The Salvation Army’s Disaster Management Centre in Wyn­ berg were the recipients on 21 June. Paul Issa, one of the owners of Bucca­ neer Shoes, says that they hope these boots will help men who are looking for work in demanding environments such as construction sites or manufacturing factories – anywhere that is physically taxing. Captain Alan Kay, of The Salva­ tion Army responded to the generous donation by saying: “We are extremely grateful to Buccaneer Shoes. Likewise we are always grateful for any assistance received towards those in need and hope that the Bucanneer challenge to Cape manufacturers receives a warm response and positive outcome for Western Cape charity organisations.” Photo: Supplied

Solidarity for Cape Town’s animals CAPE TOWN’S animal welfare organisations have joined forces to create the Western Cape Animal Welfare Forum – an umbrella body that will speak for, advocate and lobby on behalf of the member organisations. At a meeting held at the Animal Rescue Organisation’s Headquarters in Ottery recently, it was collectively decided by those present to formalise and better regulate the activities of the previously informally constituted Animal Welfare Forum. In doing so, the organisation hopes to create a unified, collective voice for Cape Town’s animals – by those groups dedicated to their well-being and protection. Members of the Animal Welfare Forum include the Cape of Good Hope SPCA (CoGH SPCA), Animal Rescue Organisation (ARO), Animal Anti-Cruelty League (AACL),

Animal Welfare Society Stellenbosch (AWSS), Animal Welfare Society Helderberg (AWSH), The Emma Animal Rescue Society (TEARS), The Cart Horse Protection Association (CHPA), Mdzananda Animal Clinic, Township Animal Rescue (TAR), African Tails, Animal Issues Matter (AIM) and Aniwell. “The forum is made up of likeminded animal welfare organisations, which represent thousands of South Africans whose support enables these individual organisations to make a substantial difference in the lives of thousands of animals. “We have come together as one body, as we are jointly concerned about pet over-population and the importance of sterilisation, the desperate need for veterinary care services to impoverished communities, and how to maximise the use of our scarce resources whilst not

detracting from each member’s individual identity and brand,” says Animal Welfare Forum chairperson, Dr Yvonne Robson. All the partners agreed to respect one another’s differences and to subscribe to a pre-determined set of principles and standards, which will be regulated and governed by an elected chairperson, who will serve an annual term. It is hoped that by formalising the activities of this umbrella body, other similarly-minded organisations will join and strengthen the forum’s voice and influence. “The Animal Welfare Forum will develop its own identity, aims and objectives, which will dove-tail with the activities of its existing and future partners, and will in no way dilute their identity, brand or wield undue influence over each partner’s core business activity or ethos,” Robson says.

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People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition Page 7

LA BELLE RD

Tuesday 19 July 2011

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Page 8 People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition

GENERAL

Tuesday 19 July 2011

A FRIENDLY HAND: Gadija Basardiens (87) talks about memorable days gone by while volunteer Rehana Majal lis­ tens intently. Photos: Andre Bakkes

SINGING TO HER HEART’S CONTENT: Stella Wolhuter (85) makes up for her lack of eyesight with a singing voice that moves the world.

ON THEIR TOES: “Domino convener” Amien Nieftagodien (80) plays dominoes with some of the residents on a regular basis.

Well­wishers provide a silver lining ANDRE BAKKES

N

EARLY every morning the angelic voice of 85-year-old Stella Wolhuter fills the halls of Beit-ul-Aman Home for the Aged. “Oh what a beautiful morning, oh what a beautiful day, we are so blessed and contented, everything’s coming our way,” she sings. Her uninhibited proclamation is contagious, and soon everyone within earshot hums the tune to themselves. The 72 residents have been given a chance to live out their golden years in relative comfort. Most of these frail residents are of the Islamic faith, so the home is run on Islamic principles, though it prides itself on being multi-cultural. Beit-ul-Aman has been serving the community since 1979, and was initially created to provide specialised care for Muslims in particular, since there wasn’t a similar place for poorer seniors to go to. Thirty years later and the home is still the only facility of its kind in the Western Cape. As a result, the demand for residency is high, so the representatives of the home have

Smooth sailing THE internationally-acclaimed sailor and polar region adventurer, Skip Novak, will be giving a special talk on sailing and adventuring in polar regions and the effects of global warming in the Antarctic, prior

to first do house visits to see if there isn’t any other alternative for the person seeking accommodation. “We don’t want to be a dumping ground,” says Naadir Agherdien, the current chairperson of the board. “In our community there is a strong feeling that there shouldn’t be old age homes, since the family must take care of them, but these days it is difficult. Some even forget about our elders.” Living life in the fast lane has its drawbacks – the most tragic of these is that many families can also not give the necessary care to its oldest members. The options for those who need special care is very limited, especially if they are Muslim. While Beit-ul-Aman receives a monthly grant from the Department of Social Development, it mostly relies on donations from the general public to help make ends meet and keep its doors open to those in need. Their operational costs alone are more than R1 million rand a year, so these donations are essential for the running of the haven. “The average shortfall for operational expenses comes to about R80 000 or R90 000 a month,” says Agherdien, before adding that they have to raise the money themselves by to the Cape of Good Hope SPCA’s AGM on Thursday July 21 at the SPCA, corner of 1st Avenue and First Road in Grassy Park. The talk will start at 13:30, followed by the SPCA AGM at 15:00 and light refreshments will be served. Booking is essential. Contact Claudia on (021) 700-4157/41 for further information.

Early medicine of the Cape THE Friends of Welgemeend and Boerneef Art Collection will host a talk by Prof Jacques de Villiers on “The Early Medicine of the Cape”. The talk will take place on Monday 25 July at 19:30 at the Welgemeend Manor House in Gardens, Cape Town, on the corner of Lingen and Welgemeend

Street. The talk will be in English and the power point annotations of the unique visual material in Afrikaans. Members pay R20 and nonmembers R25. RSVP to welgemeend@gmail.com or SMS Helena le Roux on 082 461 9753.

SMME breakfast meeting notice THE next SMME meeting at the Central Library will be held on Thursday 21 July at 07:15 to 09:00 in the Old Drill Hall, at the corner of Darling and Parade streets in Cape Town. Lorna Powe, of Sales Partners Rosebank, will talk on “Business Building and The Six Necessary Steps to Every Effective Sales Process”. Powe has worked with blue chip companies such as Old Mu-

tual, Media24, Mobil Oil, CSC and Clicks Group, both in South Africa and Europe. There will be a light buffetstyle breakfast and networking opportunity prior to the talk, which starts at 7:40am. There is a charge of R15, payable at the entrance. To book, phone (021) 467-1542, SMS 083 539 8442 or email kathleen.laishley@capetown.gov.za.

having at least one fundraising event a month. The next fundraiser is a golf day in October, a popular event and a highlight on their calendar. In 2009 the home very nearly had to close its doors, since the economic downturn saw donations drying up. The Oasis Crescent Fund Trust intervened not a moment too soon, and stepped in to make a generous donation of R1 million. This ensured that the home could build up a reserve of funds, but they are always in need of help from the community. Agherdien says many old age homes have not been completely fire-compliant, so after one home was ravaged a few months ago, all were ordered to bring in sweeping changes. They must now become compliant by the end of July or August, which means they must dip into that reserve fund. It will set them back about R300 000. This is just a once-off payment, but their biggest expense is for adult nappies. All of this just serves as extra motivation for their valiant sponsors, who will undoubtedly come to the home’s rescue once again, says Agherdien. Its dependence on the private sector is the

lifeblood of the home, since companies have to date not followed the sterling example set by Oasis or the well-wishers within the community. Funds are, of course, not the only thing the residents need. Some of them have no family to speak of, and become desperately lonely. Volunteers come in to keep them company, but there is always space for more. On 1 July superintendent Zulphaa Hassen was appointed, but apart from her, the staff is almost solely made up of contracted volunteers. “The need for volunteers will continue, but they can’t run the place. So there is a need for qualified personnel to address the residents’ needs. Now with Zulphaa, most of this will be managed and we will run the place better,” says Agherdien. On Mandela Day (yesterday July 18), Islamic Relief sent 10 doctors to the home to hold a health programme, and do some muchneeded exercises with the residents. Agherdien says he cannot thank donors enough, but in the same breath he implores everyone who can lend a hand to step forward and make a difference. Contact Beit-ul-Aman on (021) 761-1540.

Festive lunch on the cards THE Simon of Cyrene Anglican Church in Acacia Road in Parkwood Estate will be hosting a “Christmas in July” luncheon on Sunday 24 July at the Hyde Park Hall in Hyde Road.

The event is due to start at 12:45 for 13:00. The cost is R95 for adults and R45 for children under the age of 12. For more information, contact the parish office on (021) 705-6138.

An employment opportunity ON Thursday 14 July, a hundred otherwise-unemployed people took to Table Mountain National Park to pick up litter as part of the Make South Africa Work and MSR (an employment-creation NGO formerly known as Men on the Side of the Road) initiative. On the day workers cleaned three different areas, including Oude Kraal, Tafelburg Road and Signal Hill. “Today is going to help me provide some food for my family. I am very happy”, said Bulelani Mangaliso from Nyanga East, who was part of the project. Another unemployed man, Nosipho Njongo, said: “I have been in the township doing nothing. I am now happy that today I am working.” During the month of May MSR invited South Africans to make South Africa Work by donating R140 to cover one worker for a day. The money raised in the Cape is being used to employ workers to do basic maintenance and tidy up the mountain for the benefit of the whole community while combating unemployment.

HELPING HAND: Unemployed people from across the Cape got the opportuni­ ty to do their part for the community and earn some money.Photo: David Van der Lingen


GENERAL

Tuesday 19 July 2011

People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition Page 9

‘Make fashion, not war’ HANRIE BOSCH

P

UMEZA MKHONZA is excited by life and the unknown that comes upon waking every morning. She is driven by coffee and a dogmatic motivation to leave the world a better place than she found it. She is bored by news and conforming to other people’s views and standards, and moves to the beat of her own, fashionable, drum. Mkhonza is an up-and-coming local Cape Town designer who has just had her first fashion show at Cape Town Fashion Week. The self-proclaimed “vintage junkie and fashionista” and finalyear student at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology, is seemingly an over-achiever by nature. She matriculated by the age of 16, and made most of her friends’ matric dance dresses. It is no wonder that by the tender age of 21 this young designer has her head firmly planted on her vintage-clad shoulders. Born in the Eastern Cape and living in Cape Town for the past 17 years, Mkhonza finds her inspiration in the vibrant cityscape, and does not see her self living anywhere else in the world. Mkhonza was one of only 20 finalyear fashion students who were invited to showcase their work on Wednesday 13 July at the opening of Cape Town Fashion Week through the first ever Foschini African Fashion International (AFI) fast-track initiative for young designers. “We were told on a Friday that the people from Fashion Week would be coming to look at our designs on the following Monday. “I did not give it much thought, and just left my portfolio there and went off to my dentist appointment. When I got back on Monday I had been chosen to showcase my work.” Hundreds of photos, thousands of metres of fabric and two days later, Mkhonza is still a bit shell-shocked about having taken part in the biggest youth fashion platform in the country. “I had to work from January until just a few days before the Fashion Week show to get everything ready. It is still really amazing, but now I have to start taking my self seriously as a designer and make the most of this opportunity.” Not only is she an over-achiever, modest and talented, but she is also friendly and bubbly early in the morning, with no signs of fatigue from her big day – and not even

fashionably late. Sipping her coffee on the pavement of trendy Kloof Street, Mkhonza muses about the meaning of her fashion: “Fashion should mean something, that is why I chose the concept of ‘make fashion, not war’ for my collection.” “It is an eclectic mix of military and African influences that I have chosen to highlight all of the wars that are happening in Africa. I also chose this theme to show people that you do not need to be dripping in beads to be proudly African.” Clearly not one to conform to standards or norms, Mkhonza has shaven off all of her hair, tried her hand at drama and even expressed interest in politics and architecture, but ultimately fashion has stuck to her. “Fashion is truly my passion. You just can’t dress up a building as beautifully as a person.” Mkhonza has many muses and inspirations, ranging from coffee to supermodel Alex Wek, and numerous South Africans she would love to dress. “I have always been blunt, so maybe I should just throw my clothes at them. It would at least be exciting.” But when asked which politician she would love to dress, a naughty smile crossed her face: “I would design Julius Malema something that covers his mouth – tastefully of course.” And what exactly is Mkhonza’s secret to her design talent? “Before I start designing, I will wake up early, get ready, and then go back to sleep for another three hours, just to get the creative juices flowing you know. “There is just something about waking up just to sleep some more that I find very rewarding … and lots of Nik Naks.” Even though she did not walk away with the AFI Fast-track prize, Mkhonza has recently been approached by Elle magazine to showcase her truly authentic clothes, and she has also had a fashion spread in Drum magazine. When Mkhonza is not busy taking the fashion world by storm, she is hanging around her favourite spot in Cape Town, the Milnerton Market, or just going through the motions of being a “normal” student. Mkhonza has big plans for the future of the South African fashion scene. “I want to bring Vogue magazine to Cape Town, and launch a truly South African version of the brand, in order to have an internationallyacclaimed platform to showcase

HAUTE COUTURE: One of Pumeza Mkhonza’s designs that graced the Cape Town Fashion Week catwalk. Photos: Supplied

AFRO­MILITARY: Mkhonza used her fashion to show the world that “you do not need to be covered in beads to be African”.

FASHIONABLY POLITICAL: Mkhonza also used her range to highlight all the wars in Africa.

TALENTED: Pumeza Mkhonza feels that clothes should be a statement of who you are, “and a fashionable way of saying something”.

South African designers.” Fashion is a very fickle industry – “one day it is spots and the other day stripes” – but Mkhonza has some solid advice for up-and-coming local designers: “Shove your ideas in everyone’s faces. Knock on

doors. Sit in a boutique to observe people and get a feel for the industry. “Basically, just gate-crash … tastefully and stylishly of course. Don’t sit around and wait for Fashion Week. Get out there and get peo-

ple to wear your clothes.” Not one to sit around and wait, Mkhonza is sure to have the fashion world at her ever-so-stylish feet in no time at all, but the world will have to wait just a while longer, just until she finishes her studies.

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Page 10 People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition

IN IT TO WIN: Springbok coach, Peter de Vil­ liers becomes an ambassador for Table Moun­ tain.

GENERAL

CHAMPIONS: Springbok captain John Smit shows his support for Table Mountain along­ side New Seven Wonders Campaign Manag­ er, Fiona Furey. Photos: Supplied

Springbok support for Table Mountain T

HE mighty Springboks have thrown their weight behind the campaign to have Table Mountain named one of the New Seven Wonders of Nature. “I promise we’ll win the World Cup if you promise to vote for Table Mountain,” said coach Peter de Villiers after members of the Springbok rugby squad pledged their support for Table Mountain and became official ambassadors for the Vote for Table Mountain campaign, on Monday 11 July. Table Mountain is in the running to be named one of the New Seven Wonders of Nature, a global election that predicts over a billion votes worldwide. South Africa’s flattopped wonder needs to beat 27 other natural sites from around the world such as the Amazon River, the Grand Canyon and the Great Barrier Reef to make it into the final seven. The new Springbok ambassadors include Captain John Smit, Schalk Burger, Tendai “Beast” Mtawarira, Butch James, Bryan Habana, Jean de Villiers, Jaque Fourie, Andries Bekker, Morne Steyn, Jannie du Plessis, Gurthro Steenkamp and coach De Vil-

liers. The Springboks will fly the Table Mountain flag high ahead of the Castle TriNations tournament starting on 23 July in Sydney, Australia. Their support will continue through to the 2011 Rugby World Cup, where they will represent their country, and Table Mountain. “I urge all South Africans to put some time aside to vote for Table Mountain,” said Smit. An independent impact report, conducted by Grant Thornton, has predicted an R1,4 billion annual tourism bonanza for South Africa if Table Mountain is named one of the New Seven Wonders of Nature. “South Africans have to make sure that our flat-topped wonder makes it into the final seven. It’s a once-in-a lifetime opportunity to create a legacy, an opportunity that we can’t ignore – there will never be another election like it. Once the final seven are decided, that’s it,” says Sabine Lehmann, chairperson of the Table Mountain Bid Committee. To see a full list of celebrity ambassadors, and to vote for Table Mountain, visit www.votefortablemountain.com or SMS “table” to 34874.

Preparing for a month of unbroken fasting watching people stare at the different foods and cakes on display. “I AM actually nervous this year, because “I really just want to look more thin afI really like to eat a lot,” ter the fast, so that is maysays a confident 10-yearbe why I am so excited as old Imrah Isaacs from well,” says Isaacs. Kensington. She says last year she Isaacs was asked for found certain days to be her opinion of the month “very difficult but chalof Ramadaan, which lenging”, and is looking starts in early August. forward to getting her perIsaacs started fasting manent fasting days off to “on and off” last year, a good start. sharing the days beAccording to Isaacs, she tween whole day and sees the fast as being the half day. ideal opportunity to mainShe attends Pinelands tain “your body and forget Primary – “the blue about eating”. school” – and “loves eat- LITTLE MISS CONFIDENT: Im­ “I’m looking forward to ing” and having conver- rah Isaacs is looking forward the fast this year because sations. to Ramadaan. I think I’m going to lose This year would be weight,” Isaacs laughs. her first time fasting every day for the “During this month, you must forget whole day, and she says: “I am looking about food and just think about your reliforward to it.” gion and also staying healthy,” says During the fast, Isaacs explains, her fa- Isaacs. vourite meal is chicken and potatoes, but People should not forget to give to the she will be looking to “keep fit”. She loves poor, because “it’s very important” and taking cake to her neighbours, and enjoys should play a major role in “your month the minutes just before the fast is broken, of Ramadaan”. TAURIQ HASSEN

Tuesday 19 July 2011

FURTHER EDUCATION: Penny Vinjevold, The Head of Department of the Western Cape Edu­ cation Department (standing), attended a training session for Crawford teachers in literacy and numeracy at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology on Tuesday 12 July. Photo: Yunus Mohamed.

Ready for the big time TAMMY PETERSEN

AFTER nine years of practice and hard work, a talented group of Manenberg residents have finally been handed the big break they have been hoping for. The New Black Mob, or NBM as they are known on “the streets”, recently started recording their debut album thanks to a local producer who opened his studio and shared his experience with them. Member Christopher Damon says the group has been thoroughly enjoying the process and look forward to listening to the final product. “We have been waiting so long for this opportunity and we are relishing this experience. We are taking in everything he is teaching us so that we can improve on the skills we have built over the years,” he says. Every minute spent in the recording studio is “out of this world”, Damon continues. “This is such a dream come true for us. After all the years of struggling, we finally have this opportunity to put ourselves out there in a professional, polished way. We are working around the clock to produce a good product we can all be proud of.” The group is made up of talented locals who bring their own unique touch to the group: Rappers Kurt Naicker, who grew up in Washington after moving to the US as a child, Buren Taaibosch, Jefferey Fielies and Damon as the lyrical storytellers, while Lucinda Daniels and Stacey and Shonice Paulsen bring the songs to life. Owen Paul handles the marketing for the group. But NBM hasn’t been basking in the

limelight alone. Because they understand how difficult it can be to crack it in the music world, they have started inviting struggling artists to feature on the remaining 10 tracks that still have to be recorded. “This industry is a hard nut to crack,” Taaibosch says. “It takes lots of hard work to get such an opportunity and some never make it here at all. We would like to give others who have not been exposed to such an experience to show what they can do in a professional environment.” Once their album has been completed at the end of next month, the group plans to launch the product in Belhar, where the group was formed. “After that we want to bring it home and show everyone what we have done. Then we want to do a roadshow to promote our album and put ourselves out there,” Damon says. The still-to-be named album will be sold for R100 and will boast 12 tracks. It’s going to be a unique offering in both English and Afrikaans. We will also be continuing with the formula we used for ‘I Believe’, Damon says, referring to the group’s hit that was downloaded over 6 000 times when it was promoted by music website ToxicWeb. Paul says the group is still available for shows and fundraisers. “We love what we do and it’s indescribable to have the opportunity to make a living from something you have such a passion for. “We look forward to this journey and where it will take us.” . To feature on the group’s album or to order your copy in advance, phone Damon on 083 245 3358.

BIG TIME: The members of NBM outside the Come 2gether Lounge in Belhar where they plan to hold their album launch. In the centre is the club owner, Theo Gopie.Photo: Supplied


GENERAL

Tuesday 19 July 2011

People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition Page 11

Learning about life and sailing “WE go to sea not to learn how to sail, but to learn how to live.” This is the driving force behind Cape Windjammers Education Trust (CWET), a non-profit organisation based in Cape Town. The CWET team members use the power of offshore sail training as a tool for developing life skills, leadership skills and environmental awareness amongst South African youth. The organisation says sail training is internationally recognised for being an efficient tool to induce sustainable behavioural change in youth. “It includes instruction in all aspects of sailing, but its purpose goes far, far beyond this. Sail training uses the experience of being at sea principally as a means to help people learn about themselves, discover hidden strengths and talents, understand the value of working as a team and provides a setting for much wider aspects of education at sea. “Nothing connects people better and more permanently than the shared experience of facing and overcoming a challenge. The more intense the experience, the greater

and more sustainable the learning effect will be.” Sail training teaches a skill set that is absolutely transferable to any vocational, business or leadership sector and, in fact, to living life itself. CWET’s programmes currently target South African youth from all social and cultural backgrounds, as well as international youth for cultural exchange activities, merchant marine cadets to collect sea time, corporate business for team building and incentive travels. Organisers say bursaries are provided for youth from disadvantaged backgrounds, usually between the ages of 15 and 25 years. In recruiting sailing participants, CWET currently partners with schools and civil society organisations in the Western Cape that focus in particular on HIV and crime prevention, reconciliation, education and career development. In cooperation with these organisations, CWET selects suitable participants and identifies specific learning aims for each target group. Preparation and follow-up workshops link the sailing programme to the focus of intervention of the partner organisation, and ensure

YOUNG SAILORS: Seen here are the nine youths who completed a week’s sail training with Cape Windjammers Educational Trust in Simon’s Town. Photo: Supplied that the life-changing experience of the sailing trip is sustainable and becomes part of “real life”. Participants have the opportunity to “graduate” through programmes from single-day environmental awareness programmes to

UJW upcoming events THE Union of Jewish Women will be hosting a series of talks in coming weeks. . On 27 July, Professor Elizabeth Triegaardt will talk on “The Cape Town Ballet”. .On 3 August, Bubbles Levinson will talk on “Invisible Loyalties and How They Shape Our Lives”. .On 10 August, Daniel Silke will talk on “Tracking the Future – Top Trends to Shape The World and South Africa to 2050”. The events will take place at Stonehaven, at 10:00 for 10:30. There is an entrance fee of R20, which includes refreshments. Phone (021) 434-9555. . On 21 July, the Constantia Group will

be hosting a Pick n Pay Cooking Demonstration entitled “Cook Now, Dine Later” at the Pick n Pay Centre. The event starts at 10:00, and there is a fee of R60. Phone 083 446 2435. . On 14 August, the Florentia Group will hold a card afternoon at the Atlantic Bowling Club. The cost is R90, and includes lunch, tea and refreshments. Phone (021) 434-3850. . On 18 August, the Kesher Group will be holding a “A Girls Guide To Rugby” event at the Herzlia Middle School Hall. The event starts at 18:30 for 19:00, and costs R180. Phone (021) 434-9555 (mornings only) or (021) 439-1455.

UJW’s busy line-up THE Adult Education Division of the Union of Jewish Women of Cape Town will be hosting the following speakers: . On 20 July, Fay Singer will talk on “The Yiddish Song Festival”; and . On 27 July, Prof Elizabeth Triegaardt will talk on the “Cape Town Ballet”. The venue is Stonehaven and the time is

10:00 for 10:30. The cost is R20, including refreshments. On 21 July the Constantia Group of the Union of Jewish Women will host a cooking demonstration at the Pick n Pay Centre at 10:00 entitled “Cook Now, Dine Later”. The entry fee is R60. Contact the Union of Jewish Women on (021) 434-9555 for more information.

longer, more intimate, five-day voyages and international Tall Ship programmes and events. While Cape Windjammers currently makes use of the Rotary Scout from Sea Scouts as well as the Howard Davis, based at the Water-

PUBLIC NOTIFICATION OF THE 2011/2012 SERVICE DELIVERY AND BUDGET IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (SDBIP) Notice is hereby given in terms of Section 53 (3) (a) of Act No. 56 of 2003: Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA) that the Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan for the 2011/2012 financial year will be available at all Subcouncil offices (as listed below), libraries and the City of Cape Town’s website www.capetown.gov.za/idp from Wednesday 20 July 2011 on weekdays between 08:30 and 16:30 up to and including Monday 22 August 2011. AREA Cape Town Libraries Subcouncil 1 Blaauwberg 2 Bergdal 3 De Grendel 4 Tygerberg 5 Central 6 Bellville 7 Koeberg 8 Helderberg 9 Nxele Makana

DIAL-A-RIDE PUBLIC PARTICIPATION WORKSHOP ON 30 JULY 2011 Notice is hereby given that a public participation workshop will be held on 30 July 2011 to discuss the Dial-a-Ride public transport service for the Cape Town area. The City of Cape Town is appealing to all persons with disabilities to participate in the review of its business plan for this service. In accordance with the City’s policy of participative, democratic and co-operative governance, Dial-a-Ride users have a say in how the service is run.

10 Charlotte Maxeke 11 Looksmart Solwandle Ngudle 12 Mitchells Plain 13 David Mthetho Ntlanganiso 14 Miranda Ngculu 15 Pinelands

Dial-a-Ride is a demand-responsive public transport service, provided in terms of a commercial service contract, and funded by the City of Cape Town and the Provincial Administration of the Western Cape. The main focus of Dial-a-Ride is to provide an accessible transport service to those persons who cannot access mainstream public transport as a result of their special needs.

16 Good Hope 17 Athlone and District 18 Rondevlei 19 South Peninsula 20 Protea

Should you wish to comment, raise any concerns or attend the Dial-a-Ride workshop please contact Zanele Mabengeza at Zanele.mabengeza@capetown.gov.za or tel 021 400 2579 by 25 July 2011 to reserve your place.

21 Oostenberg

Details of the workshop are as follows: DATE: 30 July 2011 TIME: 10:00 – 14:00 VENUE: Woodstock Community Hall, cnr Aberdeen and Main Roads, Woodstock

23 Adelaide Tambo

ACHMAT EBRAHIM CITY MANAGER

front, their long-term goal is to acquire their own Tall Ship that will enable a much larger impact. For more information, contact course captain Piet Potgieter on 083 300 5712, or visit the website www.capewindjammers.org.

22 Lizo Nkonki

ACHMAT EBRAHIM CITY MANAGER

ADDRESS Reception Desk, Concourse, Civic Centre, Hertzog Boulevard, Cape Town All Libraries Municipal Offices, Royal Ascot, Bridle Way, Milnerton Municipal Offices, Brighton Way, Kraaifontein Municipal Building, Voortrekker Road, Goodwood Municipal Offices, 1st Floor, cnr Voortrekker and Tallent Roads, Parow Municipal Offices, cnr Jakkelsvlei Avenue and Kiaat Road, Bonteheuwel Municipal Building, Voortrekker Road, Bellville Municipal Offices, Oxford Street, Durbanville Municipal Offices, cnr Fagan Street and Main Road, Strand A Block Stocks & Stocks Complex, Ntlakohlaza Street, Town 2, Village 1, Khayelitsha Site B, Khayelitsha Shopping Centre, Khayelitsha Fezeka Building, cnr NY1 and Lansdowne Road, Gugulethu Parks & Bathing Building, Merrydale Avenue, Lentegeur Fezeka Building, cnr NY1 and Lansdowne Road, Gugulethu Fezeka Building, cnr NY1 and Lansdowne Road, Gugulethu Pinelands Training Centre, St Stephens Road, Central Square, Pinelands 11th Floor, 44 Wale Street, Cape Town Athlone Civic Centre, cnr Protea and Klipfontein Roads, Athlone Cnr Buck Road and 6th Avenue, Lotus River Fish Hoek Civic Centre, Central Circle, Recreation Road, Fish Hoek Alphen Centre, Constantia Main Road, Constantia Oostenberg Administration, cnr Van Riebeeck and Carinus Streets, Kuilsriver Oostenberg Administration, cnr Van Riebeeck and Carinus Streets, Kuilsriver Cnr Delft and Fort Worth Roads, Delft


Page 12 People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition

LEADER

Tuesday 19 July 2011

Proud partner THE nation celebrated Mandela Day yesterday as former president Nelson Mandela turned 93. In keeping with the worldwide gees of making the world a better place by volunteering just 67 minutes of your time, People’s Post partnered with Proudly South Africa (PSA) in a campaign to create 93 000 jobs within a year. The 93 000 Jobs for Mandela Day campaign was launched on 16 July, a partnership between selected Media 24 titles such as People’s Post, Tygerburger, City Vision and Die Burger. The campaign aims to drive job creation through guiding and mobilising state organs, the business sector and citizens on how they can assist in creating 93 000 jobs for Mandela from his 93rd to 94th birthday year. South Africans have shown that they have the power to unite as one in their indefatigable quest for democracy and, with equal gusto, in achieving world glory through successfully hosting the World Cup. Here is our chance to take centre stage again in shaping our economic destiny; our chance to soar above unemployment, poverty and despair. The statistics speak for themselves; with about a quarter of our population jobless, our unemployment rate ranks as among the highest in the world. We have the power to turn that statistic around and make Madiba proud. For 67 years, he fought oppression. Oppression has many guises and being poor subjects one to the most damaging, humiliating, soul-destroying oppression. The responsibility for job creation rests with government, industry and each individual. We are playing our part by creating a platform for business and the unemployed to connect. Regardless of how small the job is that is created, each job is a giant step towards empowering an individual, a family, a community, a nation. The platform is here. All you have to do is step up!

No blot on the landscape I FOUND Tony Robinson’s comment about the Cape Town Stadium being a blot on an iconic landscape to be quite amusing, because I have seen the stadium used as a backdrop in so many advertisements inserted by leading estate agencies in property supplements, and I can just imagine what they would say about anyone suggesting that they would use a blot on the landscape as a sales pitch for selling properties. I actually wonder if he has ever been inside the stadium or even walked around the outskirts of the stadium. I have the pleasure of living on the fan walk, and have also been inside the stadium. I have taken pictures inside and outside of the stadium and put them onto social networks. The comments on my pictures have come in from all over the world and have mirrored my own awe about the magnificence of the stadium and the exciting promise of the already very popular urban park. I have to say that I was quite disappointed that a seasoned journalist seemed to be so misinformed. I wonder what European stadiums he was referring to when he said that they could draw 50 000 spectators every week for three quarters of the year. I would imagine that only Barcelona FC could get remotely close to that achievement, and that would only be if they had a home game every week for that entire period. I am also amazed at his suggestion that for a major stadium to be justified

it must be sustainable. I assume that he has proof that the bulk of major stadiums in large cities around the world are fully sustainable. It would be unfortunate if the measure of the worth of public amenities was that their continued existence could only be justified if they were sustainable, as that would mean that the SA Museum, the SA Art Gallery, the Cape Town Castle, the Fish Hoek Civic Centre and many other public amenities would not meet the test and should also all be demolished. I find it ironic that on the one hand he refers to the Good Hope Centre as a disaster and then points out that it was suggested that the stadium should rather have been built in the same general area. One of the reasons why the Good Hope Centre was not a success is that after late night shows the area is not safe. I was almost robbed of my possessions right outside the centre. The Culemborg area that was suggested as a possible location for the stadium is even more isolated than the Good Hope Centre is and a lot less safe. I hate FIFA as much as anyone else, but with hindsight, and as a resident in the area of the stadium, I have to say that in my view the placing of the stadium on Green Point common was a good idea. The Fan Walk was one of the greatest successes of the World Cup and could not have been created elsewhere. It worked because of a wide road and a

street mall could be converted into a fan walk that was lined with a host of entertainment and shopping venues. There is no equivalent area in Culemborg. The success of the World Cup Games and the recent U2 concert was due to attendances by a large number of spectators who were predominantly local residents. There are no other venues in Cape Town that can cater for the numbers that attended the aforesaid events at Cape Town Stadium. Newlands Stadium is old and will require a great deal of expense to refurbish to increase holding capacity and to meet modern safety standards. As an old stadium, maintenance costs at Newlands will soon escalate dramatically, and rugby will have no alternative but to move to Cape Town Stadium. The rugby authorities are holding out for the best deal possible, which is quite understandable. Yes, maintenance of the Cape Town Stadium will be costly, but if Cape Town has any pretensions of being a world-class city and a premier tourist destination, it has to have a worldclass stadium, and if the old Green Point Stadium had remained it would have become an embarrassment and a blot on a rapidly-deteriorating landscape, rather than being a world-class feature that would be deemed worthy of a visit by the leading lady of one of the most powerful First World countries. I would like to close by quoting a comment recently published in the media: “The development of Cape Town Stadium and the Green Point Urban Park has given a new lease of life to the Mouille Point property market.” This is not City of Cape Town propaganda, it is a comment by Pam Golding Properties. Not bad for a blot on the landscape. KENNY PHILLIPS De Waterkant

Your SMSes Colourful viewing . I enjoyed Coloured TV. It’s nice to have some laughter and those who are not happy with the show, read a book. . Colour TV seems to be the only voice for coloured people. . This new show, Colour TV on SABC 2 is boring. Where’s the movies? Angry and bored viewer Electricity prices . I used 686 units in 7 days! I am ONE person! I went to buy another R300 and got 274 units. Somewhere I am being ripped off. Anyone else experience something similar? . I also wonder about the cost of electricity. I bought R500 at the beginning of the month and got my 50 free units but the meter ran down very quickly. Animal matters . On the 18th I will spend 67 minutes thinking of all the poor animals suffering in the townships. Pat H . Animals are like kids, they should be seen and not hurt. God bless. Liz . Wow, these rich, selfrighteous “animal lovers” who live in their huge fancy houses (with often more than one inside toilets), you really are boring old farts. Did you read that little three-yearold’s mother had go out to use an outside toilet when these dogs attacked? Please shut up. Akeela

. If you have seen or found a green ring-necked parakeet please contact 072 373 8328, www.parrotalert.com or the SPCA. It has been missing since 30 April. . I’ve witnessed people selling live chickens, limp and half dead from heat and a lack of water. Then they are packed into a tiny box with no air. This is horrible to witness. Desiree General . Congratulations to Metrorail on the school holiday programme they had. Well done! You should cover a positive story like that. Happy commuter . I don’t think the “work from home” job opportunities are real. I’ve gone on the Internet about it and couldn’t find a number to contact them on. Zenobia . After watching “The Life and Times of Mandela”, I suggest this government get their act together regarding services to informal settlements and others, otherwise I can see an uprising that we have never seen before, and all of us will suffer. These people are the ones who have put this government in power over the years. Terry . To KFC: I am another unhappy customer! There is only batter and skin. I rather go to Fruit & Veg City in Roeland Street for value for money. Jeff


People's Post Page 13

Phone: 021 713 9440 | Fax: 021 713 9481

Tuesday 19 July 2011

Big band a big hit GARY VAN DYK

T

he Big Band sound is starting to spread across the Cape Flats with the launch of a group in the Grassy Park area last week, and it’s got the beat to fight off the bad influences affecting the youth. On Thursday last week the hall of Hyde Park Primary in Parkwood came alive when the Grassy Park Youth Development Big Band was launched with some performances that almost got the school calling for repairs to their roof. William Rezant, of the Western Cape Musicians’ Association (WCMA), said that this project was inspired by the success of the achievements of the Delft Big Band, and was a partnership between them, the Department of Education, especially Franklin Lewis, the head curriculum advisor for music, as well as the Lotto, from who they are receiving funding. “In 2009 WCMA applied for funding from the Lotto for youth development in music in the Western Cape pointing out the success of the project in Delft. “Thankfully we received some funding this year and launched Kidz Can in the Retreat, Lavender Hill, Grassy Park and Lotus River areas, and the band is part of this project. “For the band we initially targeted all or most high schools in these areas, but to our surprise some of the primary schools also wanted to be part of this project. “As you can see these youngsters are all excited about being part of it,” he said. Rezant added that the idea behind the project was more than just helping youth develop themselves through music. “We also want to stop our youth from getting involved with drugs, gangsterism and all these negative influences that plague them in their areas. “Over the past few years we have seen the success of the Delft Big Band under Ian Smith, who has grown the talents of those youngsters to a phenomenal level, and we are using his skills to help us with

this new project as well. “During these recent school holidays we got going at the Battswood Arts Centre, where 130 children got into learning to read music and playing instruments ranging from marimbas and steel pan drums, to all the wind instruments featured in a big band.” At the launch last week Smith demonstrated and explained how the teaching in the big band format takes place with the new learners showing off their talents. Then it was the turn of the Delft Band to give the learners a taste of what they will be doing in a few months time, and they were blown away. Tamryn Marcus (17) is a trombonist from Grassdale High, who was very excited about what she heard. “I feel very inspired when I listen to them, and excited to know that we will also be getting to that level if we work hard. While I have been playing at school for some years, the music that they are doing is something else,” she said. Timothy Mathlay (13) from Hyde Park Primary is a saxophonist who was still wide-eyed long after the Delft band performance. “That band gave me goosebumps! It is totally different to what we have been doing at school. “I can’t to get going seriously to get to that level.” Clarinetist Allison Davids (18) is at Grassy Park High and always knew she wanted to do music, but hearing the Delft group has inspired her more. “I have been playing for a number of years, but this is the first time that I have heard band play together like that. Wow!” Lance January (17) is a trombonist who also has playing bass guitar as an option. “Why don’t we hear music like this more often? This is exciting and I love the energy of the music. “I know that with this project we are going to discover lots of new music to inspire us.” Rezant concluded by adding that similar projects are planned for more areas in the Western Cape. “We also like to appeal to anyone who has spare instruments and would like donate or contribute to these projects to contact me on 073 399 0244, (021) 4479936 or via email William@wcma.co.za.”

MIGHTY APHRODITE: Pop singer Kylie Minogue had the audience dancing in the aisles at the Grand Arena, Grand West Casino, on Wednesday 13 July, as she brought her Aphrodite tour to Cape Town fans. Photo: Jaco Marais

Belly dancers to tantalise A BEVY of beautiful dancers will take audiences on a journey to faraway places as they shimmy and undulate to the sensual rhythms of the Middle East. The Feminine Divine Annual Studio Show takes place at Bergvliet High School on Saturday 23 July from 19:00. The Feminine Divine is one of Cape Town’s largest belly dance studios, with three passionate and skilled teachers teaching over 300 students in and around Cape Town. They are led by Tenille Lindeque, one of Cape Town’s most sensual dancers, who is well respected in the belly dance community. Tickets cost R55 per person and bookings are essential. For inquiries call Tenille Lindeque on 083 760 8499 or email femininedevine@neomail.co.za.

THE BAND: Fresh off a series of sold­out shows across the Cape Peninsula, Sixgun Gospel will showcase its extensive catalogue in preparation for re­ cording its EP this month. The EP blends blues, country, rock, bluegrass and funk. The band will play at Muizenberg’s Melting Pot with up­and­coming songstress, Natasha Meister, on Friday 22 July. Photo: Supplied

SENSUALITY EPITOMISED: Tenille Lindeque opened the Feminine Divine studio in 2003 and has since been featured on Top Billing and Spirit Sun­ day. Photo: Supplied

Hobnob with hotshot directors IF YOU want to get up close and personal with directors of the calibre of Malcolm Purkey, James Ncgobo, Janice Honeyman, Geoffrey Hyland and Aubrey Sekhabi, and actors such as Dawid Minnaar, Diane Wilson and Faniswa Yisa, this conference is for you. Directors and Directing is hosted by the Gordon Institute for Performing and Creative Arts (GIPCA) from Friday 29 to Sunday 31 July.

Featuring several performances in addition to panels and talks, this groundbreaking event will take place at Hiddingh Campus, UCT. The conference will explore “thoughts around directing by some of the nation’s leading theatrical and critical minds, in carefully-staged conversations that will be intimate as they promise to be illuminating and insightful”.

Tickets are available through Computicket and cost R120. This includes all talks and performances, the opening function, coffee and tea, a Sunday brunch and closing drinks. Single-day tickets are R60. Student rates are R80 for the full conference. The full programme will be available from www.gipca.uct.ac.za from Wednesday 6 July. Contact (021) 480-7156 or fingipca@uct.ac.za.

ROCKING: The Dirty Skirts will hold their album launch at Zula Bar in Long Street in the city centre on 23 July from 21:00. Entrance is R50.Photo: Supplied


CLASSIFIEDS

Page 14 People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition

Tuesday 19 July 2011

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SPORT

Tuesday 19 July 2011

People’s Post Atlantic Seaboard­City Edition Page 15

Putting family first HEROES are people you look up to and aspire to be like because of what they have accomplished. People that show, with determination and hard work, that anything is possible. And sometimes, as we’ve seen in the Glacier Junior Series, it just takes a little pointer to inspire greatness in young golfers. Yes, all young golfers need their idols, including Sean Bradley from Cape Town. But for this 16-year-old golfer, that hero is the man he calls dad. Former professional Wayne Bradley campaigned in Asia, Europe and South Africa before he laid down his clubs and took up coaching. In the last decade he has become a household name as one of the top golf coaches in the country. “My dad may not be a Major winner or a former world number one, but he is the guy who brought me to the game of golf and who inspired me to love it as much as he does,” said Sean. “He has coached me all my life, he knows my game and he is the first one I turn to when things go wrong.

He is the first one I call with my results and he always gives me the support I need.” Just like when the 15-year-old scratch golfer walked off the golf course at Erinvale recently with a hefty 82 on his scorecard. “I was gutted. I really wanted to win and get a place in the Series Final,” he said. “My dad knew just what to say. He knew I was upset, but he doesn’t let me wallow in self pity. “I was battling on the greens all day, so he said we would work on the putting stroke but for right now, just to focus on the other things in my game that went well.” During the Glacier Junior Series visit to the Western Cape, Bradley Junior has also had to share his father’s focus. “Quite a few of my students entered the three Glacier Junior Series events in the Western Cape,” Wayne explained. “What I love about this series is that it gives the higher handicap players a chance to gain competitive experience. The low handicaps get to play a lot of tournament golf, but the higher handicaps seldom get on the golf course under these

conditions. “It has been great to see how well the younger players are coping with the pressure and how committed and competitive they are.” Sean doesn’t mind sharing his father’s attention. “I think it can be tough for him to be supportive when he has so many other ‘sons’ out there, but we have all benefited from my dad’s ability to teach and inspire,” he said. “It’s cool when guys tell me how my dad helped them to believe in themselves or how he changed their game. It’s pretty cool to have Wayne Bradley as a dad.” But Bradley Junior wouldn’t mind just one special tip from his dad to propel him to the winner’s circle. “The winner of the Glacier Junior Series goes to the Orange Bowl Junior Champs in the USA,” says the Wynberg Boys’ High pupil. “That’s a huge prize for any South African junior, because we don’t get that many chances to travel and play overseas. I just need something to click so I get to win one of these tournaments and get into the final.”

SWINGING EXPERTS: Sean and Wayne Bradley.

Photo: Glacier Junior Series

BUNDLED: Vil­ lager RFC’s Neil Cleghorn is tackled by Solly Tyibilika and Martin du Toit of Hamil­ ton’s during his side’s 41­ 13 loss in the WPRFU Super League A on Saturday. Pho­ to: Peter Heeger/Gal­ lo Images

GREAT CATCH: Miche Bucton of Kansas City Netball Club takes a fine catch as Heideveld Netball Club’s Tarren van Eeden looks on during a clash between the under­11 sides of these clubs at Westridge Sport Grounds on Saturday morn­ ing. The match was drawn 9­9. Photo: Rashied Isaacs

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TOUGH TUSSLE: Giovani Laver­ deen (left) of YMO St Luke’s and Joshua Africa of Wynberg St John’s get stuck in a physical bat­ tle during the two under­13 sides’ clash in the Aven­ dale Athletico Junior Tourna­ ment at Field Crescent on Sat­ urday. Wynberg St John’s were 2­0 victors. Photo: Rashied Isaacs


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Tuesday 19 July 2011

Positives from pulsating clash butchered a few chances and some of the new combinations need to settle and be refined,” Coetzee said. “But I am confident that we can take a number of positives from this match – the youngsters stood up to the challenge and impressed.” Coetzee also defended a decision to not take a shot at goal after receiving a penalty late in the match, saying that the captain had consulted replacement flyhalf, Demetri Caterikillis, about whether the shot was within his range. The kick, which could possibly have put Province in the lead, was not taken. Two young players who impressed on the field were flanker, Siya Kolisi, and flyhalf, Gary van Aswegen. Kolisi, who scored one of WP’s two tries, was impressive on attack and defence, while also showing steel at breakdown points. His ability to gain valuable metres with ball in hand was also notable. Van Aswegen, who scored 16 of his side’s points from his boot, was a real general in the back line, often taking the lead in making sure the troops were organised. His tactical kicking was impressive, while his defence has improved noticeably. . This Friday Province look to win their first match when they travel to Potchefstroom to take on the Leopards at Profert Olen Park.

TASMIN CUPIDO

DESPITE opening their Absa Currie Cup campaign with a draw to GWK Griquas, Allister Coetzee and DHL Western Province will be positive that the young, inexperienced side was able to put up a fight.

YOUNG ACE: DHL Western Province flyhalf, Gary van Aswegen, gets past a tackle by Davon Raubenheimer of GWK Griquas during the 26­26 draw between the two sides in the opening match of the Absa Currie Cup at DHL Newlands on Saturday. Photo: Nasief Manie/Photo24

The 26-26 scoreline at DHL Newlands on Saturday afternoon proves that the youngsters in royalblue-and-white will put up a challenge in the annual competition, despite the Cape side being plagued by injury and a number of players performing international duties. Due to the DHL Stormers’ participation up until the semi-finals of the Super Rugby competition, the Province squad only had eight days to prepare for the kick-off of the Currie Cup – the Griquas had already been training together for three weeks. Coetzee says they are positive after the performance. “Of cause we are disappointed about not being able to win, but it certainly is not all negative,” he said after the match. “We had eight players making their Currie Cup debuts today, and the youngsters showed that this team has tons of potential.” He also admitted that they had missed important point-scoring opportunities during the match. “We

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own rules, and I passed the Para-exams at the championship, which currently makes me the only qualified female in the country,” said Lentz. She also umpired at the African Table Tennis Championship in 2007. In 2008 she was the only female from Africa who was selected to be an umpire at the Beijing Paralympics. “Beijing was definitely one of my highlights. The World Table Tennis Championship in Japan (2009) will also go down as one of my favourite moments, as this is where the best in the world compete. “This is where I did my Advanced Umpires Training (AUT), to become an elite umpire called a Blue Badge umpire,” says Lentz. While the championship in Moscow was “incredible”, Lentz says the pinnacle of her career thus far has been to umpire the women’s single final at the first Youth Olympics in Singapore last year. Lentz is currently a member of the Liv-ken Table Tennis Club in Grassy Park, and serves on the national technical committee.

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People Post Atlantic Seaboard-City Edition 19 July 2011