1 Bird Scene - August & September 2011

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BIRD ISSUE ONE AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2011

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THE KNOWLEDGE CENTRE FOR ALL PET BIRDS

CONSERVATION PROJECTS

BREEDING PSITTACINES FOR PLEASURE AND PROFIT

FOREIGN BIRD KEEPING THE NATIONAL EXHIBITION BREEDING CAPE DOVES

BREEDING FR E

INTRODUCTION FROM LES RANCE

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GREATER BLUE EARED GLOSSY STARLINGS


AN INTRODUC B ird Scene is our new challenge for 2011. I consider that The Parrot Society and our professional Designers and I.T. Consultants have the skills and expertise gained from the past 44 years of publishing to be successful with such a venture. A FREE electronic magazine for all Bird Keepers to publicise their specialist areas of bird keeping will be a valuable resource in these difficult economic times. For over 44 years we have produced a monthly magazine for our members who have paid a subscription for the publication and this will continue as the magazine is the ‘Life Blood’ of our Society. However, we feel that as in 2007 when we commenced our Exhibition at Stafford ‘now is the time’ to commence an e-magazine. Many large magazine publishing companies have tried to develop ‘pay for’ electronic e-magazines but there is

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CTION

BY THE EDITOR

an understandable reluctance in these financially strained times from many to pay for these offerings. We do not have shareholders to pay and therefore our costs are modest and we feel that we can succeed to produce this new magazine FREE of charge for all Bird Keepers. Obviously we need assistance to obtain articles from the very many sources that are active in the bird keeping world but we are confident that in the same way that the Specialist Societies rallied around in 2007 to restart ‘The National Exhibition’ we will receive the material that is needed to make for a very interesting, colourful and informative publication. On a personal note I have kept and bred many foreign birds and Budgerigars over the years and am greatly looking forward to editing this new publication. Our aim is to ensure that everyone with an interest in birds and a personal computer are aware of this publication.

LES RANCE

We will use the e-magazine to publicise and raise donations for our Conservation activities around the world and to promote The National Exhibition which will be held at Stafford County Showground on Sunday 9th October as an additional feature at our Stafford Sales Day. The Exhibiting Societies have found this event to be just what they were missing. The Parrot Society supplies the Exhibition Halls and all the staging at no cost to the Societies and also pays a bounty for each show cage benched. Also, with thousands of bird enthusiasts attending the Show there are great opportunities for the Societies to display their birds and recruit new members. As the Exhibition has now been running for four years it is relatively easy for the Parrot Society to organise and we feel that now is the time to turn our expertise to another area of Bird Keeping, hence our development of this e-magazine.

Les Rance, Editor, The Parrot Society UK www.theparrotsocietyuk.org | les.rance@theparrotsocietyuk.org

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Conservation Projects Find out more about this on page 06

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CONTENTS

BIRD SCENE AUGUST / SEPTEMBER 2011

CONTENTS SOCIETY 06 PARROT CONSERVATION

38 BREEDING GREATER BLUE

PROJECTS Outlines the six conservation projects funded by the Parrot Society.

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LIZARD 16 THE CANARY An overview of this interesting long established canary variety with details of the Lizard club.

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CAPE DOVES An interesting in depth article about these small doves that are proving difficult to establish in aviculture.

EARED GLOSSY STARLINGS Soft billed birds are a great challenge, read how one successful breeder is winning.

46 BREEDING PSITTACINES Leading aviculturalist Jim Hayward gives his valuable advice and more on this subject. NATIONAL 58 THE EXHIBITION INFORMATION Extensive details on the 9th October National Exhibition ON THE COVER

BIRD ISSUE ONE JULY / AUGUST 2011

06 32

bREEDINg pSITTACINES fOR pLEASURE AND pROfIT

CONSERvATION pROjECTS

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fOREIgN bIRD KEEpINg ThE NATIONAL ExhIbITION bREEDINg CApE DOvES

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gREATER bLUE EARED gLOSSy STARLINgS

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bREEDINg

INTRODUCTION fROm LES RANCE

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A well worked article detailing the challenges for the future and how bird keepers can help each other.

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ThE KNOWLEDgE CENTRE fOR ALL pET bIRDS

fR E

BIRD 32 FOREIGN KEEPING

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BIRD SCENE: VOLUME 01, No.01, AUGUST 2011 BIRD SCENE is run by The Parrot Society UK, 92A High Street, Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, HP4 2BL, England. FOR SALES AND EDITORIAL ENQUIRES Telephone or Fax: 01442 872245 Website: www.theparrotsocietyuk.org E-Mail: les.rance@theparrotsocietyuk.org

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FEATURE

PARROT SOCIETY CONSERVATION PROJECTS ARTICLE BY: TONY PITTMAN

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Conservation Sub-committee under the chairmanship of Council member Tony Pittman was set up four years ago to set criteria for supporting projects and consider proposals received for submission to Council. It was agreed that on the whole supported projects should be long-term and on-going. It was also agreed that projects employing avicultural techniques and expertise as well as habitat restoration measures should be preferred. The PSUK should also consider working in partnership with other organisations. However the PSUK should not accept proposals, which involved financially supporting infra-structure for eco-tourism. This

was a matter for the businesses involved. Also discussed at this meeting was whether projects in countries with a GDP similar or greater than the UK should be supported. This would affect projects in countries such as Australia and New Zealand. It was finally agreed that projects in such countries would be given lower priority. The funding for projects derives from the interest on the legacy to the PSUK from the late Council member John Mollindinia supplemented with some of the Gift Aid monies received from the UK tax authorities thanks to Garry Steptowe’s hard work in preparing the claim documentation. BIRD SCENE 7


At present the following projects are receiving support: The Scarlet Macaw in Costa Rica The Parrot Society has part-funded this conservation project based on the Osa Peninsular, Costa Rica (Pacific coast) since 2004. The regular field work includes protecting the macaws from poaching activities, installing, maintaining and monitoring nest-boxes as well as conducting an education programme in local schools. The Parrot Society UK also helps fund research projects of different types. At present a genetic study is being under taken under the title “Genetic Structure and Variability of the Scarlet Macaw populations in Costa Rica”. A paper will be published on the results of the study later this year and this will be accessible to interested members on the PSUK website along with other published papers produced by the project. Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo in Australia Of our six current conservation projects this is the project that we have supported for the longest and was the one first supported by the late John Mollindinia. The main objective of the project is to place tin around the trunks of nesting trees to prevent goannas (large lizards) climbing

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them and feeding on eggs and baby cockatoos. The following report gives an excellent insight into the project.

I am pleased to report that the birds still appear to be doing well, most species travelling between water holes vital to their existence. A recent clash between conservationists and tree loggers cited the Barraband as vulnerable but that is not the case as their habitat range covers almost two thirds of New South Wales, a vast area. There is still a fair amount of trapping to do particularly on playing fields and golf courses where the cockatoos cause a great deal of damage. It is fairly demanding as I am the only licensed government trapper left to do that type of work. The funding from The Parrot Society UK came through OK, thank you for that. Fuel is one of the main issues now when travelling vast distances the grant helps with tyres etc: Last season was a very good breeding time for the Major Mitchell’s cockatoos. It is important that I go out when the Mitchell’s try to find nesting sites as a large number of Corellas are moving into the region and they monopolise the nesting trees, sadly I have to destroy these birds otherwise the Major Mitchell’s (being placid) won’t defend their own nests. I only address this issue on our tinned trees. The


FEATURE

At present a genetic study is being under taken under the title “Genetic Structure and Variability of the Scarlet Macaw populations in Costa Rica”. A paper will be published on the results of the study later this year and this will be accessible to interested members

tinning has proved to be a deterrent to Goannas (large Lizards), Cats, Opossums, etc: and I am happy with it all. Peter Davidson has retired from Tandau Farm, he went to a great deal of effort prior to leaving to ensure that John’s tree was well cared for. It is not easy for me to visit the area at nesting time as I am very busy checking my

trees. I have sent A$500 to Peter to arrange for the water hole near John’s tree to be regularly serviced, I am sure it will be. However, every time I am in that region I will service it myself. I am not sure exactly how many young Major Mitchell’s cockatoos John’s pair has produced since we first tinned the tree in 2002 but it must be around thirty.

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Meantime a number of landowners in the western Division are now aware that nests of the Majors need to be tinned and are in fact now doing so, that is good news for the birds. I enjoy receiving the P.S. magazine and always study your bird prices compared to ours some of your captive raised Australian species are cheaper in England than in Australia. That is about all the news for now I’ll touch base with you in a few months time. Regards, Ray 10

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The Kakapo in New Zealand Many of the flightless native birds of New Zealand have suffered as a result of the introduction into New Zealand of small hunting mammals such as cats, rats and mongoose. The kakapo as a ground-living bird almost became extinct until the last surviving birds were re-located to off-shore islands that had been cleared of predators. The PSUK has assisted by supplying an incubator for hand-rearing baby kakapo. The breeding of kakapo


FEATURE

depends on the trees producing rimu fruit providing a good supply. No rimu fruit means no young Kakapo! The following report shows the progress being made with this project:As predicted from rimu fruit counts, there was no breeding in 2010. All 33 of the chicks who fledged in 2009, including the 26 hand-reared chicks, are now free-living on Whenua Hou (Codfish Island) and Anchor Islands. Two of the original Stewart Island birds, Sass, a male, and Sarah, a female, died, reducing the population from 124 to 122. The population shrank again in January of this year (2011) when the veteran “Richard Henry”, the oldest kakapo in the world, was found dead. He was believed to be at least 80 years old. Discovered in Fiordland in 1975 he was transferred to the off-shore islands where he made a substantial contribution to the growth of the kakapo population there. He spent his last years wandering around Whenua Hou. Although there was no breeding in 2010, it has been

As predicted from rimu fruit counts, there was no breeding in 2010. All 33 of the chicks who fledged in 2009, including the 26 hand-reared chicks, are now free-living on Whenua Hou (Codfish Island) and Anchor Islands.

an eventful and busy year with 33 fledglings to monitor, the premature failure of 26 transmitters and the accidental dropping of a sling-load of rat poison from a helicopter onto Anchor Island. Demographics The population of 121 birds consists of 65 males and 56 females (78 adults and 43 juveniles under 6 years old). The female population has reduced by one to be four short of the population milestone of 60 identified in the recovery plan. Sarah is only the second Stewart Island female to have died on a predatorfree, offshore island in 28 years, and the first adult female death in 19 years. Distribution The population is currently divided between Whenua Hou and Anchor Islands Whenua Anchor Hou Island Total Females 33 23 56 Males 41 24 65 Total 74 47 121 On the basis of the fruit count data and numbers of females on each island up to 19 nests are expected on Whenua Hou and up to 7 on Anchor. This will be the first time that nesting on two islands at the same time BIRD SCENE 11


will be managed. In order to reduce the expense and logistical difficulty of deploying human nest-minders some of these will be replaced with “electronic nest-minders”; modified Snark data loggers that will tell us when, and for how long, females have been away from the nest. Campaign against illegal wildlife trade in Bolivia In 2009 PSUK supported Asociacion Armonia, based in Santa Cruz in eastern Bolivia, to conduct a series of public presentations against the inhumane, unsanitary and uncontrolled illegal wildlife trade in Bolivia. The project goal was to educate the Bolivian public on the realities of the illegal pet trade to motivate public and institutional support towards the enforcement of existing laws against the trade of Bolivian wildlife as well as wildlife brought in from neighbouring countries such as Brazil. Presentations were to be made in Bolivia’s five main cities – the capital La Paz, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Cochabamba, Trinidad and Tarija. The illegal trade of wild birds in Bolivia has been and continues to be the main threat to many parrot species. While Bolivia has created excellent wildlife protection laws which declare clearly that no one is permitted to trade Bolivian native wildlife without government consent and an authorized 12

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management plan, the illegal trade devastates parrot species with almost no law-enforcement. This threat with expanding agricultural land and ranching areas is driving trapping into the few protected areas in Bolivia. Asociacion Armonia in its conservation work with the Redfronted Macaw and the Armonia/ Loro Parque Fundacion Blue-throated Macaw conservation programme has been studying the extent and impact of the illegal pet trade in Bolivia. Their studies found that some 37,000 individual birds are trapped from the wild into the illegal pet trade yearly, including many large CITES protected macaws, and endemic and threatened species. One must also add the number of birds that die in the process of reaching the market- possibly another 10,000. Through these studies, they were able to take hundreds of photos of parrots in appalling conditions, suffering the blind eye of Bolivia’s law. Asociacion Armonia produced 18 panels on the illegal trade using some of these photos, demonstrating to the public the horrible situation and the threats to native wildlife. These panels were presented in 4 day periods in the five cities. The illegal trade campaign raised interest by several organisations supporting Armonia’s actions – the most important being the politically placed CITES coordinator Veronica


FEATURE

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In order to make donations to any one of the six specific projects please click on the button http://www.theparrotsocietyuk.org/donations.php and you can donate using your credit card. All donations go to your selected project, no sums go toward administration. Your support will ensure that endangered parrots survive for future generations.

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FEATURE

Varga for Bolivia, who requested to work directly with Armonia for 2010. The campaign was expanded to include more locations in 2010 and various national organisations such as the equivalent of the British Bar Association in Bolivia have taken notice and have become supportive. Parrot Environmental Education in Columbia The “Loro Bus - Parrot Bus driving conservation“ project with its slingshot amnesty campaign operated by ProAves in Colombia and supported by the Parrot Society UK won a prestigious international award, the National Energy Globe. In 2008 769 projects from 111 nations were submitted and the best from each nation was honoured with a National Energy Globe. They were presented at an international gala ceremony held in Prague in the Czech Republic on 13th April. The Yellow-shouldered Amazon in Bonaire The Yellow-shouldered Amazon (Amazona barbadensis) is recognized by the IUNC as vulnerable to the threat of extinction (BirdLife International 2010). Venezuelan populations appear to be in decline whereas on Bonaire the population is increasing and estimated to be around 800 individuals (January 2010 roost count).

Yellow-shouldered Amazons do not construct their own nest and therefore depend on cavities of sufficient size. Consequently, nesting areas are found in tree and cliff cavities and are generally located away from residential areas. The breeding season begins in April and continues until September. Eggs are incubated for approximately 27 days and chicks remain in the nest cavity for a further 60 days before fledging (Williams, 2009). Various threats impact on the breeding birds including illegal poaching. Future reporting of the Conservation projects supported by the Parrot Society In forthcoming issues of Bird Scene we will be focusing on one of the above projects with a fuller report and pictures.

Donations to Conservation projects In order to make donations to any one of the six specific projects please click on the button http://www.theparrotsocietyuk.org/ donations.php and you can donate using your credit card. All donations go to your selected project, no sums go toward administration. Your support will ensure that endangered parrots survive for future generations.

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THE LIZARD CANARY ARTICLE BY: DAVID ALLEN Photograph © Tony Tilford www.naturepicturesource.com

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FEATURE

T

he Lizard is the oldest canary and by 1742 it was well documented as a spangled canary with dark wing markings and tail and “a spot on the head called a cap”. By the 19th century the Lizard Canary had been perfected. A bird depicted in a copy of The London Illustrated News on 12 December 1846 is as the Lizard Canary is today. So the Lizard can truly claim to be the oldest distinct variety of exhibiting Canary. The Lizard Canary Association of Great Britain is the successor to the earlier body, the Lancashire Canary & Lizard Canary Fanciers Association. It has the responsibility of safeguarding and promoting the interests of the Lizard Canary. In recent years Area Societies have been formed to promote this unique Canary. There are a number of key points that differentiate the Lizard Canary from other varieties of canary. The Lizard Canary comes in two types, Gold and Silver which is equal to Yellow and Buff in most other varieties of Canary. Buff feathered birds are called Silvers in the Lizard canary fancy; this type of feather is a broader feather, on the body feathers. The Yellow or Gold in the Lizard fancy has a narrower tighter feather on the body. Lizard Canaries are colour fed and this gives he Gold/Yellow a rich golden chestnut colour and the Silver/Buff becomes a warm Silver Grey. The Lizard has a great transformation during the moult.

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LIZARD CANARY ASSOCIATION OF GREAT BRITIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS Adults £10.00 | OAP £6.00 | Juniors £4.00 Please send to the LCA secretary :Mr Dave Ross, 30, GLENORRIN CLOSE,LAMBTON, WASHINGTON, TYNE & WEAR, NE38 0DZ TEL---01914-164967 BENIFITS FOR LCA MEMBERS ARE:• LCA newsletter {three time a year} • LCA Handbook • LCA Closed rings scheme advantageous prices. [available from the secretary] The Lizard Canary Association hold an annual show each year and award patronage to several shows throughout the UK. For Patronage applications, apply to patronage secretary :David Allen -- 01865-452476. email: david.allen9750@ntlworld.com

The other unique point of the Lizard is the cap which is the area of light feather on the top of the bird’s head. These come in the following types Clear Cap: A bird with no dark feather in the cap area. Broken Cap: A bird with one tenth or more dark feathers in the cap area. Non Cap: A bird with no light feather in the cap area.

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Lizard Canaries are fairly easy to breed but there are a few rules that must be applied. A pair must be Gold or Silver it doesn’t matter which one is which. The cap type must also be considered when pairing two Lizards. Broken cap to Clear cap or Broken to Broken. But never pair two Clear caps together as this would probably give over Capped birds. The use of a non Cap to any of the types of Cap is also satisfactory.


FEATURE

There are a number of key points that differentiate the Lizard Canary from other varieties of canary. The Lizard Canary comes in two types, Gold and Silver which is equal to Yellow and Buff in most other varieties of Canary. Photograph © Tony Tilford www.naturepicturesource.com

Lizard Canary Association Anyone keeping Lizards are advised to join the Lizard Canary Association. The LCA produces a Newsletter for members three times a year. They also run a closed ring scheme for members. Our interesting website is at

www.lizardcanary.co.uk

BLCC BLCC The Blue Lizard Canary Club of Great Britain Is pleased to hold it first ever zone show at the 2011 National Exhibition.

Further information about Lizard Canaries can be found in The Lizard Canary by David Allen, dedicated to the LCA. Cost £5 plus £1 p+p from: David Allen, 108 Nowell Road, Rosehill, Oxford, OX4 4TD (Tel 01865 452476) (Email: david.allen9750@ntlworld.com)

Clubs subscriptions are £10 for UK members and 15 Euros for overseas members. Please send to the club secretary:-David Allen 108 Nowell Road, Rosehill, Oxford OX4 4TD All schedules will be sent out to current members, but this is an Open show so anyone wanting a schedule should contact David on the above address or by telephone 01865452476 For further information check the clubs website which is www.bluelizardcanary.com

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ARTICLE BY: LES RANCE

CAPE DOVES T

he Cape Dove (Oena Capensis) was a bird regularly imported from its native Africa and very few breeders considered the need to set up a captive bred aviary strains whilst imports were available to meet the demand, prices were low and there seemed no real reason to breed these delightful, colourful doves as imports were quite readily available. All that has now changed, unless aviculturalists really work hard to establish birds that were previously imported in large numbers there will be none of them left in aviculture in a few years time. It is now imperative that all those breeders with experience with domesticated or near domesticated birds work hard to establish breeding stocks of birds that previously were readily imported. We all need to select one species and try really hard to establish them. About ten years ago I kept Diamond Doves and bred a few of them so to a small degree I did have some knowledge of this family. I have chosen the Cape Dove because my good friend Jerry Fisher on the south coast introduced them to me and encouraged me to work on this species. In the

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spring of 2007 Jerry supplied me with 3 beautiful young unrelated pairs that I kept in a brand new indoor aviary 8’L x 3’W x 6’H. Cape Doves are easily stressed when transported to new homes and within a few weeks I had lost all three hens (why is it that it is always the hens that die?) After this disaster there was

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obviously no point in keeping the three cocks so I returned them to Jerry, to say the least this was not a good start!! Jerry continued to persevere with his Cape Doves but came to the conclusion that they really needed to be in outdoor flights rather than being bred in cages and in June when the weather was much warmer contacted me and


FEATURE

My efforts were very quickly rewarded as within two weeks one of the pairs started to show interest in each other and there was a fair amount of mutual preening and sitting close together, then I saw the hen on one of the nests, progress appeared promising!

Jerry continued to persevere with his Cape Doves but came to the conclusion that they really needed to be in outdoor flights rather than being bred in cages and in June when the weather was much warmer contacted me and asked if I would like to have ‘another go’…

asked if I would like to have ‘another go’, I thought that this was very brave and I decided that I must try again and use one of my parakeet aviaries to see what results could be achieved outside. The day came when the two pairs were due, as we live some 150 miles apart I collected them mid-way in the early evening, all four were in one box and generally they were quiet but when I hit a pothole in the road they would crash about and become thoroughly disturbed. Once home I let them out into their outside aviary as it was light until at least 9.30 p.m. in June. Although built in a block there is a large amount of privacy as most of the walls are constructed with 3/4” plywood but to provide them additional seclusion I placed a 3’ container grown Conifer, a Vibernum and six pots of runner beans to climb up the former. To provide nesting sites I screwed four wooden platforms 6” x 6” with a half inch lip around the edge, to the plywood wall. I had read that they seem to like to use fine roots

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Cape Doves seem a little unadventurous as far as feeding is concerned; their main staple is White millet. Doves do not shell their seed like Budgerigars; they swallow it whole and grind it up in the gizzard.

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FEATURE as nesting material and fortunately I had a pile of forest bark next to a large hazel bush the roots of which had permeated the bark pile, it was therefore an easy exercise to pull up a few roots and make nice nests for the Doves. Evidently placing two pairs in one aviary is generally not successful as fighting frequently occurs but only one of my pairs seemed interested in breeding and possibly that was why I had no difficulties in that regard. My efforts were very quickly rewarded as within two weeks one of the pairs started to show interest in each other and there was a fair amount of mutual preening and sitting close together, then I saw the hen on one of the nests, progress appeared promising! The first egg was laid on 21st July and the second the following day, they were a rich cream colour and I candled them after the hen had sat for 5 days, they both showed that the vein formation was developing so I speedily returned them to the nest. The first egg hatched on 4th August and the second on 5th. I was aware from the excellent book by I.S. Dyer “Breeding the Cape Dove: My Experience” that around eight days of age can be a critical time as the parents can stop feeding the youngsters. On 12th August I was delighted to see that my two precious babies were still doing well and

growing quickly, the first left the nest on 20th August and the second the next day. My aviary has a wire floor ‘overhang’ for the last 3’ of its length and the two babies sat on this and the mother joined them sitting very close to keep them warm, the temperature that morning was only 13C which for an August day is rather cold. Jerry Fisher warned me that it is sensible to try to check that the babies are drinking for themselves two breeders have had this problem once the young leave the nest. I took a shallow bowl of water into the aviary and simply picked up one of the babies, there was no attempt from them to fly away, it drank avidly once its beak was placed in the water, once it had consumed all it wanted I then put it down and picked up the second baby and let that drink. On 28th August I again caught my two birds and checked them but they appeared not to be thirsty. Although I mentioned above that there was a 3’ overhang the total flight size is 10’ long, 7’6” sloping to 5’6” high and 3’ wide and 7’ of the roof is covered in glass-fibre roof sheeting giving a very sheltered and protected aviary. Both young developed well and as the days shortened and temperatures dropped I carefully considered if I should move all six birds into heated indoor quarters for the winter. I would have liked to leave them where they

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were because they seemed very settled and I know that they are easily stressed when moved. I knew that what to do would be a tough call but decided to monitor them twice a day and if the cold started to worry them I would indeed move them into a heated environment. The signs to look for are that they will sit fluffed up, be inactive and look generally miserable. In late September these signs were all too evident and I decided to move them into a warmer and dryer environment. Cape Doves seem a little unadventurous as far as feeding is concerned; their main staple is White

millet. Doves do not shell their seed like Budgerigars; they swallow it whole and grind it up in the gizzard. This means there are no husks to blow off the seed bowls. I provide 50/50 Budgie mix but I do not think that they eat much of the canary seed in the mixture, they will take millet sprays but mine are not over keen. Germinated smaller seeds are generally ignored but I do provide them with home made egg food which is prepared for my parakeets, hard boiling 2 eggs each morning and mixing them (shells included) in a food processor with 200 grams (1 large

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cup) of Badminton Baked Cereal (used as a conditioner by horse owners). To this I am currently adding a level tablespoon of Pet Chef, to this dry mix I then add 1/2 a large cup of water, this makes a nice crumbly feed (be careful, do not add too much water or you will get a wet horrible mix that no birds will consume!) The 6 Cape Doves received 1/2 a tablespoonful of this mix each morning around 7.30 a.m. For those not familiar with Pet Chef this is a supplement powder designed to provide essential vitamins, minerals, trace elements and amino acids to ensure peak condition within

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your stock; there are two formulas, one for breeding stock which should be provided 6 weeks before the start of the breeding season and as long as the season continues; and a general purpose mix which has been designed for the remainder of the year. With any bird that is difficult to breed and it appears that Cape Doves fall firmly in this category, fostering with a closely related species needs to be considered. I continued to use the outside parakeet aviaries in 2008 and 2009 but both these years were not particularly good breeding seasons and I was


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ALSO BUDGIES, CANARIES, FINCHES, COCKATIELS LOVEBIRDS, SOFTBILLS, GMR’S, TOUCANS & MYNAH BIRDS ALSO ANY TYPES OF EXOTICS, MONKEYS ETC PLEASE CALL RON ON 0161 273 5447. IF EX DIRECTORY DIAL 1470 FIRST.

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Great Western Exotic Vets Neil Forbes DipECZM(avian) FRCVS Qualified Specialist in Bird Medicine. Marie Kubiak, Elisabetta Mancinelli, Pru Harvey M’sRCVS A Specialist service to all bird keepers . Full diagnostic, treatment, hospital and surgical facilities for birds 24/7, including ultrasound, x-ray, endoscopy, fluorsocopy In house laboratory – results in 30 min. Routine consultations 7 days a week. Licensed for Bird exports.

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A quarterly publication of a magazine featuring articles reports and beautiful colour photographs, something for every birdkeeper. 1 years subscription $NZ 75.00 (inc G.S.T.) Overseas applications add $NZ 10.00 per year For surface mailing MEMBERSHIP STEWARD: P.O. Box 79-202 Royal Heights, Auckland, New Zealand

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Alan K Jones

Alan Jones is now semi-retired, but is available part-time in Surrey and Kent. Please call 07787 507427 or contact akjones@birdvet.co.uk for full details"


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without concerted efforts they may be lost to UK aviculture forever or perhaps the opposite will happen and we may be able to save them. The Cape Dove is far from the only bird to be in this position… coming to the conclusion that to make any real progress with this species I needed some additional stock as I was very determined to be successful with Cape Doves, they are beautiful birds but obviously need a suitable diet and the correct housing. In 2010 I changed tactics and provided them with a fairly large and dry indoor aviary measuring 12’ long x 4’ wide and 7’ high, this had a double glazed window which I wired over and could open on warm sunny days giving the doves access to fresh air and direct sunlight, a facility that met with their considerable approval. During the year I did not lose any birds and bred 3 hens and 5 cocks using the colony system with all my stock in one large flight. Jerry Fisher feels that DIET is the key to success; some of the supplements I use are different to his. He uses iodised minerals – a black powder that pigeon breeders use with success. His birds (except the group of cocks) generally refuse his soft food mix the only birds to do so. Given that the only seed they consume in quantity is white millet he is wondering if we can develop a base mix being mainly white millet with some bonding agent

to integrate it with supplements. There is no doubt that we need to broaden the diet as much as we can and as we do not know exactly what they eat in the wild we can not imitate their natural diet. I feed blue maw seed and this they will eat so this gives some change/addition to their diet. So far the 2011 season seems to be progressing well with 4 hens sitting on 8 eggs (2 is the normal sized clutch) There is no doubt that Cape Doves are very vulnerable and not easy to breed, without concerted efforts they may be lost to UK aviculture forever or perhaps the opposite will happen and we may be able to save them. The Cape Dove is far from the only bird to be in this position and the next few years will be critical to the existence of a number of birds that were previously freely imported but are now increasingly difficult to obtain due to the lack of viable aviary strains. I will certainly continue to work hard to establish these birds in aviculture and I will use all the relevant skills that I have acquired over a number of years with my parakeet collection, it will not be a simple task but someone has to do it!!

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ARTICLE BY: RAY HOLLAND

FOREIGN

BREEDING BIRD KEEPING GREATER BLUE EARED GLOSSY STARLINGS (LAMPROTORNIS CHALYBAEUS) SUCCESSES & MISTAKES 2010

…if you advertise for people holding the species you get responses from successful breeders worried about inbreeding but either not able to find other breeders or concerned about introducing mutations via visual normals.

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M

y interest in the hobby is as a foreign bird breeder. Success is defined by breeding a species in captivity and, ultimately, by establishing a self-sustaining population. This branch of the hobby is subject to the two major threats. Firstly, since 2006, the ban on importation to the EU means that no new species are available and many others are at risk since selfsustaining captive populations have not been established. Secondly, at the opposite end of the spectrum, established species are subject to domestication. This happens when mutations begin to appear, followed by “show standards” at variance with the wild bird. These start with colour BIRD SCENE 33



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mutations but progress to encompass size, shape and feathering. The species is “lost” as a foreign bird when one can no longer acquire visually normal birds with confidence that they will breed true. This path of “development” is typified by three stages. Firstly, colour. Think Splendid Parakeet and Gouldian Finch. Secondly size, shape and feather structure. Think Budgerigar and Australian Zebra Finch. Finally, a domestic species – think various bantams (Jungle Fowl) and Aylesbury Ducks (Mallard). Developing, breeding and showing these birds is a different and perfectly legitimate branch of the hobby. What foreign bird breeders object to is the visually normal birds are seldom pure i.e. can be relied upon to produce wild-type

With still more species it could be entirely practical to “breed back” over a few generations. young. Our ability to obtain a visually normal Budgerigar or Australian Zebra Finch in terms of size, shape and feather is long gone. There are of course many species which fall somewhere between these extremes. With some established species mutations exist but with care genuine normals are still available. With still more species it could be entirely practical to “breed back” over a few generations. Regarding species not yet established, the rocketing prices of the remaining birds are concentrating minds wonderfully – and often there are more surviving birds countrywide than you might expect.

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Which brings me neatly to the purpose of this article! Practically every species of foreign bird (in either of the above categories) has its devotees who would be anxious to acquire pure normals if the birds were available. It is also my experience (with Diamond Doves and Spectacled Parrotlets among others) that if you advertise for people holding the species you get responses from successful breeders worried about inbreeding but either not able to find other breeders or concerned about introducing mutations via visual normals. With Parrotlets there is also concern about hybrids due to the similarity of the hens of some species. To take one example, last summer I realised that (with the exception of Celestials) parrotlets generally seemed to be offered for sale less frequently. An

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article (“Where are all the Parrotlets?” Sept 2010) in the Parrot Society magazine generated a response for Spectacled Parrotlets alone that resulted in birds being exchanged for new blood, pairs being made up and surplus birds being placed. As a result I now have contact with a small group of people who between them hold a potentially viable group of Spectacled with reasonable genetic diversity. There are no formalities to the group – the only commitment sought is that they offer surplus birds within the group before disposing of them elsewhere. The formation of groups like this could well make the difference in maintaining some species in captivity and in other species the existence of “ring-fenced” groups of normals. The various specialist societies (Parrot Society, Australian Finch


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Society, Waxbill Society etc) have a role to play in signposting enquiries – for example, someone looking for Normal Bourkes Parakeets would contact the Parrot Society for a referral to someone holding such birds. Likewise, this magazine could have a potential role in listing the societies and making people aware of how to go about locating specific birds. In fact, both the Parrot Society through their office and the AFS through their RADS + scheme already perform this function. Of course, this system is far from perfect but it has the advantage of no formalities – I simply “talk birds” to people a couple of times a year or when I have a specific enquiry. In my experience most bird keepers are happy to do that! If the end result works for

even a few species it will be well worth the effort. For the record, the species I am currently working with are: Endangered in Captivity Cape Dove / Spectacled Parrotlet / Green-rumped Parrotlet / Yellow-faced Parrotlet Ring-fenced Normals Diamond Dove / Bourke’s Parakeet The birds I deal with are not always species I hold – mine is simply a post-box function. If this “system” is to work, it needs people prepared to dedicate a little time and effort to a species they care about. For a modest input you could make a real contribution to your hobby.

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ARTICLE BY: RAY HOLLAND

BREEDING GREATER BLUE EARED GLOSSY STARLINGS (LAMPROTORNIS CHALYBAEUS) SUCCESSES & MISTAKES 2010 Photograph © Tony Tilford www.naturepicturesource.com

A

t one of the Stafford shows I managed to buy five Glossy Starlings. One was a Purple Glossy which turned out to be a cock and the rest Blue-eared Glossy Starlings, some of which appeared to be slightly larger and the others smaller with a greener sheen. They were all housed together for some months in a fairly large aviary with Sumatran Laughing Thrushes. The Laughing Thrushes were quite well behaved with the Starlings, but the latter would often squabble amongst themselves and pick on various individuals in turn. It soon became apparent that

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I had a dominant pair, the cock being slightly larger than the hen. The two of them would bow and scrape to each other making little squeaks and for the most part being very friendly, although on occasions even these two would squabble. I was fairly confident I had a breeding pair, so gave them an aviary to themselves approximately 16ft x 5ft covered except for the end which is open to the elements and faces east. Two nest boxes were provided one open fronted and the other a Parakeet type with bob hole – this one was put in at a slight angle and was the one they chose to lay their first clutch of three eggs in, in late May. Dried grasses, evergreen leaves, moss and feathers were used to build the nest. I feed them on standard softbill food, pellets of various types and flavours, chopped fruit, sweetcorn, wax moth larvae and mealworms. For some reason they do not appear to be very interested in crickets which surprised me. All three eggs hatched, but how long incubation had taken I could not be certain since the young were very quiet in the nest, but you knew something was happening by the constant coming and going of the parents. Upon inspection I found three very small chicks so increased the feed to three or four hour intervals for the first week using mini mealworms to start

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with and later added wax moth larvae. After about ten days the parents were observed picking up nesting material, particularly feathers and from previous experience this was an ominous sign of something going wrong, the parents wanting to nest again!! I checked the box and could find only one healthy youngster, about ten days old, the others had just disappeared. They may have been covered by the fresh nesting material or just thrown out of the nest box. At this time we were experiencing an unusually prolonged spell of really hot weather and this, together with a plentiful supply of live food may have been the spur to produce again, before finishing the first clutch. I decided to be positive and took the remaining youngster away for hand rearing which we successfully achieved using a hospital cage with low heat, the youngster being placed in a plastic tub with paper towels on the bottom to give grip and part cloth covering to replicate the darkness of nest box conditions. Feeding by syringe and tweezers every 3-4 hours with the last feed about 10.00pm and starting again at 6.00am – not a particularly good regime for those who still have to work I might add. All went well, the youngster got used to the routine after the first 2 or 3 reluctant efforts and was always very excited at the sight of a wax worm. In addition mini mealworms and Orlux hand mix


FEATURE were used without difficulty and after about another two weeks the bird was fully feathered and trying to fly. In the meantime the parents went down again, laying three eggs; the weather this time was getting back to something more like a normal British summer. In due

course two eggs hatched and the parents fed the young very well, almost competing to feed the most food. I would say that the hen was the best, taking bunches of mealworms at one go – the cock usually one at a time. After what seemed to be an age the first

They are rather like a cordon of England cricketers in the slips – seeing who can jump higher than the next to catch the thrown mealworms. This little exercise goes on for some minutes and seems to be enjoyed by everyone, most of all me.

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youngster appeared at the bob-hole, poking its head out to be fed and at about four weeks both fledged. I had expected them to appear sooner; they were a duller version of the parents and could fly well at this early stage. The young are still with their parents in December and will have to be separated well before the next breeding season starts in the Spring. The two parent reared birds are surprisingly confident and tame, they come out into the service passage way every day for exercise and to pinch as much live food as they can get from my food trolley. They appear fearless and 42

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fly at great speed about and around me – typical Starlings, real clowns and very entertaining. Strangely enough the hand reared one from the first round is quite the opposite, not a bit tame but just as hungry. In 2010 due to enforced inactivity (knee op) I was very late in getting all my birds’ flights ready for the breeding season. The Glossy’s nest box was not put in until early May and not as high up as usual, normally near the roof at an angle some 7’ up. It did not make any difference, they began adding to the nesting material and after about 14 days


FEATURE I knew the Hen was laying green/blue eggs, this time three. In the past, when obviously younger, the pair would have four or even five eggs and rear them all. However as they age three seems to be the norm. After about 14 days the eggs hatch and both parents will feed the young with mini-mealworms, waxworms and crickets which seem to be the mainstay for the fledglings. The general diet for adults and their youngsters is softbill food, Bevo, Beaphar, Bogena, Softbill Pellets both fruit type and insect varieties. They also like plenty of fresh fruit, almost any is acceptable – they are not fussy feeders. Not too long after the youngsters fledged the parents started to take in new nesting material and restart the breeding cycle again, whilst continuing to feed the first round youngsters. Not so clear thinking on my part and lack of aviary space (which will be rectified for 2011 by downsizing numbers) caused the second round to fail when, given better management, they should have survived. The first round youngsters remained in the flight (my mistake!). The nest box should

have been replaced or, at least thoroughly cleaned out, before signs of nesting again began (mistake). I did refresh the nest box when the second round young were about 7 days old but it was a messy job. Although two of the young grew and feathered well and even fledged, they were not healthy and nor did they leave the nest box when they should have. I believe a combination of the aforementioned and the nest box being slightly too small, i.e. 7½“ x 7½“ x 13” and not at a great enough angle were also a contributory factor (mistake). So after what should have been six youngsters only the first round survived to be good healthy birds. Better news from another of my three pairs of Blue Eared Glossys. I retained some youngsters from breeding four years ago and this is the first time they have attempted to breed. Strangely only one egg but this was successfully hatched and reared. This youngster being an ‘only child’ so to speak is a really strong and healthy individual. So after all these years I am pleased with the result. The three birds are still in the flight together

I retained some youngsters from breeding four years ago and this is the first time they have attempted to breed. Strangely only one egg but this was successfully hatched and reared. This youngster being an ‘only child’ so to speak is a really strong and healthy individual. So after all these years I am pleased with the result.

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(November 2010) – the only difference being the black eyes as opposed to the bright creamy yellow of the parents. Adult eye colour of these birds does vary slightly, some being more orange yellow. One rather endearing feature of the one youngster family is that they can all catch with aplomb. At feeding time they come out of their flight down the corridor to where I prepare the food and wait on the step. They are rather like a cordon of England cricketers in the slips – seeing who can jump higher than the next to catch the thrown mealworms. This little exercise goes on for some minutes and seems to be enjoyed by everyone, most of all me. One final point on feeding these birds, it seems I may be in the minority here but I continue feeding live food through the winter, although I do try to reduce the amount. I find the insects are a good carrier for the various supplements I give to my birds throughout the year, such as Insectivorous Feast and Daily Essentials 3 for my frugivorius birds like Barbets and Bulbuls. Most of my birds are through the moult now and look in excellent condition. I can thoroughly recommend them, they are real characters, rewarding and great fun to keep. For 2011 I am keeping two flights empty in the optimistic hope I will have a successful breeding season with somewhere safe to put all those youngsters. I wish!

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Most of my birds are through the moult now and look in excellent condition. I can thoroughly recommend them, they are real characters, rewarding and great fun to keep.

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ARTICLE BY: JIM HAYWARD

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BREEDING PSITTACINES FOR PLEASURE… AND PROFIT?

W

hether the current impositions on importing and exporting psittacine birds into and out of the UK remains the same, is relaxed or becomes even more draconian, one thing is for sure, the few short years in the ’sixties and ’seventies when private breeders could import from almost anywhere in the world without any restrictions will never return. The same goes for our past corresponding freedom to export surplus British bred birds to other countries with little difficulty, which helped keep our occupation in a healthy state. This outlet is either becoming increasingly difficult to achieve because of governments’

imposed conditions which are becoming harder to satisfy - or in many cases has become totally blocked. So, the bottom line is for individual breeders to aim to sell their surplus within their own countries’ borders. In Britain, the current unfavourable financial situation may in fact be beneficial towards the promotion of aviculture; with the demise of our currency making holidays abroad and imported goods vastly more expensive, many people may be considering taking their pleasure at home, and what home maker’s occupation can be more satisfying than creating a pleasant garden (small or large) with an aviary - or better still - range of BIRD SCENE 47


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…what home maker’s occupation can be more satisfying than creating a pleasant garden (small or large) with an aviary - or better still - range of aviaries which contain active, beautiful and colourful birds? aviaries which contain active, beautiful and colourful birds? In previous decades, recessions seemed to have had no detrimental effect on the demand for aviary bred psittacine birds; in fact it seemed that interest was stimulated. The money put into ‘wasting assets’ - such as expensive domestic goods and cars - dwindles to nothing over years, savings are fetching a derisory rate of interest below inflation, even houses are depreciating in their value at an alarming rate. But, as well as providing great pleasure for the owners - apart from the initial outlay of suitable housing, healthy stock and the relatively low annual maintenance and feeding costs required - a well thought out and planned collection of psittacine birds could provide a healthy return on their investment for its owners for many years to come. Considering Monetary Aspects of Breeding Whereas the commercial breeding of livestock on farms for slaughter and to 48

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provide meat, milk, wool and leather is taken for granted by a majority of the population, the word ‘profit’ has become a dirty word where the breeding of companion pets such as dogs and cats are concerned, and this is so - to a certain extent - with cage and aviary birds. This is surprisingly so even among some experienced breeders, who I have often heard say:‘well of course, it’s only my hobby; I don’t breed them for money’. But all bird breeders must cast off this attitude - which demeans their own efforts - and take heart in the fact that they really are active workers in the worthwhile conservation of nature’s riches; their work is aesthetically valuable but must also be looked at in a commonsense and practical way. Unless a person is so wealthy as to be able to totally disregard any need for a monetary return on their time and efforts, then a bird breeder’s ‘profit’ must be regarded as a necessary and important consideration. Even though their exported birds have brought money into Britain, unlike European

take heart in the fact that they really are active workers in the worthwhile conservation of nature’s riches; their work is aesthetically valuable but must also be looked at in a commonsense and practical way.


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…the prices of some species are mistakenly kept the same for many years almost by tradition; as with commercial enterprises, prices should be reviewed annually and increased if found necessary. agriculturalists, British aviculturists have never received government subsidies of hard cash to help them in their work; should they have been more self-promoting and asked for their share? The reality of inflation is another fact of life that is often disregarded by private breeders; the prices of some species are mistakenly kept the same for many years almost by tradition; as with commercial enterprises, prices should be reviewed annually and increased if found necessary. Bird dealers are often denigrated, but because of their expensive overheads which cause their need to make a large profit margin on what they buy in - they can do bird breeders a useful service by helping to buoy up prices to some degree. Overproduction If some species are produced in too great a number, prices for those species may become unreasonably depressed, so care must be taken to evaluate the market and not

over produce - this is a matter for personal research and application of a knowledgeable judgment. It may be better to stop some pairs breeding rather than accept lower prices, apart from breeding a few sufficiently high quality examples from only the very best pairs, which can be used in future years to maintain and improve the quality and hardiness of the strain. This can be a difficult balancing act, but it may be necessary. Where livestock is concerned, overstocking is detrimental as it increases the risk of stress and disease to individual birds. Even with our comparatively small private enterprises as bird breeders, we can learn from the mistakes of big business; we have all seen the photos in the news of vast fields of unwanted vehicles rusting away due to overproduction by the car industry; where, instead of a profitable asset, an injurious liability has been created. Accepting increasingly lower prices for the birds we breed seems to me to be demeaning, not just to the efforts of the breeder, but even more so to the birds themselves. The more that

Accepting increasingly lower prices for the birds we breed seems to me to be demeaning, not just to the efforts of the breeder, but even more so to the birds themselves.

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prospective owners pay for their birds the more are they likely to take great care of them; this is an unpleasant fact, as all creatures under our husbandry deserve equal care and attention, but it is very true in many cases. Marked Changes in the Popularity and Value of Species Harking back to the late ‘sixties and early ‘seventies: the ban on Australian parrots had been in force a few years, there were practically no controls on importing most South American, Indonesia and African species of parrots. But which birds were in most demand during this period? Without a doubt, British bred Australian parakeets and colour varieties; for example, Cloncurry Parakeets and Blue Indian Ringnecks could fetch £3,000 a pair, and £10,000 was obtained in Britain for the first Albino Ringneck, all this while wild caught Scarlet Macaws could be obtained for as little as £28 each, Lesser Sulphur-crested Cockatoos for £12, and African Greys £9 apiece.

After the CITES and quarantine regulations were imposed in the mid ’seventies (placing importation of parrots into the hands of commercial dealers) though prices of Australian Cockatoos continued to climb, in comparison, the majority of Australian Parrakeets gradually decreased in their prices and popularity. On the other hand, the demand for such birds as South American Macaws and Amazons, Indonesian Cockatoos and African Greys was stimulated and increased rapidly, forcing up their prices manifold. In keeping with the peculiar laws of supply and demand, escalating prices of such birds rapidly increased the demand for their ownership - and massively accelerated the numbers taken from the wild. Purity of Species versus Hybridisation So, what can we expect in the present climate of stringent controls and financial uncertainty? We can only make a calculated guess in most cases, but I believe that ‘purity’ - as well as health and hardiness - is sure to be

One of the biggest dangers to our aviary bred stocks of psittacine birds is uncontrolled hybridisation, whether it’s cross-bred Grass Parakeets, Lovebirds and Rosellas or hybrids between species of Macaws, Cockatoos, and species and sub-species of Amazons, Lories and Eclectus Parrots; all represent the same danger, which is the loss to aviculture of pure bred species and sub-species that may never again be obtainable..

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Pure strains of any of these birds - Lovebirds, Parakeets, Parrots, Lories, Cockatoos, Macaws and all - must be regarded as becoming increasingly rarer, desirable and valuable in the future… one of the most important qualities to look for by discerning breeders when obtaining new breeding stock. One of the biggest dangers to our aviary bred stocks of psittacine birds is uncontrolled hybridisation, whether it’s cross-bred Grass Parakeets, Lovebirds and Rosellas or hybrids between species of Macaws, Cockatoos, and species and sub-species of Amazons, Lories and Eclectus Parrots; all represent the same danger, which is the loss to aviculture of pure bred species and sub-species that may never again be obtainable. ‘Hybrid vigour’ is well known and made use of within horticulture, and it exists in mammals and birds; the resulting hybrids are often larger, stronger and more aggressive than their contributing parents, and can be fertile even with crosses between quite distantly related psittacine species, meaning that hybrids could eventually swamp and outnumber the pure species. This would be much faster with smaller types like Lovebirds and Grass Parakeets and slower with the

larger species of parrots like Macaws and Cockatoos, which take much longer to reach maturity - but it could happen. Therefore: pure strains of any of these birds - Lovebirds, Parakeets, Parrots, Lories, Cockatoos, Macaws and all - must be regarded as becoming increasingly rarer, desirable and valuable in the future, and certainly worth much more from a monetary perspective, than hybrids. Colour Varieties There is often a mistaken confusion between hybrids and colour mutants (colour varieties) but (provided they are not the result of hybridisation) colour varieties present no danger whatever of loss of pure forms because - however different their appearances may be - they have no adulteration of added genes and are still a continuation of their pure species or sub-species. Attractive new colour varieties genuinely new forms and not just combinations and compounds of common existing varieties - have

Attractive new colour varieties genuinely new forms and not just combinations and compounds of common existing varieties - have always been regarded as being of great value…

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One of the biggest dangers to our aviary bred stocks of psittacine birds is uncontrolled hybridisation, whether it’s cross-bred Grass Parakeets, Lovebirds and Rosellas or hybrids between species of Macaws, Cockatoos, and species and sub-species of Amazons, Lories and Eclectus Parrots; all represent the same danger, which is the loss to aviculture of pure bred species and sub-species that may never again be obtainable..

always been regarded as being of great value, and they always will be - provided we are not saddled from Europe with a ban on their breeding as has been threatened in recent times. Breeding Endangered Species Despite aviculturists’ long term interest in the aviary breeding of species and sub-species which are endangered in the wild, regretfully it appears that the increased controls and conditions that the authorities have inflicted and are continuing to impose on this laudable avicultural pursuit will kill off the efforts of private enthusiasts and lead to its demise. It seems to have been made obvious that skilled private breeders’ efforts of conservation of endangered parrots within aviculture are not wanted or appreciated by those in control; they have shown no enthusiasm and given no encouragement towards our efforts. The future for breeding endangered

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species by private individuals looks less attractive at present, unless the attitude of the authorities change for the better, which is unlikely. Breeding for the Pet Market Breeding psittacine birds to live out their lives as tame domestic pets - whether of the larger or smaller species - has been well established as a way of making higher prices and a ready sale of individual birds; varying methods of artificial incubation and hand-rearing techniques have been widely used in the endeavour of their production. It is up to the individual breeder to consider if this form of breeding is as satisfying as producing birds in as natural a way as possible, so producing birds which retain more of their natural traits and which will then be used solely by other breeders to perpetuate and strengthen their chosen species - thereby widely fortifying our aviculture stocks for the future.


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Considering Other Species Instead, now that conditions for a far greater diversity of species could be regarded as similar to those which increased the popularity and value of Australian Parakeets, it might be better to look for species which, though not on the CITES list as endangered in any way, are becoming scarcer or even rare within aviculture. By casting an eye across the current spectrum of available psittacines, and studying advertisements to evaluate which are most plentiful and which seem to be shrinking in numbers, broad assessments can be arrived at from which projections can be made of future trends. Of course it is necessary to have a particular liking for the species we take on, but the breeder must limit his choices to those types for which adequate facilities, space and length of flight can be provided. There is also a choice to be made between diversifying the species within the collection, which provides the benefit of having youngsters produced over a much greater part of the year, or specializing in one species or group of closely related species, all nesting at the same time, which gives the benefit of enabling fostering out to other pairs if it becomes necessary. Besides re-evaluating the status

of each Australian species and subspecies within British aviaries, possible groups to again consider might be the elegant Asiatic Parakeets such as Plum-heads, Slaty-heads, Derbyans, Alexandrines (in their differing subspecies), the appealing smaller African species and sub-species such as Senegals, Meyers, Ruppell’s, Jardines, and so on together with the smaller South American Conures, Caiques, Parakeets and Parrotlets. These and many other examples could be well worth featuring among a breeder’s long term avicultural plans. Is it now time for us to look again at building, or even re-building, pure aviary bred strains for the future? Not just for pleasure, but also once again for that undeservedly sullied aim of ‘profit’.

DONATE TO OUR CONSERVATION FUND… CLICK THE LINK BELOW: http://www.theparrotsocietyuk.org/donations.php

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SUNDAY 9TH OCTOBER 2011 / SUNDAY 9TH OCTOBER 2011 / SUNDAY 9TH OCTOBER 2011


FEATURE

ARTICLE BY: LES RANCE

THE NATIONAL EXHIBITION SPONSORED BY JOHNSTON & JEFF AND THE BIRDCARE COMPANY

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To provide added interest for pet bird owners there are now two large aviaries where families can ‘get up close’ to these endearing parrots, a facility that is very much appreciated by our visitors.

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T

he Parrot Society has held a show at Stafford County Showground, ST18 0BD in October since 1987 For the first show we only hired the Bingley Hall and initially we wondered if we could actually fill this massive hall. However over the past 24 years the show has developed in both size and comprehensiveness. The Showground has many advantages; geographically it is well located for the majority of UK bird lovers and also attracts visitors from Ireland and Europe. There are excellent extensive car parking facilities and the M6 motorway provides excellent access. Originally there were sales

tables for members to sell their surplus stock which was predominantly parrot species supported by trade stands selling both birds and others supplying all the dry goods such as seed, cages, boxes and supplements needed by bird keepers and also some selling china, clothes and sweets. In 2006 new legislation meant that it was no longer possible for traders to sell birds at shows, this coincided with the ban on the importation of wild caught birds into the EEC. This ban has meant that there are far fewer parrots available at reasonable prices for pet bird owners. To provide added interest for pet bird owners there are now two large aviaries where families can ‘get up BIRD SCENE 61


L A N O I T A THE N N O I T I B I H X E CIETY ARROT SO P E H T Y B RESENTED

P

16 Clubs are Exhibiting at this show. Exhibition stock includes Gloster Canaries, Old Variety Canaries, New Colour Canaries, Lizard Canaries, Budgerigars, Zebra Finches, Waxbill Finches, Australian Finches, British Birds and Hybrids, and Java Sparrows. MEMBERS & NON MEMBERS TABLES TRADE STANDS Bar and Restaurant facilities, Everything for the hobbyist & breeder. Free Car Parking. Entrance tickets are £7.00 each in advance available from our office, or our online shop via our website www. theparrotsocietyuk.org these are available until 4th October. On the door £8.00 each. Accompanied children under 16 free.

ground Staffordshire County Show Sunday 9th October 2011 from 9.30a.m. to 4.00p.m.

01442 872245

Full details are available from our office tel: The Parrot Society, 92A High Street, Berkhamsted, Herts HP4 2BL


FEATURE

close’ to these endearing parrots, a facility that is very much appreciated by our visitors. In 2007 with the assistance of seven clubs who have an interest in exhibiting birds in standard show cages an exhibition was started which gave clubs the opportunity to bring their avian gems to the attention of the thousands of bird lovers who attend the show. This attraction has proved a great success and now 17 clubs will be exhibiting on the 9th October 2011. This exhibition is sponsored by two leading suppliers to the bird world Johnston & Jeff and The Birdcare Company advertisements from both of these companies are to be found in

this E-magazine. They are sponsoring the wristbands, rosettes and supplying ½ tonne of seed and a range of avian supplements to be awarded as prizes for the exhibitors, they have also paid for the staging that the birds are exhibited on. Without their help it would have been difficult for The Parrot Society to have developed this exhibition so successfully and quickly it really has been a very satisfactory experience for all involved. In 2010 Cage and Aviary Birds weekly magazine kindly allowed us to use the title ‘The National Exhibition’ that had previously been used up until 2003 for The National Exhibition that was held at The NEC Birmingham, again we are BIRD SCENE 63


…the exhibition it is a real ‘eye opener’ especially for those who have not seen an exhibition of birds previously, all the exhibiting clubs have stands in the halls and their officials are very pleased to give you additional information on their areas of expertise.

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very grateful for this. With canaries, budgerigars, finches, British and softbills being staged this is the largest gathering of exhibition birds in the UK a result that the entire Council of The Parrot Society are very pleased with. When you visit the show this year which opens at 9.30 a.m. please remember that the exhibition opens at 12.30 p.m. and make your way to the two the Argyle Hall and the Sandylands Hall which house the exhibition it is a real ‘eye opener’ especially for those who have not seen an exhibition of birds previously, all the exhibiting clubs have stands in the halls and their officials are

very pleased to give you additional information on their areas of expertise. Advanced tickets for the show at £7 each are available from the PSUK Shop on our website www. theparrotsocietyuk.org alternatively our office is open each weekday from 9.00 a.m. to 3 p.m. to answer any queries you have relating to the show and parrot species please telephone 01442 872245. Besides tables for members to sell their surplus breeders stock we have tables from non members who wish to sell finches, canaries, budgerigars and softbills these are located on the balcony of Bingley Hall. Our own members have tables in Bingley Hall, BIRD SCENE 65


The sellers are always pleased to give advice on a range of bird related questions and therefore a tremendous amount of information can be obtained in one visit to the show.

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the large annex to the right of Bingley Hall as you enter the hall from the main entrance and there are also tables in the Prestwood Hall. All the tables are numbered and have the name of the seller clearly shown on the front of each table. The sales tables are a very popular feature of the show because they allow buyers to view a number of birds before they make their purchase. The sellers are always pleased to give advice on a range of bird related questions and therefore a tremendous amount of information can be obtained in one visit to the show. This event is definitely the one to go to each year and this is confirmed by the vast

numbers who attend many of them year after year. The pictures enclosed with this article give an insight into what occurs but only a visit can give you the real experience!

THE NATIONAL EXHIBITION SPONSORED BY JOHNSTON & JEFF AND THE BIRDCARE COMPANY

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THE NATIONA

Staffordshire County Showgro

THE NATIONAL EXHIBITION BUDGERIGAR SECTION SPONSORED BY SOUTH CHESHIRE B.S. & JUST SUPPLEMENTS OCTOBER 9TH 2011 STAFFORD COUNTY SHOW GROUND, STAFFORD

Schedules from:- John Cosby 7, Oakwood Lane, Moston, Sandbach, Cheshire CW11 3PR. 01270 526306 Email – budgie750@aol.com BS BRONZE PATRONAGE JUDGES:- G. CORSER – D. WOAN

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Canary Colour Breeders Association The National Exhibition £120 Prize Money. £60 Open. £60 C.C.B.A. Plus 19 Rosette Specialists Schedule’s from:Mr P. Moon, 24 Highfield Road, Ashbourn, Derbyshire, DE6 1DX

Judges:- Mr P. Finn & Mr C. Addis Closing Date:- Friday 30th September 2011 C.C.B.A. General Secretary:Mr K.Sheldon at ccba@blueyonder.co.uk Web site:- www.colourcanaries.co.uk

from 9.30a.m. to 4.00p.m.


THE NATIONA

Staffordshire County Showgro

The Canary CounCil The Canary Council began its life in 1984 as an off-shoot of the National Council for Aviculture. Delegates from the eleven canary sections (Border, Coloured, Fife, Gloster Irish Fancy, Lizard, Norwich, New and Old Varieties, Yorkshire, Crested) now meet at least twice a year to discuss and act upon matters appertaining to the canary fancy and aviculture as a whole. The Canary Council wholeheartedly supports this The National Exhibition and commends the Parrot Society for organising and encouraging the exhibition of canaries. The Canary Council aims and objectives are: • To encourage the keeping, breeding, exhibition/contest and study of all recognised breeds of domestic canary throughout Great Britain and Northern Ireland. • To affiliate to and uphold the rules and objectives of the National Council for Aviculture (NCA). • To make representations, either directly or through the NCA to statutory bodies, national organisations and government departments and other on matters appertaining to the Canary Fancy. • To send representatives to the meetings of, and otherwise participate in, the activities of the NCA. • To encourage governing bodies of each variety domestic canary to become members of the Canary Council. • To organise shows, events, campaigns, promotions or other such activities in the interests of the canary fancy. • To do anything else the Canary Council considers appropriate and reasonable to achieve its objectives. The Canary Council has produced a booklet “Canary Basics” on the care requirements of canaries as pets or hobbyist livestock. It covers housing, feeding, breeding and the moult. Copies available from the Secretary: Chris Smith, 61 Eastmead Avenue, Greenford, Middlesex, UB6 9RF, for 50p plus an SAE. Find out more about the Canary Council on our website: www.canary-council.co.uk

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COM-UK

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT OF COM-UK. At the recent AGM of the International Ornithological Association there members agreed unanimously to form the new federation with the NCA for the showing side of the hobby for the World Show to be known as COM-UK.So from now everything to do with the World Show will come under the umbrella of COM-UK.The aim of this is to try and improve our showing standard in Europe,the new committee of COM-UK are aware of what a lot of work they have to put in,but they feel we have the right birds in the UK to bring us up to another level.In 1925 the IOA was formed with the same aim of exhibiting there birds against the best in Europe,so just think what they must have gone through in those days. The IOA are experts in the showing side of the hobby so with the help of the NCA we all hope that we can improve even more.There is a new European Show in the pipe line so that is another big show which COM-UK will be looking at,also the NCA can use there expertise with trying to get a world show to be held in the UK in the near future by talking to our government.A new website is being formed so everybody will be able to find out what is being done by COM-UK. I am very proud to have been asked to be the first ever president of COM-UK,a first for a gloster breeder from Yorkshire.I do no that my mentor the late Ron Evans would have been as proud as I am. Many thanks,

Richard Lumley.

President. COM-UK

from 9.30a.m. to 4.00p.m.


THE NATIONA at

al ion Fife

nc Fa y

The N

Staffordshire County Showgro

w

C

an a r y S ho

The National Fife Fancy Canary Show - 2011 The Fife Fancy Federation is proud to present its National Fife Fancy Canary Show at the National Exhibition of the Year on Sunday 9th October 2011 at the Stafford County Show Ground. Around £300 in prize money and Federation and patronage rosettes on offer as well other specials donated by sponsors. The previous National Exhibition of Cage and Aviary Birds used to attract over 1500 Fife Fancy canaries and this is your opportunity to support what could become the biggest Fife Fancy Canary Show in the United Kingdom. Judges booked for the event include Dirk Pelgrims and Werner van Dessel from Belgium and Andy McEwan and J Campbell from Scotland. To apply for a show schedule/entry form please contact the Show Secretary, Gary Mann, 42 Garsdale Close, Bearcross, Bournemouth, Dorset. Tel no. 01202 582059 or 07814 597894. Exhibits will be booked in on Saturday evening between 5pm and 7.30pm and on Sunday morning between 7am and 9am, judging will commence at 9.15am. Entrance to the Parrot Society sales day is by wristband only, £6.50 each available with entry form. One free car park exhibitors parking pass is available with each entry form. Exhibitors admitted free to the exhibition hall only before and after judging. This is an open show available to all. Should you wish to join a Fife Fancy specialist club then go to the Federation website at www.canarycouncil.co.uk or contact the Secretary, Chris Smith, 61 Eastmead Ave, Greenford, Middx UB6 9RF, or email chrissmith@fifefancyfederation.co.uk. or email chrissmith@fifefancyfederation.co.uk

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Sunday 9th October 2011

Judges: Derek & Margaret Moore

GLOSTER FANCY SPECIALIST SOCIETY MEMBERS & OPEN SHOW This year all GFSS members will receive free entries in competitive classes. Please enclose SAE for cage labels and site pass. The Gloster Fancy Specialist Society is proud to be associated with the Parrot Society, The National Exhibition at the Staffordshire County Showground. Secretary:- Steve Jones 5 Ashbrook Close, Gnosall, Staffs.ST20 0HB Tel: 01785 822533 email joness74@sky.com Schedules and entries:- Show Sec. & Treasurer: John Herring 28 St. Matthews Drive, Derrington, Stafford. ST18 9LU email john@jherring8.orangehome.co.uk

from 9.30a.m. to 4.00p.m.


THE NATIONA

Staffordshire County Showgro

National Bird Show, October 9th Location, Stafford County Show Ground Stafford, St 18 OBD

IRISH FANCY INTERNATIONAL Special Awards: Best Irish Fancy in Show £15.00

Best Novice

Crystal Award,

Best Champion

Crystal Award.

Best Novice

Flighted £5.00

Best Champion

Flighted, £5.00

Best Novice

un/flighted

Best Champion

un/Flighted, £5.00

Best Junior,

Trophy, large Rosette + £3.00

This year we have four bags of Seed Donated, two for Champion Section likewise for Novice Section. Judge: Paul O’Kane, From Derry, N.Ireland. A second judge will be appointed on the day if necessary Birds accepted Saturday 8th from 6pm to 9pm & from 7am to 9am Sunday 9th. Judging at 9.15 or before if all entries are staged. Please support this event to help secure a future for this wonderful hobby. Maurice Secretary: 0121 742 6435, Mobile 0757 294 7332 Email mauriceifin@aol.com PLEASE USE THE CLUB SHOW CLASSIFICATION

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THE

Java Sparrow Society UK is pleased to announce its

Members Show 2011 in conjunction with

The National Exhibition 2011 at the Stafford County Showground

FREE ENTRY

A vast gathering of Java Sparrows!

EXTENDED CLASSES

This year our members show promises to be the best one ever with a huge prize purse and a whole host of bonus prizes donated by sponsors.

BEST IN SHOW

As a society we would like to encourage as many new novice show people to take part and are offering as much support to them as we can offer, including free entry.

£200 PRIZE FUND

BEST C.Y B.

BEST BREEDER

BEST JUNIOR MEMBER SALES

The Java Society Stand will once again be manned by experienced keepers giving as much information and advice as you would like.

Entry to the Members Show is FREE

but you must have enrolled as a paid up member by September 27th, 2011 to be eligible for the show, so join today - its well worth it! Membership includes four quarterly, full colour newsletters from as little as *£7 per year, packed with info covering all aspects of Java Sparrows and their cousins the Timor Sparrows. Free sales ads for all members are inclusive and appear each issue as well as Q&A’s from experienced keepers and a host of interesting articles, interviews and trivia. Membership Fees: *Single Adult Internet £7, Joint Internet £9, Junior Internet (under 16 years) £3.50, Overseas £13, Single Adult £8.50, Joint Adult £8.50, Junior (under 16 years) £4.50, join online using Paypal at www.javasparrow.org or for an application form contact:

join online at www.javasparrow.org

Andy Dutton, JSSUK Membership Secretary, 4 Dafydd Close, Bryn Y Baal, Nr Mold. CH7 6RZ Telephone: 01352 758870

from 9.30a.m. to 4.00p.m.


THE NATIONA

Staffordshire County Showgro

LIZARD CANARY ASSOCIATION OF GREAT BRITIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS | Adults £10.00 | OAP £6.00 | Juniors £4.00 Please send to the LCA secretary :Mr Dave Ross, 30, GLENORRIN CLOSE, LAMBTON, WASHINGTON, TYNE & WEAR, NE38 0DZ TEL: 01914-164967 Benifits for LCA members are:LCA newsletter {three time a year} LCA Handbook LCA Closed rings scheme advantageous prices. [available from the secretary]

BLCC

The Lizard Canary Association hold an annual show each year and award patronage to several shows throughout the UK. For Patronage applications, apply to patronage secretary :David Allen --01865-452476. email: david.allen9750@ntlworld.com

BLCC

The Blue Lizard Canary Club of Great Britain. Is pleased to hold it first ever zone show at the 2011 National Exhibition. Clubs subscriptions are £10 for UK members and 15 Euros for overseas members. Please send to the club secretary:-David Allen 108 Nowell Road, Rosehill, Oxford OX4 4TD All schedules will be sent out to current members, but this is an Open show so anyone wanting a schedule should contact David on the above address or by telephone 01865452476 For further information check the clubs website which is www.bluelizardcanary.com

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The Lovebird (1990) Society are supporting

THE NATIONAL 2011 To obtain an entry form and schedule for Lovebird Section please send a SSAE to:

Special prize for breeder entering the most Lovebird exhibits

Allen King 34 The Leys Bidford on Avon Alcester Warwickshire B50 4DN Tel: 01789 778109

Open to all Lovebird breeders. Cash Prizes £150 Rosettes Specials - Seed & Supplements

Free entry in order to maximise the number of birds on show

from 9.30a.m. to 4.00p.m.


THE NATIONA

Staffordshire County Showgro

awarded at the show There will be prize money and trophies

National Bengalese Fanciers Association NAL EXHIBITION We are proud to announce we are taking part in THE NATIO d. groun Show y Sunday, October 9th 2011 at the Stafford Count

To encourage support for this major event, there will be no charge for NBFA members to enter their birds. Birds for sale through the NBFA will incur a 10% charge based on their sales value. For a show schedule and entry form please contact: Our Show Secretary:- Mr. R Crook. 15 Agard Avenue, Scunthorpe. North Lincs. DN15 7DY. Section Manager:- Tony Edwards WHY NOT JOIN OUR SOCIETY. New Members are always welcome, contact Tony Edwards who will provide full details:Address:- 26, Claremont Road, Eccleshall, Stafford, ST21 6DP. Tel:- 01785 850509 E-mail (preferred):- tony@tmredwards.freeserve.co.uk

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Founded 1945

Founded 1945

The Parrot Society deserves the thanks of all UK birdkeepers for putting on this show, the “National CMYK Pantone Exhibition”. Each succeeding show has proved to be bigger and better than the previous one; in spite of the economic conditions, this year’s show will certainly be an even greater success than its predecessors, with more exhibitors participating in the competitive sections, attracting thousands of visitors to the show and the Sales Day that accompanies it. Founded in 1945, the National Council for Aviculture (NCA) is the umbrella organisation for all UK cage and aviary bird enthusiasts, and currently caters for the Canary, Budgerigar, British and Foreign Bird fancies. Its principal objective is to actively promote the welfare, study, development, breeding, and exhibition of birds within a managed environment. It was re-organised in 2007 to make it more relevant to the challenges of the 21st Century. The threats to bird-keeping are ever-present, and although not high on the government agenda at present time, we must continue to remain vigilant and to prepare ourselves for potential threats in the future. A new full colour booklet “Welcome to Birdkeeping” was published by the NCA last year. It is intended as a starting point to encourage people to take up birdkeeping as a hobby, and copies will be available from the NCA stand. The NCA website also includes a substantial number of detailed care sheets covering all aspects of bird care. Hard copies of these care sheets can also be made available to clubs on request, and to those who do not have access to the internet. Communication with existing and potential birdkeepers is an essential part of the NCA’s activities. In addition to making contributions to policies at international and government levels, the NCA aims to provide quality information to its member organisations and to the world at large through its website http://www.nca.uk.net Reports of all NCA meetings are posted on the website shortly after the event. All Clubs affiliated to the NCA, whether at specialist or CBS level, are offered the facility to have their websites linked to the NCA website, and to have significant events for their Club advertised. As another service to affiliated clubs, whether a CBS or any of the specialist clubs affiliated to the four parent bodies, is a £5million public liability insurance scheme. For a very competitive price this covers all of the clubs shows and meetings. In addition, all affiliated CBS’s are eligible for NCA rosettes for their show, and those hard working officials that are to be found at the heart of almost every bird club can be recognised through the NCA award schemes (details on the website). Visit the new impressive NCA stand at this year’s show, and talk to some of the Management Committee. Chris Smith – Chairman, NCA

from 9.30a.m. to 4.00p.m.


THE NATIONA

Staffordshire County Showgro

The OVCA was formed in 1970 and was the first Canary Section to be part of the National Exhibition in Stafford. The O.V.C.A is committed to returning the Old and Rare breeds of Canary to the British Show Bench. If you keep or have any interest in these Old Breeds why not become a member Membership fee’s are:Adult. £10. Partnerships £15. Senior Citizens £5. Juniors Free, but must Register with Secretary each Year. Two or more newsletters are issued each year to fully paid up members. Patronage is granted to many shows across the UK who promote these Old Breeds. Two Club Shows are held each year one in the North and one in the South. The National Exhibition is an Open Show you do not have to be a member of the O.V.C.A to exhibit or win any of the Special Prizes on offer. Classes are provided for both Old Varieties and Rare Breeds of Canaries For a schedule and entry form or to become a member please contact: Mr. K. McCallum OVCA General Secretary, Pallinsburn, 8 Ridley Avenue, Blyth, Northumberland, NE24 3BB. Tele:- 01670 355848 E mail Kevin.mccallum@talktalk.net

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Stafford Canary Club

The Stafford Canary Club are delighted to be associated with the National Exhibition Show hosted by the Parrot Society @ Staffordshire County Showground on Sunday 9th October 2011.

In the late 70’s a group of Staffordshire based fanciers held an informal meeting to discuss the possibility of creating a crested coloured canary with type. They were aware that at that time there was a crested coloured canary on the continent but felt this bird was devoid of type and did not sport the type of crest as seen on English crested birds. It was decided to try and produce a red or rose canary 5 inches in length with good type & perfect crests equal to any other English crested bird. Now after years of selective breeding good sized birds with even crests are being produced. The first Stafford Canary was exhibited by Zoe Finn in 1987 at the Perry Hill Show in Birmingham. In 1998 the Stafford Canary Club was formed & was accepted as a new breed in 1990 by the Canary Council, the first new breed since the fife canary in the 1950’s. In 1990 Dr Ahmed El Soussi was charged with the task of drawing a new pictorial standard of the breed, this pictorial standard is still used to do, an addition of a pictorial plain head bird drawn by Penny Berrill was added some years later. In 1992 the Stafford Canary Club of America was formed by a group of American fanciers, today this clubs numbers exceed 70. Subscriptions are set at £5.00 / year (£8.00 overseas) SCC currently has 20 UK based members Prize money – Best Stafford £10.00, Best Champion, Novice & Juvenile £5.00 Schedules can be obtained from Club Secretary Darren Lowe – 07785 541692 stafford. canary@googlemail.com

from 9.30a.m. to 4.00p.m.


THE NATIONA

Staffordshire County Showgro

THE BRITISH, NATIVE BIRD, MULE & HYBRID CLUB, ARE PROUD TO PRESENT THE BRITISH BIRD SECTION AT THE NATIONAL EXHIBITION 2011. AT STAFFORD COUNTY SHOWGROUND ST18 0BD SUNDAY 9th OCTOBER JUDGE: Mr Steve Beadle… Bristol Schedules available from: Mr S. Fitzpatrick, 13 Brunt Road, Rawmarsh, Rotherham, South Yorkshire, S62 5EW. Entries close, Monday 3rd October 2011

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THE WAXBILL FINCH SOCIETY The Society for Breeders of African and Asiatic Estrildid finches

The Waxbill Finch Society is pleased to be continuing its association with the National Bird Show of the Year at Stafford Anyone requiring a show schedule and entry form for the WFS classes (including Australian Finches) at the show, please contact Bob Storey on 01226 761658.

MEMBERSHIP DETAILS Individual (including spouse): £12.50 Overseas: £20 Juniors (under 17): Free Cheques and postal orders should be made payable to The Waxbill Finch Society and sent with your contact details to the Membership Secretary: John Dodwell, “Langford”, Sandygate, Isle of Man, IM7 3AQ. More information and membership form available at www.waxbillfinchsociety.org.uk

from 9.30a.m. to 4.00p.m.


THE NATIONAL EXHIBITION Staffordshire County Showground, Sunday 9th October 2011

THE ZEBRA FINCH SOCIETY The Zebra Finch Society are pleased to announce that we will be putting on a Full Gold Star Patronage Show, with an additional 6 classes for single birds, at this year’s National Bird Show of the Year on 10th October 2011 at Staffordshire Showground.

Founded 1952. THE ZEBRA FINCH SOCIETY IS THE WORLD’S OLDEST SPECIALIST SOCIETY DEDICATED TO THE BREEDING, KEEPING AND EXHIBITING OF ZEBRA FINCHES.

The judges for this Gold Patronage event will be the experienced Dave Edwards & Nigel Smith. Exhibition and sales entries in the Zebra Finch Section will be FREE OF CHARGE to all fully paid up members of the Zebra Finch Society. There will be a 10% handling charge on all sales birds sold on the day. For a Show Schedule and Entry Form please contact our Show Secretary: Mr Mike Sollis. 23 Stream Mills, Cinderford, Gloucestershire. GL14 3JD.

Not a member of the ZFS?

Then why not join our society by contacting our Membership Secretary: Mr Allen Bennett. ZFS Membership Secretary, 11 Primrose Way, Seaton, East Devon. EX12 2UR. or download an application form online.

Peter Harrison - Best in Show, NBSOTY 2010

Membership costs: Single & partnerships = £12.00 Senior Citizens (65 & over) = £9.00 Junior (under the age of 16) = £8.00 Overseas Members (sterling only) = £18.00 Society Affiliation = £5.00

YOU CAN ALSO VISIT US AT OUR WEBSITE

www.zebrafinchsociety.co.uk SUNDAY 9TH OCTOBER 2011 from 9.30a.m. to 4.00p.m.