The Pearson Global Forum 2020 - Conference Program

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CONFERENCE PROGRAM

October 6-8, 2020

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Table of Contents

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Welcome

1 Conference Overview

3 Conference Agenda

5 Speaker Biographies

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Welcome

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n behalf of The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts, I’d like to welcome you to The Pearson Global Forum, The Climate of Conflict. The objective of this paramount gathering is to bring together scholars, leaders, and practitioners to address pressing issues of global conflict through the identification of important lessons for conflict resolution from around the world. Your participation is pivotal to the realization of this goal, and to the essential transmission of this crucial information to the wider audience at our Global Forum. The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts was established through a grant from the Thomas L. Pearson and Pearson Family Members Foundation and is dedicated to contributing to a world more at peace through research, education, and engagement. As an institute within the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago, our distinguished faculty apply a data-driven, analytical approach to examining issues related to conflict and reconciliation and are currently working in Nigeria, Afghanistan, and Colombia, among other countries. Through our Fellows and Scholars program for master’s and doctoral students and our course curriculum, we hope to inspire future policy leaders and academics to focus on these topics in a rigorous way. It is our goal to convene leading scholars and high-level policy makers from around the globe to exchange ideas and maximize the potential for impact in preventing and resolving violent conflicts and informing policy. We hope this Forum is an opportunity for you to learn of current research and active endeavors to promote peace through conflict resolution, and begin important conversations that may impact positive change. I’d like to extend my personal thanks to you for joining us, and I welcome you to our virtual Pearson Global Forum.

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James A. Robinson Institute Director, The Pearson Institute; Reverend Dr. Richard L. Pearson Professor of Global Conflict Studies and University Professor, Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago 2


Conference Overview THE THIRD ANNUAL PEARSON GLOBAL FORUM The University of Chicago’s Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts presents the third annual Pearson Global Forum, The Climate of Conflict. This Forum is a significant public event with the goal of convening leading scholars and high-level policy makers from around the globe to exchange ideas and maximize the potential for impact in preventing and resolving violent conflicts and informing policy. This conference will discuss the causes and consequences of conflict, and strategies to intervene and mitigate conflict and to consolidate peace. Conflicts around the world persist and exacerbate, with resolution often seeming intractable, and other times indomitable. Against the backdrop of an ongoing global pandemic and the deteriorating climate-related reality, societies, economies, and futures are being ravaged. As the international community continues to deal with these countless active conflicts and the quickly shifting relationships between and among nations, it is our responsibility to deconstruct conflict in order to find paths towards resolution, peace, and stability. At The Pearson Institute, we are mobilizing our mission to convene international leaders and world-renowned academics at The Pearson Global Forum to explore rigorous research and analysis to influence solutions, strategies, and policy for reducing and mitigating conflict to achieve a more peaceful world.

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THE PEARSON INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY AND RESOLUTION OF GLOBAL CONFLICTS The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts at the University of Chicago promotes the ongoing discussion, understanding and resolution of global conflicts, and contributes to the advancement of a global society more at peace. Established through a gift from The Thomas L. Pearson and The Pearson Family Members Foundation, and led by Institute Director James A. Robinson, co-author of Why Nations Fail and The Narrow Corridor, the Institute achieves its mission by employing an analytically rigorous, data-driven approach and global perspective to understanding violent conflict. Global in its scope, activities, and footprint, The Pearson Institute attracts students and scholars in the field of conflict studies from around the world.

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Conference Agenda

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The Pearson Global Forum DAY ONE

Tuesday, October 6, 2020 All times shown in CDT 9:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.

WELCOME REMARKS

9:15 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

KEYNOTE: CONFRONTING THE CLIMATE CRISIS

9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

James A. Robinson; Institute Director, The Pearson Institute; Reverend Dr. Richard L. Pearson Professor of Global Conflict Studies and University Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

Alice Hill; David M. Rubenstein Senior Fellow for Energy and the Environment, Council on Foreign Relations

CLIMATE CONFLICT: WATER

• Supratik Guha; Professor, Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago; Director, Nanoscience and Technology Division and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, and Senior Scientific Advisor to the Director, Argonne National Laboratory • Amir Jina; Assistant Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago • Michael Tiboris; Pearson Associate; Nonresident Fellow, Chicago Council on Global Affairs; Director, Clear Water Farms Program, River Alliance of Wisconsin • Moderator: Margaret Goud Collins; Executive Director, Friends of International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis 10:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. BREAK 11:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. FLASH TALK: THE END OF WATER AS WE KNOW IT • Seth B. Darling; Director, Center for Molecular Engineering and Senior Scientist, Chemical Sciences & Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory; Fellow, Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago 6


11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

CLIMATE CONFLICT: MIGRATION

• Elizabeth Ferris; Research Professor, Institute for the Study of International Migration, Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University • Walter Kaelin; Envoy of the Chair, Platform on Disaster Displacement • Kayly Ober; Senior Advocate and Program Manager, Climate Displacement Program, Refugees International • Moderator: Abrahm Lustgarten; Senior Reporter, ProPublica 12:15 p.m. – 12:30 p.m.

FLASH TALK: ENVIRONMENTAL MIGRATION, URBANIZATION, AND CONFLICT PROCESSES

• Vally Koubi; Professor and Senior Scientist, Center for Comparative and International Studies, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich; Professor, Institute of Economics, University of Bern

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DAY TWO

Wednesday, October 7, 2020 All times shown in CDT 9:00 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.

WELCOME REMARKS

9:05 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

KEYNOTE: ENDING ENDLESS WARS REQUIRES PREVENTING THEM IN THE FIRST PLACE

• 9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Katherine Baicker; Dean and Emmett Dedmon Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

Elizabeth Hume; Vice President, Alliance for Peacebuilding

GLOBAL PANDEMICS

• Oeindrila Dube; Philip K. Pearson Professor of Global Conflict Studies, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago • Mark Koyama; Associate Professor of Economics, George Mason University • Ada Palmer; Associate Professor of Early Modern European History and the College, University of Chicago • Moderator: Katherine Baicker; Dean and Emmett Dedmon Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago 10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. BREAK 10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. CASE STUDY: HAITI • Paul Farmer; Chief Strategist and CoFounder, Partners In Health; Kolokotrones University Professor, Harvard University • Chelsey L. Kivland; Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Dartmouth College • Michèle Duvivier Pierre-Louis; President, Fondation Connaissance et LibertéFOKAL; Former Prime Minister of Haiti • Moderator: James A. Robinson; Institute Director, The Pearson Institute; Reverend Dr. Richard L. Pearson Professor of Global Conflict Studies and University Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

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11:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

FLASH TALK: HOW SECURITY TRANSITIONS FAIL AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT

• Austin L. Wright; Pearson Faculty Affiliate; Assistant Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago 12:00 p.m. – 12:30 p.m.

FIRESIDE CHAT

• Zalmay Khalilzad; Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation, U.S. Department of State • Andrew Wilder; Vice President, Asia Programs, U.S. Institute of Peace 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

CASE STUDY: AFGHANISTAN

Laurel Miller; Director, Asia Program, International Crisis Group; Former Deputy and Acting Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, U.S. Department of State • Gretchen Peters; Executive Director, Center on Illicit Networks and Transnational Organized Crime • Michael Semple; Professor, The Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice, Queen’s University Belfast • Moderator: Andrew Wilder; Vice President, Asia Programs, U.S. Institute of Peace 1:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

FLASH TALK: DICTATORSHIP AND THE MISSING STUDENTS

• Maria Angélica Bautista; Pearson Faculty Affiliate; Assistant Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

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DAY THREE

Thursday, October 8, 2020 All times shown in CDT 9:00 a.m. – 9:05 a.m.

WELCOME REMARKS

9:05 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

KEYNOTE: SETTING THE CONDITIONS, AVOIDING THE CONSEQUENCES

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Ka Yee C. Lee; Provost and David Lee Shillinglaw Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and the College, University of Chicago

Madelyn Creedon; Former Principal Deputy Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. Department of Energy; Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs, U.S. Department of Defense

UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF CONFLICT

• Thomas Countryman; Chairman, Board of Directors, Arms Control Association • Francesca Giovannini; Strategy and Policy Planning Officer to the Executive Secretary, Comprehensive Nuclear-TestBan Treaty Organization • Robert Rosner; William E. Wrather Distinguished Service Professor, Departments of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, the College, and Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago; Chair, Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists • Moderator: Rachel Bronson; President and CEO, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. BREAK 10:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. FLASH TALK: THE ROAD TO CONFLICT RESOLUTION: 5 GAPS • Clare Lockhart; Director and Co-Founder, Institute for State Effectiveness

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11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

HOW NEGOTIATIONS TAKE PLACE

• Steven E. Miller; Director, International Security Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School • Wendy R. Sherman; Professor of Practice and Director, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School; Former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs, U.S. Department of State • Konstantin Sonin; Pearson Faculty Affiliate; John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago • Moderator: Anne Gearan; White House Correspondent, The Washington Post 12:00 p.m. – 12:15 p.m.

FLASH TALK: COMBATING POLARIZATION

• Mina Cikara; Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Harvard University 12:15 p.m. – 12:20 p.m.

CLOSING REMARKS

James A. Robinson; Institute Director, The Pearson Institute; Reverend Dr. Richard L. Pearson Professor of Global Conflict Studies and University Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

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Speaker Biographies

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KATHERINE BAICKER Dean and Emmett Dedmon Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

Katherine Baicker, PhD, is the Dean and the Emmett Dedmon Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago.  She is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the National Academy of Social Insurance, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dean Baicker serves on the Congressional Budget Office’s Panel of Health Advisers, and on the Board of Directors of Eli Lilly and Company, and HMS. She is a member of the Advisory Board for the National Institute for Health Care Management; a Trustee of NORC; on the Board of Directors of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and a Trustee of the Mayo Clinic. She has served as a Commissioner on the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission; as Chair of the Massachusetts Group Insurance Commission; as Chair of the Board of Directors of AcademyHealth, and as a Senate-confirmed member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. Dean Baicker’s research focuses on the effectiveness of public and private health insurance, including the effect of health system reforms on health disparities and the quality of care. Her large-scale research projects include the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment, a randomized evaluation of the effects of Medicaid coverage. She received her BA in economics from Yale and her PhD in economics from Harvard.

MARIA ANGÉLICA BAUTISTA Assistant Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

Twitter: @MAngelicaBau

Maria Angélica Bautista is an Assistant Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy and a Faculty Affiliate of The Pearson Institute. She received her PhD in political science at Brown University. Her research focuses on the political, economic and social consequences of state-led repression. She studies the case of the military dictatorship in Chile based on a unique dataset she collected and explores the extent to which repression affected individual political preferences, behavior and economic outcomes by comparing subjects who were victims of 14


political torture or imprisonment by the state to subjects who did not. Her work also documents the impact of repression on Chile’s transition to democracy and its negative effect on tertiary education. She is currently conducting research on the impact of women in comparative politics in Africa and sources of variation of organization in Colombian paramilitary groups.

RACHEL BRONSON President and CEO, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Website: thebulletin.org • Twitter: @RachelBronson1 / @BulletinAtomic

Rachel Bronson is the President and CEO of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. She oversees the publishing programs, management of the Doomsday Clock, and a growing set of activities around nuclear risk, climate change, and disruptive technologies. Before joining the Bulletin, Bronson served as the Vice President of Studies at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. She also taught “Global Energy” as an Adjunct Professor at the Kellogg School of Management. Prior to moving to Chicago, Bronson served as Senior Fellow and Director of Middle East Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. Earlier positions include Senior Fellow for International Security Affairs at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Fellow at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and Adjunct Professor at Columbia University. Bronson’s book, Thicker than Oil: America’s Uneasy Partnership with Saudi Arabia (Oxford University Press, 2006), has been translated into Japanese and was published in paperback in June 2008.

MINA CIKARA Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Harvard University Website: intergroupneurosciencelaboratory.com • Twitter: @profcikara

Mina Cikara is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. She received her PhD in psychology and social policy from Princeton University and completed a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. Professor Cikara studies how the mind, brain, and behavior change when the social context shifts from “me and you” to “us and them.” She focuses primarily 15


on how group membership, threat, and prejudice disrupt the processes that allow people to see others as human and to empathize with others. She uses a wide range of tools—standard laboratory experiments, behavioral measures,

fMRI

and

psychophysiology—to

examine

failures

of

empathy,

dehumanization, and misunderstanding between groups. She is equally interested in the behavioral consequences of these processes: discrimination, conflict, and harm. Most recently, the National Science Foundation awarded Professor Cikara the CAREER Award to support her research. She has published articles in journals including Nature, Human Behaviour, Psychological Science, and Perspectives on Psychological Science and her research has been featured in many popular outlets including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, NPR and BBC Radio.

MARGARET GOUD COLLINS Executive Director, Friends of International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

Website: friendsofiiasa.org • Twitter: @mrgcollins

Margaret Goud Collins has been working at the intersection of science and policy since 1977, holding positions in academia, government, and the nonprofit sector. Since 1997, she has been central to US participation in the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), an international science and policy research institute near Vienna, Austria. She served as Program Director for the U.S. Committee for IIASA at the NAS, then as the IIASA Secretary in Vienna, where she was responsible for building links between the Institute and global scientific communities related to energy, water resources, land use, population, risk, air quality, climate, negotiations, and systems modeling. She is presently Executive Director for the Friends of IIASA nonprofit in the U.S. She has previously worked for the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the NOAA Chief Scientist. Her scientific background is geology and oceanography, with degrees from Stanford and the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography, and guest appointments at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the University of the Philippines Marine Science Institute. She was elected an AAAS Fellow in 2008 in Section X: Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering. 16


THOMAS COUNTRYMAN Chairman, Board of Directors, Arms Control Association

Website: armscontrol.org Twitter: @TMCountryman / @ArmsControlNow

Thomas Countryman is Chairman of the Board of the Arms Control Association (ACA). The ACA is a nonpartisan NGO which analyzes key security issues and advises the executive branch, Congress and the public on choices to promote global security and reduce the risk that weapons of mass destruction will be used. He retired from the Senior Foreign Service in January 2017 after 35 years of service. At that time, he served simultaneously as acting Undersecretary for Arms Control and as Assistant Secretary for International Security and Nonproliferation (ISN), a position he held since September 2011. The ISN Bureau leads the U.S. effort to prevent the spread of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. After serving in Belgrade, Washington, and Cairo, he advised Ambassador Albright on Middle East affairs at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations, and was Director for Near East Affairs at the National Security Council. He directed State’s Office of South Central European Affairs, and was Minister for Political Affairs in Rome, Deputy Chief of Mission at the Embassy in Athens (including five months as Chargé d'Affaires), and Foreign Policy Advisor to the U.S. Marine Commandant. Before ISN, he was Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Political-Military Affairs, and Deputy Assistant Secretary for European Affairs, with responsibility for the Balkans. Countryman graduated from Washington University in St. Louis (summa cum laude) in economics. He speaks SerboCroatian, Arabic, German, Italian and Greek.

MADELYN CREEDON Former Principal Deputy Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. Department of Energy; Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs, U.S. Department of Defense

Twitter: @mrc5920

Madelyn Creedon has had a long career in US government service, most recently as Principal Deputy Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the Department of Energy, a position she held from 2014 to 2017. 17


She served in the Pentagon as Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs from 2011 to 2014, overseeing policy development in the areas of missile defense, nuclear security, cybersecurity, and space. She served as counsel for the U.S. Senate Committee on Armed Services for many years, beginning in 1990; assignments and focus areas included the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces as well as threat reduction and nuclear nonproliferation. During that time, she also served as Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs at the NNSA, Associate Deputy Secretary of Energy, and General Counsel for the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission. She started her career as a trial attorney at the Department of Energy. Following retirement from federal service in 2017, Madelyn established Green Marble Group, LLC, a consulting company and currently serves on a number of advisory boards related to national security. She is also a Research Professor at the George Washington University Elliott School of International Affairs and a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution. She holds a JD from St. Louis University School of Law, and a BA from the University of Evansville.

SETH B. DARLING Director, Center for Molecular Engineering and Senior Scientist Chemical Sciences & Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory; Fellow, Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago

Website: anl.gov • Twitter: @argonne

Seth B. Darling is the Director of the Center for Molecular Engineering and a Senior Scientist in the Chemical Sciences & Engineering Division at Argonne National Laboratory. He also serves as the Director of the Advanced Materials for EnergyWater Systems (AMEWS) Energy Frontier Research Center. He received his PhD in physical chemistry from the University of Chicago. His group’s research centers around molecular engineering with a current emphasis on advanced materials for cleaning water, having made previous contributions in fields ranging from selfassembly to advanced lithography to solar energy. He has published over 125 scientific articles, holds a dozen patents, is a co-author of popular books on water and on debunking climate skeptic myths, and lectures widely on topics related to energy, water, and climate.

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OEINDRILA DUBE Philip K. Pearson Professor of Global Conflict Studies, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

Website: odube.net

Oeindrila Dube’s research focuses on understanding the causes and consequences of conflict and crime in the developing world. Dube’s current research interests include studying the role of employment opportunities in engaging at-risk Muslim youth, understanding the role of trauma in post-conflict recovery, and analyzing the role of gender in conflict. Through this research agenda, she aims to help advance The Pearson Institute’s goal of incubating new strategies for curbing violence worldwide. In past work, Dube has examined how commodity price shocks influence civil war in Colombia, documented how the availability of guns from the U.S. promotes violent crime in Mexico, and experimentally evaluated the effects of post-conflict reconciliation in Sierra Leone. Dube’s research affiliations include the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD), the Centre for Economic Policy Research, the International Growth Center, and the University of Chicago Crime Lab. She co-chairs the crime and violence initiative at MIT’s Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) and serves as an Associate Editor at the Review of Economics and Statistics. Before joining The Pearson Institute, Dube was an Assistant Professor of Politics and Economics at New York University and a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Global Development. She holds a PhD in public policy from Harvard University, an MPhil in economics from the University of Oxford, and a BA in public policy from Stanford University. She also received a Rhodes Scholarship in 2002.

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PAUL FARMER Chief Strategist and Co-Founder, Partners In Health; Kolokotrones University Professor, Harvard University

Website: pih.org / ghsm.hms.harvard.edu Twitter: @pih / @harvardmed

Medical anthropologist and physician Paul Farmer has dedicated his life to improving health care for the world's poorest people. He is Co-Founder and Chief Strategist of Partners In Health, an international non-profit organization that since 1987 has provided direct health care services and undertaken research and advocacy activities on behalf of those who are sick and living in poverty. Dr. Farmer and his colleagues have pioneered novel community-based treatment strategies that demonstrate the delivery of high-quality health care in resourcepoor settings. Dr. Farmer holds an MD and PhD from Harvard University, where he is the Kolokotrones University Professor and the Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School; he is also Chief of the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Additionally, Dr. Farmer serves as the United Nations Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Community-Based Medicine. Dr. Farmer has written extensively on health, human rights, and the consequences of social inequality. He is the recipient of numerous honors, including the 2018 Public Welfare Medal from the National Academy of Sciences.

ELIZABETH FERRIS Research Professor, Institute for the Study of International Migration, Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Website: georgetown.edu/profile/elizabeth-ferris Twitter: @Beth_Ferris / @gumigration / @georgetownsfs

Elizabeth Ferris is a Research Professor with the Institute for the Study of International Migration at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. From January-September 2016, she also served as Senior Advisor to the UN General Assembly’s Summit for Refugees and Migrants in New York. From 2006-2015, she was a Senior Fellow and Co-Director of the Brookings-LSE 20


Project on Internal Displacement where she worked to support understanding and protection of internally displaced persons. Prior to joining Brookings, she spent 20 years working in the field of humanitarian assistance, most recently in Geneva, Switzerland at the World Council of Churches. She has also served as the Director of the Church World Service’s Immigration and Refugee Program, as Research Director for the Life & Peace Institute in Uppsala, Sweden and as a Fulbright Professor at the Universidad Autónoma de México. Her teaching experience has included positions at Lafayette College, Miami University and Pembroke State University. She has written extensively on refugee, migration and humanitarian issues, including The Politics of Protection: The Limits of Humanitarian Action (Brookings Institution Press, 2011) and Consequences of Chaos: Syria’s Humanitarian Crisis and the Failure to Protect, with Kemal Kirsici (Brookings Institution Press, 2016). Her newest book, Refugees, Migration and Global Governance: Negotiating the Global Compacts, coauthored with Katharine Donato, was published by Routledge Press in 2019. She has done extensive work on environmental migration and displacement, with a particular focus on planned relocations in order to protect people from the effects of disasters and environmental change, including climate change. In this regard, she has written on such diverse issues as displacement in the Arctic and the Pacific. She received her BA degree from Duke University and her MA and PhD degrees from the University of Florida.

ANNE GEARAN White House Correspondent, The Washington Post

Twitter: @agearan • Facebook: agearan

Anne Gearan is a White House Correspondent for The Washington Post, with a focus on foreign affairs, national security and U.S. security policy. This is the third time she has been posted at the White House. Gearan

has

covered

U.S.

policy

and

engagement

overseas

across four administrations, with particular emphasis on Syria, Iran, Iraq, Russia, North Korea and China. Gearan has also focused on Afghanistan and Pakistan, and traveled extensively with the U.S. Secretary of State and military leaders. She has visited more than 80 countries on six continents while covering the State Department, Pentagon and White House.

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She was previously the paper’s lead campaign reporter covering Hillary Clinton, writing daily campaign stories and analysis of the 2016 presidential race. She is an MSNBC contributor, providing reporting and analysis on politics and foreign policy. Gearan joined the Post in 2012 after more than 20 years with The Associated Press (AP), including 10 covering national security issues from Washington. She was the Chief Diplomatic Correspondent for the wire service from 2004 to 2009, and the Chief Pentagon Correspondent from 2009 to 2011. Gearan was the Senior Foreign Affairs Specialist on the White House team for AP prior to joining the Post. She served three times as National Security Editor in the Washington bureau. Gearan grew up in Rochester, New York as the daughter of a newspaper editor and a former reporter. Her first job was delivering the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle. She lives in Washington.

FRANCESCA GIOVANNINI Strategy and Policy Planning Officer to the Executive Secretary, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization

Website: ctbto.org • Twitter: @fgiovannini123

Francesca Giovannini is Strategy and Policy Officer in the Office of the Executive Secretary at the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). Prior to joining CTBTO, she served for five years as Director for Global Affairs and International Security at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in Boston. She earned her doctorate from the University of Oxford, UK. In 2012-2013, she was a MacArthur Post-Doctoral Nuclear Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. She taught graduate seminars on arms control, strategic stability and nuclear non-proliferation policies at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and at the University of California,

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Berkeley.


SUPRATIK GUHA Professor, Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago; Director, Nanoscience and Technology Division and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, and Senior Scientific Advisor to the Director, Argonne National Laboratory

Website: guha-lab.pme.uchicago.edu

Supratik Guha is a professor at the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, and Science Strategist in the Physical Sciences and Engineering Directorate at Argonne National Laboratory. Prior to 2016, he worked at IBM Research, where his last position was a Director of Physical Sciences, responsible for IBM’s worldwide strategy in the physical sciences. His interests are in materials and systems for future information processing. Much of his recent work and interests have involved geographical area sensor networks and cyberphysical systems for water, soil science and agriculture. He holds a PhD in materials sciences from the University of Southern California, and is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He is also a Fellow of the Materials Research Society and the American Physical Society.

ALICE HILL David M. Rubenstein Senior Fellow for Energy and the Environment, Council on Foreign Relations

Website: cfr.org/expert/alice-c-hill • Twitter: @Alice_C_Hill

Alice Hill is the David M. Rubenstein Senior Fellow for Energy and the Environment at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). Her work at CFR focuses on the risks, consequences, and responses associated with climate change. Hill previously served as Special Assistant to President Barack Obama and Senior Director for Resilience Policy on the National Security Council staff where she led the development of national policy to build resilience to catastrophic risks, including climate change and biological threats. Prior to this, Hill served as Senior Counselor to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), in which she led the formulation of DHS's first-ever climate adaptation plan and the development of strategic plans regarding catastrophic biological and chemical threats, including pandemics. Earlier in her career, she was a supervising judge on the Los Angeles Superior Court and Chief of the White-Collar Crime Unit in the United States 23


Attorney’s Office in Los Angeles, California. Oxford University Press published her co-authored book, Building a Resilient Tomorrow, in 2019. She currently serves on the boards of the Environmental Defense Fund and Munich Re Group’s U.S.-based companies. In 2020, Yale University awarded her the Public Voices Fellowship on the Climate Crisis.

ELIZABETH HUME Vice President, Alliance for Peacebuilding

Website: allianceforpeacebuilding.org Twitter: @LizHume4Peace / @AfPeacebuilding

Liz Hume, JD, MA, is the Vice President at the Alliance of Peacebuilding. She directs the Policy and Advocacy program, where she co-leads the Global Fragility Act Coalition, comprising 65+organizational members, which was instrumental in supporting the passage of the bipartisan Global Fragility Act recently signed into law. She is a conflict prevention expert and has more than 20 years of experience in senior leadership positions in bilateral, multilateral institutions and NGOs overseeing conflict prevention and peacebuilding programs in conflictaffected and fragile states in Asia, Eastern Europe, and Africa. She was the Chief Legal Counsel for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Bosnia and Herzegovina and in Kosovo, where she was responsible for developing the legal framework and policies in support of the implementation of the Dayton Peace Accords and UN Resolution 1244. After 9/11, Liz worked for the International Rescue Committee in Pakistan and Afghanistan, where she established and managed the Protection Department for Afghan refugees and returning IDPs (internally displaced persons). She also helped establish the Office of Conflict Management and Mitigation at USAID, developing programs and policies to improve the U.S. government’s ability to address the causes of violent, deadly conflict.

AMIR JINA Assistant Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

Website: amirjina.com • Twitter: @amirjina

Amir Jina is an Assistant Professor at University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy, researching how economic and social development is shaped by the environment. He uses economics, climate science, and remote sensing to understand the impacts of climate in both rich and poor countries, and has 24


conducted fieldwork in India, Bangladesh, Kenya, and Uganda. Jina is a founding member of the Climate Impact Lab, an interdisciplinary collaboration estimating the human and economic costs of climate change with state-of-the-art empirical methods. Prior to University of Chicago, He was a visiting scholar at University of California, Berkeley where he worked on the Risky Business initiative. Jina received his PhD in sustainable development and MA in climate and society from Columbia University, BA in mathematics and theoretical physics from Trinity College, Dublin, and previously worked with the Red Cross/Red Crescent in South Asia and as a high school teacher in Japan.

WALTER KAELIN Envoy of the Chair, Platform on Disaster Displacement Website: disasterdisplacement.org • Twitter: @wakaelin / @DDisplacement

Walter Kaelin is Professor Emeritus for International and Swiss Constitutional Law, University of Bern in Switzerland. He is the present Envoy of the Chair of the Platform on Disaster Displacement and the former Envoy of the Chairmanship of the Nansen Initiative on Disaster-Induced Cross-Border Displacement (20122015). Previously, he served as Representative of the United Nations (UN) Secretary-General on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons (20042010), as a member of the UN Human Rights Committee (2003-2008 / 20122014) and as Special Rapporteur of the UN Human Rights Commission on the situation of human rights in Iraqi-occupied Kuwait (1991-1992). From 2011-2015, he acted as Director of the Swiss Centre of Excellence in Human Rights.

ZALMAY KHALILZAD Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation, U.S. Department of State

Website: state.gov • Twitter: @us4afghanpeace

Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad was appointed by Secretary Pompeo as Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation on September 21, 2018. Previously, Ambassador Khalilzad served as U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations 2007-2009, Ambassador to Iraq 2005-2007, and Ambassador to Afghanistan from 2003 to 2005.

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Prior to that, Amb. Khalilzad served as Special Presidential Envoy to Afghanistan, and prior to that Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Southwest Asia, Near East, and North African Affairs at the National Security Council. Between 1993 and 1999, Amb. Khalilzad was Director of the Strategy, Doctrine, and Force Structure program for RAND's Project Air Force. While with RAND, he founded the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. Between 1991 and 1992, Amb. Khalilzad served as Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Planning. He also served as a senior political scientist at RAND and an associate professor at the University of California San Diego in 1989 and 1991. From 1985 to 1989 at the Department of State, Amb. Khalilzad was a member of the Policy Planning Staff and served as Special Advisor to the Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs working on policy issues, advising on the Iran-Iraq war and the Soviet War in Afghanistan. From 1979 to 1986, Amb. Khalilzad was an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. Amb. Khalilzad received his bachelor's and master's degree from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon. He went on to earn a PhD from the University of Chicago.

CHELSEY L. KIVLAND Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Dartmouth College

Website: chelseykivland.net • Twitter: @ChelseyKivland

Chelsey L. Kivland is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Dartmouth College, where she writes and teaches about street politics, insecurity, and social performance in contemporary Haiti and the broader Caribbean. She is the author of Street Sovereigns: Young Men and the Makeshift State in Urban Haiti (Cornell University Press, 2020), which analyzed the potential and challenges of organizing politically in urban contexts characterized by poverty, insecurity, and governmental neglect. Her current project explores changing notions of citizenship, statehood, and the social contract through an ethnography of the global regulatory regime of criminal deportation, as manifested between the United States and Haiti.

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VALLY KOUBI Professor and Senior Scientist, Center for Comparative and International Studies, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich; Professor, Institute of Economics, University of Bern

Website: ib.ethz.ch/people/koubi.html

Vally Koubi is a Professor and Senior Scientist at the Center for Comparative and International Studies (CIS) at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich), and a Professor at the Department of Economics at the University of Bern, Switzerland. She received her BA degree from the University of Athens, Greece, and her MS, MA and PhD degrees from the University of Rochester. Koubi’s research focuses on the social consequences of climatic changes and the determinants of domestic environmental policies and outcomes as well as international environmental cooperation across countries and time. Her research on the social consequences of climatic changes aims at understanding the effects of climatic changes on migration and conflict mainly in the developing world. This research combines perspectives from different social science disciplines and employs a wide range of research methods, including macroquantitative analyses and micro-level surveys, survey experiments, and field experiments in several countries such as Bangladesh, Cambodia, Kenya, Nicaragua, Peru, Uganda, and Vietnam. She has published articles in journals including Climatic Change, Ecological Economics, International Organizations, Journal of Peace Research, Nature Climate Change and World Development.

MARK KOYAMA Associate Professor of Economics, George Mason University Website: mason.gmu.edu/~mkoyama2/About.html • Twitter: @MarkKoyama

Mark Koyama is an Associate Professor in Economics at George Mason University. He is also a Research Fellow at the Center for Economic Research and Policy (CEPR) and a Senior Scholar at the Mercatus Center. Born and educated in the UK, Mark received his BA and DPhil from the University of Oxford. His main research interests are in economic history. In particular he is interested in the institutions that support economic growth and liberalism. His book, Persecution and Toleration: The Long Road to Religious Freedom (2019) with Noel Johnson, explores the rise of religious toleration in early modern Europe. In recent work he has studied the economic impact of the Black Death and state formation across Eurasia. 27


KA YEE C. LEE Provost and David Lee Shillinglaw Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Chemistry, James Franck Institute, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and the College, University of Chicago

Ka Yee C. Lee serves as the fourteenth Provost of the University of Chicago. As Provost, she is responsible for academic and research programs across the University and oversees the University’s budget. She is the David Lee Shillinglaw Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Chemistry, the James Franck Institute, the Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and the College, and a member of the Board of the University of Chicago Medical Center and the Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratory. Prior to her appointment as Provost, Lee served as Vice Provost for Research, working with deans, faculty, and researchers across the University to increase access to research funding and resources, among other responsibilities. Lee is an elected member of the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and a Fellow of the American Physical Society. Her research focus lies in the area of membrane biophysics, and she is the author or co-author of more than 125 scholarly publications. Lee joined the University in 1998 as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and was appointed full professor in 2008. She has served as Director of the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center and Associate Director of the James Franck Institute, as well as Chair of the Faculty Advisory Board for The Hong Kong Jockey Club University of Chicago Academic Complex | Francis and Rose Yuen Campus in Hong Kong. Her honors include being named a Searle Scholar, a David and Lucile Packard Fellow for Science and Engineering, and a Sloan Research Fellow. She also was the recipient of the Llewellyn John and Harriet Manchester Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and the inaugural recipient of the Arthur L. Kelly Prize for Exceptional Faculty Service in the Physical Sciences Division. Lee holds an ScB degree in electrical engineering from Brown University, and MS and PhD degrees in applied physics from Harvard University. She completed her postdoctoral training at Stanford University and the University of California, Santa Barbara. 28


CLARE LOCKHART Director and Co-Founder, Institute for State Effectiveness

Twitter: @clarelockhart

Clare Lockhart is the Director and Co-Founder of the Institute for State Effectiveness (ISE), which works on citizen-centered governance, and economic development, including in post-disaster and peace-building contexts. She is also a Senior Fellow at Yale University’s Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, where she teaches seminars on citizenship, governance and approaches to reform. Lockhart is the co-author, along with Ashraf Ghani, of the book Fixing Failed States and is currently writing two books. She regularly contributes analysis on issues of security, peacebuilding, and development. Lockhart has worked in a range of countries including in the United States, Europe, East Asia, Nepal, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Sudan. She has been named by Foreign Policy magazine as one of the “100 Most Influential Global Thinkers” and nominated as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Lockhart serves on a number of boards including the Asia Foundation, SOLA Afghanistan, and Equality for Peace and Democracy.

ABRAHM LUSTGARTEN Senior Environmental Reporter, ProPublica

Twitter: @abrahml

Abrahm Lustgarten is a Senior Environmental Reporter, focusing on the way climate change will affect the way we live. For the past two years he has been at work on a series of articles in partnership with The New York Times magazine and the Pulitzer Center about global climate migration and demographic responses to the climate crisis. His 2015 series examining the causes of water scarcity in the American West, “Killing the Colorado,” was a finalist for the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting and received the 2016 Keck Futures Initiative Communication Award from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Lustgarten coproduced the 2016 Discovery Channel film “Killing the Colorado,” and has previously worked with PBS Frontline, including on the 2010 documentary “The Spill,” about how BP’s corporate culture of recklessness and profiteering led to the Deepwater Horizon tragedy. That film was nominated for an Emmy. His early investigation into the environmental and economic consequences of fracking was some of the first coverage of the issue, and received the George Polk award for environmental

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reporting, the National Press Foundation award for best energy writing, a Sigma Delta Chi award and was honored as finalist for the Goldsmith Prize. Before joining ProPublica in 2008, Lustgarten was a staff writer at Fortune. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, Scientific American, Wired, Salon, and Esquire, among other publications. He is the author of two books, Run to Failure: BP and the Making of the Deepwater Horizon Disaster, and also China’s Great Train: Beijing’s Drive West and the Campaign to Remake Tibet, a project that was funded in part by a grant from the MacArthur Foundation. Lustgarten earned a master’s in journalism from Columbia University in 2003 and a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from Cornell University.

LAUREL MILLER Program Director, Asia, International Crisis Group; Former Deputy and Acting Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, U.S. Department of State

Website: crisisgroup.org • Twitter: @LaurelMillerICG

As Director of International Crisis Group’s Asia Program since January 2019, Laurel leads the organization’s research, analysis, and policy advocacy about and in the region. Previously, she was a Senior Foreign Policy Expert at the RAND Corporation, where her work covered a wide range of subjects including conflict resolution, democratization, institution-building, and anti-corruption. From 2013 to mid-2017, Laurel was the deputy and then acting Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan at the U.S. Department of State. During prior U.S. government service, she was Senior Advisor to the Assistant Secretary of State for European Affairs, Senior Advisor to the U.S. Special Envoy for the Balkans, and Deputy to the Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues. She was directly involved in peace negotiations in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Macedonia. Laurel also served as Director for Western Hemisphere Affairs at the National Security Council. Laurel was a Senior Expert at the U.S. Institute of Peace, and has been an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and an Adjunct Professor of law at Georgetown Law. Earlier, she practiced law with Covington & Burling in Washington, DC, and Brussels. Laurel is a graduate of Princeton University and the University of Chicago Law School.

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STEVEN E. MILLER Director, International Security Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Website: belfercenter.org/person/steven-e-miller

Steven E. Miller is Director of the International Security Program, Editor-in-Chief of the quarterly journal, International Security and also co-editor of the International Security Program's book series, Belfer Center Studies in International Security (which is published by the MIT Press). Previously, he was Senior Research Fellow at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) and taught defense and arms control studies in the Department of Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Miller is editor or co-editor of more than two dozen books, including, most recently, The Next Great War? The Roots of World War I and the Risk of U.S.-China Conflict. Miller is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, where he is a member of their Committee on International Security Studies (CISS). He currently co-directs the Academy's project On the Global Nuclear Future.

KAYLY OBER Senior Advocate and Program Manager, Climate Displacement Program, Refugees International

Website: refugeesinternational.org • Twitter: @KaylyOber

Kayly Ober is the Senior Advocate and Program Manager of the Climate Displacement Program at Refugees International (RI). Prior to RI, she worked as a Policy Specialist for the Asian Development Bank and as a Consultant at the World Bank, where she authored the flagship report, “Groundswell: Preparing for Internal Climate Migration.” She has also previously worked at the Overseas Development Institute, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and World Resources Institute, among others. She is currently completing her PhD in geography at the University of Bonn, where her dissertation explores the governance of climate change and migration issues at the international level and based on fieldwork in urban and rural Thailand. She holds a Master of Science in environment and development (with distinction) from the London School of Economics and a Bachelor of Arts in

.... . ..... . .

international studies (cum laude) from American University.

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ADA PALMER Associate Professor, Early Modern European History and the College, University of Chicago

Websites: adapalmer.com / exurbe.com • Twitter: @Ada_Palmer

Ada Palmer is a historian focusing on the history of censorship and radical thought, especially the ways censorship evolves and changes during revolutions in information technology, from the print revolution to the digital. An Associate Professor in the History Department with affiliations in Classics, Gender Studies, and the Institute on the Formation of Knowledge, she works broadly on the history of science, religion, heresy, freethought, atheism, censorship, books, printing, and long-term European history, especially the Renaissance and Enlightenment. Her current research focuses on how studying the print revolution can help lawmakers and corporations make wiser choices today during the digital revolution, while her first academic book Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance (2014) explores the impact of the rediscovery of classical atomism on the development of modern science and thought. She is also a science fiction and fantasy novelist, author of the awardwinning Terra Ignota series beginning with Too Like the Lightning (Tor Books), which explores a twenty-fifth century civilization of voluntary citizenship and borderless nations, written in the style of an eighteenth-century philosophical novel. She is a disability activist with a focus on self-care training and invisible disability, a composer of polyphonic a cappella music, studies anime and manga, works as a consultant for anime and manga publishers, blogs for Tor.com, and writes the history, philosophy and travel blog ExUrbe.com, which hosts her recent essay on the question "If the Black Death caused the Renaissance will COVID-19 cause a golden age?" and her celebrated guide to how to find good gelato anywhere in the world, once featured in The Economist.

GRETCHEN PETERS Executive Director, Center on Illicit Networks and Transnational Organized Crime

Website: gretchenpeters.org / cintoc.org / counteringcrime.org Twitter: @GretchenSPeters

Gretchen Peters is Executive Director of the Center on Illicit Networks and Transnational Organized Crime (CINTOC), a strategic intelligence organization that finds hidden criminal networks, and she co-founded the Alliance to

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Counter

Crime

Online. Her

work supports governments,

communities

and foundations to understand, investigate and counter transnational and online threats, ranging from rogue states to criminal traffickers. Peters has served as a subject matter expert (SME) to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Counter-Narcotics and Global Threats and USCENTCOM’s AfPak Center (J2), and she supported USSOCOM’s Counternarcotics and Transnational Threats (J36) team to identify, research and counter tier one security threats. She co-chaired an OECD Task Force on Wildlife and Environmental Crime, and received grants from key conservation foundations, including the Elephant Crisis Fund, to map illicit supply chains moving ivory from Africa to Asia. Peters is considered a leading authority on the intersection of crime and terrorism, trade-based money laundering, the illegal wildlife trade, online crime and transnational organized crime. In a past life, she worked as a journalist for 20 years. Peters authored Seeds of Terror, a groundbreaking 2009 book about the Afghan heroin trade that impacted U.S. policy towards Afghanistan and the understanding of the conflict there.

MICHÈLE DUVIVIER PIERRE-LOUIS President, Fondation Connaissance et Liberté-FOKAL; Former Prime Minister of Haiti

In September 2008, Michèle Duvivier Pierre-Louis became Prime Minister of Haiti. While Prime Minister, Pierre-Louis also served as Minister of Justice and Public Security. Upon leaving office in November 2009, Pierre-Louis resumed her activities at the Fondation Connaissance et Liberté – FOKAL, as President, coordinating special projects. Pierre-Louis is also a professor at Université Quisqueya, Haïti. In 2010, President Zapatero of Spain nominated her as a member of the International Commission Against the Death Penalty, based in Spain. In 2014, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon nominated her as a member of a High Level Panel on a Technology Bank for the Least Developed Countries. In 2017, UN Secretary General Antonio Guteres nominated her as a member of the High Level Advisory Board on Mediation. Michèle Duvivier Pierre-Louis is a member of a Review “Chemins Critiques” in which she wrote several articles along with other Haitian and Caribbean writers, on politics, 33


economics, arts and culture. She has also contributed to several books and reviews. She holds a degree from Queens College of New York and has received several awards and distinctions in her career. She holds a Doctorate Honoris Causa in humanities from Saint Michael College, Vermont in 2004. From September through December 2010, she was a Resident Fellow at the Institute of Politics at Harvard Kennedy School. In December 2014, she received a second Doctorate Honoris Causa from the University of San Francisco.

JAMES A. ROBINSON Institute Director, The Pearson Institute, Reverend Dr. Richard L. Pearson Professor of Global Conflict Studies and University Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

Website: uchicago.edu/jamesrobinson

As Institute Director, James A. Robinson is guiding The Pearson Institute’s research agenda, engaging the international academic and practitioner community through The Pearson Global Forum, and setting the curriculum for the next generation of leaders and scholars. A prominent political scientist and economist, Robinson has conducted influential research in the field of political and economic development and the factors that are the root causes of conflict. His work explores the underlying relationship between poverty and the institutions of a society and how institutions emerge out of political conflicts. Drawing insights from game theory and global history, he employs rigorous statistical analysis and case studies to identify the political foundations of economic development and growth. His work has deepened the understanding of political institutions throughout the world. Robinson has a particular interest in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa. He is widely recognized as the co-author of Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty, with Daron Acemoglu, the Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics at MIT. Translated into 38 languages since its publication in 2012, the book offers a unique historic exploration of why some countries have flourished economically while others have fallen into poverty. He has also written and coauthored numerous books and articles, including the acclaimed Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy (also with Acemoglu). 34


His most recent book coauthored with Daron Acemoglu, The Narrow Corridor: States, Societies, and the Fate of Liberty answers the question of how liberty flourishes in some states but falls to authoritarianism or anarchy in others–and explains how it can continue to thrive despite new threats. He is currently conducting research in Bolivia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sierra Leone, Haiti, and Colombia, where he has taught for many years during the summer at the University of the Andes in Bogotá. Robinson served as an academic advisor to the World Bank’s 2017 World Development Report on Governance, on the board of the Global Development Network from January 2009 to December 2011, and on the Swedish Development Policy Council, a committee advising the Swedish Foreign Minister on Sweden’s international development policy, from 2007 to 2010.

ROBERT ROSNER William E. Wrather Distinguished Service Professor, Departments of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, the College, and Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago; Chair, Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Website: astro.uchicago.edu/people/robert-rosner.php

Robert Rosner is a theoretical physicist on the faculty of the University of Chicago since 1987, where he is the William E. Wrather Distinguished Service Professor in the departments of Astronomy & Astrophysics and Physics, as well as in the Enrico Fermi Institute, the Computation Institute, and the Harris School of Public Policy. He served as Argonne Laboratory Director from 2005–2009, and prior to that was the Laboratory’s Chief Scientist and Associate Laboratory Director for Physical, Biological and Computational Sciences (2002–2005). He is Chair of the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists; was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001; and was elected to the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (as a Foreign Member) in 2004. He has been increasingly involved in energy technologies, and in the public policy issues that relate to the development and deployment of various energy production and consumption technologies, including especially nuclear energy, the electrification of transport, and energy use in urban environments. In 2011 he co-founded the University of Chicago’s Energy Policy Institute (EPIC), spanning the Harris School of Public Policy, the Booth School of Business, and the Griffin Department of Economics.

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MICHAEL SEMPLE Professor, The Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice, Queen's University Belfast

Michael Semple is a Professor at The Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice, Queen's University Belfast. He conducts research and dialogue, delivers policy advice and participates in the public debate on conflict and peace-making. He is considered a global expert on the Taliban movement. He researches the political culture of the Taliban and its implications for peace-making strategies. He has researched and advised on the inter-play between local and national level processes in peace-making. Semple has worked and travelled extensively in Afghanistan and Pakistan for three decades. He has served with the United Nations and was Deputy to the European Union Special Representative in Afghanistan. During the COVID crisis he has been based in Afghanistan and is one of the few Westerners travelling extensively in the country. He has served as an Honorary Adviser to the Chair of the Afghan High Peace Council. His advice is widely sought by senior Afghans and international actors in the peace process.

WENDY R. SHERMAN Professor of Practice and Director, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School; Former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs, U.S. Department of State

Website: cpl.hks.harvard.edu • Twitter: @wendyrsherman / @harvardcpl

Wendy R. Sherman is a Professor of the Practice of Public Leadership and Director of the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School. In addition, she is a Senior Fellow at the School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. Amb. Sherman is Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs. She is currently an MSNBC global affairs contributor and on the USA TODAY Board of Contributors. Amb. Sherman is the author of Not for the Faint of Heart: Lessons in Courage, Power and Persistence published by PublicAffairs, September 2018. She serves on the boards of the International Crisis Group and the Atlantic Council, and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Aspen Strategy Group. 36


She has served four U.S. Secretaries of State. As Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs, Amb. Sherman led the U.S. negotiating team that reached agreement on a Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action between the P5+1, the European Union, and Iran for which, among other diplomatic accomplishments, she was awarded the National Security Medal by President Barack Obama. Amb. Sherman, with a Masters in social work, began her career as Director of Child Welfare for the State of Maryland. Later, she managed Senator Barbara Mikulski’s successful campaign for the U.S. Senate, served as Director of EMILY’s List and ran Campaign ’88 at the Democratic National Committee for the Dukakis presidential campaign.

KONSTANTIN SONIN John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago Website: harris.uchicago.edu/directory/konstantin-sonin Twitter: @k_sonin • Facebook: konstantin.sonin

Konstantin Sonin is John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and Faculty Affiliate of The Pearson Institute. His research interests include political economics, development, and economic theory. His papers have been published in leading academic journals in economics and political science. In addition to his academic work, Sonin writes a blog on Russian political and economic issues and a fortnightly column for the Russian-language newspaper Vedomosti, and contributes to all major Russian media. In 2012, he was an Economic Advisor to the presidential campaign of Mikhail Prokhorov. Sonin earned an MSc and PhD in mathematics from Moscow State University and an MA in economics at Moscow’s New Economic School, was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, served on the faculty of the New Economic School (NES) and Higher School of Economics (HSE) in Moscow, and was also a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. As an NES and then HSE Vice-Rector, Sonin was a Founder of the HSE-NES joint undergraduate program, and oversaw HSE international recruitment effort in 15 disciplines. Now he is affiliated with HSE and Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics as a Visiting Professor and Adviser. 37


MICHAEL TIBORIS Nonresident Fellow, Chicago Council on Global Affairs; Director, Clear Water Farms Program, River Alliance of Wisconsin

Website: thechicagocouncil.org/expert/michael-tiboris wisconsinrivers.org • Twitter: @MichaelTiboris

Michael Tiboris is a writer, educator, and water policy analyst specializing in water resource conflict. He is a Nonresident Fellow at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs’ Global Food and Agriculture Program, Director of the Clear Water Farms Program at the River Alliance of Wisconsin and Faculty Affiliate of The Pearson Institute. He lectures on water politics at the Harris School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin Madison. His work on water politics and policy is published in peer reviewed academic journals, law reviews, policy reports, popular media sources, and in partner publications for the World Bank, USAID, and the Environmental Law and Policy Center. Tiboris holds a PhD in applied ethics and political philosophy from the University of California, San Diego, and has been supported by the Spencer Foundation, San Diego State University’s Institute for Ethics and Public Affairs, and the American Council of Learned Societies. His research was recognized by the University of Pennsylvania’s “Global Go-To Think Tank Index Report” as among the best work produced in 2016.

ANDREW WILDER Vice President, Asia Programs, U.S. Institute of Peace

Website: usip.org •Twitter: @usip • Facebook: usinstituteofpeace

Andrew Wilder is the Vice President of Asia programs. He joined the U.S. Institute of Peace in August 2010 as the Director of Afghanistan and Pakistan Programs. Prior to joining the Institute, he served as Research Director for Politics and Policy at the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University. Previously, Wilder served as Founder and Director of Afghanistan's first independent policy research institution, the Kabul-based Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU). This was preceded by more than 10 years managing humanitarian and development programs in Pakistan and Afghanistan, including with Save the Children, International Rescue Committee, and Mercy Corps International. Wilder is the author of The Pakistani Voter: Electoral Politics and Voting Behaviour in the Punjab (Oxford University Press, 1999), and has written numerous other 38


publications. He has conducted extensive research exploring issues relating to statebuilding, development and stabilization efforts in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Recent research has focused on electoral politics in Afghanistan, and the effectiveness of aid in promoting stabilization objectives in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Wilder holds a bachelor’s degree in foreign service from Georgetown University. He also holds a master’s degree in law and diplomacy and a doctorate from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

AUSTIN L. WRIGHT Assistant Professor, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

Twitter: @austinlwright

Austin L. Wright is Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago's Harris School of Public Policy and Faculty Affiliate of The Pearson Institute. His research leverages microlevel data to study the political economy of conflict and crime in Afghanistan, Colombia, Indonesia, Iraq, and Thailand. His research on substate conflict largely focuses on rebel strategy, examining how rebel groups adopt new technologies of war in a dynamic environment. Wright’s research also unpacks how individuals respond to unexpected economic and climatic conditions, including projects on opium diseases and intelligence sharing, weather shocks and crime, and wildfires and interpersonal violence. His work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Niehaus Center for Global Governance, The Asia Foundation, and World Bank. Wright is a Faculty Affiliate of the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project, a Nonresident Fellow of the Liechtenstein Institute, and a Non-Resident Research Associate of the Deep South Watch program in Thailand. He received a BA and BS from the University of Texas at Austin and an MA and PhD from Princeton University.

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